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The Spider-Slayer is scheduled for execution and Mayor J. Jonah Jameson is leaving nothing to chance. To ensure that everything goes according to plan, Jameson's called in the one man he can trust to oversee everything - the Superior Spider-Man. COLLECTING: Superior Spider-Man 11-15 The Spider-Slayer is scheduled for execution and Mayor J. Jonah Jameson is leaving nothing to chance. To ensure that everything goes according to plan, Jameson's called in the one man he can trust to oversee everything - the Superior Spider-Man. COLLECTING: Superior Spider-Man 11-15


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The Spider-Slayer is scheduled for execution and Mayor J. Jonah Jameson is leaving nothing to chance. To ensure that everything goes according to plan, Jameson's called in the one man he can trust to oversee everything - the Superior Spider-Man. COLLECTING: Superior Spider-Man 11-15 The Spider-Slayer is scheduled for execution and Mayor J. Jonah Jameson is leaving nothing to chance. To ensure that everything goes according to plan, Jameson's called in the one man he can trust to oversee everything - the Superior Spider-Man. COLLECTING: Superior Spider-Man 11-15

30 review for The Superior Spider-Man, Vol. 3: No Escape

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Superior reading! This TPB edition collects issues #11-16 from the title of “Superior Spider-Man”. Creative Team: Writers: Dan Slott & Christos Gage Illustrators: Humberto Ramos & Giuseppe Camuncoli THIS IS A JOB FOR... A VILLAIN Please. A lifelong criminal, a murderer, doesn’t suddenly become a different-- --different… I can understand that many hardcore fans of Spidey weren’t thrilled about this run, my brother is one of them and he wasn’t thrilled that I wanted to buy this run and that I Superior reading! This TPB edition collects issues #11-16 from the title of “Superior Spider-Man”. Creative Team: Writers: Dan Slott & Christos Gage Illustrators: Humberto Ramos & Giuseppe Camuncoli THIS IS A JOB FOR... A VILLAIN Please. A lifelong criminal, a murderer, doesn’t suddenly become a different-- --different… I can understand that many hardcore fans of Spidey weren’t thrilled about this run, my brother is one of them and he wasn’t thrilled that I wanted to buy this run and that I am actually enjoying it. I am a Spidey’s fan, maybe he is not in my number one spot, but definitely I am fan of Spider-Man and trust me, I think that Peter Parker is the one to be Spider-Man. However, it was pretty obvious that this deal that Doctor Octopus taking the mind and body of Peter Parker and becoming the Superior Spider-Man would be a momentary thing. In comic books not even death is something final, so why would be a simple interchanging of minds? Sure, now that we are able to know how long was, it was pretty long, a little more of two years, so I think that reading it as a chance to read a Spider-Man’s run BUT without Parker leading the title is quite interesting and amusing. I read Batman & Robin’s run where Batman’s mantle was in Dick Grayson’s control with Damian Wayne as his Robin and I can tell you that it was a really good reading, and that doesn’t mean that I agree that Batman is Bruce Wayne. But a change in the status quo of a super-hero comic book title is always welcoming, I think. At least I enjoyed it. And I can tell you that while I still need to read three more volumes, so far, this Superior Spider-Man run has been indeed quite superior than the stuff done in Batman & Robin. Taking more risks, far more creative and definitely with a clear and open intention of doing that not only would radically change the status quo of Spider-Man’s character but also leaving an indelible mark on it that even when the expected “return” of Peter Parker to the title will make impossible that things would remain the same as before. In simple words, doing what any comic book creative team should do when they take control of any comic book title. LIFE VS RESPONSIBILITY As Doctor Octopus, my identity wasn’t so bifurcated. Octavius and Octopus were one and the same. Perhaps it’s “Peter Parker” that’s holding me back. If I cast that part of my new life aside... ...gave myself fully to the “Spider”... ...I could do greater things for this world. And would anything of value truly be lost? I guess that it was common thinking by many fans and readers that with Otto Octavius in the head of Peter Parker’s body, it meant that Spider-Man would become a real menace as Daily Bugle keeps publishing on its titles. I suppose that nobody was expecting that Octavius would keep Spider-Man’s responsibility and using his powers to protect the innocent, to serve the community and to punish the guilty. And certainly it was a surprise that he’d become... ...a SUPERIOR hero in every way! Even Peter Parker’s regular life has been rewarded having Otto on the mind’s helm, since he “returned” to college to get a doctorate title for Parker, something that the real Peter Parker never did. Certainly there is a matter of ego involved since Otto isn’t just some villain that thought that adding “Doctor” to his battle name sounded cool. Octavius is really a doctor with an university title. So, if he is now living Parker’s life, the least that he have to do is to get “again” his dang doctorate title! Spider-Man’s job is superior as never Parker was able to do it. Sure, lacking money was an issue to ponder in his limited possibilities, but nevertheless, Otto is without a question, not only doing a better performance was Spider-Man on its reach but also thinking with more logic of how to engage each situation. A fire? Call the Fire Department. A petty theft? Call NYPD. A car crash? Call paramedics… and Auto-Club. He isn’t God, he can’t be everywhere. So, it’s quite logical and smart to prioritize his time. Spider-Man’s power is a responsibility, yes, but a responsibility to be where he can do the most of good and where he is really needed and nobody else would be able to do what he can do. Oh, and he is also smart enough to call for Police back-up when he knows that he will engage against a dangerous villain who can put bystanders’ lives in peril. Readers always love that romantic picture of the lonely hero against the world, but why the hero can’t call