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The Invisibles Book One Deluxe Edition

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One of Grant Morrison's most controversial and trippiest and abstract comic book titles! Follow the adventures of The Invisibles, a secret organization out to battle against physical and psychic oppression brought upon humanity by the interdemsional alien gods of the Archons of Outer Church! Collects THE INVISIBLES #1-12, ABSOLUTE VERTIGO #1. One of Grant Morrison's most controversial and trippiest and abstract comic book titles! Follow the adventures of The Invisibles, a secret organization out to battle against physical and psychic oppression brought upon humanity by the interdemsional alien gods of the Archons of Outer Church! Collects THE INVISIBLES #1-12, ABSOLUTE VERTIGO #1.


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One of Grant Morrison's most controversial and trippiest and abstract comic book titles! Follow the adventures of The Invisibles, a secret organization out to battle against physical and psychic oppression brought upon humanity by the interdemsional alien gods of the Archons of Outer Church! Collects THE INVISIBLES #1-12, ABSOLUTE VERTIGO #1. One of Grant Morrison's most controversial and trippiest and abstract comic book titles! Follow the adventures of The Invisibles, a secret organization out to battle against physical and psychic oppression brought upon humanity by the interdemsional alien gods of the Archons of Outer Church! Collects THE INVISIBLES #1-12, ABSOLUTE VERTIGO #1.

30 review for The Invisibles Book One Deluxe Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    It’s possible that I’m dumber than a fence post. Not that it’s necessarily fair for me to impugn the intellect of the average fence post, mind you, having never spent a considerable amount of time conversing with such stolid support structures—and for purposes of comparison, let’s assume we’re talking about an average fence post, as I’m sure there are some exceedingly gifted fence posts that are highly intellectual and who choose a life of physical labor and stoically standing in a field simply b It’s possible that I’m dumber than a fence post. Not that it’s necessarily fair for me to impugn the intellect of the average fence post, mind you, having never spent a considerable amount of time conversing with such stolid support structures—and for purposes of comparison, let’s assume we’re talking about an average fence post, as I’m sure there are some exceedingly gifted fence posts that are highly intellectual and who choose a life of physical labor and stoically standing in a field simply because they feel it’s their highest and best use, and not necessarily because it’s the only job they could get; it’s just that one assumes (perhaps unfairly) that fence posts are, by and large, intellectually unremarkable. But, I just didn’t get The Invisibles. Granted, this is not exactly a new phenomenon for me with Grant Morrison’s work, though if it’s the case that I rarely catch all of Mr. Morrison’s pitches, in this instance, I caught even fewer than normal; I felt like a one-legged catcher working with a knuckleballer. Who The Invisible are, what their purpose is, who they oppose…having now read hundreds of pages about them, I still don’t feel like I could satisfactorily answer those questions, which means I couldn’t really bring myself to care whether they succeed or not, though I’m given to understand that the Invisible are fighting some sort of secret intellectual oppressors and their success is paramount to our ability to have free thought and expression. I know that primarily from reading summaries of The Invisibles, though, not the text itself, which is troubling. (Warning: holier-than-thou moralizing and soap boxing ahead!) That said, there’s another reason I’m hanging a 2-star rating on this book, and that’s due to Morrison’s use of the Marquis de Sade as a character in the tale. It’s not that I object to the use of de Sade generally; what I object to is that, at the end of the brief arc in which he appears, de Sade seems to be standing in as a noble representation of being anti-establishment/authoritarian hegemony and is tasked by The Invisibles with helping to create a future where all—even the deviant—can be happy. I’m intellectually astute enough to recognize that Morrison was using de Sade as shorthand for libertine philosophy and a counterculture counterpunch against the systemic influence of the Man—I get that. But, when using historic persons in creative works, a storyteller should consider all aspects of that person and what message their inclusion might send to the reader. Let us not forget that de Sade was a serial rapist and pedophile. He had serious mental issues and was a sexual deviant of the worst and most damaging kind. Look, I’m no prude (as most of you know); I’m all in favor of two consenting adults engaging in whatever floats their respective boats under circumstances in which the boundaries are sufficiently clear that there’s no danger of harm (emotional, mental, or physical) to either party, even if that involves an inflatable cat, a nine-iron, and kumquats. But, lionizing a man who routinely tortured women (without consent, I might add) and sodomized children is, at best, a careless storytelling faux pas. I suspect that Grant Morrison is an enlightened and progressive individual, and I highly doubt that he would in any way condone de Sade’s horrific real-life acts. But, I think he could have made a better storytelling choice here. There are ways he could have achieved the same end without making at least one reader step outside the story and begin to wonder why on earth Morrison would be suggesting that such a horrible example of humanity should be held up as a savior, a distracting mental foray that may explain, in part, why I had no idea what the hell was going on most of the time (though I suspect that would have been the case with or without our friend the Marquis, give my aforementioned (average) fence-post intellectual wattage). de Sade’s relatively brief appearance isn’t the primary reason for the low rating, but it certainly didn’t help the situation, and I’m in no way inclined to continue forward with this series, though I’ll give Morrison another shot at some point. For those who have read the book, I’d be curious to hear your take on it—it goes without saying that my point of view is by no means the “right” one or the only acceptable one, though I’ll say that you are one smart fence post if you’re scooping up everything Morrison is pooping out here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    The weirdest comic I've ever read, even from Morrison. A social commentary on consciousness, good and evil, incorporating religion, occultism, witchcraft, philosophy, art, and literature. A slipstream blend of cerebral, light horror, science-fiction, and spy adventure. There's astral projection and time travel, zombies, demons, gods. And well known historical figures like writers Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, and philosopher Marquis de Sade. For those blubbering about the inclusion of de Sad The weirdest comic I've ever read, even from Morrison. A social commentary on consciousness, good and evil, incorporating religion, occultism, witchcraft, philosophy, art, and literature. A slipstream blend of cerebral, light horror, science-fiction, and spy adventure. There's astral projection and time travel, zombies, demons, gods. And well known historical figures like writers Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, and philosopher Marquis de Sade. For those blubbering about the inclusion of de Sade, I didn't know the man, but he was a philosopher of freedom who undeniably influenced modern society (psychology, philosophy, literature and sexuality), and whose character of rebellion works perfectly for what Morrison does here. So get over it. It's fiction. Our protagonists are King Mob, Ragged Robin, Boy, Lord Fanny, and Jack Frost. A ragtag and diverse group of goofy but fascinating characters written by a psychedelically-fueled and hyper-creative 90s Grant Morrison. They aren't the deepest characters yet, Jack Frost aside, but that's due more to pacing and the grand vision of this work. This is Morrison's most indulgent work and I applaud him for just going for it, fuck the critics. It's not inaccessible as much as it is holistic, not wandering as much as it is voyeuristic. Scenes are longer than needed, or sometimes not needed at all, yet they somehow circle around and enhance the overall vision of rebellion, of an unconscious world buried under a mass psychic hallucination called capitalism and conformity, naivety and ignorance, greed and hatred. You don't always know where the story is going, but you're pleasantly surprised when it gets there. The artwork is dated at twenty years old, but it's still great. Most of the time artwork this old is a chore to read, but I found myself impressed at moments, even with the huge lineup of illustrators. Because there was clean lines, great figure and facial drawing, bright and sometimes arbitrary colors, and solid panel progression. The psychedelic moments, especially with Tom O'Bedlam, were fantastic. And the covers by Brian Bolland (Killing Joke) are absolutely epic. If The Invisibles is one thing it's different for the sake of it. I can't name any comic today that does what this does, blending all of these elements so masterfully, and creating a unique reader experience. As long as you're in no rush and are willing to partake in this experimental work, you'll enjoy yourself, because it's quite the trip. A Short Note on the Deluxe Edition... I totally forgot to review the edition itself. Considering it's from Vertigo it's actually pretty badass. Sturdy gloss cover in bright orange, wrapped in a thick matte dust jacket with Bolland's covers. The glued binding is moderate, some minor gutter loss, but it stays fairly flat. My only complaint is the paper...typical hardcover paper, thin and semi-gloss, but not a deal breaker. It's durable and oversized, I say go for it, unless you really want the behemoth omnibus.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιnΕ

