web site hit counter Brooks: The Biography of Brooks Robinson - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Brooks: The Biography of Brooks Robinson

Availability: Ready to download

Finalist for the 2014 Casey Award! Selected by the National Baseball Hall of Fame for the 2014 author's series Brooks Robinson is one of baseball's most transcendent and revered players. He won a record sixteen straight Gold Gloves at third base, led one of the best teams of the era, and is often cited as the greatest fielder in baseball history. Credited with almost single- Finalist for the 2014 Casey Award! Selected by the National Baseball Hall of Fame for the 2014 author's series Brooks Robinson is one of baseball's most transcendent and revered players. He won a record sixteen straight Gold Gloves at third base, led one of the best teams of the era, and is often cited as the greatest fielder in baseball history. Credited with almost single-handedly winning the 1970 World Series, this MVP was immortalized in a Normal Rockwell painting. A wholesome player and role model, Brooks honored the game of baseball not only with his play but with his class and character off the field. Author of The Bird: The Life and Legacy of Mark Fidrych, Doug Wilson returns to baseball's Golden Age to detail the birth of a new franchise through the man who came to symbolize it as one of baseball's most beloved players. Through numerous interviews with people from every part of the legendary player's life, Wilson reveals never-before-reported information to illuminate Brooks's remarkable skill and warm personality. Brooks takes readers back to an era when players fought for low-paying yearly contracts, spanning the turbulent 60s and 70s and into the dawning of the free agent era. He was elected to the MLB All-Century Team and as president of the MLB Players Alumni, Brooks continues to influence today's baseball players. In the current climate of astronomic salaries, steroids, off-field troubles, and heroes who let down their fans, Brooks reminds baseball fans of the honor and glory at the heart of America's favorite pastime.


Compare

Finalist for the 2014 Casey Award! Selected by the National Baseball Hall of Fame for the 2014 author's series Brooks Robinson is one of baseball's most transcendent and revered players. He won a record sixteen straight Gold Gloves at third base, led one of the best teams of the era, and is often cited as the greatest fielder in baseball history. Credited with almost single- Finalist for the 2014 Casey Award! Selected by the National Baseball Hall of Fame for the 2014 author's series Brooks Robinson is one of baseball's most transcendent and revered players. He won a record sixteen straight Gold Gloves at third base, led one of the best teams of the era, and is often cited as the greatest fielder in baseball history. Credited with almost single-handedly winning the 1970 World Series, this MVP was immortalized in a Normal Rockwell painting. A wholesome player and role model, Brooks honored the game of baseball not only with his play but with his class and character off the field. Author of The Bird: The Life and Legacy of Mark Fidrych, Doug Wilson returns to baseball's Golden Age to detail the birth of a new franchise through the man who came to symbolize it as one of baseball's most beloved players. Through numerous interviews with people from every part of the legendary player's life, Wilson reveals never-before-reported information to illuminate Brooks's remarkable skill and warm personality. Brooks takes readers back to an era when players fought for low-paying yearly contracts, spanning the turbulent 60s and 70s and into the dawning of the free agent era. He was elected to the MLB All-Century Team and as president of the MLB Players Alumni, Brooks continues to influence today's baseball players. In the current climate of astronomic salaries, steroids, off-field troubles, and heroes who let down their fans, Brooks reminds baseball fans of the honor and glory at the heart of America's favorite pastime.