for support? Personal patrols around the city? Pfft! Otto has robotic spiders doing the work to watch over New York and the very robots take the decision if the emergency is something that it can redirected to the proper public department or if definitely it’s something that requires Spider-Man’s presence. And if small mobile spider-like robots aren’t enough, just add living paid minions with military training and big armored suits to the system and New York is quite safe with the minimum of effort. And of course, any superior hero needs superior headquarters! Yes! Spider-Man has his own headquarters! Those days being in a humble apartment hearing a simple Police-frequency radio are over! Now, Spidey is watching over New York from his own island and with the latest of computer systems. Finally, Otto isn’t just crying “Banzai!” each time that a villain shows up without a clue of how beating him/her, just giving random punches and trusting the “hero’s luck” would do its magic. No, Otto has plans, back-up plans and redundant plans. Yep, a villain mastermind doing a hero’s job. Works for me! Obviously, when another villain mastermind (and clearly the only one who can claim to be above of Doctor Octopus’ level) is around and smart enough to keep a low profile. Otto should be making more plans, or at least not blindly trusting so much in his established structure, but hey! Not all can be so easy for the “hero” or the reading wouldn’t be so amusing and interesting! ...Nothing says “Goblin” like a dead blonde!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Lots of stuff happening in this volume, and all of it was good. Warning: Spoilersish Stuff. It's fun to expect the unexpected from this title. The bad guys are still playing by Parker's rules, which includes taking hostages and thinking that Spidey will dart to their rescue. Thus enabling their escape. Of course, since it's Otto in there? Not so much. Random Villain: You'll never be able to save the civilians & catch me! Superior Spider-Man: I'm sure the civilians will be fine. *evil grin* Random Vil Lots of stuff happening in this volume, and all of it was good. Warning: Spoilersish Stuff. It's fun to expect the unexpected from this title. The bad guys are still playing by Parker's rules, which includes taking hostages and thinking that Spidey will dart to their rescue. Thus enabling their escape. Of course, since it's Otto in there? Not so much. Random Villain: You'll never be able to save the civilians & catch me! Superior Spider-Man: I'm sure the civilians will be fine. *evil grin* Random Villain: Butbutbutbut... Then there's the part where he blackmails Jameson. Talk about poetic justice! You know how Daredevil was having all that trouble with Kingpin & Shadowland? Well, I don't. I mean, it's on my To-Read list, but...*cough* Anyway, Otto pretty much swooped in leveled that shit. There's another side story with the Hobgoblin that's fantastic all by itself. Otto 'outs' Phil Urich on television, and starts a civilian manhunt that leads to his capture. Brilliant! Come on, Peter! Why didn't you do this stuff! All of this leads up to a cliffhanger of an ending, that shows the Green Goblin planning a massive takeover. *rubs hands together with glee* Of course, as much as I enjoy the action and humor, Anna is the heart of this whole Superior comic book. I just love her! Oh, Doc Ock! You've come such a long way, baby!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    It’s always interesting to see how genres adapt themselves to historical developments. In times of extreme global and environmental exploitation and of heightened, increasingly undemocratic mass surveillance, the superhero genre arguably faces a problem: By definition, the superhero genre celebrates, rather than critiques, undemocratic, super-powered forms of social control. How can we cheer for characters that represent excessive social control if what we and the planet really need is fundament It’s always interesting to see how genres adapt themselves to historical developments. In times of extreme global and environmental exploitation and of heightened, increasingly undemocratic mass surveillance, the superhero genre arguably faces a problem: By definition, the superhero genre celebrates, rather than critiques, undemocratic, super-powered forms of social control. How can we cheer for characters that represent excessive social control if what we and the planet really need is fundamental change? As it turns out, the two superhero titles I am currently reading, Marvel’s Superior Spider-Man and DC’s Injustice: Gods Among Us, both struggle with this very issue – and come up with different solutions. In DC’s Injustice, a group of long-established heroes, shaken by outrageous acts of super-villainous terrorism, take their superhero game to the next, openly totalitarian level. Their behavior is generally portrayed as selfless and well-intentioned yet ultimately misguided (once things start looking like a movie about the Soviet Union directed by Michael Bay they must be un-American, right?), and so it is opposed by the remaining heroes who feel that the “good old” undemocratic ways of super-powered surveillance should not be taken to the extreme. In Marvel’s Superior Spider-Man, by contrast, it’s not the superheroes who try to raise the level of social control to “superior” levels, but super-villain Doc Ock – motivated by Spidey’s heroic sense of responsibility (that comes with Peter Parker's body), yes, but also and increasingly by his own villainous egomania. In other words, there is a dose of actual villainy in Marvel’s interpretation of America’s ongoing slide towards totalitarianism, which to me makes it the “superior” interpretation This third volume has the Superior Spider-Man applying more and more excessive force, brutalizing villains and reducing the Kingpin’s Shadowland to rubble. He gets away with it because he by now has Mayor Jameson under his webbed thumb: “You’re going to fill out your forms and make whatever calls you have to. And ensure that this surgical strike has the full backing of the mayor’s office. Is that understood?” Peter Parker’s motto “With great power comes great responsibility” has been super-sized accordingly: “Might makes right!” And yet, where there is power, there is resistance…