    Terrorism Can Be Fashionable And Fun [Spoilers... sort of.] This is Grant Morrison with the handcuffs off, unshackled from the Superhero chain-gang. Like Alan Moore, Warren Ellis and Neil Gaiman, Morrison never got properly edumacated at a University-whatnot, and like his fellow Brit comic-book super-writers, he possesses an imaginative genius that puts many-a serious novelist to shame. After penning some ground-breaking stories for DC like Batman: Arkham Asylum - A Serious House on Serious Earth( Terrorism Can Be Fashionable And Fun [Spoilers... sort of.] This is Grant Morrison with the handcuffs off, unshackled from the Superhero chain-gang. Like Alan Moore, Warren Ellis and Neil Gaiman, Morrison never got properly edumacated at a University-whatnot, and like his fellow Brit comic-book super-writers, he possesses an imaginative genius that puts many-a serious novelist to shame. After penning some ground-breaking stories for DC like Batman: Arkham Asylum - A Serious House on Serious Earth(a psycho-drama with elements of Gothic Horror, in which Morrison gets very upstaged by the painted art of Dave McKean), Morrison soon became recognized as one of the more exciting comic innovators (there were 2 at the time), unafraid of scaring readers off with his nifty 'experiments' on runs of Animal Man and Doom Patrol, breaking the fourth wall & whatnot, all taken for Granted nowadays. The Invisibles' letter pages are now slightly legendary for establishing Morrison's brand of fucked-up, one that is profoundly interested in finding and making and peeking through the cracks in mundane reality, searching for the treasure-maps and books bound in human flesh, tucked into the walls between multiversal 'apartments' by some romantic alchemist. There was ritual magic gobbledygook, as he tried to coordinate a cosmic circle jerk to save 'The Invisibles' from cancellation. Seriously. He asked every fan to masturbate at a certain time & concentrate on saving The Invisibles. One of Brian Bolland's stellar covers from the third iteration, and 2 pages from the re-colored first story-arc by Yeowell: When Vertigo emerged in the wake of The Sandman's success, offering mature-reader, creator-owned titles, Morrison was an obvious fit, happy to create his own series, which would explore his many fascinations. It was clear from the start that The Invisibles would be something revolutionary, and Morrison took it seriously (whatever you think of the guy, he's never been one to grind out a half-assed script). It's a very fucking 1990's comic-book. If it seemed a touch anachronistic after 9/11, by 2020 it's been already spent decades vacillating between metatextual relevance, irrelevance & super-relevance... just don't ask me to explain why. Or how. Or what. The series' anti-heroes are anarchist-terrorists, waging a guerrilla war against the forces of darkness and order; in this case, these forces happen to be the demonic agents of another universe, seeking to infect our world with their custom-made virus of conformity and submission. They exist unseen and unnoticed by most of the population, but agents of order are everywhere: in the government, the churches, the schools. Surgically altered, their eyes and genitals removed by their masters - the imposing, monstrous Archons - these barely-human minions, able to generate their black insectoid armor out of the air itself minions, are tasked with making Inferno-forming planet Earth, making of it a subservient, sterilized Hell suitable for the Archons... in particular 'The Grand Archon - The King-Of-All-Tears'. Miss Dwyer is his twisted right hand, along with the reprehensible Sir Miles, a slimy aristocrat & secret political puppetmaster. He has resisted being changed by The Archons, supposedly to better interact with the uninitiated, but is forced to 'take communion' from the black & purple-veined tits of Miss Dwyer, slurping the toxic milk from her beetle-shell nipples. Meet your local Archons: The-King-Of-All-Tears, The-King-In-Chains-Unborn-And-Barren, and... Orlando. He kind of got fucked over in the name and title department. No wonder he's so pissy. Yeah, they're a lovely bunch, courtesy of Quitely, Yeowell and Thompson: Against the forces of Order and Conformity stand The Invisibles, agents of Chaos, Imagination and Freedom. King Mob is the cool, charismatic leader at the beginning of the story, charged with initiating a new recruit into the Mysteries of the Invisible College, and doing his best to stick a monkey-wrench in the gears of the Apocalyptic-machine. The cell is rounded out by 'Boy', a black woman from Chicago who was once a cop, 'Lord Fanny', a transvestite sorceress from the slums of Rio de Janeiro, and 'Ragged Robin', who might be from the future (a question answered definitively by series end). After losing a member to a typically atypical Invisibles-brand insanity, they track down a rebellious young thug from Manchester named Dane McGowan, who will soon be known as 'Jack Frost'. The second volume of The Invisibles introduced Phil Jimenez as the regular artist, whose sharp linework was well-matched to the surgically precise renderings of regular cover artist, Brian Bolland. His then-recent switch to digital art, with a mix of pixelated and hand-painted colors, resulted in some of his best cover work: This first book deals with the trials that Dane must endure before he can understand the true nature of the world, as opposed to the manufactured reality that convincingly passes itself off as empirical data. King Mob leaves him in the hobo-shaman hands of Tom O'Bedlam, who serves as Obi Wan Yoda to Morrison's little foul-mouthed Skywalker. This story was repurposed by the Wachowski Brothers (now the hideous Wachowski Sisters) for The Matrix, with Neo as Dane McGowan and Morpheus as Tom O'Bedlam, complete with the climactic leap of faith from the roof of a skyscraper. Instead of the red pill/blue pill sequence in the Matrix, The Invisibles featured a blue mold that grew on the walls of an abandoned subway station. In both cases, ingestion meant leaving behind the manufactured world of illusions, and facing a very frightening reality. Morrison was not flattered by their obvious theft, and remarked on it several times. Frank Quitely's 'beginning of the end' title page, a page by Weston from the beginning, and another page by Weston from the end... terrible visions of things to come, part 1: After making 'Jack Frost' the fifth member of their cell, they embark on a quest via Psychic time-travel, to the horrible, bloody height of the French Revolution. The Guillotine is very busy and life is very cheap; there are reports of corpse-devouring ghouls, possibly linked to the cell's mission: bringing 'back' the Marquis De Sade as an agent. And no, I don't give a flying fuck if De Sade was a real life rapist/pedophile piece of shit*. While their unoccupied bodies are waiting for them, a demon named 'Orlando' - from the 'land of the unfleshed'- is alerted to their location. Now defenseless against a monstrosity with a predilection for flaying his victims alive, things go very wrong... Terrible visions of things to come, part 2, courtesy of Chris Weston, and some fine Phil Jimenez artwork; Miss Dwyer, armored and set for sidereal warfare... whatever the fuck that is. This is one of the best mainstream comics ever made. Its one weakness was its constantly shifting line-up of artists, some very good, some fairly mediocre. It was at its best with the regular creative team of artist Phil Jimenez and inker John Stokes, and Chris Weston as back-up penciler. The razor-sharp '2000 A.D.'