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Kill Shakespeare, Vol. 3: The Tide of Blood

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The critically acclaimed series returns with a new adventure of Shakespearean proportions! With Richard III and Lady Macbeth defeated, Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, and Romeo face an even greater danger - Prospero, a rogue wizard who plans to destroy all of creation! Hamlet must embark on a perilous journey to a remote island whose inhabitants have gone mad and want the Dane's The critically acclaimed series returns with a new adventure of Shakespearean proportions! With Richard III and Lady Macbeth defeated, Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, and Romeo face an even greater danger - Prospero, a rogue wizard who plans to destroy all of creation! Hamlet must embark on a perilous journey to a remote island whose inhabitants have gone mad and want the Dane's blood... if they aren't beaten to the chase by one of Hamlet's allies.


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The critically acclaimed series returns with a new adventure of Shakespearean proportions! With Richard III and Lady Macbeth defeated, Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, and Romeo face an even greater danger - Prospero, a rogue wizard who plans to destroy all of creation! Hamlet must embark on a perilous journey to a remote island whose inhabitants have gone mad and want the Dane's The critically acclaimed series returns with a new adventure of Shakespearean proportions! With Richard III and Lady Macbeth defeated, Hamlet, Juliet, Othello, and Romeo face an even greater danger - Prospero, a rogue wizard who plans to destroy all of creation! Hamlet must embark on a perilous journey to a remote island whose inhabitants have gone mad and want the Dane's blood... if they aren't beaten to the chase by one of Hamlet's allies.

30 review for Kill Shakespeare, Vol. 3: The Tide of Blood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Romeo turns into the violent, emo lovechild of Gerard Way and Robert De Niro in Cape Fear; everyone trips balls and hangs out with maliciously magical talking trees; Prospero doesn’t have any eyes for reasons I can’t explain; and weak-willed Will continues to confusticate, unsure whether he’s a god or a mewling, milquetoast magpie. Another 3.5-star outing in a solid series; we’ll round it up and call it four(sooth) stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    3.75/5stars I read this volume before the others because its for my adaptation project with "The Tempest" and this is the volume that looks at it. BUT this has made me FASCINATED to pick up the series for real - it's such an interesting story and premise where all of Shakespeare's plays are placed in the same world, and Shakespeare himself is the "Wizard-God" - so cool! 3.75/5stars I read this volume before the others because its for my adaptation project with "The Tempest" and this is the volume that looks at it. BUT this has made me FASCINATED to pick up the series for real - it's such an interesting story and premise where all of Shakespeare's plays are placed in the same world, and Shakespeare himself is the "Wizard-God" - so cool!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tanelle Nash

    Although this volume isn’t my favourite in the series it holds up. I can’t wait to continue to see what comes next, the cliffhanger at the end was worth reading the whole novel for.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Not sure whether this fits with my studies or not. I appreciate that there is a multimodal element to this project (the comic book based upon Shakespeare's characters, soon to be a motion picture?) but seems to be moving further away from its original design: a video game pitting heroes against villains. Perhaps I need more Understanding Comics before I can claim to be an expert in this four-coloured field. Here is a brief analysis of what right and wrong with the Tide of Blood series. First of a Not sure whether this fits with my studies or not. I appreciate that there is a multimodal element to this project (the comic book based upon Shakespeare's characters, soon to be a motion picture?) but seems to be moving further away from its original design: a video game pitting heroes against villains. Perhaps I need more Understanding Comics before I can claim to be an expert in this four-coloured field. Here is a brief analysis of what right and wrong with the Tide of Blood series. First of all, very promising title that harken back to Kurosawa's 1957 masterpiece while also subtly suggesting Prospero's maddening island. Lots of blood get penciled in as well. Titus Andronicus gets mentioned within the first issue, but the enemy at the gate does not yet make an appearance (can't wait to see what happens when he does!). The six-issue story focuses on Romeo instead of Hamlet, which is a pleasant surprise, especially as Juliet has the hots for someone else, and this love triangle drives much of the plot for this series, and it looks like the next one too. And it true comic book fashion, a couple of dearly departed make their reappearance, plus an off-stage character makes peculiar number of appearances, both in the story as well as an epilogue-like flashback. Series four is in the works. Yet the authors must also heed what critics should say about this series. Not all glittering pages are gold, and while I appreciate this Canadian effort to do something different with Shakespeare, the creative team seems to recklessly disregard some of the play's most endearing qualities. Not every female character is tainted with sin, whether it is the kick-ass Juliet, now general of the Will Freedom fighters, who gets maliciously slandered, nor Miranda assaulted by Caliban and his brood, nor just about any other female character who receives lewd treatment. Busty babes and corny one-liners may draw in teenaged boys who may think it is sophisticated smut, but someone more familiar with Shakespeare's play will quickly spot the absence in the comics of women who are men's better halves: Rosalind, Portia, Cordelia, Hermione, etc. etc. also, while some attempt was made to lighten up the story with humour, the fool's wit still needs sharpening, especially as it has to do more than move the plot along. "Remember the porter" and have more drunkards spouting off political ebullitions. After all, this form traditionally was known as the funny pages, so the authors could tone down the blood and lust while injecting more socially just wit.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This volume introduces Miranda, Prospero, Caliban and Sycorax. It followed Romeo more than anyone and his complicated screwed up life. He pines for Juliet, but Juliet wants Hamlet, and Hamlet loves Juliet, (view spoiler)[ at least until the end, when he blames her for Romeo's death. (hide spoiler)] Prospero was a great bad guy, looked great and creepy, had interesting motivation (and interesting backstory in the follow up short), with the battle with Lady Macbeth and Shakespeare being pretty ama This volume introduces Miranda, Prospero, Caliban and Sycorax. It followed Romeo more than anyone and his complicated screwed up life. He pines for Juliet, but Juliet wants Hamlet, and Hamlet loves Juliet, (view spoiler)[ at least until the end, when he blames her for Romeo's death. (hide spoiler)] Prospero was a great bad guy, looked great and creepy, had interesting motivation (and interesting backstory in the follow up short), with the battle with Lady Macbeth and Shakespeare being pretty amazing. This is the best volume thus far. Really getting into this series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    star_fire13