30 review for Brooks: The Biography of Brooks Robinson

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brina

    Before reading, my biggest passion is baseball. I belong to the baseball book group here on goodreads, and Doug Wilson, one of the regular contributors, mentioned that he had written a few books about members of baseball's hall of fame. I decided to read his biography of Brooks Robinson over the all star break. Brooks Robinson will turn eighty next year and is still considered one of baseball's most liked and by default revered players. He came from an era where players played their entire caree Before reading, my biggest passion is baseball. I belong to the baseball book group here on goodreads, and Doug Wilson, one of the regular contributors, mentioned that he had written a few books about members of baseball's hall of fame. I decided to read his biography of Brooks Robinson over the all star break. Brooks Robinson will turn eighty next year and is still considered one of baseball's most liked and by default revered players. He came from an era where players played their entire career on one team, and were loyal to both their team and city. Robison signed with the Baltimore Orioles out of high school in 1955 and manned third base until he retired from the game in 1977. He remains as much of a fixture in Baltimore as crab cakes, and all who have met him maintain that he is the nicest and most genuine celebrity they have ever met. I enjoyed reading about Robinson's upbringing in Little Rock, Arkansas during a wholesome era. All boys played baseball and Brooks played for the American Legion Doughboys who won the state championship for two years in a row. After graduating from Little Rock's Central High in 1955, Robinson signed with the Orioles and immediately began play with the York White Roses minor league affiliate. In an era where position players weren't rushed to the majors due to players remaining on one team unless they were traded or retired, Robinson did not become a fixture at third for the Orioles until 1960. After he joined the team, the Birds took off. I do not follow the Orioles or their history so I enjoyed learning about the history of a team that I am not as familiar with. I also enjoyed learning about Robinson off the field. In today's era for the most part, players do not interact with fans, they only sign autographs for a fee, and live in gated communities away from the average American. Robinson's highest salary with the Orioles was $110,000 so he lived in a modest ranch home near the ballpark and often walked to work. As he signed autographs, he made time for each and every fan, learning about their lives in the process. Rarely saying no to people, Robinson participated in charitable events throughout the Baltimore community, and owned two businesses, making inroads in the civic community as well. A genuine athlete and person, Robinson was a first ballot hall of famer in 1983 and remains active in baseball alumni activities today. I enjoyed reading Wilson's account of Brooks Robinson. It shows from reading about Robinson's childhood and life off of the field that Wilson put in much meticulous research time. An above average baseball read, I rate Brooks 3.8 stars and recommend it to baseball fans looking to learn more about one of the legends of the game.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jayw

    Nicest guy in the history of professional baseball just happens to be the best ever 3rd baseman too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Harold Kasselman

    In his introduction, Doug Wilson tells readers that he deliberately did not interview Brooks Robinson lest the legend's charm would taint his objectivity. "I did not set out to blindly apply another coat of polish to the statue of a legend. In fact{ } I wanted to find out if the legend was indeed fact." One cannot come away from this biography without a clear understanding that the author came away with reverence for his subject. And why not? As Tom Hanks says in the movie Sleepless in Seattle, In his introduction, Doug Wilson tells readers that he deliberately did not interview Brooks Robinson lest the legend's charm would taint his objectivity. "I did not set out to blindly apply another coat of polish to the statue of a legend. In fact{ } I wanted to find out if the legend was indeed fact." One cannot come away from this biography without a clear understanding that the author came away with reverence for his subject. And why not? As Tom Hanks says in the movie Sleepless in Seattle, "Everyone knows Brooks Robinson was the greatest third baseman in baseball history". (Many would argue Mike Schmidt offensively). And as Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski pointed out on the last day of Memorial Stadium, he won 16 gold gloves but what counts is the gold in his heart. Associated Press writer Gordon Beard, contrasting Brooks to Reggie Jackson's famous egocentric remark that they named a candy bar after him, said of Brooks, "nobody ever named a candy bar for Brooks. Around here, we name our children after him." Well. Wilson's book confirmed what I had always hoped, and that is that the legends are true. The humility, the giving, the caring, the work ethic, all match perfectly with the four great catches he made in the 1970 World Series. This is a wonderful book about a man that no one ever had a bad thing to say about. And there is plenty of recap of baseball lore. I thoroughly enjoyed the chapters about the 69-71 World Series . I had forgotten how great that Orioles team was with the Robinson boys and the great pitching staff. They won 4 pennants and two world championships. Perhaps they should have won in 1969-they had a better all around team. I found myself alternatively tearing up and then laughing out loud at other times ( namely Doug Decinces pulling up third base and giving it to Brooks on his retirement, and the comments of Earl Weaver as well.). An example of Brooks' character was related by former umpire Bill Valentine. After calling three close plays at third base all safe against Brooks, the latter said nothing.(he was never thrown out of a game) Later in the game Valentine called a long fly foul that went into the stands foul. Valentine saw an usher tending to a woman where the ball had landed. he asked Brooks "Did that ball hit the lady?" He said, "No, you finally got a call right and she fainted". There is no controversy in this book-just a lot of feel good moments about a guy who lived his life the way we would all like to live.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tillie