-style, made popular by Brian Bolland, was executed brilliantly by both Jimenez and Weston, giving a solid and attractive aesthetic that made the time-travelling and multiple-level realities and invading extra-dimensional monstrosities all the more unsettling. Jill Thompson does some excellent work on her story-arc, and Steve Yeowell, while limited, acquits himself well here. For Morrison fans, this is the essential work; an uncensored trip through a powerful imagination, refusing to simplify his story, but nevertheless creating an exciting tale that is easy to appreciate. Even if you don't get every reference, or unravel every secret, it's still a thoroughly enjoyable read, and merits re-reads. The head of John the Baptist re-animated as a cryptic oracle in Revolutionary France... Mayan and Voodoo deities like Quetzalcoatl and Papa Guedhe... conspiracies involving the British Royal family, and a secret heir with Lovecraftian tentacles... the richness of Morrison's 'crazy' is glorious to behold, and it makes sense, in its way. This is no Finnegan's Wake... if you survived 'Final Crisis' - which, in many respects, was stranger than 'The Invisibles' - you'll have no problems getting into it. Let chaos reign, and hail motherfucking Barbelith... *(view spoiler)[[History isn't required to pass the purity test of Woke post-modernity. Great & regular people alike are complicated; a person can do great things, & that same person can also do things we find sickening from a modern perspective. I'm not going to condemn the founding fathers of the US for owning slaves at a time when slave ownership was common, especially since slavery has been a part of human civilization since the dawn of agriculture. On the other hand, I can despise Roman Polanski as a contemporary who has transgressed against the most fundamental of societal norms, and support his imprisonment as a pedophile shitstain. I also think he's a great film-maker, and for me, the films stand apart from their creator, just as his children should never be published for their father's crimes. The sins of the creator do not fall upon the creation.] (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    PRE-READ: I fucking hate what I've read of The Invisibles with a seething passion, but these new editions are super attractive and I LOVE BRIAN BOLLAND SO GODDAMN MUCH. So I may end of trying it again. -- Okay, so I finished this book. Did I hate it as much as I hated reading Say You Want a Revolution many years ago? No. It might in fact be impossible for me to have hated a book as much as I hated that one. Part of the impetus for trying again with a larger compendium was that I thought maybe a fe PRE-READ: I fucking hate what I've read of The Invisibles with a seething passion, but these new editions are super attractive and I LOVE BRIAN BOLLAND SO GODDAMN MUCH. So I may end of trying it again. -- Okay, so I finished this book. Did I hate it as much as I hated reading Say You Want a Revolution many years ago? No. It might in fact be impossible for me to have hated a book as much as I hated that one. Part of the impetus for trying again with a larger compendium was that I thought maybe a few different story arcs, with some different artists, would force me to give the book more of a chance, and this was pretty much right. The other reason I didn't hate The Invisibles as much this time around was my lowered expectations: the thing is, everyone you know who's read The Invisibles needs to also tell you how it's the best comic of all time, sort of like how people talk about David Foster Wallace, or Saga or like, Arrested Development. I don't know why certain pieces of media inspire everyone who likes them to turn into mansplaining twats (technical term), but The Invisibles is just one of those things. Anyway, going in with the acceptance that the book is not in fact good and your friends are not terrible people for having bad taste makes reading the whole thing easier. There are parts of the book -- some character designs, mainly -- that are kind of cool, actually. It's just that the whole thing is sort of a plotless ripoff of a bunch of other books that are better, which is a very Grant Morrison problem, and also a very young-writer-y problem. Morrison tends to do best with established properties that provide him some kind of framework to inject with hippyzappy new age anti-capitalist mumbo whatsit, but when he's given the responsibility of providing a framework too, he just borrows from Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman, which (aside from random new age anti-capitalist mumbo whatsit books) may be the only authors he's ever read. So anyway, the plot of this book is There's A Conspiracy and although one character has been included specifically to ask "What is the nature of said Conspiracy, pray tell?" no one really has an answer, and we are supposed to be sort of delighted by this, I think, or maybe spooked out by the unknown spookiness, depending on the mood. And then when the question "And what are we fighting the Conspiracy for?" is asked, the first answer is sort of "Freedom!" and the other answer is "So we can dance!" and this is fairly literal as the characters then start dancing. So the rampant weirdness of this book is most like Morrison's Doom Patrol, except that series had, like, narrative goals and this one really doesn't, and that book seemed genuine and this one seems like when that guy you knew in college put on eyeliner and lipstick in order to be "challenging" but it was really just a little sad because that's all he could come up with. The book is about magic, which is sometimes kind of fun and there's a whole standalone issue with a side character in which the magic and plot and weirdness are all balanced and totally work, and it sort of feels like an issue of Hellblazer and maybe that's what this book wants to be, sometimes? There's some creepy villains and horror bits that make me think Morrison would have written a really good Hellblazer, but instead we have this. There's one four-issue arc where they go back in time and visit/rescue/I'm actually not sure what with Marquis de Sade, and I think it's mainly there to prove that Morrison can do research and read books, because other than being sort of like a creatively-interpreted book report on the French Revolution, it doesn't seem to make any sense why it's there. But there's also one issue where a minor character who was killed about ten issues prior gets a full backstory told in montage, and that story is pretty interesting and shows some of the fun things Morrison is able to do with nonlinear narrative, which is absolutely one of his specialties. It also suggests that maybe The Invisibles isn't really supposed to be about anything, and it's more like a sandbox for Morrison to try things out in, and I'm honestly more fine with that than with any other interpretation of the book I can think of. Anyway, the next paperback volume of this omnibus series isn't out til December, and I think I can absolutely give that volume a shot also, even if I'm pretty sure the book isn't actually good. It's just good enough, and I need to have said I've read it. But don't make me watch Arrested Development. Just get over it already.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kosta Voukelatos