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Dr. Octopus/Superior Spider-Man is still working out the kinks to this whole super-hero thing. 1) Don’t bust-up (too badly) or maim villains. 2) Do suck up to and then use (view spoiler)[ and eventually blackmail (hide spoiler)] Mayor Jamison. 3) Do improve upon Peter Parker’s Spider-Man original design. 4) Do form your own army of Spider underlings and crush Shadowland. 5) Don’t mouth off to the Avengers, especially Thor. If you do, don't get hit in the face. 6) Don’t leave a paper trail of your huge Dr. Octopus/Superior Spider-Man is still working out the kinks to this whole super-hero thing. 1) Don’t bust-up (too badly) or maim villains. 2) Do suck up to and then use (view spoiler)[ and eventually blackmail (hide spoiler)] Mayor Jamison. 3) Do improve upon Peter Parker’s Spider-Man original design. 4) Do form your own army of Spider underlings and crush Shadowland. 5) Don’t mouth off to the Avengers, especially Thor. If you do, don't get hit in the face. 6) Don’t leave a paper trail of your huge expenses (Big giant spider-tanks, a million spider bots, etc.). It might come back to bite you in your Spider-Ass. 7) Don’t forget your alter-ego, Peter Parker. It was bad form to miss Aunt May’s 117th birthday party. 8) Do erase all vestiges of the real Peter Parker from your mind. 9) Don’t kill

