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Russian Folktales from the Collection of A. Afanasyev: A Dual-Language Book

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This original dual-language edition features new translations of stories selected from the authoritative three-volume collection by famed author Alexander Afanasyev, Popular Russian Tales. Afanasyev recorded hundreds of folktales, the first compilations of which were published between 1855 and 1867 and featured such characteristically Russian figures as Vasilisa, Baba Yaga This original dual-language edition features new translations of stories selected from the authoritative three-volume collection by famed author Alexander Afanasyev, Popular Russian Tales. Afanasyev recorded hundreds of folktales, the first compilations of which were published between 1855 and 1867 and featured such characteristically Russian figures as Vasilisa, Baba Yaga, Ivan Tsarevich, and the glorious Firebird. This edition's fables include The Little Hen; The Cockerel and the Hand-Mill; Baba Yaga; The Little White Duck; and Ivanko Medvedko. Suitable for high school and college intermediate-level Russian classes, these timeless tales will captivate readers of all ages. Left-hand pages feature the original Russian text; right-hand pages contain the new English translation by Sergey Levchin, who provides an informative Introduction.


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This original dual-language edition features new translations of stories selected from the authoritative three-volume collection by famed author Alexander Afanasyev, Popular Russian Tales. Afanasyev recorded hundreds of folktales, the first compilations of which were published between 1855 and 1867 and featured such characteristically Russian figures as Vasilisa, Baba Yaga This original dual-language edition features new translations of stories selected from the authoritative three-volume collection by famed author Alexander Afanasyev, Popular Russian Tales. Afanasyev recorded hundreds of folktales, the first compilations of which were published between 1855 and 1867 and featured such characteristically Russian figures as Vasilisa, Baba Yaga, Ivan Tsarevich, and the glorious Firebird. This edition's fables include The Little Hen; The Cockerel and the Hand-Mill; Baba Yaga; The Little White Duck; and Ivanko Medvedko. Suitable for high school and college intermediate-level Russian classes, these timeless tales will captivate readers of all ages. Left-hand pages feature the original Russian text; right-hand pages contain the new English translation by Sergey Levchin, who provides an informative Introduction.

30 review for Russian Folktales from the Collection of A. Afanasyev: A Dual-Language Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    oh carlyn what key

    seriously there is nothing more weird and bewildering and beautiful than russian fairy tales. first of all the titles are incredible. "if you don't like it, don't listen" is a classic example. the way they end is my favorite part. often the story is clipped short by: "i was there, i drank mead with the king and it got in my beard but did not spill into my mouth." or other such brilliance. and baba yaga and her chicken-leg hut? don't even get me started. seriously there is nothing more weird and bewildering and beautiful than russian fairy tales. first of all the titles are incredible. "if you don't like it, don't listen" is a classic example. the way they end is my favorite part. often the story is clipped short by: "i was there, i drank mead with the king and it got in my beard but did not spill into my mouth." or other such brilliance. and baba yaga and her chicken-leg hut? don't even get me started.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Serena W. Sorrell

    Hmm. Well. I liked half of the stories? But they got very samey after a while. And boy oh boy, are the names Ivan and Vasilisa ever popular. All the Baba Yagas and creepy wooden dolls were the best. Also that gray wolf was a chill guy~ and why aren't women freaking out about falcons flying into their rooms and turning into beautiful men, or is this just something that happens in Russia? Hmm. Well. I liked half of the stories? But they got very samey after a while. And boy oh boy, are the names Ivan and Vasilisa ever popular. All the Baba Yagas and creepy wooden dolls were the best. Also that gray wolf was a chill guy~ and why aren't women freaking out about falcons flying into their rooms and turning into beautiful men, or is this just something that happens in Russia?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    Here's a good list of things that will happen in a Russian fairy tale: - Ivan is an idiot and will probably end up dying because of it. If he doesn't die, his two older brothers will. - someone's limbs will be ripped off. probably multiple someones. - Baba Yaga loves to chase people and have them do chores for her and then let them go - there are multiple Baba Yagas - at the end of any given story the teller will remind you pointedly that he hasn't had anything to drink - the people who die are Here's a good list of things that will happen in a Russian fairy tale: - Ivan is an idiot and will probably end up dying because of it. If he doesn't die, his two older brothers will. - someone's limbs will be ripped off. probably multiple someones. - Baba Yaga loves to chase people and have them do chores for her and then let them go - there are multiple Baba Yagas - at the end of any given story the teller will remind you pointedly that he hasn't had anything to drink - the people who die are just like, welp! guess i'm dead! unless they're coming back to life and getting revenge. - random foreign princes will not be able to enter russia. instead of an explanation the story will just say "for some reason he could not enter russia" - ICONIC. - 80% of them are re-telling another story you already read but with an added twist; i.e., this time it's Baba Yaga as the antagonist instead of Kochchei the Deathless (or once, a vampire). - I would die for Kochchei the Deathless. Just out here trying to save these women from their terrible fiance/husbands and what does he get for it? His heart eaten. Absolutely NO gratitude.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mihai Zodian

