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I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, pr I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, professional and religious organizations. If one is to acquire a real appreciation of the magnitude of changes underway in the Soviet Union, one must first review the actual character of the totalitarian inheritance.


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I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, pr I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, professional and religious organizations. If one is to acquire a real appreciation of the magnitude of changes underway in the Soviet Union, one must first review the actual character of the totalitarian inheritance.

30 review for I Chose Freedom

  1. 5 out of 5

    dina

    I found this book (the original Charles Scribner's and Sons 1946 hardcover edition) in the Harbin Hot Springs library, to which I solemnly intend to return it. It is a mind-blowing story, told by a man who rose to near the very top of the Soviet Party and then defected to the US in the mid 1940's. You must look me in the eye and promise to READ IT RIGHT NOW. The translator is not named, but he is clearly a superb writer; the book is gripping, even though - I won't lie - it is long. The editing a I found this book (the original Charles Scribner's and Sons 1946 hardcover edition) in the Harbin Hot Springs library, to which I solemnly intend to return it. It is a mind-blowing story, told by a man who rose to near the very top of the Soviet Party and then defected to the US in the mid 1940's. You must look me in the eye and promise to READ IT RIGHT NOW. The translator is not named, but he is clearly a superb writer; the book is gripping, even though - I won't lie - it is long. The editing and the language is worthy of a great novel (I don't say that lightly), but it is entirely a true story, feverishly written in the months after the escape. A story like this was being heard in the West for the first time, and lead to a large libel trial in France, but it was corroborated by numerous others. He lived through fantastic man-made famines and Stalin's purges, first as an idealistic son of a revolutionary, and later as a "confirmed enemy of the regime". This man's strength and intelligence is otherworldly; his whole family and many friends were killed in revenge for his speaking out, so the least we can do is read his story. In it are also the stories of scores of friends, colleagues, aquaintances, lovers, and others he had encountered; the energy and frenetic pace of his life alone are staggering. It might seem obviously relevant to me and my family's history, but it needs to be read by everyone everywhere who has ever given a thought to the nature of power and evil or to the meaning of strength and goodness. It is also a profoundly compelling first-hand account of some of the key events in the 20th century history, and as we all know, those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it. This article tells the story of his son and the aftermath, but don't let it be a substitute for the book itself, which will not disappoint you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya Borys

    A must-read and a life-changer. Reading this book was really scary. After this book, nothing can make you like Stalin and the Soviet Union. Kravchenko was one of the first defectors from the Soviet Union, persecuted, he killed himself in the USA. A powerful first-hand account of an apparatchik who survived the multiple Stalinist purges of the Communist party and Soviet leadership replete with echoes of words from the contemporary leftist political ranks uttered unknowingly of their prior life at A must-read and a life-changer. Reading this book was really scary. After this book, nothing can make you like Stalin and the Soviet Union. Kravchenko was one of the first defectors from the Soviet Union, persecuted, he killed himself in the USA. A powerful first-hand account of an apparatchik who survived the multiple Stalinist purges of the Communist party and Soviet leadership replete with echoes of words from the contemporary leftist political ranks uttered unknowingly of their prior life at the murderous hands of Josef Stalin. A story like this was being heard in the West for the first time, and lead to a large libel trial in France, but it was corroborated by numerous others.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kateryna Martynenko