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The third volume in the utterly brilliant Superior Spider-man is yet another winner from Dan Slott and his cadre of super-talented artist collaborators. Comprising two 3-issue arcs, both storylines are amazing in different ways but share an originality and freshness that permeates this series. In the first story arc, Spider Slayer is to be the last prisoner in The Raft, the island prison off of Manhattan, to be executed by the state. His crime: murdering J. Jonah Jameson’s wife. Jameson asks Spi The third volume in the utterly brilliant Superior Spider-man is yet another winner from Dan Slott and his cadre of super-talented artist collaborators. Comprising two 3-issue arcs, both storylines are amazing in different ways but share an originality and freshness that permeates this series. In the first story arc, Spider Slayer is to be the last prisoner in The Raft, the island prison off of Manhattan, to be executed by the state. His crime: murdering J. Jonah Jameson’s wife. Jameson asks Spider-Man to join him on the day of execution to ensure the death penalty is carried out and, of course, things don’t go the way he planned. As well as Spider Slayer, fellow prisoners Boomerang, the Vulture, and Scorpion also run riot, enhanced by Slayer’s mini-robots. There are so many details about this story that I loved, but, importantly, I really enjoyed the story itself. Spider-Man anticipating Slayer’s escape and his spider-bots going toe-to-toe against Slayer’s spider-bots was really fun, and seeing Jameson get in on the action himself was great – and he holds his own too! I won’t say how it plays out but it is handled superbly with Slayer thinking he has the upper hand because he knows what Spider-Man would do - except this is Otto the Superior Spider-Man and he’s constantly surprised by new Spidey’s choices, as are we as readers. The Raft was meant to close but because of something Jameson says to Spider-Man during the escape attempt, Spider-Man’s able to take The Raft as his own private lair. It’s brilliant how Otto has adapted to the role of superhero but still has the mentality of a supervillain, getting a lair, building his robots, even acquiring henchmen (called “Spiderlings”!). It’s both really funny and says a lot about the character, distinguishing Otto once more from Peter’s Spider-Man. The second story arc deals with Kingpin’s Shadowland headquarters, a crime nexus in the heart of New York. Shadowland was a series Marvel did a few years ago which I admit I didn’t read but, having read some reviews of the series, don’t feel I missed much. This much I know: it looks like an Eastern fortress and it’s making the residents living around it miserable. Why the Avengers don’t stomp it to pieces, I don’t know, but Spider-Man decides to do just that and, armed with his giant robot spider and army of Spiderlings, smashes Shadowland, putting Kingpin on the run – incredibly all in one issue! This is why I like Superior Spider-Man than just regular Peter Parker Spider-Man – Peter would never do anything like this, despite knowing Shadowland exists. He just doesn’t have the wherewithal to do something of this scale, the planning, the imagination, the firepower, the balls - but Otto does and pulls it off admirably. Otto is proactive compared to Peter who was only ever reactive. Otto’s also got no boundaries, is unafraid of taking huge risks, and his boundless ambition and confidence creates enormously exciting stories within a short amount of space, all to the good. He’s redefining Spider-Man as a superhero and crime-fighter. The other issues in the story arc feature Phil Urich, aka Hobgoblin, whose tenure as Kingpin’s henchman is up once Spider-Man appears to tear down Shadowland, so has to find other financial sources. Luckily for him the Goblin King has hacked Spider-Man’s spider-bots so that anyone resembling a goblin is undetected, allowing Phil to get away with his crimes much to Spider-Man’s frustration. Without going too deeply into the plot, there is one moment that stands out as remarkable and that’s Spider-Man’s outing of Phil Urich as Hobgoblin on every screen in New York! He does this primarily to get the people of the city to help him prevent further crime sprees but it’s doubly surprising in that he chose to reveal Phil as Hobgoblin so publicly – again, Otto is one unpredictable superhero and one determined to use all of the resources he has at his disposal. It feels like all of this is enough for one book, right? Well, I haven’t even mentioned the other storylines Slott is juggling like Otto getting his PhD from former classmate Professor Lamaze, whom he despises, or his burgeoning relationship with Anna Maria, or how Carlie Cooper is closing in on discovering “Peter’s” secret identity. And I still haven’t mentioned the other big moments in this book like a character death and the emergence of a powerful new enemy! It’s insane how much Slott is putting into this story, it is absolutely bursting with creativity in one of the most engaging stories I’ve ever read from Marvel, let alone starring Spider-Man. Slott is a genius and Superior Spider-Man, I have to say once more, is a masterfully written book by one of the greatest talents Marvel has. Slott’s bringing his A-game to every issue and it really shows. I think I could write a dissertation on Superior Spider-Man if I wanted, it’s so richly textured and layered – but I’ll leave it with this review and simply say I loved this third book like I loved the last two and can’t wait to read the next one. I don’t know who can read this and think otherwise, but there is only one verdict for Superior Spider-Man: it rules. Treat yourself to this incredible story and read it today!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    11 - Spidey goes out to the raft to watch the execution of the Spider-Slayer. Things don't go as planned. I'm still really digging watching Otto walking around in Peter's body, both with the Spidey-costume and without. I'm also quite pleased that Dan Slott keeps surprising me with the writing. He's damn good. 12 - The raft is in chaos as Spidey takes on the Spider-Slayer, Boomerang, The Vulture, and The Scorpion! The best part of this issue was when the Spider-Slayer tells Spidey to quit orating 11 - Spidey goes out to the raft to watch the execution of the Spider-Slayer. Things don't go as planned. I'm still really digging watching Otto walking around in Peter's body, both with the Spidey-costume and without. I'm also quite pleased that Dan Slott keeps surprising me with the writing. He's damn good. 12 - The raft is in chaos as Spidey takes on the Spider-Slayer, Boomerang, The Vulture, and The Scorpion! The best part of this issue was when the Spider-Slayer tells Spidey to quit orating like a Bond villain. Things go from bad to worse when the Slayer upgrades Boomerang, The Vulture, and The Scorpion and opens the Lizard's cell. I'm pretty excited to see where this goes. 13 - The final showdown between Spidey and the Spider-Slayer and his minions. Yeah, Brutality and taking the long view of things are becoming the hallmarks of the Superior Spider-Man. I knew he'd settle the Spider-Slayer's hash but that was pretty harsh. I loved the ending of this one with Spidey taking The Raft as his new headquarters. 14 - Spider-Man and the Spiderlings take out Shadowland. Meanwhile, things are brewing with the Goblin underground and the Green Goblin has proclaimed himself the new Kingpin of Crime! I thought it was pretty cool that the Superior one has gathered an army of minions and I love how things are escalating toward a showdown between the Spider and the Goblin. Why don't more super heroes have underlings? 15 & 16- The Hobgoblin escaped the destruction of Shadowland and Spidey wants him bad! Spidey uses his Big Brother-ish ways to find Phil Urich and exposes him as the Hobgoblin! Too bad the police are just as inept as ever and a new chapter of Phil Urich's life begins. Closing Thoughts: Dan Slott hit this one out of the park but I sense even bigger things to come. I don't know if he intended it when starting the Superior Spider-man but Slott seems to be exploring what makes a hero a hero and exactly where the line between super hero and super gestapo is. He also uses Otto to point out some of the inherent absurdity in the whole super hero concept. Anyway, I'm giving this one 4 out of 5 stars. I'm in it for the long haul.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    The Spider-Slayer is locked up in an island prison off the coast of New York City awaiting execution for a brutal murder. Despite overwhelming danger, Mayor J. Jonah Jameson insists on being present. I’d like to say everything goes smoothly, but there wouldn’t be much of a story then would there? Just before he’s set to meet his maker, The Slayer unleashes his plan for escape as several of Spidey’s foes are being given free reign over the prison. Can the Superior Spider-Man keep the civilians saf The Spider-Slayer is locked up in an island prison off the coast of New York City awaiting execution for a brutal murder. Despite overwhelming danger, Mayor J. Jonah Jameson insists on being present. I’d like to say everything goes smoothly, but there wouldn’t be much of a story then would there? Just before he’s set to meet his maker, The Slayer unleashes his plan for escape as several of Spidey’s foes are being given free reign over the prison. Can the Superior Spider-Man keep the civilians safe, take down his foes and re-capture the Spider Slayer? I grabbed this one from the local library thinking that I had already read volume two. It wasn’t until I was about a quarter of the way in that I realized I couldn’t remember anything from the prior instalment. Turns out I didn’t read it after all. However, as Stan Lee famously said, “every comic book is someone’s first”, I wasn’t lost for long as series writer Dan Slott – in sticking with Lee’s credo – did a great job bringing me up to speed. This series continues to impress me. You would think the idea of doing a “body-switching storyline” would come off as desperate, but Slott has managed to breathe new life into the wall-crawler. Spider-Man has always been known as a trash-talking comedian, but with Otto Octavius’ straight man routine applied to the web-slinger, it works just as well, if not better. Now, to go back and get volume two.