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The Legacy Letters: his Wife, his Children, his Final Gift

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Winner of 5 national awards including the Mom’s Choice Award, The Legacy Letters reveals to us the rediscovered private letters from a dying father to his children—and his wife. His words of wisdom, interwoven between deeply personal stories and poignantly-told memories, ultimately become the practical, moral, and spiritual guidebook for his children he’d never live to see Winner of 5 national awards including the Mom’s Choice Award, The Legacy Letters reveals to us the rediscovered private letters from a dying father to his children—and his wife. His words of wisdom, interwoven between deeply personal stories and poignantly-told memories, ultimately become the practical, moral, and spiritual guidebook for his children he’d never live to see, and for his wife, his redemptive act of love. “Live Life to the Fullest” becomes the father’s passionate plea to his family—and to all of us desiring to live the same way. Woman’s World Magazine writes, “This inspirational classic is the perfect comfort book for people hungry to find meaning in their lives.” Combining the best elements of such inspirational bestsellers as Tuesdays with Morrie, The Last Lecture, and Chicken Soup for the Soul, author Carew Papritz creates a timeless work that The Huffington Post calls, "A Must-Read Book of Wisdom for Life...exquisite, intimate, passionate, humorous, and genuine..." Back Cover Description of The Legacy Letters A tragedy begins. A husband and wife separate. He’s dying. She doesn’t know. She’s pregnant. He can’t return. Now he races against time— In the solitude of a mountain cabin. In a faraway mountain range. Trying to finish . . . For his children— his captivating stories and memories, turned into practical, moral, and spiritual instructions, now their “guidebook to life.” For his wife— his intimate words of great love and deep regret, now his journey of redemption, now her passage to forgiveness. Ultimately, he gives his final gift to her, to them, and now, to us all. The Legacy Letters


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Winner of 5 national awards including the Mom’s Choice Award, The Legacy Letters reveals to us the rediscovered private letters from a dying father to his children—and his wife. His words of wisdom, interwoven between deeply personal stories and poignantly-told memories, ultimately become the practical, moral, and spiritual guidebook for his children he’d never live to see Winner of 5 national awards including the Mom’s Choice Award, The Legacy Letters reveals to us the rediscovered private letters from a dying father to his children—and his wife. His words of wisdom, interwoven between deeply personal stories and poignantly-told memories, ultimately become the practical, moral, and spiritual guidebook for his children he’d never live to see, and for his wife, his redemptive act of love. “Live Life to the Fullest” becomes the father’s passionate plea to his family—and to all of us desiring to live the same way. Woman’s World Magazine writes, “This inspirational classic is the perfect comfort book for people hungry to find meaning in their lives.” Combining the best elements of such inspirational bestsellers as Tuesdays with Morrie, The Last Lecture, and Chicken Soup for the Soul, author Carew Papritz creates a timeless work that The Huffington Post calls, "A Must-Read Book of Wisdom for Life...exquisite, intimate, passionate, humorous, and genuine..." Back Cover Description of The Legacy Letters A tragedy begins. A husband and wife separate. He’s dying. She doesn’t know. She’s pregnant. He can’t return. Now he races against time— In the solitude of a mountain cabin. In a faraway mountain range. Trying to finish . . . For his children— his captivating stories and memories, turned into practical, moral, and spiritual instructions, now their “guidebook to life.” For his wife— his intimate words of great love and deep regret, now his journey of redemption, now her passage to forgiveness. Ultimately, he gives his final gift to her, to them, and now, to us all. The Legacy Letters