    I picked up Book One of The Invisibles on a whim and I have to say I am glad that I did. I found that many of the characters were difficult to sympathize with as a result of their demeanor or just how they were presented. However, I thoroughly enjoyed the final chapter of the book that humanized a nameless guard that was present in the early chapter of the book. Overall, it was an interesting read and I will be picking up Book Two when I get the chance!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    RB

    If you're in the mood for a teenager imitating Alan Moore that somehow managed to get a writing deal with Vertigo, your dream, well then Grant Morrison's "The Invisibles" is for you. Where Moore delves deep into his themes and offers layered storytelling with wonderful subtext, Mr. Morisson only name drops--the occult and the like receives lip service and not a lot more, the real life people who pop up in the story are rendered shockingly distasteful and could've just been left out, and any poli If you're in the mood for a teenager imitating Alan Moore that somehow managed to get a writing deal with Vertigo, your dream, well then Grant Morrison's "The Invisibles" is for you. Where Moore delves deep into his themes and offers layered storytelling with wonderful subtext, Mr. Morisson only name drops--the occult and the like receives lip service and not a lot more, the real life people who pop up in the story are rendered shockingly distasteful and could've just been left out, and any political or social critique comes in the form of bland dialogue. And, on the subject of dialogue, this book is inundated with the type of dialogue that you wouldn't expect to find in the first draft of someone absolutely uninterested in comics, or writing, and has only taken up the hobby for money and enjoys yelling nonsensical, chic anarchistic messages and believes themselves to be just so goddamn punk, man. The writing in this collection is so surprisingly asinine and unbelievable that the one upside to it all is that you'll finish reading it feeling as if you, even if you hardly can string a sentence together, can be a published author--by Vertigo, no less. So, Vertigo, I offer you my services - I make no show of having one iota of writing talent but I do have some interests that I can certainly name drop and I do love Alan Moore so, you know, I can steal from him and just be lazy as fuck and forget all the stuff that makes his work so powerful, and I can also throw in some scenes with wild sex and drugs (I assure you I've taken more than Grant here, who seems unable to grasp some very basic biological facts about crack cocaine, a drug I've never tried nor will ever but I can feign experience) and I, too, have read Lovecraft and Burroughs and can type . . . like this . . . flashing images of money coming my way in streams of green neon . . . squid-faced men in astronaut suits sip absinthe with . . . losing interest in writing and thinking about the cosmic nothingness of Morisson's work and . . . pulsing jissim leaping through dank corridors positively more attractive than reading "The Invisibles" . . .

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chaitra

    This wasn't on my initial list of comics to try as an introduction to the genre. It probably didn't belong in it, considering how odd it is. I didn't hear of it until I read Neil Gaiman's The View from the Cheap Seats in which he made a mention of Invisibles and how Grant Morrison got most of the stuff in it from aliens who abducted him while he was in Kathmandu. This sounded suitably bizarre, and more than a little interesting and I had to read it immediately. Of course I had to. I binge read c This wasn't on my initial list of comics to try as an introduction to the genre. It probably didn't belong in it, considering how odd it is. I didn't hear of it until I read Neil Gaiman's The View from the Cheap Seats in which he made a mention of Invisibles and how Grant Morrison got most of the stuff in it from aliens who abducted him while he was in Kathmandu. This sounded suitably bizarre, and more than a little interesting and I had to read it immediately. Of course I had to. I binge read comics for two days while sick, beginning with some Batman (not Grant Morrison), and ending with this first deluxe edition. I wasn't woozy anymore from the meds I took, but this still felt like something that came from an alien. I liked the start, Dane as the disaffected youth, old Tom his mentor. It took me a while to get used to the comic, and the art, all too vibrant and utterly creepy. Arcadia is the main story line (I think), and it starts just after Dane joins the Invisibles as Jack Frost, and the 5 of them go traipsing off to rescue the spirit of Marquis de Sade while a demon called Orlando hunts for their bodies that they left behind. And I loved this too, it's uncomfortable, and it's great. There is a story about Jim Crow, another Invisible that King Mob's group are said to be in touch with, and a bunch of big pharma wankers. And these are all great. But the two that really hit a nerve were the last two. Royal Monsters, about an Invisible spy in the house of the bad guys, whose job is to kill the monster moonchild who's supposed to be the next king of England, but fails, and fails and fails again. Best Man Fall, is a life flashing before your eyes kind of story, it's how a young man with promise ends up in a particular place at a particular time. It's perfect. I'm not sure if it's the best recommendation, that the most affecting story happened to be only one in the entire collection without any evil otherworldly creatures in it, but I also loved how insane and weird the whole concept is.