    Growing up in Baltimore during the "glory days" of Orioles baseball I was drawn to this book. Brooks was one of my favorite Orioles growing up, so I was anxious to read this biography. I was glad that it wasn't an authorized one because it came from a non-biased person. It truly chronicled his life using the facts and quotes from others. If Brooks had been involved in the writing of this book, I think he would have downplayed much of his well deserved accolades because that's the kind of person Growing up in Baltimore during the "glory days" of Orioles baseball I was drawn to this book. Brooks was one of my favorite Orioles growing up, so I was anxious to read this biography. I was glad that it wasn't an authorized one because it came from a non-biased person. It truly chronicled his life using the facts and quotes from others. If Brooks had been involved in the writing of this book, I think he would have downplayed much of his well deserved accolades because that's the kind of person he is. I learned a lot more about Brooks and the history of the Orioles that I didn't know. I also learned the establishment of "The Orioles Way" and that it didn't start with Cal Ripken's era. One fact I found truly interesting was that the Orioles were a team brought from another city and that they were the St. Louis Browns. That makes both of our current teams have their origin as "The Browns". What a coincidence! Brooks is truly a great legend and a real role model for all of us. Congratulations to Doug Wilson for writing such a wonderful book about a truly great man! Thanks from all the Baltimore Orioles fans who grew up watching this man. A job well done!

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Dugan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Doug Wilson did a fantastic job in writing this one. I had a feeling when I first picked up the book that it would be a good one because of my outstanding experience with his biography about Northborough native Mark Fidrych. Throughout Wilson’s writing, you get a clear idea of the kind of person Brooks was, the kindest, most loving baseball player in the history of the game. This book is phenomenal in its balance between the magic that Brooks performed on the field in an Orioles uniform at third Doug Wilson did a fantastic job in writing this one. I had a feeling when I first picked up the book that it would be a good one because of my outstanding experience with his biography about Northborough native Mark Fidrych. Throughout Wilson’s writing, you get a clear idea of the kind of person Brooks was, the kindest, most loving baseball player in the history of the game. This book is phenomenal in its balance between the magic that Brooks performed on the field in an Orioles uniform at third base and who he was in his everyday life. The 16 Gold Glove awards that Mr. Robinson won at the hot corner are a very minute component of what this man is comprised of, his heart of gold and passion for life imminent on every single page. Just a scrawny kid from Little Rock with a thick southern accent, Brooks Robinson humbled all others on the field with his humanly impossible plays at third base as well with his memorable at bats in the World Series. Doug Wilson illustrates a hall of fame person in Brooks Robinson, a gentleman enshrined in the game of baseball and the hearts of those he affiliated himself with for eternity. Well done, Mr. Wilson, well done.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marty Monforte