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Given that I haven't exactly been keeping up to date on Spider-Man before the Superior storyline started, it isn't surprising that this collection didn't feel quite as vibrant to me. A lot of it has the feel of cleaning up after loose ends left over from years past. Returning to Spider-Slayer, for example, or Kingpin's Shadowland. That's not to say that I didn't like this collection, because I absolutely did. But somebody who just started actively keeping track of Spider-Man because of the new d Given that I haven't exactly been keeping up to date on Spider-Man before the Superior storyline started, it isn't surprising that this collection didn't feel quite as vibrant to me. A lot of it has the feel of cleaning up after loose ends left over from years past. Returning to Spider-Slayer, for example, or Kingpin's Shadowland. That's not to say that I didn't like this collection, because I absolutely did. But somebody who just started actively keeping track of Spider-Man because of the new direction (like me) won't be as invested in some of these developments as a long-time reader. But while the specific characters brought into the story here weren't as absorbing to me, I did like the direction that it seems to be taking Otto's Spider-Man. He's always been more proactive, more ruthless, but this is taking things to a whole new level. Like building a giant mech to help him preemptively take out Shadowland. Or planning for virtually every possibility when trying to prevent Spider-Slayer from escaping the Raft. It's also interesting to see him start to lapse into his super villain roll. He has a lair, costumed henchmen, and a tendency to monologue. Lair aside, kind of unusual traits to see in a hero. And yet, he still seems like he's trying, in his own way, to fight what he perceives as the good fight. That's one of the things that makes the book interesting.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    There some serious shit afoot here in the land of the Superior. Otto-cum-Spidey (hey, wouldn't you use that phrasing too?) gets invited out to witness-cum-stand-guard (OK, I'll allow it) while the state offs Spider-Slayer. (Why this dude gets the death sentence and not the hundreds of other mass-murderers I all of comicdom, I don't understand - but he's an asshat with a really unnecessarily pointy face mask so let's get him!) Then of course something goes awry, as it always does in Spidey land, a There some serious shit afoot here in the land of the Superior. Otto-cum-Spidey (hey, wouldn't you use that phrasing too?) gets invited out to witness-cum-stand-guard (OK, I'll allow it) while the state offs Spider-Slayer. (Why this dude gets the death sentence and not the hundreds of other mass-murderers I all of comicdom, I don't understand - but he's an asshat with a really unnecessarily pointy face mask so let's get him!) Then of course something goes awry, as it always does in Spidey land, and everyone has to survive the chaos. Otto gets amazing with his planning, Jameson goes off the reservation and goes Schwarzenegger on some villains, and the villains do some fun stuff while they're on a rampage. Otto is a little...driven, yes? He gets an idea in his head (murder, for a hypothetical) and he kinda doesn't stop for any sightseeing or side-missions. It's a little disconcerting, because if he keeps playing asshole with Spidey's life, how much if a shambles will it be in by the time Parker regains control? I means, I know that the deal with Spidey is his life has to be shit for him to properly wallow in his own shame, guilt and challenges. And giving him a great life with lots of perks can only last so long before we don't get to see him punched in the face a few times a year. So the deal with Otto is he's going to wreck havoc with all the good stuff Spidey's been able to pull off lately, and leave his life worse than he found it. But c'mon - please don't completely shamble up Parker's gig - leave him something to cling to while his job, love life and reputation go to the stinky, sticky bottom of the outhouse-cum-shithole. Meanwhile, the fun of unrestrained Otto rampage just keeps on growing. Facing down Fisk, tangling with Hobgoblin, linking up with Jameson in an icky way, and even going pretty over the top with the resources he's using to clean up the city. Where does it go next? How can Slott top this as we go further? I'll never tire of hearing Otto berate his lessers. I'll also never tire of Ramos drawing Spidey adventures, and Camuncoli's no slouch either. Fun, big exaggerated shapes and really clean, evocative framing. I gotta agree with Sam Quixote's review - there's so much meaty distance and originality in these stories that it's hard to focus on any one aspect of them without short-shrifting everything else. It's like Halloween night when there's too much damned candy to choose from.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    With Peter Parker's presence gone, Doctor Octopus is truly protecting the city as only a supervillain would...with blackmail, brutality, murder, and an army of henchmen. I don't want to say The Superior Spider-Man series is bad because it's not, but Doc Ock as Spider-Man is insufferable. I find him incredibly pompous and obnoxious. Reading about his exploits isn't fun for me. He's doing good, but the way he's doing it is so bad that even Wolverine was concerned in the last volume. Bottom line, I j With Peter Parker's presence gone, Doctor Octopus is truly protecting the city as only a supervillain would...with blackmail, brutality, murder, and an army of henchmen. I don't want to say The Superior Spider-Man series is bad because it's not, but Doc Ock as Spider-Man is insufferable. I find him incredibly pompous and obnoxious. Reading about his exploits isn't fun for me. He's doing good, but the way he's doing it is so bad that even Wolverine was concerned in the last volume. Bottom line, I just don't like The Superior Spider-Man. I think I'll be skipping ahead to the next Spider-Man series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    Much more action packed than the last volume. The Superior Spider-Man decides to combine the job of a hero with the tactics of a villain. Henchmen, giant robots, and maniacal laughs abound.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Otto Octavius is a truly fascinating character and the highlight of Superior Spider-Man's third volume, No Escape. The Spider-Slayer is set for execution and Mayor Jameson wants Spider-Man to ensure he meets his demise. Then, tired of the Kingpin hiding in plain sight, Otto launches a full scale attack on his Shadowland fortress. Dan Slott (with a brief assist from Christos Gage) makes this series feel like an addictive TV show where I can't wait to see the next episode. Who'd have thought that Otto Octavius is a truly fascinating character and the highlight of Superior Spider-Man's third volume, No Escape. The Spider-Slayer is set for execution and Mayor Jameson wants Spider-Man to ensure he meets his demise. Then, tired of the Kingpin hiding in plain sight, Otto launches a full scale attack on his Shadowland fortress. Dan Slott (with a brief assist from Christos Gage) makes this series feel like an addictive TV show where I can't wait to see the next episode. Who'd have thought that this concept would have so much depth and be so damn entertaining? The only real setback with this volume was the inclusion of several old faces, who were unfamiliar to me as a new reader. Occasionally, I struggled to keep up with who they were, their history and what they can do. Given how well Slott previously introduced the likes of Massacre and Cardiac, this unexpectedly threw me off at times. Otto himself earns the book it's four stars, though. His journey is becoming more and more intriguing and the effect he's having on the city is as fascinating to watch as he is. His determination to be the best he can be may well prove to be his undoing in time, not least as he remains unaware of those working to oppose him. As for the art, inker Terry Pallot joins Camuncoli and Dell for the first three issues, contributing to the best looking half of the book. Ramos and Olazaba do a good job with the second, although Spidey is drawn in some weirdly contorted poses. Their backgrounds are detailed, characters expressive and they easily handle crowded scenes in the final issues, so it's a bit jarring to see Spidey drawn at awkward angles and inked too heavily while in action. No Escape may not reach the highs of its predecessors, but a slightly flawed Superior Spider-Man is still damn good Superior Spider-Man. Now, where's my copy of Volume Four?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Finally seeing Doc Ock Spidey without the little Peter Parker on his shoulder. Good volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aldo Haegemans