  8. 5 out of 5

    SuperSillySerra

    If you like chaos magik and anarchy, this book is for you! This blew my mind. I recently read Doom Patrol and thought that was Morrisons wildest piece of works. Nope, Its The Invisibles. A boy on the wrong path of life falls down the rabbit hole when a old bum shows him the "real" London and tells him he is apart of a secret society that helps save the world. The Invisibles are here to fight the systems that hold mankind back; So far thats been an old Hispanic fleshless god and an evil corporatio If you like chaos magik and anarchy, this book is for you! This blew my mind. I recently read Doom Patrol and thought that was Morrisons wildest piece of works. Nope, Its The Invisibles. A boy on the wrong path of life falls down the rabbit hole when a old bum shows him the "real" London and tells him he is apart of a secret society that helps save the world. The Invisibles are here to fight the systems that hold mankind back; So far thats been an old Hispanic fleshless god and an evil corporation creating drugs to control the poor. Really political, lots of references to art and magik with just some ridiculous theories about what the future holds. I can also see a lot of Mark Millar's Secret Service in this story. Weather its because they use to work together or that's just how London life is, I couldn't tell you. I really liked this book and plan on reading the rest. Unfortunately I can see people not "getting"' it and that is a shame but I think a lot of people could use a story like this right now.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Sumper

    I went into this knowing nearly nothing about it, usually you got a clue what genre or which setting it is in, here I didn't even know who or what gender the protagonist is. So I bought this purely based on the fact that its written by grant morrison. And I would recommend reading it like this, because it just adds to it. Thats why i wont say a word about what happens, just that it is the usual Morrison weirdness and occasional greatness. 4.5 stars out of 5. (altho the last collected issue was a 5 I went into this knowing nearly nothing about it, usually you got a clue what genre or which setting it is in, here I didn't even know who or what gender the protagonist is. So I bought this purely based on the fact that its written by grant morrison. And I would recommend reading it like this, because it just adds to it. Thats why i wont say a word about what happens, just that it is the usual Morrison weirdness and occasional greatness. 4.5 stars out of 5. (altho the last collected issue was a 5)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Koen

    Well, this is some crazyness right here!! Think I'll have to reread it to understand just a little bit more ;-) Love all the different components in here. Everything is so well thought of and worked out. Reread first or continue to second book?... :-P Well, this is some crazyness right here!! Think I'll have to reread it to understand just a little bit more ;-) Love all the different components in here. Everything is so well thought of and worked out. Reread first or continue to second book?... :-P

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Dead Beetles (1). A good introduction, primarily because it offers a great character sketch of Dane and suggests some of the weirdness that is to come [7/10]. Down & Out in Heaven & Hell (2-4). This is basically the story of Dane's initiation, and it's never been my favorite arc. It's too decompressed, and it's all about tearing Dane away from what's familiar to him, but it doesn't really approach the mysteries of the Invisibles, and that's just not enough to support a story line. Still, it hints Dead Beetles (1). A good introduction, primarily because it offers a great character sketch of Dane and suggests some of the weirdness that is to come [7/10]. Down & Out in Heaven & Hell (2-4). This is basically the story of Dane's initiation, and it's never been my favorite arc. It's too decompressed, and it's all about tearing Dane away from what's familiar to him, but it doesn't really approach the mysteries of the Invisibles, and that's just not enough to support a story line. Still, it hints at something bigger and at the time was (barely) enough to keep me reading [6/10]. Hexy. This short story from Absolute Vertigo is a little bit of nothing about King Mob, but it's nice to have it in the collection [5/10]. Arcadia (5-8). This is the arc that really opens up the strange and weird possibilities of the Invisibles. I find some of the parts with the Marquis de Sade a little too unpleasant (unsurprising) but everything else is such a weird mess that you can't help but keep reading [7/10]. 23: Things Fall Apart (9) is really a direct continuation of the action of Arcadia, and it's good action-adventure. Leaving us on a cliffhanger for several months was rather a surprise [7/10]. Season of Ghouls (10). This is a wonderful look at another Invisible, for the fact that it's so thematic and so magical. The actual story beyond that is a fun anti-corporate one [7+/10]. Royal Monsters (11). The next one-off is terrific because it gives texture to the bad guys, but it's also a wonderful story of personal horror that Morrison really hits out of the ball park [8/10]. Best Man Fall (12). Wow, this is an amazing finale to this first volume of Invisibles, both for its wonderful kaleidoscope storytelling and for its awesome interlinking with the rest of the Invisibles storyline [/10/10]. Overall, this is an interesting volume that makes you want to read more, but it's really in the single issues that Morrison excels.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    There's a lot going on in this book. At times, the amount of unexplained information can be rather overwhelming, but the world and backstory was interesting enough to draw me in. Despite not fully understanding everything that was happening, I was curious enough to press on and see what happened next. I have a feeling that this will be a series where I'll just have to accept that everything is not going to click at first, and I'll need to keep going to provide context to things I've already read There's a lot going on in this book. At times, the amount of unexplained information can be rather overwhelming, but the world and backstory was interesting enough to draw me in. Despite not fully understanding everything that was happening, I was curious enough to press on and see what happened next. I have a feeling that this will be a series where I'll just have to accept that everything is not going to click at first, and I'll need to keep going to provide context to things I've already read. As an introduction to the series, I think it was a little intimidating, but it definitely captured my attention enough to make me want to finish the series and dive deeper into this world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Richard Trapunski

    This was my first time delving into the world of Grant Morrison. I loved some of the psychedelic art, dense historical/cultural allusions and humour, but there are lots of diversions and the main story takes a long time to get going. After 12 issues, aside from some idea of anti-conformity, time travel and 90s queer and rave culture, I'm not 100% sure what the Invisibles' mission is or who they're fighting against. This collection feels like an extended prologue. Looks like I'll have to shell out This was my first time delving into the world of Grant Morrison. I loved some of the psychedelic art, dense historical/cultural allusions and humour, but there are lots of diversions and the main story takes a long time to get going. After 12 issues, aside from some idea of anti-conformity, time travel and 90s queer and rave culture, I'm not 100% sure what the Invisibles' mission is or who they're fighting against. This collection feels like an extended prologue. Looks like I'll have to shell out for the next one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Rereading this a long time after my initial read, but this time in print rather than a computer. With this first installment, it is reminding me of a more psychedelic Planetary, Volume 1: All Over the World and Other Stories by Warren Ellis. I think I prefer Planetary but wanted to revisit this one. King Mob's combat outfit with the mask and wig is awesome though, as is the character of Jim Crow. I'll definitely be finishing rereading this. Rereading this a long time after my initial read, but this time in print rather than a computer. With this first installment, it is reminding me of a more psychedelic Planetary, Volume 1: All Over the World and Other Stories by Warren Ellis. I think I prefer Planetary but wanted to revisit this one. King Mob's combat outfit with the mask and wig is awesome though, as is the character of Jim Crow. I'll definitely be finishing rereading this.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    “I built a door made of words, escaped through it.” This is Grant Morrison at his Grant Morrisoniest: Half of it doesn’t make sense, but somehow as a whole you can follow it and it’s fun 🤷‍♂️