    Brooks Robinson played his entire career with the Baltimore Orioles. He was known as a good hitting and excellent fielding third baseman. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame. Robinson was one of the best players in the history of the Baltimore Orioles and is a good ambassador for the game of baseball. Robinson is well respected within and outside the game of baseball. He is well respected for his character and his mild mannered personality. Doug Wilson's biography "Brooks: The Biography of Bro Brooks Robinson played his entire career with the Baltimore Orioles. He was known as a good hitting and excellent fielding third baseman. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame. Robinson was one of the best players in the history of the Baltimore Orioles and is a good ambassador for the game of baseball. Robinson is well respected within and outside the game of baseball. He is well respected for his character and his mild mannered personality. Doug Wilson's biography "Brooks: The Biography of Brooks Robinson" is a well written biography of Robinson. It covers his formative years, his baseball career and his induction to the baseball hall of fame. The book features information obtained from many interviews of those who know Robinson and who helped develop his baseball skills. The book is well researched and written. The book is a simple account of Robinson's career. The book features quotes from people who have known Robinson. Former coaches, teammates, opponents and fans are quoted in the book. Their quotes are very consistent and similar to one another. Robinson is well respected throughout the game of baseball and in the Baltimore community. The book does a good job of chronicling the improvement of the Baltimore Orioles during the time that Robinson played there. The team gradually got better and eventually played in a four World Series' during Robinson's career. Robinson also got better as his career developed. The book discussed the trade for Frank Robinson, which helped make the Orioles a better team. The book also points out the different leadership styles of Frank and Brooks. Frank Robinson was a much more vocal leader, while Brooks was more laid back and quiet. However, both were effective leaders during the time that they played. Both were well respected in the clubhouse and around baseball. Brooks Robinson played at a time when a lot was changing for the players. During Robinson's career, players won the right to free agency. The players won more rights thanks to the efforts of Marvin Miller, the free agency of Curt Flood and other players who represented the players through the player's union. Brooks Robinson was an active member of the union and he helped to secure more rights for the players. Robinson also played during a time when players started to get more speaking opportunities. During the off season, Robinson would speak at different banquets and dinners. Robinson was born and raised in Little Rock, Arkansas. He grew up on a farm in a middle class family. Robinson took after his mother, but had a bond with his father that was created through sports. His father taught Brooks how to hit and throw a baseball. Robinson followed the St. Louis Cardinals when he was growing up. Robinson was well liked and popular when he was growing up. He and his classmates took pride in Little Rock Central School and the sports team for the school were good and competitive teams. Robinson was a very competitive athlete. He played for an American Legion team called the Doughboys. His coach's name was George Haynie, who taught the players the fundamentals. By his senior year in high school, Robinson was considered to be a good hitter who could hit homeruns. He was always known as a good defensive player. In February of 1955, the Baltimore Orioles' general manager Paul Richards learned about Robinson. After his senior year, Robinson was offered a basketball scholarship to the University of Arkansas. At the same time, he was offered contracts from the New York Giants, Cincinnati Reds and the Baltimore Orioles. Each team offered Robinson a $4,000 signing bonus plus a major league contract. Robinson accepted the offer from the Orioles. Richards was a good general manager and manager. He was a tough leader who wanted to be respected, more than he wanted to be liked. He managed the Orioles well. Richards started the "double switch" in baseball and was one of the first to promote the Iron Mike pitching machine. Prior to 1955, Richards traded some of the veteran players for younger players because the Orioles did not have a good minor league system. Robinson did well with the Orioles from the beginning. He was assigned by the York White Roses of the Class B Piedmont League. He started at second base. After his first game, he was incorrectly referred to by the local newspaper as "Bob Robinson". At York, Robinson batted .311 with 11 home runs in 95 games. On September 17th, 1955, Robinson arrived in