30 review for The Legacy Letters: his Wife, his Children, his Final Gift

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donna Ledesma

    It’s like a breath of fresh air, this book. Upon starting on the pages, I was surprised to immediately feel that this book would resonate with me for the following reasons… First, I believe I am sufficiently passionate for many things (music, words, nature… oh, that gift of youthful exuberance, I think I have it). Second, I love hearing words of delight, of awe and beauty, of positive ions and energy; they’re like music to my ears. Lastly, and especially, I love listening from/about old folks. To It’s like a breath of fresh air, this book. Upon starting on the pages, I was surprised to immediately feel that this book would resonate with me for the following reasons… First, I believe I am sufficiently passionate for many things (music, words, nature… oh, that gift of youthful exuberance, I think I have it). Second, I love hearing words of delight, of awe and beauty, of positive ions and energy; they’re like music to my ears. Lastly, and especially, I love listening from/about old folks. To know that these letters were written decades ago totally boosted me. As someone born from the ‘90s, I am nostalgia in the making. I do fantasize about being a baby boomer, a gen-X kid, and, my goodness, do I salute The Greatest Generation—just saying those words sends shivers down my spine! I would love to live in these eras, where there were less technology and more, more people. I am one of those who ache for this generation that has too much information but too little substance, too much rules but too little integrity. I think, today's people need a dose of these legacy letters -- not only to experience how it's like to live back in the day, but also to grasp the vigor and frolic human beings are capable to contain. And that’s what this book is all about. It’s about humanity, individuality, your personhood, your innermost, your soul, your actions, your relationships, your morals, your character, your aspirations, your dreams, all interpreted into fireworks and musical notes, earth and sky, snowflakes and colors, all that’s “spanglorious and grandacious”, as the writer puts it. I can only imagine how it’s like to be this old man’s kid, holding the letters, words exploding in my eyes. The words and style were in themselves graceful and candid, almost enchanting. I do wonder though. There is so much mystery left that had not been disclosed in this book; too many letters unpublished. It’s intriguing and at the same time bothering… how exactly it is like to seclude oneself, months before death comes knocking on your door. How exactly it is like to never fully say goodbye, to hide the illness until death, to die alone… In my whole reading of this book, my constant question was, what made this man decide to do all these? It haunts me, really. And just like the novels that I have read, a part of me is sorrowful; I wish the writer had come to surrender to Jesus as God. I ache as a Christian whose truth is that there are only two ultimate choices possible: Christ, or death. I speak as to what the published letters in this book contain. Nevertheless, I love this book. It is now one of my favorites. I cannot deny the original vibe that the writer has; his tone that is almost never-heard-of… It makes me smile. Reading it is like picking up gold stones along the way, adding to my pocketful of diamonds and youthful exuberance. The gold stones will remain in me as I continue to grow up. I love that there is this kind of man who once existed, despite the circumstances. He is so real to me, joints and marrows. I can only wish for the universe to conspire so that I may meet him and ignite a spark of his blazing fire of passion. Because that’s what this book is all about. Passion, love, and more passion and love. Highly recommended!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    In “The Legacy Letters” the narrator is offering a final gift to his twin children and wife. A memento of his mind: advice, lessons lo learn, and the key to a happy life. The book is comprised of multiple letters written to his children, whom he has never met, and a few to his wife recollecting the happy times they had together. Wouldn’t it be interesting to do something similar with your own children? To have a kind of guidebook of “life lessons.” Something they read throughout their life in hop In “The Legacy Letters” the narrator is offering a final gift to his twin children and wife. A memento of his mind: advice, lessons lo learn, and the key to a happy life. The book is comprised of multiple letters written to his children, whom he has never met, and a few to his wife recollecting the happy times they had together. Wouldn’t it be interesting to do something similar with your own children? To have a kind of guidebook of “life lessons.” Something they read throughout their life in hope to prevent them from making the same mistakes you did. Or simply just to offer a sense of, been there, done that for them. While the book doesn’t have the typical plot, climax, and resolution it does offer some lofty advice. Giving the reader something to ponder throughout, giving a chance for self-reflection. A few lines for my take away… “Because when you travel, really travel – getting deep down into the towns and people, the land and culture – you will be forever changed. Changed into a person of the world.” –This is a hope for me in my life. I love travel and truly feel that you will change as you experience other cultures around the world. It gives you a new perspective of life. “Find the work you love to do. Because, in my book, the greatest devil of them all is to work just for money.” –So true, what is money worth if you are doing something you do not enjoy? “Time. It’s our most precious resource. We forget how rare time is until we realize how little we have left.” –How often do we think of this? In the grand scheme there really isn’t much time given to us. It’s important to cherish the time that we have. Spend it wisely.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linh