    I felt like I was reading an illustration of Propp or another Russian formalist. Almost the perfect hero`s journey, with a fascination for the number three and Baba-Yaga. I felt like I was reading an illustration of Propp or another Russian formalist. Almost the perfect hero`s journey, with a fascination for the number three and Baba-Yaga.

  5. 4 out of 5

    rae

    i am a sucker for fairy tales in general, but this collection gives me insight into gogol's imaginative workings... absurdities, odd, cruel, dry humor... and excellent illustrations to boot... i am a sucker for fairy tales in general, but this collection gives me insight into gogol's imaginative workings... absurdities, odd, cruel, dry humor... and excellent illustrations to boot...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    The synopsis for this particular edition is, for some reason, in English instead of in Dutch - the reason I mention this is because the Dutch edition only includes 50 fairytales, and not the 200 promised in the English synopsis. Russia has always interested me greatly, but I personally haven't gotten around reading any of the great classics just yet. I grew up with Russian folk songs (especially when a certain Belgian guy by the name of Helmut Lotti decided to record them as well), my mom loves R The synopsis for this particular edition is, for some reason, in English instead of in Dutch - the reason I mention this is because the Dutch edition only includes 50 fairytales, and not the 200 promised in the English synopsis. Russia has always interested me greatly, but I personally haven't gotten around reading any of the great classics just yet. I grew up with Russian folk songs (especially when a certain Belgian guy by the name of Helmut Lotti decided to record them as well), my mom loves Russia and the Romanovs, so I must have gotten it from her. Still, I have zero reading experience when it comes to Russian works. I love fairytales, so when I saw a cheap copy of this particular book, I figured it was time to get some Russian-related reading done. Reading fairytales is always interesting, because as long as the fairytales are European (and maybe this is a global thing, but I've only read European fairytales so far) there are many parallels that can be drawn. Stories that have the same premise, or the same build-up. You find a couple of those stories in here, too. I'm not one to take notes while reading (that makes it look a bit too much like a homework assignment, something I actually try actively to avoid when reading for fun), so I can't tell you exactly which story shares what characteristic with a certain other famous fairytale, but I do remember very clearly that one story had the same opening as Beauty and the Beast (at least, the version the 1946 French and the 1978 Czech version are based on). The rest of the story differs slightly, but the parallels are there. That's just the one example however, there are many more! Another thing that's quite curious about these fairytales is the insane amount of repetition. Character names are repeated a lot (Wassilissa, Iwan [without luck], etc.). There seems to be a theme of Tsars marrying merchant's daughters, the Baba Jaga makes frequent appearances, there are many magical devices (e.g. a little doll) which can make or do anything in just one night, and it's constantly stressed that the morning is wiser than the evening. So yes, loads of repetition. But then I suppose that's a fairytale characteristic, though I never noticed it quite as clearly as I did now. Overall, quite an enjoyable read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This is a vast compendium of folk tales (no fairies, really, in Russian folklore)... but they seem often to be the same story with various character configurations, having a hard time 'feeling' the subject matter. Think this is going to be more of a reference book than a 'read'. Think I'd enjoy a more realized version of the stories--like in individual picture books. ************* As I go along, I find it's more engaging. I've found a better tempo, slower rather than faster. ************** Russian This is a vast compendium of folk tales (no fairies, really, in Russian folklore)... but they seem often to be the same story with various character configurations, having a hard time 'feeling' the subject matter. Think this is going to be more of a reference book than a 'read'. Think I'd enjoy a more realized version of the stories--like in individual picture books. ************* As I go along, I find it's more engaging. I've found a better tempo, slower rather than faster. ************** Russian folk tales are complex and their impact unfolds gradually--there's no way to summarize