Baltimore. The Orioles had used 12 players at third base during the season. Robinson started 6 straight games. After the season, Robinson was sent to the Columbian winter league. Robinson became the starting third baseman to begin the 1957 season. He had a low batting average throughout the season, however, he was put in the every day lineup because he was such a good fielder. Unfortunately, early in the season, Robinson got injured running to first base. He was out for a while. When he came back from his injury, he continue to receive playing time. His reputation as a fielder was growing, however, around this time, Richards sent Robinson to Vancouver to play in for Orioles' minor league team. He did well there. Robinson hit .331 in 42 games at Vancouver. This experience helped Robinson to become a better hitter and overall player. In 1960, the Orioles appeared to be a team on the rise. MLB observers thought that they had a lot of potential. The Orioles' scouts signed top players and the Orioles appeared to be building a good team. Milt Pappas, Jack Fisher, Jerry Walker, Jackie Brandt, Jim Gentile and Robinson were all talented players who could make the Orioles better. Baltimore was becoming a more populous city at this time, and the Baltimore Colts had won the NFL championship in 1958 and 1959. Robinson was becoming more popular around baseball and was becoming a better hitter. Additionally, in 1960, Robinson won the Gold Glove Award, which was given to the best defensive player at each position. In 1960, Robinson married his girlfriend Connie. They would go onto have four children - three sons and a daughter. In 1961, their first child was born. By 1961, Robinson had been known as the "vacuum cleaner" because of his outstanding defensive ability at third base. Robinson had earned much respect because of his dedication to the game of baseball. In 1964, the Orioles hired Hank Bauer to be their manager. He was a tough man, but treated the players well. He did not have a curfew and simply expected the players to play their best at all times. He was known as a "player's manager," but he still received respect from the players. No one ever talked back to him or gave him a hard time. Gene Woodling was hired as the Orioles' hitting coach. Robinson went through some ups and downs ands went through some hitting slumps during the season. However, he persevered and still had a good season. Robinson made the all star game and hit a two run triple in the game. The Orioles won 97 games, but did not win the pennant. After the season was over, Robinson travelled to different dinners to give speeches. He and other players received $25 to $50 per appearance. Additionally, Robinson received a raise from $15,000 to $50,000 at the end of the season. Robinson also became part owner of a restaurant and a sporting goods store at this time. In 1965, the Orioles traded for Frank Robinson. Brooks and Frank got along well, and Frank Robinson made the Orioles an even better team. They both stared a commitment to winning and they both did their best for the team. Frank batted third, while Brooks batted fourth. In the second game of the year, in the first inning, Frank and Brooks hit back to back home runs. Powell also played well that year, and the trio of Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson and Boog Powell became difficult for opposing pitchers to stop. In 1966, Brooks Robinson was the top vote getter for the All Star game. The Orioles faced the Dodgers in the World Series. The Dodgers were lead by Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Don Sutton. The Dodgers were the favorites, however, the Orioles swept the Dodgers in four games. As Wilson points out, the "Orioles became the first non-Yankee American League World Champion since 1948." During the offseason, Brooks Robinson and other players went to Vietnam on a good will tour. He spent 17 days visiting the troops. The players made no political statements about the war. They went there to show respect for the troops and the men who were making the sacrifice to be there. Robinson played in the World Series with the Orioles in 1966, 1969, 1970 and 1971. They beat the Dodgers in 1966, lost to the Mets in 1969, defeated the Reds in 1970 and lost to the Pirates in 1971. Robinson played well in the post season. Robinson retired after the 1977 season and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York in 1983. Many Orioles' fans came to the ceremony. Wilson points out that "56 buses, 14 planes, and countless individual cars made the 250-mile "trip of pride" sponsored by the business community of Baltimore." It was a well attended ceremony. I would recommend this book for baseball fans and fans of the Baltimore Orioles. It is a well written and well researched book. It covers Robinson's career, his personality, his post baseball career and his connection to the Orioles and the Baltimore community.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dale Stonehouse