    As the names of the man behind these letters is unknown to me, I will refer to him as "Papa" in my brief comments about this collection of letters. I applaud Papa for his ability to remain positive and so wholesome despite his tragic story. Knowing that he will not be able to meet his unborn twins, he sets about writing them letters to leave them a legacy of his thoughts and words. The Legacy Letters is filled to the brim with back to the basics common sense and a wholesome view on life. Unfortu As the names of the man behind these letters is unknown to me, I will refer to him as "Papa" in my brief comments about this collection of letters. I applaud Papa for his ability to remain positive and so wholesome despite his tragic story. Knowing that he will not be able to meet his unborn twins, he sets about writing them letters to leave them a legacy of his thoughts and words. The Legacy Letters is filled to the brim with back to the basics common sense and a wholesome view on life. Unfortunately, nothing is common about common sense and the word wholesome has long disappeared from the vocabulary of many people in this 21st century world with our reality television, and every day news stories involving guns. It is completely understandable that a father would want to ensure that this wisdom is passed along to his unborn children. I especially liked the chapters: Time - The First and Last Gift, The Everything and Nothing of Money, There are Hard Days to Live, and Travel the World. I felt like Papa was talking directly to me, and perhaps at the age that I'm at, I could truly appreciate the wisdom of his words. I have already book marked these passages to share with friends and family and, later on in life, my future children. I will be honest, there were some chapters that I felt were a little too personal or spoke of a life shared between Papa and the people in his world that I had trouble relating to. With that said, these are personal letters and it must have taken a lot of consideration before his family chose to share them with the billions of readers in the world. I wish an actual biography or memoir could be written of Papa's life, how he met his wife, how they separated and what happened after he died and the children received the letters. I'll be the first, but I'm sure I won't be the last to say that I would definitely buy that book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I won this book on a Goodreads giveaway. It is terrible. I cannot understand the awards and positive reviews this book has received. The format, letters to children from a dead father is contrived, trite, and forced. The messages are pure common sense. I have to admit I read about 20% trying to find something to convince me to read more, and I couldn't. So, while I have marked it as "read," that means I couldn't finish it because it was so unpleasant to read. Ugh. I won this book on a Goodreads giveaway. It is terrible. I cannot understand the awards and positive reviews this book has received. The format, letters to children from a dead father is contrived, trite, and forced. The messages are pure common sense. I have to admit I read about 20% trying to find something to convince me to read more, and I couldn't. So, while I have marked it as "read," that means I couldn't finish it because it was so unpleasant to read. Ugh.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    A bundle of letters, a dying man, hope for his family's future and his legacy. Estranged from his pregnant wife and found to be with terminal cancer; a lost man finds peace in writing out his hopes dreams, advice, memories, and thoughts out to his unborn children. His wife doesn't know that her husband is ill, she doesn't even know that he found out she was pregnant. So when she gets the first letter months after his passing she is flabbergasted. She didn't even know he was sick, there is no cha A bundle of letters, a dying man, hope for his family's future and his legacy. Estranged from his pregnant wife and found to be with terminal cancer; a lost man finds peace in writing out his hopes dreams, advice, memories, and thoughts out to his unborn children. His wife doesn't know that her husband is ill, she doesn't even know that he found out she was pregnant. So when she gets the first letter months after his passing she is flabbergasted. She didn't even know he was sick, there is no chance for a reconciliation or for him to meet his kids. In reality, he saved her from pity and from forcing her to forgive him because of his circumstances, he wanted her to remember him as he was. The remaining letters, poems, and songs won't be given to her or their kids until their tenth birthday and they have no idea how much the letters will impact the rest of their lives. Each letter contains some nuggets of wisdom, humor, and memories. It's clear that their father put his heart and soul into the 200 letters he wrote in less than a year. Even though his clock was ticking faster and faster, he doesn't speed up or rush his letters. They are full of tenderness and nostalgia. He's trying to impart what he can on kids he'll never meet. From appreciating the seasons, traveling, falling in love, turning 18, appreciating music, and respecting nature; they are all written from a rugged romantic rancher extracting what beauty he can out a bleak situation. Even though this reads as non-fiction, the letters and the story are in fact, fiction, but don't let detract from the message and the lessons. A wonderful book that readers won't soon forget about.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Richards

    I'm so thankful that I was introduced to this beautiful story. I had the pleasure of meeting the author at the Readers' Favorite International Book Awards in November 2014. So many of the chapters resonated with me. Having lost a child myself, Mr. Papritz's chapter on "The Losing of Love" hit me right in the heart. How do you explain to young people that loss happens and the journey you are then challenged to travel is a long road filled with tears and "what could have been?" To quote the author I'm so thankful that I was introduced to this beautiful story. I had the pleasure of meeting the author at the Readers' Favorite International Book Awards in November 2014. So many of the chapters resonated with me. Having lost a child myself, Mr. Papritz's chapter on "The Losing of Love" hit me right in the heart. How do you explain to young people that loss happens and the journey you are then challenged to travel is a long road filled with tears and "what could have been?" To quote the author: "But the profound loves, that for which you would give most anything to and sacrifice most everything for, are the most painful of all to lose - the parent or child, the brother or sister, the husband or wife, the friend or the lover." "Papa" did a marvelous job of sharing life lessons with his children that he will never meet...never hold...never tuck in bed at night. Some of the prose gets a little heavy with descriptive words or phrases, but they work when you realize this man's situation and the legacy he wants to leave his wife and children. Having read this dying man's story, it makes me wonder what type of legacy I will be leaving for my son and grandchildren. I can only hope it is one he spoke of...love, forgiveness, seeking truth and exploring the world. I truly enjoyed this book and will be handing it over to my son.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I wanted to believe this book is a true story, and it read like it was. It's instead an amazing work of fiction. I mean amazing. The language in this book is like music, which makes sense because the author is musical as well. It's lyrically written, beautiful language, much of it unusual and personal. It's the story of a couple that separates over something minor (isn't that the usual way?). The wife soon learns she's pregnant with twins but is angry and doesn't tell the husband. He learns he i I wanted to believe this book is a true story, and it read like it was. It's instead an amazing work of fiction. I mean amazing. The language in this book is like music, which makes sense because the author is musical as well. It's lyrically written, beautiful language, much of it unusual and personal. It's the story of a couple that separates over something minor (isn't that the usual way?). The wife soon learns she's pregnant with twins but is angry and doesn't tell the husband. He learns he is dying and chooses not to tell his wife for fear of harming her pregnancy, which he learns about from a friend. He only has months to live, so he goes to a remote cabin belonging to his family in the mountains. There he writes letters to his children and wife while enjoying his last days and nature. The letters are remarkable. The rest of the story you must read for yourself. A wonderful and cerebral book. Kudos to the author for making us want to believe this story is true.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie Gianni