these stories, hardly a way to keep them separate in my head. I've tried to tell them to people in a sentence or two. Impossible. There's not only three princes, three suitors, the sorcerer figure, the lover-queen, princess, old people in the forest with an only daughter, woodcutters and firebirds and talking fish and magical horses, and all of the animals in the forest, each with their legendary personalities-- but one on top of the other--plus, of course, the terrible Baba Yaga in her hut on chicken legs. I WANT THIS IN AN ILLUSTRATED EDITION!!! I'll never be done with it, want to see all the operas and ballets based on these stories. What a treasure, such a different feel than Grimm. The 'morals' to the stories are very different, often the very opposite of the German. Fascinating on the narrative end, and as a look into the culture and mind-set of the preliterate, oral culture of Russia. Such cultures don't die when the more sophisticated, modern ones come in, they live one inside the other inside the other, like nesting dolls.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    man the Russians are depressing!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This is an illustrated collection of five Russian folk tales: Vasilisa the Beautiful, Maria Morevna, The Feather of Finist the Falcon, The Frog-Tsareva and Tsarevich Ivan, the Firebird and the Grey Wolf. The tales were collected by Alexander Afanasyev, who collected and published a large number of Russian folk tales in the 19th century. The illustrations are by Ivan Bilibin, who was a well known Russian illustrator and stage designer around 1900. I'm not entirely sure why this is listed as an al This is an illustrated collection of five Russian folk tales: Vasilisa the Beautiful, Maria Morevna, The Feather of Finist the Falcon, The Frog-Tsareva and Tsarevich Ivan, the Firebird and the Grey Wolf. The tales were collected by Alexander Afanasyev, who collected and published a large number of Russian folk tales in the 19th century. The illustrations are by Ivan Bilibin, who was a well known Russian illustrator and stage designer around 1900. I'm not entirely sure why this is listed as an alternate edition to the one that has many more tales in it but it's a good introduction to Russian fairy tales. The great strength of this collection is the illustrations. The stories are interesting but carry many of the same elements so that reading it in one sitting, you really notice the themes. It might have been better to have included some fairy tales that didn't feel quite so similar. However, the illustrations more than make up for it. There are several of Bilibin's prints throughout and each page has a lovely decorative border. I'd buy this just to keep on my shelf just for the love of the art. As someone who was completely unfamiliar with Russian fairy tales until reading the Winternight Trilogy by Katherine Arden, this was a good introduction to the subject and the art had me drooling.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lekeisha The Booknerd

    I could read a whole book of Baba Yaga tales, alone, so to get one with a few about the infamous witch; along with other familiars is a treat. Most of the stories are new to me. More than a handful are the ones that I've heard about before, but this book is more accurate than anything that have passed through my ears, I'm sure. The more a tale passes through someone's mouth, the more elaborate they become. This was a refreshing course on classic Russian fairy tales that anyone can appreciate. I I could read a whole book of Baba Yaga tales, alone, so to get one with a few about the infamous witch; along with other familiars is a treat. Most of the stories are new to me. More than a handful are the ones that I've heard about before, but this book is more accurate than anything that have passed through my ears, I'm sure. The more a tale passes through someone's mouth, the more elaborate they become. This was a refreshing course on classic Russian fairy tales that anyone can appreciate. I will be moving on to Native American tales next time, so hopefully it will be a faster read. Overall, this is a very good collection.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    This is a collection Russian Fairy Tales. There is love, death, and betrayal, as with all good tales. The narrative is detailed, vivid, often emotional, and evocative. Characters are sometimes emotional, caring, and humorous. Overall, a fun read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    A wonderfully illustrated introduction to Russian fairytales. I only wish there were more than five stories to devour!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Riddhiman