    Really the only thing preventing this book from 5 stars is the subject's complete absence of controversy and conflict. Everything else is as compelling in a positive light as any human could be. If you love good baseball and good stories about a good person, here is a good place to start; but be forewarned it may spoil subsequent reading about less admirable ballplayers. The game of baseball has proven to be is common ground for the best and worst of human behavior and values; Robinson shows us Really the only thing preventing this book from 5 stars is the subject's complete absence of controversy and conflict. Everything else is as compelling in a positive light as any human could be. If you love good baseball and good stories about a good person, here is a good place to start; but be forewarned it may spoil subsequent reading about less admirable ballplayers. The game of baseball has proven to be is common ground for the best and worst of human behavior and values; Robinson shows us the best.

  8. 4 out of 5

    victor harris

    A well-deserved tribute to one of the class players in all of sports. The author did border on the monotonous at times as he kept repeating how teammates, fans, and even rivals had immense respect for Robinson. He clearly was worthy of the adulation but the reader didn't need to be reminded of it on virtually every other page. A well-deserved tribute to one of the class players in all of sports. The author did border on the monotonous at times as he kept repeating how teammates, fans, and even rivals had immense respect for Robinson. He clearly was worthy of the adulation but the reader didn't need to be reminded of it on virtually every other page.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol Irvin

    Loved this bio of Brooks Robinson!! Being a lifelong Orioles fan and Brooks being my all time favorite player-this book doesn't disappoint!! Loved this bio of Brooks Robinson!! Being a lifelong Orioles fan and Brooks being my all time favorite player-this book doesn't disappoint!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Harlan Thacker

    What a great read. As a kid growing up in Baltimore, I had read a biography of Brooks Robinson. I had hopes this would be more in depth and more geared to adults, and would delve into things I didn't already know. Wow, those hopes were far exceeded. There were dozens of things that were completely new to me, too many to describe here, but I'll mention one. In 1977, when Brooks had announced his impending retirement, the team scheduled a special day to honor him. His parents came, and many reporte What a great read. As a kid growing up in Baltimore, I had read a biography of Brooks Robinson. I had hopes this would be more in depth and more geared to adults, and would delve into things I didn't already know. Wow, those hopes were far exceeded. There were dozens of things that were completely new to me, too many to describe here, but I'll mention one. In 1977, when Brooks had announced his impending retirement, the team scheduled a special day to honor him. His parents came, and many reporters and other media members descended on Mrs. Robinson, to say she and her husband had done a great job raising their son. Whether a good or bad day on the baseball field, their son was always courteous and polite to everyone. Her response was to initially say thank you, followed by "what made Brooks into the great man he is far more than anything we did, was his constant playing with blind and deaf children. We lived one block from a school for the blind, and one block (in the other direction) from a school for the deaf. Brooks spent countless days and hours with those kids, just playing with them and spending time with them. He came away from that with two things in great abundance. An enormous level of gratitude for all the blessings God has brought into his life, and a tremendous amount of compassion for those who are not as fortunate." Both of which all of us could use a lot more of.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Person

    Reaffirms all I have ever heard. I appreciate the author's comment about few books being written about Brooks Robinson because the story is somewhat repetitive: he was a great player, humble man, and all around nice guy. Reaffirms all I have ever heard. I appreciate the author's comment about few books being written about Brooks Robinson because the story is somewhat repetitive: he was a great player, humble man, and all around nice guy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    What a great book! I'm not an Orioles fan, but I love baseball and baseball history and the story of Brooks Robinson was excellent! A great ballplayer and a great human being! Please check this one out! What a great book! I'm not an Orioles fan, but I love baseball and baseball history and the story of Brooks Robinson was excellent! A great ballplayer and a great human being! Please check this one out!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Don McDaniel

    Fantastic - A great read - couldn’t put it down. And what a warm, validating treatment of a Baltimore hero and American treasure, Brooks Robinson. Thanks to God for Brooks Robinson.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Larry Prather

    It's about Brooks. What else needs to be said? It's about Brooks. What else needs to be said?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alan Kimball

    A well written biography of Brooks Robinson, Hall of Fame nice guy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Austin Gisriel