    Our 21st Century society has lost a lot of morale, hope and faith from decades of war, homelessness and unemployment. The daily struggles of life has taken away the pure joy of believing. Parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, teenagers, and anyone in between must read this book. Especially for teenagers who watch television and movies not seeing any viable role model out there and think that they have to lose their standards to fit in, you have to read this book to gain some hope and trust in ou Our 21st Century society has lost a lot of morale, hope and faith from decades of war, homelessness and unemployment. The daily struggles of life has taken away the pure joy of believing. Parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, teenagers, and anyone in between must read this book. Especially for teenagers who watch television and movies not seeing any viable role model out there and think that they have to lose their standards to fit in, you have to read this book to gain some hope and trust in our modern world. Papritz asks questions that every teenager and twenty-something think about. "How will you live? On a ranch, or in the city, or both? Will you raise cowboys, or doctors, or both?" Papritz tackles daily to lifelong question in this truly touching story of a dieing father writing to the children he will never know. Live, love, laugh with this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Blaze Pascal

    I just ordered my second copy of The Legacy Letters for a friends birthday, and I'm sure I'll order plenty additional copies. This book is like finding a refreshing glass of water after wandering in the desert for years. Good old fashion, home spun values and wisdom, that we could all stand to review. In a world where yes and thank you have been replaced with shrugs and grunts, this book hits the mark. My advice, take a break from your smart phones this summer, and stick your nose into a copy of I just ordered my second copy of The Legacy Letters for a friends birthday, and I'm sure I'll order plenty additional copies. This book is like finding a refreshing glass of water after wandering in the desert for years. Good old fashion, home spun values and wisdom, that we could all stand to review. In a world where yes and thank you have been replaced with shrugs and grunts, this book hits the mark. My advice, take a break from your smart phones this summer, and stick your nose into a copy of this wonderful book. Who knows, If we can all get back to some traditional values and manners, maybe our kids will get the message too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Nachlinger

    The Legacy Letters is a fictional story told in letters from a dying man, his last days spent alone in a cabin in the wilderness. He's estranged from his wife, and his letters are written to his children, to be read when they're ten years old. The book's blurb says: "The Legacy Letters reveals to us the stories, memories, and music of a dying father, which ultimately becomes the practical, moral, and spiritual gift and guidebook for his children he'd never live to see, and for his wife, his redem The Legacy Letters is a fictional story told in letters from a dying man, his last days spent alone in a cabin in the wilderness. He's estranged from his wife, and his letters are written to his children, to be read when they're ten years old. The book's blurb says: "The Legacy Letters reveals to us the stories, memories, and music of a dying father, which ultimately becomes the practical, moral, and spiritual gift and guidebook for his children he'd never live to see, and for his wife, his redemptive story of love." Carew Papritz's writing is superb, and his advice is common-sense smart. This is a book to savor.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The Legacy Letter is a collection of heartfelt and endearing letters from a Father to his unborn children. These letters are a father’s last gift. Each letter is unique and contains wisdom from a man who has fully lived his life. How can one put into words a whole lifetime of experiences? From growing up to how to be a man, these letters will pull at your heartstrings. This book is beautifully written. I felt a variety of emotions while reading. I could feel love. I could feel regret. I could fe The Legacy Letter is a collection of heartfelt and endearing letters from a Father to his unborn children. These letters are a father’s last gift. Each letter is unique and contains wisdom from a man who has fully lived his life. How can one put into words a whole lifetime of experiences? From growing up to how to be a man, these letters will pull at your heartstrings. This book is beautifully written. I felt a variety of emotions while reading. I could feel love. I could feel regret. I could feel a sense of desperation at times but most of all, I felt hope. This book is a breath of fresh air. It makes you think about life and the choices you’ve made and are making. In a world where having feelings is a joke and having standards is far and few, this book is inspiring. To be better! To welcome positivity! To be yourself and what you truly believe in! The book itself is beautiful. The cover is colorful and the pages have a textured look and feel to it. The look is vintage. Those small touches added to the already beautiful book. I give this 5 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mellott-Foshier