    This book is one volume of the collection by Afanasyev and contains 5 of Russian Folk/fairy tales narrated in a storytelling manner, i.e in a manner in which the stories used to be told orally, accompanies by nice illustrations. The premise of the stories is very similar to other famous European folk tales; I could see traces of Cinderella, The Frog Prince, Grimm's Fairy Tales etc. in them. But my greatest surprise was the story, 'The Feather of Finist The Falcon' in which I found a striking res This book is one volume of the collection by Afanasyev and contains 5 of Russian Folk/fairy tales narrated in a storytelling manner, i.e in a manner in which the stories used to be told orally, accompanies by nice illustrations. The premise of the stories is very similar to other famous European folk tales; I could see traces of Cinderella, The Frog Prince, Grimm's Fairy Tales etc. in them. But my greatest surprise was the story, 'The Feather of Finist The Falcon' in which I found a striking resemblance to an Indian fairy tale that I had read long back. This and the other tales hint that a multitude of such tales with a similar set of attributes and themes exist all over the world. There could be two theories regarding this: 1. The tales originated separately and the points of similarity are just coincidences. 2. The tales have a common origin and have been slightly altered and customized to suit the region as it spread to different parts of the world The 2nd explanation seems more plausible. This could be a fascinating subject of research for a PHD scholar pursuing comparative literature.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    This collection is a bit of a mixed bag. The illustrations alone - full page, full color - make this book worth owning (although I wish I'd gotten the hardcover) and it's fascinating to see the Russian versions of some classic folk tales. Plus there's an intriguing underlayer in some of the stories, where the women have full control over when and whom they choose to marry ("consent" is a sadly unusual word for fairy tales), and where a woman is the one to ride off to battle, leaving her husband This collection is a bit of a mixed bag. The illustrations alone - full page, full color - make this book worth owning (although I wish I'd gotten the hardcover) and it's fascinating to see the Russian versions of some classic folk tales. Plus there's an intriguing underlayer in some of the stories, where the women have full control over when and whom they choose to marry ("consent" is a sadly unusual word for fairy tales), and where a woman is the one to ride off to battle, leaving her husband behind to tend the castle. "Maria Morevna" is my favorite of the bunch, with clever narrative choices that made it a highly enjoyable read. Unfortunately, this all goes astray in the last two tales. In "The Frog-Tsarevna," the boy gets the fairy-girl by literally catching her about the throat, holding onto her as she transforms into various creatures, then breaking her in half. This is an explicit portrait of domination and ownership that isn't surprising in fairy tale traditions but was a disappointment after the female agency shown in the previous tales. The final tale, "Tsarevich Ivan, the Firebird, and the Grey Wolf," was a retelling of a story I've seen in a variety of forms. It was fairly dull, since Ivan did nothing of value to show his worth, and the wolf did all the work and received none of the glory. I did like the wolf, though. It's enough to make me consider yet another fairy tale retelling with the wolf in the hero's role.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ardyth

    Fun collection of five tales, gathered and translated by Afanasyev (whose work was further adapted by Lang for the colored Fairy Tale books) in the nineteenth century. These are readable adventures with a good mix of heroes and heroines, and a great rhythm. By the end, you recognize patterns in the Russian storytelling style: three times nine kingdoms, journeys are short in the telling but long in the doing, etc. You can find Afanasyev's full collection, and no doubt many of those stories are fu Fun collection of five tales, gathered and translated by Afanasyev (whose work was further adapted by Lang for the colored Fairy Tale books) in the nineteenth century. These are readable adventures with a good mix of heroes and heroines, and a great rhythm. By the end, you recognize patterns in the Russian storytelling style: three times nine kingdoms, journeys are short in the telling but long in the doing, etc. You can find Afanasyev's full collection, and no doubt many of those stories are fun, too... but this edition really shines thanks to Ivan Bilbin's gorgeous artwork. Link below for a sample. http://allart.biz/up/photos/album/B-C... Also, surprise!! The book is good in hard copy but looks AMAZING on a Kindle app for iPad. Like stained glass windows. 😍 That's a first.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Giulia

    Recently read these stories, and they're such a break from our usual Grimm's fairytales. The stories have a lot of similarities in their themes, but the magical realism, at times scary storylines and strong heroines make this enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, the illustrations are divine! Recently read these stories, and they're such a break from our usual Grimm's fairytales. The stories have a lot of similarities in their themes, but the magical realism, at times scary storylines and strong heroines make this enjoyable for everyone. Furthermore, the illustrations are divine!