    Doug Wilson provided some very specific anecdotes about Brooks Robinson that reminded me why my parents held up the Oriole great as someone to emulate. He reminded me of why we would have named either of our two girls Brooks had either been a boy. He reminded me of why Brooks has been my life-long hero. Having said that, The Biography of Brooks Robinson was not an entirely satisfying read for three reasons. The first reflects on the subject more than the author, and that is Brooks' life is not a Doug Wilson provided some very specific anecdotes about Brooks Robinson that reminded me why my parents held up the Oriole great as someone to emulate. He reminded me of why we would have named either of our two girls Brooks had either been a boy. He reminded me of why Brooks has been my life-long hero. Having said that, The Biography of Brooks Robinson was not an entirely satisfying read for three reasons. The first reflects on the subject more than the author, and that is Brooks' life is not a compelling 290 page read. Every chapter sounds the same theme: Brooks is a great guy. The second is the random nature of the sources. Earl Weaver was the only prominent Oriole who was interviewed especially for the book. Insights from Frank Robinson, Boog Powell, Jim Palmer, et al, came from previously printed sources. Random fans were interviewed, but it would have been very interesting to read the perceptions of one fan who grew up in Aberdeen, MD, idolizing Brooks. He was the one among us who actually got to play third base for the Orioles, and of course, I'm speaking about Cal Ripken. The third issue I have is the writing itself is pedestrian and sometimes over the top. "Like a singular warrior, standing with remarkable coolness a mere 90 feet away from club-wielding Philistines, with only his wits and a small leather glove to defend himself; fielding projectiles that most sane men would have tried to dodge," is an example of the latter. Perhaps, presenting Brooks' life as the shining example of a long-gone era and placing his deeds within the context of that era would have made for a more compelling read. Nevertheless, Brooks fans and Oriole fans everywhere will enjoy this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I just missed seeing baseball Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson play, although, even if I'd been on top of baseball when I was slightly younger, I would've missed him at his prime. I'd seen a few of his plays on highlight reels, of course, but, to me, he's always been more of a mythical figure, an icon. Doug Wilson's book gives a great overview of his life and what made him so special as a ballplayer as well as a person. I'd also read Wilson's bio of Mark Fidrych, and the Brooks bio is similar. It's a I just missed seeing baseball Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson play, although, even if I'd been on top of baseball when I was slightly younger, I would've missed him at his prime. I'd seen a few of his plays on highlight reels, of course, but, to me, he's always been more of a mythical figure, an icon. Doug Wilson's book gives a great overview of his life and what made him so special as a ballplayer as well as a person. I'd also read Wilson's bio of Mark Fidrych, and the Brooks bio is similar. It's a very positive take on a life, although there are mentions of some botched business decisions and occasional minor conflicts with Baltimore Oriole management. Generally, though, Robinson comes across as very saintly. Wilson's an ophthalmologist, not a writer, but he does a decent job in describing a life. His strength is definitely research. The strictly chronological nature of the book detracts from it. At the same time, I think if Wilson tried to get too fancy or literary there would be more problems. Wilson doesn't overreach -- he stays within himself as a writer, and this is a pleasant book. I'm looking forward to his next one. Reading this also made me want to see more of Brooks Robinson's play. Thank goodness for youtube -- the 1970 World Series is on there. Robinson was the series' MVP, so it's worth checking out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom Gase

    Really liked this book on one of the all time greatest third basemen of all time, Brooks Robinson. Robinson played 23 years of baseball, all with the Baltimore Orioles, but I felt like I didn't know enough about him outside of how well he played in the 1970 World Series. This book talks about that and a whole lot more in his career from his start in the late 1950s, through the talented teams in the 1960s and early 1970s. I was born in 1977 and never saw him play, but the author, Doug Wilson, did Really liked this book on one of the all time greatest third basemen of all time, Brooks Robinson. Robinson played 23 years of baseball, all with the Baltimore Orioles, but I felt like I didn't know enough about him outside of how well he played in the 1970 World Series. This book talks about that and a whole lot more in his career from his start in the late 1950s, through the talented teams in the 1960s and early 1970s. I was born in 1977 and never saw him play, but the author, Doug Wilson, did a good job of making me feel like I was actually at all the games. I thought it was a little overkill near the end with just how nice of a person Robinson was on and off the field, but besides that a great book. Looking forward to reading the author's other baseball books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    Thorough but plodding biography of one of the best third basemen in Major League Baseball history. Takes him from his early days in Little Rock, Ark., to becoming the toast of the Baltimore Orioles, to his active post-baseball career in the game. Although the author has interviewed a number of people to add new insight to Robinson's own two autobiographies, he seems to go out of his way not to use Robinson's own words. Their light use is glaring. Also, his description of Robinson being one of ba Thorough but plodding biography of one of the best third basemen in Major League Baseball history. Takes him from his early days in Little Rock, Ark., to becoming the toast of the Baltimore Orioles, to his active post-baseball career in the game. Although the author has interviewed a number of people to add new insight to Robinson's own two autobiographies, he seems to go out of his way not to use Robinson's own words. Their light use is glaring. Also, his description of Robinson being one of baseball's nicest guys, while true, is repetitive and becomes tiresome. I was fortunate to get to meet the now-Hall of Famer in around 1983 when he came to Chattanooga for a combined — I think — Red Food Stores and American Cancer Society fundraiser. Good guy. Mediocre book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Miller