    If you’re a fan of Mitch Albom, you will love reading The Legacy Letters by Carew Papritz. (Tuesdays with Morrie is one of my favorite books ever.) And you won’t be the only one who loves it. The Legacy Letters has won several awards including best fiction and best non-fiction. How’s that possible? When I started reading, I initially thought the book was non-fiction and then learned on the book flap that The Legacy Letters is Carew Papritz’s first work of fiction. I can see how it was placed in bo If you’re a fan of Mitch Albom, you will love reading The Legacy Letters by Carew Papritz. (Tuesdays with Morrie is one of my favorite books ever.) And you won’t be the only one who loves it. The Legacy Letters has won several awards including best fiction and best non-fiction. How’s that possible? When I started reading, I initially thought the book was non-fiction and then learned on the book flap that The Legacy Letters is Carew Papritz’s first work of fiction. I can see how it was placed in both categories. I’m not sure knowing that a book is fiction or non-fiction changes my interpretation or response to it, but it’s something I’ll be more mindful about in the future. Curious if it does for you? Regardless, I loved this small book of big moments, life lessons and regrets-to-be (as the main character calls them) written in beautifully descriptive and poetic words. I’m not spoiling anything by letting you know this book is a series of letters written by a husband estranged from his wife (it’s stated on the back cover). Only after this separation did he learn he was terminally ill and that his wife was pregnant with twins. You would think facing those major life (and death) changes would bring them back together. Rather, he isolates himself in a remote place to write letters to his future son and daughter that he would never see. And that the children would not receive the letters until they were 10 years old. That made me pause and is why I gave this book 4* rather than 5*. I couldn’t get past the fact that he assumed it was better for everyone if he stayed away. Your wife’s pregnant (and how did you know she was having a boy and a girl?). She and the children need you. But is this really a flaw in the story or rather a character flaw and we all fall short every single day of how others believe we should behave? After all, what other people think of you is, fortunately, none of your business. So I put aside my judgement and boxed away that criticism and unanswered questions and focused on the meaningful and heartwarming messages of love, life, grief, passion and more. Not to give too much away, I did want to share a few of my favorite gems that I believe all to-be parents, parents of toddlers, parents of teenagers, parents of kids going off to college, grandparents, college graduates and emptynesters could appreciate. Actually, anyone could benefit to meditate on some of The Legacy Letters’ “declarations of what’s important in life” to become better versions of themselves. It was a challenge to narrow down my favorite takeaways (as I pretty much had a favorite on every page), but here are a few in my book review of The Legacy Letters. Find better dance partners “Life is too short to be dancing with idiots.” While idiots are not avoidable, this declaration is a reminder that how you spend your time and who you spend your time with is a choice. Your choice. Find a better dance partner. Busy. Busy. Busy. “You can busy yourself right into the grave.” Don’t do this. Read. Read. Read. “Read what you like, not what you’re told to like. That way you’ll read for a lifetime.” I’m always astonished when I cross paths with people who don’t read. Some who haven’t read a book since high school or college. It’s a way of life beyond my comprehension. Some of my favorite memories of my son is reading to him, my son reading to me, reading with him or spending hours together browsing in a bookstore. Travel. Travel. Travel. “Because when you travel, really travel…you will be forever changed…not just forever riding on the coattails of your own purposely filled fenced and tightly mowed backyard of a world.” I believe travel is the best gift we can gift to our children and to ourselves. Grief “And when you understand that it is possible for someone you have lost to become part of who you are, only then will you realize a most amazing and different life, filled with an immense power and sadness, so infinitely unexplainable and yet so ferocious with purpose.” Take a moment and reread that message. And then read it again. Fitting in “Sometimes you may feel as if you don’t fit into this world. Stumble around then and be curious…until you fall into your passions.” This sentiment has no shelf life. In fact, it describes me perfectly at the moment. Still stumbling. Still curious. Still falling into my passions. Get out of your own way Now I’ve got U2’s song stuck in my head…and if only I could practice the following words of wisdom in my overthinking mind. “Longest of your echoing nights which contain the merry-go-round of your greatest fears and longings.” Do your best “Make doing your best a habit and you’ll never know not doing your best.” As long as you always do your best you are capable of at that moment in your life, no one can ask or expect any more. Not even yourself. And even when you don’t, your worst moments will not define you. Time “Time. You’re either for it or against it. Do what you want to do and with the people you love. Why live a life diluted?” Exactly. Embrace your age “Old is for old people. If you believe the numbers, they you’re old. If you don’t believe the numbers and believe in your spirit, then you’re ageless.” I’ve never understood why people get so hung up on age. I’m 54 and I’m really okay with it. In fact, it annoys me when someone says, “I’m 29” (when they’re 39 or 49). Or brag that they’re younger than someone else like it’s some kind of achievement. I don’t get it. Why? Who wants to be 29 again? We were all born at our own perfect time. So just stop it with the age thing cuz I’m not listening. Another thought from The Legacy Letters. “…being old, hell, that’s your choice.” And I’m not choosing it. I would catch my 90-something grandmother climbing up on the counter to reach the top shelf. She never chose old. Be my like my grandma. Money and success “Money. Too much can make you happily unhappy. Too little can make you habitually unhappy.” Truth. On writing Love where he talks about why writing is better than speaking. Essentially, mouth words carry air and written words carry weight. Writing is a way to rediscover and uncover your own truth. “It is godawful fierce work to explore your jungle of thoughts and emotions, to work your way through the tangle of your half lies and partial truths, to eventually track do your most honest thoughts, capture them intact, and finally bring them to paper.” Parenting “Don’t teach your children to fear being honest with you. They should be able to talk to you about anything or ask for your help at any time.” Here was another moment when some of those critical thoughts escaped the box I put them in. How can he be providing parenting advice when he’s not living his own words. But still including because it’s great advice. Doodling “You are the doodle in the margin.” One of my favorite lines. Gratitude “Wake up. Be thankful.” Life really is as simple as that. Again, these are just a few of my favorite lines from The Legacy Letters. Enjoy!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barbara M