    Just this book would be one hell of a movie!

  15. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Been awhile since I read volume 2 but this picks up pretty much right where the last left off. Spider-Slayer is about to be executed and J. Jonah ask Spider-man to be there. Of course with Doctor Octopus at the helm of Spider-man's body he says yes but with other reasons of why he's doing it. So when he goes to the prison you just KNOW something is going to go wrong. But what works is how lethal and fucked up Superior Spider-man is, always thinking ahead of the villains because, well, he was one Been awhile since I read volume 2 but this picks up pretty much right where the last left off. Spider-Slayer is about to be executed and J. Jonah ask Spider-man to be there. Of course with Doctor Octopus at the helm of Spider-man's body he says yes but with other reasons of why he's doing it. So when he goes to the prison you just KNOW something is going to go wrong. But what works is how lethal and fucked up Superior Spider-man is, always thinking ahead of the villains because, well, he was one. The second half deals with Hobgoblin and Shadowland (Not sure if this was part of the event, I couldn't even remember that terrible Daredevil Event but I don't think so) anyway Kingpin takes control of a part of New York and says he's unstoppable. So Superior Spider-man plans to break through in a brutal way, which is wonderful. Then we deal with Otto using the civilians of New York to hunt down Hobgoblin. This Spider-man ain't playing. Overall, it's a lot of fun. Some of it drags a bit due to excessive dialogue but overall the plot is entertaining and this Superior Spider-man is much more brutal and keeps the series from getting boring. Also, the art is stellar. A 4 out of 5.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    I believe I may now refer to Dan Slott's run with Superior Spider-Man (not even including his ASM work) as Un-precedented. 3 superb volumes in a row, to START a new series. Unheard of. Bravo Sir. You'd think that Doc Ock as Spidey would be kind of a one-trick pony, that he'd just do evil stuff to ruin Peter's rep, but the way it's been written, Otto is a wholly different person as Spider-Man, and some might even say, a BETTER Spider-Man in many regards. There's just so much to digest in every issu I believe I may now refer to Dan Slott's run with Superior Spider-Man (not even including his ASM work) as Un-precedented. 3 superb volumes in a row, to START a new series. Unheard of. Bravo Sir. You'd think that Doc Ock as Spidey would be kind of a one-trick pony, that he'd just do evil stuff to ruin Peter's rep, but the way it's been written, Otto is a wholly different person as Spider-Man, and some might even say, a BETTER Spider-Man in many regards. There's just so much to digest in every issue, reading the TPB is 5-6 TIMES as much. I LOVE this. Usually books don't do enough, or do things that make no sense. Slott writes this like an actual person might think to do with the #1 Bad Guy as the Hero, with a new moral compass. No Escape takes the first 3 issues, and concerns JJJ and Spidey on the Raft to witness the execution of Alistair Smythe, the Spider Slayer (who killed JJJ's wife). The rest of the Raft has been fairly decommissioned, so not many others on it (other than 3 who Spidey beat the shit out of in Vol. 1 (Boomerang, Scorpion, Vulture) oh and 1 other...)...hmm what could possibly go wrong? Everything. Smythe has his little Slayer bots go haywire, and give power back to the 3 aforementioned, just as he avoids his execution, and tries to escape. He thinks he's outsmarted Spidey, since he's spent years planning this. However, he's planned for Peter Parker Spidey, not Otto Octavius Spidey. Doc Spidey is ready to counter-attack each move he makes, like a genius chess player running into another master. I love that Doc Spidey is just so much more proactive than reactive, which gives him the time to think before any actions, because you know with Peter, something would have gone wrong. JJJ makes it clear to Spidey in no uncertain terms that Smythe is not to leave the Raft alive...which will come back to bite him in the ass later on. However, it's not Spidey who saves JJJ from Scorpion's attack, but another Green reptilian...who's also had some recent mind transference. Very cool. Nice to see JJJ in action and behaving like a human, but also to see Otto get the drop on him, and take care of Smythe. As a result of this, Otto goes full Bond Villain, granted a floating island as his new "lab" (lair) and hiring henchmen and building gigantic robots with full autonomy from the Mayor of NYC (JJJ). Perhaps just to show off how ruthless and driven Doc Spidey is, Slott has him take out Shadowland (Kingpin's HQ in Hell's Kitchen) in LESS THAN 1 ISSUE! This leaves Kingpin's #2 (the new Hobgoblin - Phil Urich - Ben's Nephew and Bugle employee) without a job...it also puts him in the crosshairs of Spidey. Otto fully outs him as the Hobgoblin (he's renting the franchise from the original, and the original is making a ton of cash doing this...very odd but practical) on all the web, TV, etc. Then he arrives and throws him a solid beatdown. Near the end of the volume, Phil is broken out of police custody by another powerful figure, who is still absorbing all of the criminal enterprise of NYC that is left devoid of direction by Spidey's war on crime. He's laughing himself crazy (the villain) as he is just getting more and more powerful without having to lift a finger thanks to SPidey. (which is paradoxically beautiful, and I can't wait to see what it does to Otto, knowing that all his good intentioned work is actually having a reverse effect.) In the meanwhile, Otto finally gets Peter's PhD, he and Anna Maria get closer, and we find out who was behind all of Hobgoblin's tech (which sets up some of the storyline for the next volume). I loved this, not as much as the previous 2, but the creativity and ideas were just enough to give it 5 stars. Slott makes me think he's thought this out long and hard, and planned months ahead, whereas other writers seem like they haven't even thought things out to the end of the page. Otto is growing by leaps and bounds as the new Spidey, and he's becoming a heck of a lot more successful than one might have thought...however, it does feel like they're setting him up for a fall, but will we see if that's SPidey, or just Peter Parker who's luck never held up? Please read this whole series, start at issue #1 and go! Great work, way to infuse life and energy and excitement into a series!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Ok. Vol. 1 had me mildly convinced. Vol. 2 was way better but still not "wow" better, for some reason I can't pinpoint. But at last Vol. 3 does it. In two different storylines Otto agressively searches contact with the ennemy. Using the full scale of his brains he outsmarts and overpowers them brilliantly, using means Peter would have never dared use or even thought of. I've already said that Dan Slott is a reliable writer; I normally wouldn't qualify his plots as amazing but he rarely disappoint Ok. Vol. 1 had me mildly convinced. Vol. 2 was way better but still not "wow" better, for some reason I can't pinpoint. But at last Vol. 3 does it. In two different storylines Otto agressively searches contact with the ennemy. Using the full scale of his brains he outsmarts and overpowers them brilliantly, using means Peter would have never dared use or even thought of. I've already said that Dan Slott is a reliable writer; I normally wouldn't qualify his plots as amazing but he rarely disappoints and usually delivers good and strong stories. Here I do qualify his plot as amazing. The way he uses Octavius' genius mind to model a terribly- almost frighteningly- effective Spidey is as surprising as nearly mind-boggling: A fascinating comparison is developing between both incarnations of the web-crawler and it's not favorable to Pete in terms of pure efficiency. That's an intriguing and interesting change of view, darker and (way) more violent.  Aside from the main storylines something is brewing underground, promising some explosive confrontation in the near future. Dan Slott doesn't spare himself and reaches a huge creative peak with this series. Giuseppe Camuncoli and Humberto Ramos do 3 issues each. Very different styles indeed but both deliver good stuff. Camuncoli would be more naturally better suited to fit the mood of the book but Ramos' cartoony style is more restrained than usual and, surprinsigly, it works quite well.