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Munoz

    The central story is indulgently violent with an immature and underdeveloped "fuck the man" routine that didn't resonate with me, but the standalone stories (and wanderings into the world of Byron and Shelley) are weird and imaginative and sometimes really beautifully written and drawn. Recommended if you like bizarre, high-concept, literary comics; avoid if depictions of extreme violence are a no-go. The central story is indulgently violent with an immature and underdeveloped "fuck the man" routine that didn't resonate with me, but the standalone stories (and wanderings into the world of Byron and Shelley) are weird and imaginative and sometimes really beautifully written and drawn. Recommended if you like bizarre, high-concept, literary comics; avoid if depictions of extreme violence are a no-go.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wombo Combo

    I read this three years ago and was bored out of my mind for the most part. I ended up picking this up from the library again since they haven't gotten any new comics in since COVID-19 hit and I fell in love. This is a book that is desperately trying to convince people to live the lives they want. It's like Morrison wrote this specifically with the intention of convincing people that they don't have to be who others want them to be and that they shouldn't be held back by expectations placed upon I read this three years ago and was bored out of my mind for the most part. I ended up picking this up from the library again since they haven't gotten any new comics in since COVID-19 hit and I fell in love. This is a book that is desperately trying to convince people to live the lives they want. It's like Morrison wrote this specifically with the intention of convincing people that they don't have to be who others want them to be and that they shouldn't be held back by expectations placed upon them by their culture. I'm sure that to some, this seems obvious and like a juvenile theme ("just be yourself") but Morrison treats it like a gospel message, as if it's the only idea that really matters. In many ways, I think that's probably the right way to view it. So, onto actual content of the book; there's a lot of crazy stuff happening. Lots of intense, well done action scenes paired with the oddities you'd expect from Morrison's Doom Patrol run (though not as bizarre or many). There are plenty of magick rituals and there's lots of talk of secret rites and societies. Characters travel through the ages and fight weird dudes said to be keeping the human race down. There were several points while reading this that I realized that the Matrix kinda ripped this off. Not the cyberspace stuff (which it got from William Gibson's Neuromancer) but the general conspiratorial bent (and the jumping off the roof scene from the first film.) Still a great flick, though. Now this is a comic book, a graphic novel if you will, so how is the art? Um...mostly bad. Like, not great, but certainly better than most people would be able to do. I don't know what it is, but most (though not all) of these old Vertigo books have friggin' awful artwork. Though I suppose that if I had to choose between this and the Liefeldian monstrosities that were popular in those days, these guys aren't half bad, though there were certainly much better artists. This was a super entertaining read from front to back. I had a great time honestly. This collection ends with issue twelve, which is an emotional punch to the gut. It's one of the best standalone single issues I've ever read. If I'm left with one thing after reading this, it's the reminder that we all die one day, and if we're lucky (and ambitious and skilled and smart, etc.) we'll be able to turn the years we have into pleasant ones that we can look back on with pride, and maybe, just maybe, we will rest in peace.

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Raz

    I am not an avid graphic novel reader. I read Alan Moore's Sin City, Watchmen and V for Vendetta. The Invisibles was recommended to me as the next step, and I am happy it was. While I did not understand all Morrison is trying to say (sadly, I was not educated on Shelley and Lord Byron so it went over my head), the parts I did get were quite satisfactory. The compendium starts with "Dead Beetles" and the three issues of "Down & Out in Heaven & Hell", which together serve as an introduction and the I am not an avid graphic novel reader. I read Alan Moore's Sin City, Watchmen and V for Vendetta. The Invisibles was recommended to me as the next step, and I am happy it was. While I did not understand all Morrison is trying to say (sadly, I was not educated on Shelley and Lord Byron so it went over my head), the parts I did get were quite satisfactory. The compendium starts with "Dead Beetles" and the three issues of "Down & Out in Heaven & Hell", which together serve as an introduction and the story of Dane's recruitment to The Invisibles. This is actually not the strongest part of the compendium. I am not sure the execution managed to convey what Morrison had in mind. Especially the mystic/fantastic/psychedelics parts did not really catch my eye. I think artists of The Sandman did it better. This is followed by "Hexy", which is quite redundant. Things get better in the next five volumes, the four volumes of "Arcadia", and then "23: Things Fall Apart", which are the first real adventure of The Invisibles. As mentioned, Shelley and Lord Byron were lost on me, but it is still a strong adventure arc, and it starts revealing and expanding on the King Mob team. However, the next volumes, "Season of Ghouls", "Royal Monsters" and "Best Man Fall" were in my eyes the best of the collection. While they do not deal with the King Mob group per se, they shed a stronger light on the universe of The Invisibles. "Best Man Fall" is probably the best in the volume, and it gave me quite an emotional jolt. I'm looking forward for the next volumes, this one gets four stars out of five.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    The first 100 pages were some of the best story I had been reading for some time now. It felt like Alan Moore work and I was really enjoying all the characters and mythology. Once the 100 page mark past the book went into a very weird place and didn't resurface for a long time. Saying I got lost would be an understatement but I stuck with it and 300 pages of gruelling reading I'm done. The characters seem interesting but the story moves around a lot so you barely spend time with just one group. The first 100 pages were some of the best story I had been reading for some time now. It felt like Alan Moore work and I was really enjoying all the characters and mythology. Once the 100 page mark past the book went into a very weird place and didn't resurface for a long time. Saying I got lost would be an understatement but I stuck with it and 300 pages of gruelling reading I'm done. The characters seem interesting but the story moves around a lot so you barely spend time with just one group. The Jack character turned into this whining and annoying person who just kept going until the inisibles exit from the volume. I like Morrisons writing and I trust he has a plan for this series so I'll stick with this even though I want certain questions answered. The book isn't without its flaws but it's a long way from conventional and delivers interesting side characters every now and again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    The most bizarre comic book I've read... since the last Grant Morrison one. A group of transcendental freedom fighters battle against the forces of evil and repression. Totally bonkers, stuffed full of allusions to myth, science, literature, religion, philosophy, history, other comic books, pop culture, and football hooliganism. Can't wait to read book two! (Oh, and, as a physical artifact, these hardcover deluxe edition are gorgeous.) The most bizarre comic book I've read... since the last Grant Morrison one. A group of transcendental freedom fighters battle against the forces of evil and repression. Totally bonkers, stuffed full of allusions to myth, science, literature, religion, philosophy, history, other comic books, pop culture, and football hooliganism. Can't wait to read book two! (Oh, and, as a physical artifact, these hardcover deluxe edition are gorgeous.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Keen