    This is a beautifully written and touching true story. It begins with a man and wife separating. Soon after, the man learns that he has a terminal illness and doesn't tell his wife. His wife learns that she is pregnant with twins and doesn't tell her husband. He hears through someone else that his wife is pregnant and goes off to a cabin in the woods to prepare to die. While in the cabin, he writes a beautiful collection of letters to his unborn twins. He shares with them all he has learned abou This is a beautifully written and touching true story. It begins with a man and wife separating. Soon after, the man learns that he has a terminal illness and doesn't tell his wife. His wife learns that she is pregnant with twins and doesn't tell her husband. He hears through someone else that his wife is pregnant and goes off to a cabin in the woods to prepare to die. While in the cabin, he writes a beautiful collection of letters to his unborn twins. He shares with them all he has learned about life. He writes beautifully about the simple joys of life, as well as, it's sorrows. After his death, he left instructions for the letters to be delivered to his twins when they were ten years old. The letters are his gift to his children who came to know him through reading them. He was able to "live on" through his letters to his children. The author of the letters had experience writing and the letters are beautiful and well crafted. I found it enjoyable to read this book slowly - I read a couple letters a day - and really thought about them. One letter, for example, was about how not to grow old. He talks about how age is relative and you can see if someone is old by just looking into their eyes. He says you have grown old when you think you are too old to do things and you just give up and stop trying. He also writes beautiful letters about just stopping to enjoy the beauty of nature - the snow, the rain, the sunshine... Note: Readers who enjoyed this book might also enjoy "Notes to Jacqui: A Polio Survivor's Thoughts to His Daughter." It was an inspirational book I enjoyed written by a father to his daughter.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    There is something achingly personable about opening The Legacy Letters to the page titled Early Evening. It's really difficult to explain. At first, my eye was drawn to the page and then I found my hand gently caressing it I often think of sunset as a tranquil time and in this book, it's an appropriate time for an intimate ceremony of final rest. I've reread December 23rd multiple times and my heart aches when I come to the words, dying far away from his family and friends. This man who is dying There is something achingly personable about opening The Legacy Letters to the page titled Early Evening. It's really difficult to explain. At first, my eye was drawn to the page and then I found my hand gently caressing it I often think of sunset as a tranquil time and in this book, it's an appropriate time for an intimate ceremony of final rest. I've reread December 23rd multiple times and my heart aches when I come to the words, dying far away from his family and friends. This man who is dying chose to give these letters to his wife and the children that he would never live to know. These precious letters contain much value! These words faithfully guide us and speak to the essence of a life lived with small things in natural beauty. In a book about the size of a hand, Carew Papritz brilliantly makes us aware of the silent nature of this message which is a simplification to a gratifying, soulful life. And while I loved the warnings about the compromises of adulthood, and the morse code of semi-finished thoughts, I think my favorite passage was there is no fear in dying just the fear of not loving and living deeply enough. The Legacy Letters was gifted from the author. The Legacy Letters, I treasure. An interview with the author is on my book blog

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    After learning he's terminally ill "Papa" also finds out his estranged wife is pregnant with twins he'll never meet. He decides to leave them with a series of letters full of memories, words of wisdom, advice, etc. Papritz's beautiful style of lyrical writing was a gorgeous change in my typical reading repertoire. Although the letters could sometimes seem disjointed (as commented by other reviewers) that would be the case when writing to an intimate audience such as your own children. For instan After learning he's terminally ill "Papa" also finds out his estranged wife is pregnant with twins he'll never meet. He decides to leave them with a series of letters full of memories, words of wisdom, advice, etc. Papritz's beautiful style of lyrical writing was a gorgeous change in my typical reading repertoire. Although the letters could sometimes seem disjointed (as commented by other reviewers) that would be the case when writing to an intimate audience such as your own children. For instance, I've been writing my very own letters to my 3 year old son since he was born and I'm sure anyone other than him would often think they were a bit off. That being said, I'm not sure I'll encourage little 10 yo "R" to turn up a bottle of whiskey. Or vodka. Or tequila. But that's just me. I'm not a cowboy. And I'm east coast. We prefer to wait until the sixteenth birthday before getting our kids sloshed. :) I must admit, I did feel a bit cheated to flip the last page to see that I wasn't reading the "complete" set of letters that's available. I am intrigued to hear the songs! I received this book in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Wells