  18. 4 out of 5

    RG

    This was great. A story about The Raft and one about the Hobgoblin. Its developing nicely.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    MILD SPOILERS FOLLOWED As light as his adventures can be, Spider-Man has always been defined by tragedy as his reason for being a superhero came out of his guilt over the death of Uncle Ben. Throughout his comics history, death has always cropped up in not only in Spidey's life, but the lives of those around him, not least from J. Jonah Jameson, whose wife was taken from him by Alistair Smythe, the Spider-Slayer. On the day of the Spider-Slayer's execution, Mayor Jameson is leaving nothing to chan MILD SPOILERS FOLLOWED As light as his adventures can be, Spider-Man has always been defined by tragedy as his reason for being a superhero came out of his guilt over the death of Uncle Ben. Throughout his comics history, death has always cropped up in not only in Spidey's life, but the lives of those around him, not least from J. Jonah Jameson, whose wife was taken from him by Alistair Smythe, the Spider-Slayer. On the day of the Spider-Slayer's execution, Mayor Jameson is leaving nothing to chance and appoints the Superior Spider-Man to help oversee the execution so that he would not escape from the Raft. Unfortunately, Smythe has other plans as he attempts to take the mayor and members of the press hostage in order to break free, so Otto has to take extreme measures to prevent so, under the authorisation of the mayor. During the "Big Time" storyline where the death of Marla Jameson took place, it was a turning point for Peter Parker who is determined that no one dies. With Otto takes over as Peter and eradicating the last memories of his former enemy's memories, this is a Spider-Man who doesn't mind the bloodshed and not hesitate to manipulate the system to achieve his goals, such as blackmailing the mayor so that Spidey has full control of the Raft as his own base of operations, where he develops arach-naught tanks and an army of Spiderling minions. As the series progresses, Dan Slott is expanding the technological advances for Spider-Man's crime-fighting efforts, taking the story and characters in different directions, such as the people who know who Spider-Man actually is (without the knowledge of Otto) are questioning the hero's methods, including actually controlling the entire city in order to catch a single criminal. As for Otto himself, who still struggles under the public persona as Peter Parker and starts to negate that identity and more in spider-mode. With this approach to characterisation, the Parker side of the story takes a bit of a backseat with many of the supporting characters don't have much of a voice, with the exception of JJJ. One can say that Slott is wrestling with too many characters in this volume, especially during the Hobgoblin subplot and much like that villain's confusing history, there are multiple players on the table. The amount of clutter is also evident in the artwork from both Guiseppe Camuncoli and Humberto Ramos, who at least off show off some impressive action sequences, whether Spider-Man taking some of his rogues gallery who have been enhanced by the Spider-Slayer, or the unlimited amount of Spider-Bots crawling around everywhere. A few missteps aside, Superior Spider-Man keeps getting bigger from not only the gadgets Otto has under his belt, but setting up a huge dastardly plan from arguably Spidey's greatest enemy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    This series continues to be fun and interesting. It's been so long since I've read any Spider-Man (not counting the early Essential books) because I was just not enjoying what they were doing with the character. However I find this storyline to be very exciting. It's great to see how they show the difference between the Doc Ock Spider-Man and the Peter Spider-Man. Doc is really coming at it like a Scientist. He keeps adding more and more gear to his arsenal. I know that Peter is back in the book This series continues to be fun and interesting. It's been so long since I've read any Spider-Man (not counting the early Essential books) because I was just not enjoying what they were doing with the character. However I find this storyline to be very exciting. It's great to see how they show the difference between the Doc Ock Spider-Man and the Peter Spider-Man. Doc is really coming at it like a Scientist. He keeps adding more and more gear to his arsenal. I know that Peter is back in the books now, but I really like Doc as Spider-Man. The growing story of the Goblin King is cool. I like when they have characters behind the scenes, pulling the strings. Goblin King is building up an army to take Spider-Man down. You have to give it up to a guy who isn't just going into things blind. He knows Spider-Man won't go down easy, so he's coming at in a smart way. I'm really excited to see this fight get started. The big problem with this book, and most of the current marvel collections, is the length. They keep putting out books that are just 4 or 5 issues. It doesn't matter what happens at the end, the book will end after that 5th issue. It's really annoying. I would rather wait for a few more months to get a bigger collection with a more complete story, then get this tiny 130 page books. I remember when trades collected a whole year worth of issues. I miss those days. I would say that this problem is more from my own personal wants, rather than a fault of the work itself, but I still think it's note worthy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    I feel like I'm reading the Punisher, and while I enjoy the Punisher, this actually isn't that book, despite appearances to the contrary. "Leave nothing standing! Leave no one alive!" ~ Spidey I get that it's Ock, but he's supposed to be smart, yes? Like ridiculously smart? How does he think bringing the feds or the avengers to his doorstep is a good long term strategy? Even Wolverine tends to be smart enough to murder people when the public isn't recording it all on their smartphones. I suppose I feel like I'm reading the Punisher, and while I enjoy the Punisher, this actually isn't that book, despite appearances to the contrary. "Leave nothing standing! Leave no one alive!" ~ Spidey I get that it's Ock, but he's supposed to be smart, yes? Like ridiculously smart? How does he think bringing the feds or the avengers to his doorstep is a good long term strategy? Even Wolverine tends to be smart enough to murder people when the public isn't recording it all on their smartphones. I suppose it is supposed to be his arrogance leading him on the path of stupidity? I know he doesn't honestly think the Mayor can protect him long term, right? Right?! Then for all the crap he gives Parker for living a poorly organized life, he doesn't even bother to be Parker for like four days. What? I mean, I was fine with it because I think watching him just be an arrogant ass is boring, but still. And really, it is none of the above that bothers me. It's that I expect no one to deal with his nonsense until Parker magically takes his body over, at which point he will be blamed (and praised, I suppose) for all of it. (I really hope I'm wrong about that.) Our options seem to be "Murderer Spidey" or "Ineffective Spidey". I really did really enjoy reading this though. I just kept expecting Thor or someone to come punch him in the face.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Des Fox

    Remember that time when Spider-Man extorted The Raft out of J.J.J., turning it into a new base of operations, then enlisted an army of mercenaries and mech suits to raid the criminal heart of New York, seemingly executing Kingpin in the process? Me tooooo. Just as I was afraid I was getting bored, Slott tosses that at me, and I remember why Superior is my all-time favorite Spidey-story. This is just brilliant comics, and I hope we find room for The Superior Spider-Man in the post Battleworld futu Remember that time when Spider-Man extorted The Raft out of J.J.J., turning it into a new base of operations, then enlisted an army of mercenaries and mech suits to raid the criminal heart of New York, seemingly executing Kingpin in the process? Me tooooo. Just as I was afraid I was getting bored, Slott tosses that at me, and I remember why Superior is my all-time favorite Spidey-story. This is just brilliant comics, and I hope we find room for The Superior Spider-Man in the post Battleworld future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Callie *Fights Censorship*

    This series is very well written. It is truly a genius concept but could have gone very wrong, I'm glad it didn't. Still this volume felt like an in between, a bridge. In the last volume the reader saw that Otto might make a good Spiderman on paper but in actuality is still an arrongant villain at heart, this volume shows more of the same. I can tell that pretty soon stuff is gonna go down big time, at least I hope so. Still not a huge fan of the art. This series is very well written. It is truly a genius concept but could have gone very wrong, I'm glad it didn't. Still this volume felt like an in between, a bridge. In the last volume the reader saw that Otto might make a good Spiderman on paper but in actuality is still an arrongant villain at heart, this volume shows more of the same. I can tell that pretty soon stuff is gonna go down big time, at least I hope so. Still not a huge fan of the art.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lono

    See my review here, Superior Spider-Man Volume 2 See my review here, Superior Spider-Man Volume 2

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    Consistently good series so far!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill Buckley