  17. 5 out of 5

    hanna

    Dnf 102/189 stories.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pia Sophia

    The thing I love about Russian literature, including all of these precious stories, is how dark and intelligent they are. Russians know how tough life can be, and they're not afraid to show it. This wisdom is portrayed in this beautiful collection by short and longer tales. Speaking through animals, kings and peasants. Each as smart and important as the other. It amazes me that these tales are all ever so interesting to read. Whether they talk about a tsar's or a princess' fate, about a quarrel The thing I love about Russian literature, including all of these precious stories, is how dark and intelligent they are. Russians know how tough life can be, and they're not afraid to show it. This wisdom is portrayed in this beautiful collection by short and longer tales. Speaking through animals, kings and peasants. Each as smart and important as the other. It amazes me that these tales are all ever so interesting to read. Whether they talk about a tsar's or a princess' fate, about a quarrel between animals or about an agreement made by two rivers; they are one by one delightful and will leave you with a lesson you will ponder over. These tales speak of deep love and hurt at the same time. They speak of fear (I love all the Baba Yaga stories!) and trust. And, bottom line of a whole bunch of these tales: nothing is as it seems to be. Some stories, I recognize from when I was a child myself (for example, The Wolf and the Goat) and other tales are completely new to me. I like how the stories capture society, in a way, which is still relevant even today. There's evil stepmothers and wealthy kings, witches and talking animals. Reading these tales is a true feast for your eyes. Not to forget the beautiful illustrations that go with them! After reading these tales, I can surely say that not only the stories' plots are poetic and magical, but the language with which they're written is as well. A must-read for lovers of fairy tales, young and old.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicki Markus

    Russian Fairy Tales is a delightful and comprehensive collection of stories from Russian folk tradition. I had such fun reading them--a few each day--and comparing them with tales from other European traditions. It is interesting to look at the crossover and where differences occur. A brilliant book for readers of all ages.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debora

    I would recommend this volume if you want to start learning more about Russian folklore and fairy tales. The illustrations are beautiful, and they'll accompany you through this fascinating reading. Do not buy it if you intend to read it to your kids or younger audience; the language is quite archaic, and they would probably struggle to understand and appreciate the stories properly. I would recommend this volume if you want to start learning more about Russian folklore and fairy tales. The illustrations are beautiful, and they'll accompany you through this fascinating reading. Do not buy it if you intend to read it to your kids or younger audience; the language is quite archaic, and they would probably struggle to understand and appreciate the stories properly.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kasia

    There were a lot of familiar stories in here that I didn't realize had Russian or Slavic origins. The illustrations are so beautiful - it was slightly repetitive so I only read the stories that caught my interest. There were a lot of familiar stories in here that I didn't realize had Russian or Slavic origins. The illustrations are so beautiful - it was slightly repetitive so I only read the stories that caught my interest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Wish there were more of them...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matina Viola

    If you are looking for something similar to Grimm's tales this is not what you are looking for. If on the other hand you are a big fan of Aesop's fables and faes you are going to enjoy it!! If you are looking for something similar to Grimm's tales this is not what you are looking for. If on the other hand you are a big fan of Aesop's fables and faes you are going to enjoy it!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    The language is a little stilted, but I loved this collection of fairy tales that allowed me to see some common threads in Russian Fairy Tales.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jude