    Paprtiz's prose is lyrical and poetic. His distinct voice keeps you turning the pages so quickly, you'll be shocked how much of the book you've read in one sitting. The wisdom of "The Legacy Letters" is deeply affecting and you'll find yourself thinking about the advice they offer, and sharing their wisdom with family, friends, and loved ones. Papritz takes the "live last day like it's your last" cliche and gives us the whys and hows through the message the father conveys to his unborn children, Paprtiz's prose is lyrical and poetic. His distinct voice keeps you turning the pages so quickly, you'll be shocked how much of the book you've read in one sitting. The wisdom of "The Legacy Letters" is deeply affecting and you'll find yourself thinking about the advice they offer, and sharing their wisdom with family, friends, and loved ones. Papritz takes the "live last day like it's your last" cliche and gives us the whys and hows through the message the father conveys to his unborn children, taking life's lessons and turning them on their head in new and unique ways. This must-read novel is also a must-share. Just as the letter-writer's children must share his meaningful letters with a wider audience, reader's will feel compelled to do the same with the novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bollt

    I don't quite know how to react to this book. There was a lot -- a *lot* -- in this book that really resonated with me ... advice the father writes to his children about life, love, dreams ... and I think it really had some very poignant things to say. That said ... I think the writing style didn't seem to match the background story. I mean, this is supposed to be a guy who grew up pounding in fence posts and herding cattle, and yet he uses all this flowery language -- and for a pair of ten-year- I don't quite know how to react to this book. There was a lot -- a *lot* -- in this book that really resonated with me ... advice the father writes to his children about life, love, dreams ... and I think it really had some very poignant things to say. That said ... I think the writing style didn't seem to match the background story. I mean, this is supposed to be a guy who grew up pounding in fence posts and herding cattle, and yet he uses all this flowery language -- and for a pair of ten-year-holds to read? The language is far too sophisticated for a ten-year-old to understand. A friend received multiple copies of this book from a Goodreads giveaway, and gave me a copy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Person1234

    I just won this book in a giveaway, and I can't wait to receive it in the mail! The premise of the book seems super interesting, and everyone says it is AWESOME!!!! I hope they are correct, and I will definitely be updating this review once I receive my review copy and finish reading the book! Thanks again, Goodreads, for choosing me as one of the winners to receive an advanced reader's copy of this book! I'M SUPER EXCITED, AND I CAN'T WAIT TO RECEIVE THE BOOK, READ IT, AND REVIEW IT! AHHHHHHHH! I just won this book in a giveaway, and I can't wait to receive it in the mail! The premise of the book seems super interesting, and everyone says it is AWESOME!!!! I hope they are correct, and I will definitely be updating this review once I receive my review copy and finish reading the book! Thanks again, Goodreads, for choosing me as one of the winners to receive an advanced reader's copy of this book! I'M SUPER EXCITED, AND I CAN'T WAIT TO RECEIVE THE BOOK, READ IT, AND REVIEW IT! AHHHHHHHH! :) :DDDDDDDDDDDD

  19. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This is a book filled with advice from a man that will never have a chance to meet his children. A book filled with spiritual pourings from his heart. A book filled with how to live, how to treat others, and how to connect with God. I sensed a deep regret and longing in his writings of the loss of his marriage and wife. A man who has had to make peace with both losses. His straight forward words of wisdom makes him wise way beyond his years. He has lived a life time in a short time. This is a book This is a book filled with advice from a man that will never have a chance to meet his children. A book filled with spiritual pourings from his heart. A book filled with how to live, how to treat others, and how to connect with God. I sensed a deep regret and longing in his writings of the loss of his marriage and wife. A man who has had to make peace with both losses. His straight forward words of wisdom makes him wise way beyond his years. He has lived a life time in a short time. This is a book you don’t want to miss. Tragic, sad, but yet happy and at peace.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gardiner

    I loved it. It doesn't read like fiction, because it isn't. It is a dying man's letters to his unborn children. He and his wife have separated and he learns he is dying, and she learns she is pregnant with twins. They find out about each other's dilemma through other people. It is very touching and moving and I feel it should be read by everyone. I loved it. It doesn't read like fiction, because it isn't. It is a dying man's letters to his unborn children. He and his wife have separated and he learns he is dying, and she learns she is pregnant with twins. They find out about each other's dilemma through other people. It is very touching and moving and I feel it should be read by everyone.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Noelle Walsh

    This was such a nice book. Halfway through I think my eyes got teary. By the end, my face was soaked. It was so touching, and so worth reading. It's a definitive must read for everyone! It's just such a beautiful book that touches the soul. *won on GoodReads First Reads* This was such a nice book. Halfway through I think my eyes got teary. By the end, my face was soaked. It was so touching, and so worth reading. It's a definitive must read for everyone! It's just such a beautiful book that touches the soul. *won on GoodReads First Reads*

  22. 4 out of 5

    Georgina Clement

    I loved this book! This author writes beautifully and with deep honesty.