    Одна з найкращих книг, які я читала у своєму житті, важлива на рівні "Одного дня Ивана Денисовича" та інших викривальних творів радянського періоду - книга Віктора Кравченка "Я обираю свободу". Віктор Кравченко народився в 1905 році у Дніпропетровську. Він дійшов до найвищих щаблів радянської номенклатури, ставши представником технічної еліти 30-х - 40-х, він керував металургічними комбінатами і заводами, а під час війни був посланий в США працювати над поставками по ленд-лізу. Кравченко ненавид Одна з найкращих книг, які я читала у своєму житті, важлива на рівні "Одного дня Ивана Денисовича" та інших викривальних творів радянського періоду - книга Віктора Кравченка "Я обираю свободу". Віктор Кравченко народився в 1905 році у Дніпропетровську. Він дійшов до найвищих щаблів радянської номенклатури, ставши представником технічної еліти 30-х - 40-х, він керував металургічними комбінатами і заводами, а під час війни був посланий в США працювати над поставками по ленд-лізу. Кравченко ненавидів радянську владу, за свою тривалу кар'єру він бачив численні порушення прав людини - він був у виморених голодом українських селах, на заводах, де працювали раби з Гулагу, його друзів знищували в чистках. Кравченко залишився в США, щоб написати про всі ці речі і відкрити світові те, що вібувалося у сталінському СССР. Всю його родину включно з далекими родичами, всього близько 30 людей, знищили після того, як він відмовився повертатися. Його книга була перекладена на понад 20 мов і опублікована величезними тиражами у багатьох країнах світу. Комуністична партія Франції подала на нього в суд за клєвєту на рядянську дійсність, але цей суд виграв Кравченко, зумівши довести свою правоту, з допомогою численних свідків, які так чи інакше втекли із пекла таборів та голоду із СССР. Книга Кравченка - це те, про що я мріяла увесь час поки вивчала історію радянського союзу. Це шедевр мемуарної прози, який дає неймовірно точний, об'єктивний огляд розвитку СССР від початку і до часів війни через досвід людини, яка змогла вибитися у найвищі ешелони номенклатури, залишившись при цьому вірним правді і своєму народу. Мене надзвичайно вразила, книга і сама особистість Віктора Кравченка. Це надзвичайно сильна, незламна, вільна людина, яка не втрачає можливості критично мислити і аналізувати у найжахливіших умовах, людина, яка готова ціною власної смерті або смерті близьких боротися із режимом. Книга Кравченка доступна для скачування англійською і у скорочено варіанті російською. Ця надзвичайна, сильна, правдива і смілива книга була написана задовго до 20 з'їзду, задовго до Відлиги, вона була по суті однією із перших рішучих спроб викрити брехливий і підлий радянський режим. Я б дуже хотіла, щоб ця книга була перевидана у сучасній Україні і особливо Росії і щоб кожна людина її прочитала. Ця книга - свідчення адекватного очевидця про жахи і саму лицемірну огидну суть Совка, яку в наш час багато хто забуває.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Udaiiiiiii

    Really, nobody has read this? My interest comes from these lines in his wikipedia article: "Kravchenko also wrote a lesser known book, that was the sequel to "I Chose Freedom", entitled "I Chose Justice" in 1950. His inspiration came from a paranoia stemming from his "Trial of the Century" and the McCarthy's, so-called,"anti-communist witch hunt". Kravchenko realized that the western world engaged in injustices against humanity resembling the regime he originally fled from. Upon this he then chos Really, nobody has read this? My interest comes from these lines in his wikipedia article: "Kravchenko also wrote a lesser known book, that was the sequel to "I Chose Freedom", entitled "I Chose Justice" in 1950. His inspiration came from a paranoia stemming from his "Trial of the Century" and the McCarthy's, so-called,"anti-communist witch hunt". Kravchenko realized that the western world engaged in injustices against humanity resembling the regime he originally fled from. Upon this he then chose different ways to counter-act exploitation and Stalinist development by moving to Bolivia, the location of his apparent suicide. These ways included investing his profits made from "I Chose Freedom" into an attempt to organize poor farmers into new collectives."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pat Schakelvoort