    “Did you ever believe you could kill child? I doubt it. ‘To kill is a sin,’ You were told. But to kill in our name is your duty. You will send your sons and daughters to war for us and make no protest. ” This is one of those books that I have been meaning to read for years. Morrison and his squad of supporting artists have produced a multi-layered, multi-dimensional odyssey into the here, there and everywhere, pulling us deep into 328 pages of pure pleasure. Prepare to get swept up in a glorious “Did you ever believe you could kill child? I doubt it. ‘To kill is a sin,’ You were told. But to kill in our name is your duty. You will send your sons and daughters to war for us and make no protest. ” This is one of those books that I have been meaning to read for years. Morrison and his squad of supporting artists have produced a multi-layered, multi-dimensional odyssey into the here, there and everywhere, pulling us deep into 328 pages of pure pleasure. Prepare to get swept up in a glorious rush of lush colouring, sublime art work and some all-round beautiful drawing. We get buffered along amidst a wash of psychedelic, surreal people and places, featuring an epic cast of crazy and colourful characters, who will strike awe, fear and wonder. “One day when we’re all gone, the creatures who come after us’ll find these old steel skeletons marching across desert wastes or tropical swamplands. Think how mysterious they’ll appear, like the old stones are to us. The new caretakers of the earth will wonder if these pylons were built to mark highways of unknown and forgotten power.” There is so much to marvel at in here, from the range of mid 90s leisure wear, to the clicking needles of the women witnessing beheadings during the French revolution. And let’s not forget John Lennon, Byron, Shelley and De Sade. More than twenty years on and all the political themes and social statements are still as relevant and as powerful as ever, and that’s what great art does. This is truly magical story telling. There are some genuinely terrifying characters in here, taking on many creepy and disturbing forms. “We’re not our sadness. We’re not our happiness or our pain but our language hypnotises us and traps us in little labelled boxes.” There are echoes and traces of the likes of Moore and Chaykin in here, but Morrison is very much his own voice. This is a violent, gruesome, smart and utterly addictive piece of writing, right up until the teasing, closing panels. And to think that this is only the beginning, there is so much to be resolved and revealed. What a journey. An absolute treat!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Randall

    This is an interesting fusion of elements I like and elements I intensely dislike. As such I have to err on the side of anarchic-creative explosion which makes me appreciate the whole for the risks it takes (with middle finger proudly protruded). That said, having read this collected Deluxe Edition #1 I still feel I know hardly anything about the actual plot. - Some of the philosophy of this reminds me of the worst tendency of the Plato's Cave dilemma. Everything is very carelessly labelled as 'u This is an interesting fusion of elements I like and elements I intensely dislike. As such I have to err on the side of anarchic-creative explosion which makes me appreciate the whole for the risks it takes (with middle finger proudly protruded). That said, having read this collected Deluxe Edition #1 I still feel I know hardly anything about the actual plot. - Some of the philosophy of this reminds me of the worst tendency of the Plato's Cave dilemma. Everything is very carelessly labelled as 'us vs them', 'them' being barely sketched ideas of 'The Man' who wants to impose mind control on the everyday masses. 'Us' being those who use anarchy, psychedelics and violent means to rail against the status quo. This is slippery in the typical ways, ie. crack is depicted as being evil while psychedelics are liberating. - The use of violence is grotesque, occasionally bordering on fascistic. In particular the final issue of this collection is an especially sick joke. - Gee Dane is a fucking drainer in this. They do allude to his repetitive moaning in a joke about his use of the 'f' word every other minute, this doesn't help to make it less grating. It's a poor device to have a character who questions every new challenge to his reality, despite the fact that he is so far from Kansas from early on in the story. It's all made me interested enough to order #2, but I do see this as encapsulating the best and worst of the genre.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    I don't quite know if I'm sold on this one yet. It just took too much energy to get through -- something that is undoubtedly rare for me when it comes to this medium. Don't get me wrong: if you're looking for something really fucking weird and absolutely brilliant, you've come to the right place. The problem I think I had was that I just find the main plot to so far be rather dull and boring. Morrison hasn't really given enough information about his main characters to make me really feel anything I don't quite know if I'm sold on this one yet. It just took too much energy to get through -- something that is undoubtedly rare for me when it comes to this medium. Don't get me wrong: if you're looking for something really fucking weird and absolutely brilliant, you've come to the right place. The problem I think I had was that I just find the main plot to so far be rather dull and boring. Morrison hasn't really given enough information about his main characters to make me really feel anything for them and I'm not sure if I'm interested or vested enough to continue this series. That being said, I think the only things that have piqued my interest are actually the last two stories that are (nearly) completely unrelated to the main one, but contain enough depth and richness to get lost in. The humanity and fragility in them are Morrison at his best and I wish he'd do more with his main cast than strange and unrelated side characters. Perhaps the difficulty with Morrison is that he does his best work when he focuses on a single strong character. The characters are there, he just has to find ways to develop them more fully. I wish he would have done that by the end of this first collection. All in all, not terrible, not astounding, but I was, admittedly, slightly underwhelmed and disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dan Ray

    Sort of the Libertarian super squad. A bunch of people manage to open their minds (in various New Age, hippy BS or Timothy Leary ways) and try to fight off an ill-defined but all-encompassing evil force of conformity. So it's like The Illuminatus trilogy of Robert Anton Wilson, with a smattering of Ayn Rand. I guess I can't describe or define this story by anything other than comparison with other works, and I think that's Grant Morrison's bag. Taking elements from other plots / characters and r Sort of the Libertarian super squad. A bunch of people manage to open their minds (in various New Age, hippy BS or Timothy Leary ways) and try to fight off an ill-defined but all-encompassing evil force of conformity. So it's like The Illuminatus trilogy of Robert Anton Wilson, with a smattering of Ayn Rand. I guess I can't describe or define this story by anything other than comparison with other works, and I think that's Grant Morrison's bag. Taking elements from other plots / characters and referencing hundreds of esoteric or occult Easter eggs. Wrapping them all up into a fairly coherent plot and letting it all roll forward, keeping things vague enough that whatever happens next is guaranteed to be a surprise. Ironically, losing the ability to surprise because of this. I thought the protagonist was a terrible, unsympathetic little ass, and I hope he grows on me or gets killed off in the next installment. The stand alone stories of Jim Crow, the Moon child, and the nameless henchman getting a back story were the best parts far and away.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    I’m not going to proclaim I know everything that’s going on here. Anyone who does it either lying or Grant Morrison. I won’t spend time researching all the literary allusions, historical references, and conspiracy theories that populate this book either, because that’s a fool’s errand and I just don’t care enough. Instead, I’m going to let the weirdness wash over me and whatever sticks, sticks. Look, The Invisibles is prime psychedelic-influenced Morrison. That much is obvious. So, naturally, it I’m not going to proclaim I know everything that’s going on here. Anyone who does it either lying or Grant Morrison. I won’t spend time researching all the literary allusions, historical references, and conspiracy theories that populate this book either, because that’s a fool’s errand and I just don’t care enough. Instead, I’m going to let the weirdness wash over me and whatever sticks, sticks. Look, The Invisibles is prime psychedelic-influenced Morrison. That much is obvious. So, naturally, it’s partly brilliant and partly insane. Across this first volume, there were parts I loved, parts that made me go, “hmmm”, and parts that I blinked at and moved past without second thoughts. I imagine that’s going to be the case for the remainder of the series, and strangely enough, I’m okay with it. The way I see it, at least after 12 issues, the experience of reading The Invisibles is more important than the narrative. Story and character are secondary to ideas. And there sure are a lot of those in this series. Take it for what you will.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Cullen