    (Full disclosure: Brooks is MY #1 childhood hero. I played 3rd in Little League because of him; two of my proudest possessions are a signed Norman Rockwell print of him as well as a collection of each year of his baseball cards.) The author admits upfront that he's not a Brooks fan, but he'd heard such great things about him as a person, that he set out to discover the real story - could someone be THAT universally adored? Answer: Yes. An easy read, that's essentially a paean to a great player an (Full disclosure: Brooks is MY #1 childhood hero. I played 3rd in Little League because of him; two of my proudest possessions are a signed Norman Rockwell print of him as well as a collection of each year of his baseball cards.) The author admits upfront that he's not a Brooks fan, but he'd heard such great things about him as a person, that he set out to discover the real story - could someone be THAT universally adored? Answer: Yes. An easy read, that's essentially a paean to a great player and a greater person.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Excellent book on the best third baseman that ever played the game. However, his great records, world series, all-star team selection (15 consecutive years) are not what he will be best remembered for. His personality, friendliness, charisma, husband father and all around a super person is what really drew people to adore him. Sparky Anderson said it best, "I'm beginning to see Brooks in my sleep, if I dropped this paper plate, he'd pick it up on one hop and throw me out at first." A great read Excellent book on the best third baseman that ever played the game. However, his great records, world series, all-star team selection (15 consecutive years) are not what he will be best remembered for. His personality, friendliness, charisma, husband father and all around a super person is what really drew people to adore him. Sparky Anderson said it best, "I'm beginning to see Brooks in my sleep, if I dropped this paper plate, he'd pick it up on one hop and throw me out at first." A great read even if you are not a baseball follower or sports for that matter.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Graney

    Quick, fun read. Author is very good at describing game situations, especially the 1970 World Series. The praise for Robinson not just as a player but also as a great man is over-the-top and certainly deserved. Every Oriole fan should read this.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Dean

    A little different than a typical athlete's biography - very comprehensive and will likely be considered the definitive work on Brooks' career and life. Gives more depth to the man beyond the 1970 World Series, and shows the type of human being he is. I enjoyed this book very much. A little different than a typical athlete's biography - very comprehensive and will likely be considered the definitive work on Brooks' career and life. Gives more depth to the man beyond the 1970 World Series, and shows the type of human being he is. I enjoyed this book very much.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Schaffer

    Great read. Fast paced and covers the golden age of Orioles baseball. A lot of adulation for Brooksie..but to be fair he is and always has been a great guy with little if any controversy around him.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Greg Embert

    Pretty much your straight up biograpny. A little dry but entertaining nevertheless.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lance

    Excellent bio on Brooks Robinson - my full review is posted here: http://sportsbookguy.blogspot.com/201... Excellent bio on Brooks Robinson - my full review is posted here: http://sportsbookguy.blogspot.com/201...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stu

    A very rewarding biography about the best third baseman who ever lived.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Brookes

    Poorly written and repetitive. Could've used a good editor. Lacks Brooks' voice and whitewashes any controversy, including ongoing rift with current Orioles brass. Poorly written and repetitive. Could've used a good editor. Lacks Brooks' voice and whitewashes any controversy, including ongoing rift with current Orioles brass.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Don

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Ko

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.