    Kravchenko was one of the first defectors from the Soviet Union, in a time when defecting from the Soviet Union wasn't cool. It doesn't bring any new information on the situation in the Soviet Union, but it does point out a lot of the Soviet bureaucracy as well. In the last pages it does point out the American handling of the relations with the Soviet Union during the second world war: The Americans refrained from any criticism towards the Soviet Union, because of the Soviet sensitivity. The aut Kravchenko was one of the first defectors from the Soviet Union, in a time when defecting from the Soviet Union wasn't cool. It doesn't bring any new information on the situation in the Soviet Union, but it does point out a lot of the Soviet bureaucracy as well. In the last pages it does point out the American handling of the relations with the Soviet Union during the second world war: The Americans refrained from any criticism towards the Soviet Union, because of the Soviet sensitivity. The author states that during that time almost every ally of the United States was criticised instead of the Soviet Union.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marim

    لكي تعرف ما قد يكون مسار حياتك عندما تكون شخصا منتجا، في ظل حكومة تقمع الحرية، و تقلل من أهمية الفرد، و تتظاهر بأنها تساوي بين الجميع، في حين أن الحقيقة هي أن أفراد المجتمع لا يجدون القمح، و الرؤساء يدخنون السيجار! لكي تعرف ما قد تصل إليه المبادئ من سامية، إلي ملطخه بدماء الأبرياء. فلتنظر إلي روسيا الشيوعية، و باقي الإتحاد السوفيتي

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Fares

    This book was my grandfather's gift to my mom ,Reading such a heritage meant a lot to me especially when it belongs to a dear person ,. This book was my grandfather's gift to my mom ,Reading such a heritage meant a lot to me especially when it belongs to a dear person ,.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hirstwood

    Please note - I read an abridged version of the book - only 240 pages not 560. I chose freedom, despite it's dreadful cover and the smell of dust emanating from my copy, was such a powerful book. It is the life of Victor Kravchenco. He describes how he became involved in the communist party and eventually became a most trusted member of the Soviet govenment. I would love to quote big sections of the book, but I will try and resist. Kravchenko was born in the Ukraine (when it was part of Tsarist Ru Please note - I read an abridged version of the book - only 240 pages not 560. I chose freedom, despite it's dreadful cover and the smell of dust emanating from my copy, was such a powerful book. It is the life of Victor Kravchenco. He describes how he became involved in the communist party and eventually became a most trusted member of the Soviet govenment. I would love to quote big sections of the book, but I will try and resist. Kravchenko was born in the Ukraine (when it was part of Tsarist Russia), and had a revolutionary father who spent many years in prison. But Kravchenko inherited a basic socialist ideal from him. As Kravchenko grew up he became invoved in the youth communist party, and then was accepted into the party proper when he was in twenties. Since Kravchenko had some agricultural experience (growing up in the countryside) he was sent out to supervise the collectivisation of farming. It was perhaps here, that Kravchenko has his forst doubts about the party as he saw for himself that collectivisation had a result of famine and death. He says "we denounced as 'anti-soviet rumours' what we knew as towering fact". Despite these doubts Kravchenko stays in the party - indeed, what choice did have, you don't leave the party. And the book continues to describe the years of Stalin's purges (cleansing the Soviet Communist Party from within), forced labour camps, child forced labour... The list is sickening and seemingly endless. In chapter 13 he describes a new rule to be enforced - if a workers (who lives in barracks that he/she shares with up 350 other people along with bedbugs and lice and vermin) is 20 minutes late for work, they will be sent for trial and sentenced to forced labour or if it's their third offence, they will be killed. I came across this rule in Solzhenesyn's The First Circle, and A Day in the Life... To be honest I was unsure whether to believe the reason why a sick worker wouldn't go to the dr to be excused work. Here is the answer. If the worker queued to see the doctor it could make them late for work, if the dorctor then said they were fit for work, then they were in for forced labour in Siberia or worse. By the time the USSR was brought into the second world war with Hitler invading them (despite their friendship pact), the Soviet Union was woefully unprepared. Kravchenko is promoted to the government level of the Party to oversee the production of equipment for the war effort. He describes the luxuries available to his level of government, while the citizens/peasants are starving and living in shared barrack huts. But he also describes how in his position he has all the responsibility and no ability to share his load downwards. He is constnantly monitored by the NKVD (secret police) both at home and at owrk they search his possessions his furniture, looking for anything incriminating. Eventually as the Soviet Union cannot produce munitions quicky enough, they enter into an agreement with the USA to be supplied with raw materials and products. Here Kravchenko sees his chance to get away. He is sent to oversee the aquisition of products under the agreeement, and after seven months, manages to defect. I read this book after it was mention by Doris Lessing inher autobigraphy. She said it would change anyone's view if they were pro-communist, and she is right. Despite having studied Stalin's policies for myself many years ago, I still have a communist leaning - one that I know in my heart is naive, knowing that power corrupts, and knowing the evidence of every country that has tried communism has become a dictorship totalitarian state - which wasn't the point of communism, but always the result. I am glad to have read this side of the story. I have read all of Solzhenytsins books (still cant spell his name though!), and I've read a lot of books by various workers and prisons of the Soviet regime, but this is the first I have read by someone in the regime, and I am impressed by his candour, and thoroughly disgusted and upset by his description of life under Stalin. Unfortunaztely I can also quite believe that the story has been sanitised to an extent for the mass market.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Danny Perez