    After being introduced by a friend i was somewhat skeptical till i realised that the story was based on poetry, what is poetry, what its for, who writes it and philosophy of the hegemoic world and the fight fore freedom, control and much much more. It is a subliminal history lesson in a harmonic paradox of art and poetry, about survival, time travel and the people who live outwith soicety or try to mould it in their image. Honestly, you would be forgiven by feeling confused at the end of reading After being introduced by a friend i was somewhat skeptical till i realised that the story was based on poetry, what is poetry, what its for, who writes it and philosophy of the hegemoic world and the fight fore freedom, control and much much more. It is a subliminal history lesson in a harmonic paradox of art and poetry, about survival, time travel and the people who live outwith soicety or try to mould it in their image. Honestly, you would be forgiven by feeling confused at the end of reading this volume and have the need to read it again to make sense of it. It is a cmplex story with complex obscure references that only someone with those interest would see stand out or had been used in a film of some sort. Overall, this is truly a fantastic story as is the art work that illuminates the pages. Grant Morrison has certainly got my appreciation, respect and attention.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    Ive seen a lot of people say that this run is the most whacky Grant Morrison runs. And I have to say that I agree heavily with them, this is one of the most absurdly dense things I’ve ever read. He flexes his literary knowledge, he flexes his flair for disturbing scenes, and his use of psychedelics in this run more than any other comic I’ve read. It’s the weirdest Morrison book I’ve read and the weirdest period. Morrison has a particular style of psychedelia induced, literary vomit that if you lov Ive seen a lot of people say that this run is the most whacky Grant Morrison runs. And I have to say that I agree heavily with them, this is one of the most absurdly dense things I’ve ever read. He flexes his literary knowledge, he flexes his flair for disturbing scenes, and his use of psychedelics in this run more than any other comic I’ve read. It’s the weirdest Morrison book I’ve read and the weirdest period. Morrison has a particular style of psychedelia induced, literary vomit that if you love you’ll love this book. If you don’t like his introspective garbage as much as me then you definitely will hate this kind of thing. Even though I would call myself a casual fan of Morrison’s work, this title is a little hard for me swallow at times. I have no idea what’s going on at all still after having finished the book but I’m still very interested in it. So idk, make of that what you will. I’m going to keep reading it because frankly, I can’t stop. But I don’t think I could recommend it to many people.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    The thing with the Invisibles, is that Grant Morrison has an almost poetic way of writing for characters who live on the trashy parts of our minds. I enjoyed the first issue and the potential direction it began in, but the more I read the more the characters and dialogue felt confusing for the sake of “smart literature” and it just doesn’t work with this story or this artwork. I’m not a fan of any of the characters, not their designs and not their personality. There’s a whole lot going on and re The thing with the Invisibles, is that Grant Morrison has an almost poetic way of writing for characters who live on the trashy parts of our minds. I enjoyed the first issue and the potential direction it began in, but the more I read the more the characters and dialogue felt confusing for the sake of “smart literature” and it just doesn’t work with this story or this artwork. I’m not a fan of any of the characters, not their designs and not their personality. There’s a whole lot going on and really not a substantial amount of hook. As I’ve read in other reviews, it’s just not as good as the other similar comics out there and therefore isn’t worth continuing. Ultimately it just tries to be something way more than it is and I’m not buying it. Sorry Grant. To each their own I guess.

  29. 5 out of 5

    dr_set

    Volume 1 of the invisibles it is a psychedelic trip with countless cultural references from the 60-90 period. Fans of Planetary are going to enjoy this one as well as it’s quite similar in many ways. The first dozen issues read like Grant’s own version of Alice in wonderland with his alter ego, King Mob, in the role of the Mad Hatter; showing Dane McGowan, A.K.A. Jack Frost, how deep the rabbit hole goes. We spin around from one issue to another in confusion alongside the protagonist, a revel teen Volume 1 of the invisibles it is a psychedelic trip with countless cultural references from the 60-90 period. Fans of Planetary are going to enjoy this one as well as it’s quite similar in many ways. The first dozen issues read like Grant’s own version of Alice in wonderland with his alter ego, King Mob, in the role of the Mad Hatter; showing Dane McGowan, A.K.A. Jack Frost, how deep the rabbit hole goes. We spin around from one issue to another in confusion alongside the protagonist, a revel teenager from London as he is recruited to fight in a secret organization of anarchist that stand against a sinister force.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ross Kitson

    Having read part of this years ago I was keen to further my progress, and so purchased these sizeable volumes 1 and 2. It's standard Grant Morrison comics, with those entertainingly bizarre characters, other dimensional horrors, and quirky narratives that you'd come to expect. Thinking back I think it came after his work on Zenith, and Doom Patrol, both of which I loved. Why 4 stars? As good as it was, some of the widen your mind philosophical parts wore thin for me, and (similar to the Sandman in Having read part of this years ago I was keen to further my progress, and so purchased these sizeable volumes 1 and 2. It's standard Grant Morrison comics, with those entertainingly bizarre characters, other dimensional horrors, and quirky narratives that you'd come to expect. Thinking back I think it came after his work on Zenith, and Doom Patrol, both of which I loved. Why 4 stars? As good as it was, some of the widen your mind philosophical parts wore thin for me, and (similar to the Sandman in that era) the art was very variable in quality which lets some stories down (I'm biased towards Yeowell, Parkhouse, and Ridgway).

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