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Horror Report -Angela

    This was truly a moving book to read. In this book a father (and husband) is living out his last days isolated in a cabin in the mountains. He’s left his pregnant wife and children because he and his wife have separated. But really, it’s also to spare them the torture of watching him die from a terminal illness. Through the format of letters written to his wife and kids, he tries with all his might to put pen to paper in order to leave something of himself behind for his family. Not just some let This was truly a moving book to read. In this book a father (and husband) is living out his last days isolated in a cabin in the mountains. He’s left his pregnant wife and children because he and his wife have separated. But really, it’s also to spare them the torture of watching him die from a terminal illness. Through the format of letters written to his wife and kids, he tries with all his might to put pen to paper in order to leave something of himself behind for his family. Not just some letters, but something of meaning. A collection of stories, thoughts, feelings, lessons, tragedies, joys, everything a parent would want to share with his family and teach his children. He tries to leave them with the very best of him, indelibly written on pages of time. His time. This book will take you into the heart and mind of a true human being. The love, passion, pain and regret, the thankfulness and thoughtfulness expressed in this manuscript could serve well as a book for a family to have and hand down generation to generation. This would definitely be something I would want my godchildren to read and have for when they have children. (I don’t have children of my own.) This is the kind of book that would actually allow an adolescent to understand why parents do some of the things they do when we are that young. This book was certainly worth reading. I usually read only horror and this was a beautiful break from my dark and scary world of entertainment. Not to mention that I have lost both of my parents, my father in 2014, and my mother in 2018, and I got this book after Mom passed. There was really a lot of it that hit deep down with me, made me think of my folks and how they felt at times. I wish I could have actually read it to them over the course of a couple of weekends. They would have enjoyed that. There is no way to fully express a parent’s love for their family, their spouse, and children, especially the children. But this book does a very good job of getting really, really close. I would recommend this to anyone I know that likes to read anything of substance and value. The Legacy Letters is written so well it doesn’t even seem like fiction. This would be an intellectual and emotional investment, not just a book to be read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Arash Farzaneh

    If you like a healthy dose of well-written poetry and helpful portions of self-help philosophy, The Legacy Letters is the book for you! I'm also a fan of the epistolary novel, so this book really hit the spot for me. The premise may be fictional and a tad melodramatic, but all of this is used for good effect. It certainly makes us think about as well as feel various issues alongside solid and sturdy tips and advice on everything from childhood, parenthood, marriage as well as our current way of If you like a healthy dose of well-written poetry and helpful portions of self-help philosophy, The Legacy Letters is the book for you! I'm also a fan of the epistolary novel, so this book really hit the spot for me. The premise may be fictional and a tad melodramatic, but all of this is used for good effect. It certainly makes us think about as well as feel various issues alongside solid and sturdy tips and advice on everything from childhood, parenthood, marriage as well as our current way of life. It also shows and reconfirms to us that true and lasting joys are not bound with material gains and wealth, but often quite to the contrary. Not all that glitters is gold but time well spent is worth so much more!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Shultz

    This book is charming. It is best read at night before going to sleep or curled up in a cosy chair with a blanket and cup of tea. Better yet, read it by the fireplace or outside in nature! It left me feeling peaceful and grateful. It is best read unhurried so it can soak in like sunshine on your shoulders. If you are looking for a read to relax and refocus on what really matters in life, this book might be for you. Enjoy!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joy Kidney

    This little book was splashed all over social media. Sounded like such a compelling story, but then when it came, it's revealed on the flaps of the book jacket that the whole premise was made up. The prose is often overwrought, as in the Milky Way being likened to "some saucy necktie." The most encouragement is to live by your senses. That said, it's the first book in publishing and literary history to win awards in both fiction and non-fiction categories. Non-fiction? How did that stand? This little book was splashed all over social media. Sounded like such a compelling story, but then when it came, it's revealed on the flaps of the book jacket that the whole premise was made up. The prose is often overwrought, as in the Milky Way being likened to "some saucy necktie." The most encouragement is to live by your senses. That said, it's the first book in publishing and literary history to win awards in both fiction and non-fiction categories. Non-fiction? How did that stand?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I have a renewed appreciation for handwritten letters after reading this book. I was reminded of letters my father wrote to me weekly as a college freshman. I wanted the story to be real but was not disappointed in the fictional presentation of life lessons, beautiful descriptions and human feelings. I gave myself permission to slow down and savor the little and big things that make up a full life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kiefer

    Oh my gosh, this is one of the most intimately touching books I have ever read. I want every family member, friend and even enemy I may have made in my life to read this amazing book. I bought it on Amazon after watching Carew Papritz's videos on YouTube and am so glad I did. I am looking forward to reading all the other letters that didn't make it to this book, some day. Oh my gosh, this is one of the most intimately touching books I have ever read. I want every family member, friend and even enemy I may have made in my life to read this amazing book. I bought it on Amazon after watching Carew Papritz's videos on YouTube and am so glad I did. I am looking forward to reading all the other letters that didn't make it to this book, some day.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeani Rottle

    This small but insightful book is one that deserves to be read again and then again. The author imparts profound thoughts and lessons that we could only wish all young people could have access to. So many words made me laugh out loud while others left me thinking about things I wish I had learned when I was younger. It is a book that should be experienced with a high liter pen!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ayesha Hettiarachchi

    In The Legacy Letters the narrator is offering a final gift to his twin children and to his wife. A memento of his mind advice, lessons to learn, and key to a happy life. The book is comprised of multiple letters written to his children whom he has never met, and few to his wife recalling the happy times they had together

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