    Este libro trata sobre la vida política personal de un funcionario soviético y desertor ucraniano Viktor Kravchenko. El libro abarca temas como la colectivización en la URSS por el cambio de régimen al comunismo y sus implicaciones, así mismo el ataque a dicho régimen y a Stalin, los crímenes llevados acabo por la policía (NVKD o GPU), en particular la hambruna de 1932-1933, y la cooperación de los gobiernos de Joseph Stalin y Adolf Hitler. Sin duda es un relato crudo; al inicio, nos presentan a Este libro trata sobre la vida política personal de un funcionario soviético y desertor ucraniano Viktor Kravchenko. El libro abarca temas como la colectivización en la URSS por el cambio de régimen al comunismo y sus implicaciones, así mismo el ataque a dicho régimen y a Stalin, los crímenes llevados acabo por la policía (NVKD o GPU), en particular la hambruna de 1932-1933, y la cooperación de los gobiernos de Joseph Stalin y Adolf Hitler. Sin duda es un relato crudo; al inicio, nos presentan a un joven entusiasta con el Partido Comunista, que tiene fe y que cree que formará parte de la generación que cambió a su nación, pero conforme avanza la historia, vamos viendo como pierde la fe en su partido y se cuestiona si realmente hace lo correcto. Hasta nos demuestra que los campos de concentración existían mucho antes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y cómo Hitler fue ganando simpatizantes a su causa. Sin duda es una lectura que vale la pena. Es una historia verídica que ejemplifica que el hombre está condenado a repetir su pasado si no lo conoce.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Fantastic. It is an autobiography. Stalin is 10x Hitler. The closed society was very good at turning their own people against each other and creating such an environment of fear that nobody would dare speak out against the most insidious decisions from Moscow. I would read this again, and recommend it to anyone.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fer Lis

    How can this book been so forgotten? It´s definitely a must in any "totalitarianism bookshelf". How can this book been so forgotten? It´s definitely a must in any "totalitarianism bookshelf".

  12. 4 out of 5

    Doug Hauser

    Should be a must read for all those who are enamored with Socialism & Communism.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence

    I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, professional and religious organizations. If one is to acquire a real appreciation of the magnitude of changes underway in the I Chose Freedom is melodramatic in title only. It is the work of an average communist party member during the Stalin era. Kravchenko was a technocrat who miraculously cut through the totalitarian fabric of Stalinist ideology to demonstrate the bureaucratization of Soviet life and the annihilation of genuine intermediate social structures, such as families, trade unions, professional and religious organizations. If one is to acquire a real appreciation of the magnitude of changes underway in the Soviet Union, one must first review the actual character of the totalitarian inheritance.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Leonardo