    Part 3 in the series. Pretty good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    I read the comic books Superior Spider Man #11-15. 8 out of 12. Spider Slayer time! This book is so well balanced, when Parker was close to getting his body back, you were 100% sure he'd get it, but no? It's like a dream, or is that a nightmare? Amazing plotting. Superior is believable, he is acting true to form, being heroic in the most effective and scientific way he can. 8 out of 12. I read the comic books Superior Spider Man #11-15. 8 out of 12. Spider Slayer time! This book is so well balanced, when Parker was close to getting his body back, you were 100% sure he'd get it, but no? It's like a dream, or is that a nightmare? Amazing plotting. Superior is believable, he is acting true to form, being heroic in the most effective and scientific way he can. 8 out of 12.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julian

    Dan Slott continues to pull no punches as Otto steps up his plan to be the best Spider-man there ever was and what a great story Slott pulls together. Although made up of two distinct stories the cohesiveness of Slott's vision and clear purpose when putting it all together shines through and makes for a great reading experience. I've been reading through the BPRD series recently and so much of that book seems haphazard and random as it jumps around and abandons plot points only to pick them up 1 Dan Slott continues to pull no punches as Otto steps up his plan to be the best Spider-man there ever was and what a great story Slott pulls together. Although made up of two distinct stories the cohesiveness of Slott's vision and clear purpose when putting it all together shines through and makes for a great reading experience. I've been reading through the BPRD series recently and so much of that book seems haphazard and random as it jumps around and abandons plot points only to pick them up 10 volumes later when it doesn't really matter at all. In Superior Spider-man it's clear from the first issues that there was a grand plan for Otto and the momentum of the series has been building at a steady pace ever since the series began. I'm nervous about future volumes since I know the Spider-man movie came out and Peter had to be rushed back into the role (uuuggh) but I hope that Slott is able to continue this story and see it through to the end that he had initially envisioned – this story deserves it (as well as the fans of both Peter and Otto). I am continually amazed at how Slott is able to tie all of his spider-stories to contemporary issues while simultaneously examining the role of superheroes and supervillains. He spins together relevant questions about the use and misuse of contemporary technology, the dangers of essentializing specific truths (with a capital 'T'), the things we sacrifice to feel safe or help others feel safe, as well as presenting situations which get to the core of vigilantism and the desire for punishment and redemption in both a personal and societal sense. On a conceptual level I love this series but the writing itself is hit or miss and the art has gone downhill drastically. I don't know why the art has changed so much over three volumes but each of the artists ends up trying to imitate their predecessor which goes all the way back to Ryan Stegman's excellent work in the first volume. Ryan Stegman (issue 1) For a series that boomed in popularity and became one of the bestselling books on the stands I don't see why they didn't stick with a good thing when they had it. The work by Humberto Ramos in this volume is incredibly mediocre and adds nothing to the story or universe that Slott is trying to tell (in a few places the cartoonishness of his style takes away from the impact and tension contained in Slott's story). Humberto Ramos (issue 15) Stegman's work was dynamic and full of angular lines that, when converging in action sequences, coalesced to create a picture that always seemed to be in movement. Ramos' drawing lacks any sort of dynamism and his figures, when compared to Stegman, seem to be floating in the air frozen instead of fighting. Great artwork is able to support the story, drive it forward, or even create a narrative all its own that runs in parallel to the larger work (the individual comic or the larger series) whereas the most common kind of artwork takes no risks, reaps no rewards and is entirely redundant. This style of safe artwork is stuck in a rut, frozen and bland instead of dynamic and evolving. It attempts to illustrate the action instead of take on and drive forward unique elements of the narrative while developing a language of its own. Hopefully in the future the artwork rises to meet the quality of the storytelling.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael Emond

    I'll rate this one slightly lower than the first volumes. There is beginning to be a bit of diminishing returns on Doc Ock as a Superior Spider-man. First, Parker's last memories have been washed away so we don't get to have his conscious poking in to act as a counter point to what Doc Ock is doing with his body.Second - the main story is building towards a confrontation with Green Goblin and I guess that doesn't thrill me. The first half about the Raft and the Spider-Slayer was well done but it I'll rate this one slightly lower than the first volumes. There is beginning to be a bit of diminishing returns on Doc Ock as a Superior Spider-man. First, Parker's last memories have been washed away so we don't get to have his conscious poking in to act as a counter point to what Doc Ock is doing with his body.Second - the main story is building towards a confrontation with Green Goblin and I guess that doesn't thrill me. The first half about the Raft and the Spider-Slayer was well done but it does point out something that always irritates me - how the "well guarded Raft" is so vulnerable to super villain attacks. I know that is part of living in a super-hero world but gosh - seems like you need a more effective way of housing villains without putting civilian guards in harm's way all the time. Still a fun read but since Slott decided Doc Ock would ignore his personal life and focus on being a better Spider-man we are missing that aspect of the character and I think the book suffers for it. ANd there was a lack of humour in this volume. I am always praising Slott for injecting the fun with the drama but this volume he didn't balance the light with the dark as well as he normally does...and it looks like it is going to get worse.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    In this volume, Otto fully embraces the role of Superior Spider-Man, doing things his way, complete with a new costume and methodology from Peter. Reading between the lines, I'm guessing Slott wants the reader to either a) side with Otto enjoying how he plays at being a super-hero or b) begin to realize that his way doesn't work, that his original personality won't enable him to be a hero, and to see why Peter is better. I'm definitely in the second camp, and while I do enjoy the ways that Otto in In this volume, Otto fully embraces the role of Superior Spider-Man, doing things his way, complete with a new costume and methodology from Peter. Reading between the lines, I'm guessing Slott wants the reader to either a) side with Otto enjoying how he plays at being a super-hero or b) begin to realize that his way doesn't work, that his original personality won't enable him to be a hero, and to see why Peter is better. I'm definitely in the second camp, and while I do enjoy the ways that Otto insults people, I know he's not a hero and found myself quickly/already wanting Peter to return. You start to see Otto's castle crumble, but knowing there are 3 more volumes it may be awhile. One other note is that I am totally unaware of the current status quo for Peter's supporting cast, why certain villains are there/not there, changed, etc. For me I just had to go with it, for some, if you don't know the why's and who's it may be a little jarring trying to understand everyone's position and their relationship in Peter's life. Still interested to see how it pans out.

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