    This collection of tales was written, or rather, recorded by renowned Russian folklorist Alexander Nikolayevich Afanasyev in the mid-19th century. The book contains some of the best-known Russian folktales, including: Vasilisa the Beautiful; The Feather of Finist the Falcon; The Frog-Tsarevna; and Tsarevich Ivan, the Firebird and the Grey Wolf. Of all the characters I came across in this volume, and there are a few who feature in more than one tale, I was particularly taken by Baba Yaga. Baba Yaga This collection of tales was written, or rather, recorded by renowned Russian folklorist Alexander Nikolayevich Afanasyev in the mid-19th century. The book contains some of the best-known Russian folktales, including: Vasilisa the Beautiful; The Feather of Finist the Falcon; The Frog-Tsarevna; and Tsarevich Ivan, the Firebird and the Grey Wolf. Of all the characters I came across in this volume, and there are a few who feature in more than one tale, I was particularly taken by Baba Yaga. Baba Yaga is a cannibalistic witch who lives in a small wooden hut at the edge of the forest. Now, this description may not seem so different from a lot of other witches in children’s stories, but Baba Yaga has so many fantastic quirks, the likes of which I would never have imagined. Her hut stands on hen’s legs, and will only lower itself to permit entry when in receipt of a certain rhyme. It is also surrounded by a picket fence adorned with the skulls of Baba Yaga’s victims, the eye sockets of which glow in the night. Instead of a broomstick, Baba Yaga travels through the forest in a giant mortar, driving herself forward with a pestle in her right hand, while sweeping the forest floor with a broom in her left hand. Oh and she is also often followed by spirits. I love her. Having no familiarity with Russian folklore prior to this, I feel the collection gave a good introduction to some of the most famous characters in Russian folk literature. It’s a beautiful volume, and some of the illustrations are so elaborate I feel I could have spent hours studying them. Originally posted on Jade the Obscure

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    I purchased this for a course in Russian folklore I took in college, and recently re-read it. It's a longer collection than most (including Grimm's), offered without commentary, and very enjoyable. While sharing certain oratorical formulas with Scandinavian folklore (many-headed dragons v. many-headed trolls, Otherworld beings detecting hidden heroes by smelling Russian blood rather than Christian blood), there is a flavor to these tales that is distinctly Russian. I purchased this for a course in Russian folklore I took in college, and recently re-read it. It's a longer collection than most (including Grimm's), offered without commentary, and very enjoyable. While sharing certain oratorical formulas with Scandinavian folklore (many-headed dragons v. many-headed trolls, Otherworld beings detecting hidden heroes by smelling Russian blood rather than Christian blood), there is a flavor to these tales that is distinctly Russian.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bunny

    Too weird. Even for me, who lives for weird. I have to think a lot gets lost in translation. It just has to. I mean, they got married, and chewed bread for the rest of their lives? Do what? And then the fairy tales aren't even well thought out. "They did this and this. And then something happened, and she turned into a dove." "Something happened"? Literally? That's your great plot twist? No. No, no, no. Too weird. Even for me, who lives for weird. I have to think a lot gets lost in translation. It just has to. I mean, they got married, and chewed bread for the rest of their lives? Do what? And then the fairy tales aren't even well thought out. "They did this and this. And then something happened, and she turned into a dove." "Something happened"? Literally? That's your great plot twist? No. No, no, no.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    An excellent starting point for anyone interested in fairy tales from non-western cultures; the differences between these and Grimm's are plainly apparent, but they're still familiar enough to be approachable without much need of explanation or introduction. There's a pretty broad mix of theme, and nearly all are appropriate for young children. I first ran across this book in a teacher's yard sale, and it's been a fast favourite ever since. I can't recommend it highly enough. An excellent starting point for anyone interested in fairy tales from non-western cultures; the differences between these and Grimm's are plainly apparent, but they're still familiar enough to be approachable without much need of explanation or introduction. There's a pretty broad mix of theme, and nearly all are appropriate for young children. I first ran across this book in a teacher's yard sale, and it's been a fast favourite ever since. I can't recommend it highly enough.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    These fairy tales are so good that I enjoy reading them as an adult. You just can't go wrong with these Russian tales. My mom enjoyed them a lot when she was young and she got me to like them too. Our favorite tale is obviously the one with Baba Yaga. These fairy tales are so good that I enjoy reading them as an adult. You just can't go wrong with these Russian tales. My mom enjoyed them a lot when she was young and she got me to like them too. Our favorite tale is obviously the one with Baba Yaga.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Mi Infancia

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