    La suerte de Victor Kravchenko –el diplomático soviético que, en 1944, desertó mientras estaba en Nueva York y luego escribió sus famosas memorias, I Chose Freedom– merece mencionarse aquí. Su libro, escrito en primera persona, fue el primer informe importante sobre los horrores del estalinismo, empezando con un detallado relato de la colectivización forzosa y del hambre en Ucrania, donde el propio Kravchenko –a principios de la década de los treinta todavía un verdadero creyente del sistema– pa La suerte de Victor Kravchenko –el diplomático soviético que, en 1944, desertó mientras estaba en Nueva York y luego escribió sus famosas memorias, I Chose Freedom– merece mencionarse aquí. Su libro, escrito en primera persona, fue el primer informe importante sobre los horrores del estalinismo, empezando con un detallado relato de la colectivización forzosa y del hambre en Ucrania, donde el propio Kravchenko –a principios de la década de los treinta todavía un verdadero creyente del sistema– participó en la imposición de la colectivización. La historia más conocida sobre Kravchenko acaba en 1949, cuando ganó en París un gran juicio contra sus acusadores soviéticos, quienes incluso habían llevado a su exmujer ante el tribunal para testificar sobre su corrupción y alcoholismo y dejar constancia de su violencia doméstica. Lo que no es tan conocido es que, inmediatamente después de su victoria, mientras estaba siendo ensalzado como un héroe de la Guerra Fría, Kravchenko se mostró profundamente preocupado por la anticomunista caza de brujas de McCarthy, y advirtió de que, utilizando semejantes métodos para combatir el estalinismo, Estados Unidos corría el riesgo de parecerse a su oponente. También se mostró crecientemente consciente de las injusticias de las democracias liberales, y su deseo por ver cambios en la sociedad occidental llegó a convertirse en casi una obsesión. Después de escribir una secuela mucho menos popular de su I Chose Freedom, significativamente titulada I Chose Justice, Kravchenko emprendió una cruzada para encontrar un nuevo modo de organizar la producción que fuera menos explotador. Esto le condujo a Bolivia, donde invirtió su dinero en organizar a los agricultores pobres en nuevos colectivos. Aplastado por el fracaso de estas empresas, se retiró a la soledad y finalmente se pegó un tiro en su casa de Nueva York. Su suicidio fue la consecuencia de su desesperación, no de algún chantaje del KGB; prueba de que su denuncia de la Unión Soviética había sido un genuino acto de protesta contra la injusticia. Primero como tragedia después como farsa Pág.100 --- En 1946 Viktor Kravchenko, un burócrata soviético de categoría intermedia que había huido a Estados Unidos en abril de 1944, publicó sus memorias, Yo elegí la libertad. Cuando éstas aparecieron en Francia, en mayo del año siguiente, bajo el título J'ai choisi la Liberté, causaron sensación por su descripción de las purgas y masacres soviéticas y, especialmente, por la del sistema de los campos de concentración soviéticos, el gulag. En noviembre de 1947, dos meses después de la reunión del Cominform celebrada en Polonia, en la que se había hurgado en el pasado de los líderes del PCF por no atenerse a la línea dura soviética, la revista intelectual del Partido, Les Lettres françaises, publicó una serie de artículos que afirmaban que el libro de Kravchenko era una trama de mentiras tejidas por los servicios secretos norteamericanos. Cuando el periódico repitió y amplificó estos cargos en abril de 1948, Kravchenko interpuso una demanda por libelo. En el juicio, que duró desde el 24 de enero al 4 de abril de 1949, Kravchenko presentó en su defensa una serie de testigos bastante oscuros; pero los demandados podían blandir un fajo de declaraciones de destacados intelectuales no comunistas franceses: el novelista de la resistencia Vercors, el físico y Premio Nobel Frédéric Joliot-Curie, el crítico de arte Jean Cassou, el héroe de la resistencia y director del Museo de Arte Moderno de París, y otros muchos. Todos ellos atestiguaron el impecable historial del Partido Comunista Francés, las indiscutibles credenciales revolucionarias de la Unión Sovética y las inaceptables implicaciones de las afirmaciones de Kravchenko, aunque fueran ciertas. En el juicio, Kravchenko recibió un simbólico e insultante franco por daños y perjuicios. Posguerra Pág.276

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marcy

    This book is an important read. It gives a wonderful first-hand account of a dark period of world history - communism in Russia. It was fascinating to read how the author embraced communism in his youth for noble reasons- to better the lives of his family and neighbors. You then see how the truth of it is slowly made known to him as he watches his family, faith, community, and nation destroyed. It made me think, "God bless America!". I think of Victor's story often and vow to never take our free This book is an important read. It gives a wonderful first-hand account of a dark period of world history - communism in Russia. It was fascinating to read how the author embraced communism in his youth for noble reasons- to better the lives of his family and neighbors. You then see how the truth of it is slowly made known to him as he watches his family, faith, community, and nation destroyed. It made me think, "God bless America!". I think of Victor's story often and vow to never take our freedoms or country for granted!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary Sudeth

    A powerful first-hand account of an apparatchik who survived the multiple Stalinist purges of the Communist party and Soviet leadership replete with echoes of words from the contemporary leftist political ranks uttered unknowingly of their prior life at the murderous hands of Josef Stalin. An important book for the reasonably well-informed reader interested in the manifestation of man's nature unbridled by the checks and balances of other men. A powerful first-hand account of an apparatchik who survived the multiple Stalinist purges of the Communist party and Soviet leadership replete with echoes of words from the contemporary leftist political ranks uttered unknowingly of their prior life at the murderous hands of Josef Stalin. An important book for the reasonably well-informed reader interested in the manifestation of man's nature unbridled by the checks and balances of other men.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jerianna

    This is a life-changer. It is well-written and compelling and made me really think about things that I take for granted. It also made me worry for our country, and the freedoms that we throw away for "Our Piece of the Pie". It is so hard to regain freedoms once lost. I got frustrated by the author's choices sometimes, but can't judge--I've always enjoyed freedom, safety, and plenty. This is a life-changer. It is well-written and compelling and made me really think about things that I take for granted. It also made me worry for our country, and the freedoms that we throw away for "Our Piece of the Pie". It is so hard to regain freedoms once lost. I got frustrated by the author's choices sometimes, but can't judge--I've always enjoyed freedom, safety, and plenty.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie Mcsweeney

    Most eye opening part of this read was the way he describes how huge European and US misconceptions about life within the USSR were. Also a great description of how the slow realisation of Kravchenko about the true nature of Stalin's regime. Oh and where were all the female comrades in the top echelons...? Most eye opening part of this read was the way he describes how huge European and US misconceptions about life within the USSR were. Also a great description of how the slow realisation of Kravchenko about the true nature of Stalin's regime. Oh and where were all the female comrades in the top echelons...?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jan Mech

    Skvělé čtení, ...když chtěj vědět, jací jsou komunisti.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Abeer Galal

    آثرت الحرية ،، كتاب تتوارثه الأجيال ،، تمت قرائته مرتين وفى كل مرة كان هناك أبعاد اخرى تكونت لدى

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    Another eye-opening account of life in the USSR under Stalin

  22. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    A scary little book about being a Russian throughout the communist regime.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kitty Red-Eye

    http://spartacus-educational.com/RUSk... http://spartacus-educational.com/RUSk...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sylvain Munger

    I was not expecting much from this book but it blew me away. The translation is very good such that it almost reads like a novel. A shocking look behind the curtain during the Stalin era.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  26. 4 out of 5

    Namik Gurbanzade

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julia Bilous

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mykhailo Malchenko

  30. 4 out of 5

    Olga Pogynaiko

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