    God piss. I was feeling lukewarm about this until the end! (view spoiler)[I must have missed something cuz I totes didn't think Juliet had actually slept with Romeo. Anyways, now she's pregnant with his kid, Hamlet hates her, and everyone thinks that she killed Romeo. I'm kinda excited to see what happens next! (hide spoiler)] God piss. I was feeling lukewarm about this until the end! (view spoiler)[I must have missed something cuz I totes didn't think Juliet had actually slept with Romeo. Anyways, now she's pregnant with his kid, Hamlet hates her, and everyone thinks that she killed Romeo. I'm kinda excited to see what happens next! (hide spoiler)]

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mook

    *3.5 A new country is being built in the wake of King Richard's demise. But forces are gathering in the neighbouring kingdom of Titus. Closer to home, Romeo has lost faith in the "god" Shakespeare and his former love is in a happy relationship with Hamlet. His chance meeting with a frightened Miranda, who begs them to come deal with her mad father Prospero, seems like a chance to prove himself a hero. But all is not what it seems... I liked getting backstory on Lady Macbeth - unlike the previous t *3.5 A new country is being built in the wake of King Richard's demise. But forces are gathering in the neighbouring kingdom of Titus. Closer to home, Romeo has lost faith in the "god" Shakespeare and his former love is in a happy relationship with Hamlet. His chance meeting with a frightened Miranda, who begs them to come deal with her mad father Prospero, seems like a chance to prove himself a hero. But all is not what it seems... I liked getting backstory on Lady Macbeth - unlike the previous two volumes, she now has relationships with people that she actually cares about (Miranda, and Prospero to a certain extent), and a reason to try and gain the quill beyond just power for power's sake. The drama surrounding Romeo, Hamlet, and Juliet was also fairly well done. Juliet is done living in the past - but Romeo is drowning in it. Hamlet, who let his own demons get the better of him before, is constantly reaching out, trying to bring Romeo back from the edge he's been standing on. The dynamic is interesting mostly because instead of the two men fighting, it's Romeo and Juliet who get into a violent battle, both furious with each other. It's not my favourite comic series, but I'm solidly invested in seeing where this is going.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rainbow007

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. MASSIVE SPOILERS BELOW! This volume was, by far, the best in the series so far, as it was no longer quite so easy to predict what would happen next, and the cliche plot line of a fantasy rebellion against a tyrannical kingdom had been set aside...it was, until the ending came around. If you've seen my reviews of the previous volume, you may remember my complaint that Lady Macbeth was reduced to a one note villan. To this threequel's credit, it solved that problem rather nicely. Miranda, the wizard MASSIVE SPOILERS BELOW! This volume was, by far, the best in the series so far, as it was no longer quite so easy to predict what would happen next, and the cliche plot line of a fantasy rebellion against a tyrannical kingdom had been set aside...it was, until the ending came around. If you've seen my reviews of the previous volume, you may remember my complaint that Lady Macbeth was reduced to a one note villan. To this threequel's credit, it solved that problem rather nicely. Miranda, the wizard that warns the main character's of the world ending danger and leads them to the island where the story unfolds, is revealed to be Lady Macbeth in disguise, luring her enemies to the land of her former teacher, Prospero, in an effort to win back his favor. However, she does not grovel at his feet for it, as she confronts him about his neglect of his daughter, the real Miranda. She is greatly concerned when she learns that Miranda is in a less than consensual relationship with one of Prospero's beast-like henchman, Caiban, and has been, ahem, "ravaged" many times by him. Lady Macbeth and Miranda have a sisterly relationship, as the former promises to protect her and take her away from the island before criticizing Prospero for allowing it to happen. In the end, she even turns against him when she finds out his plan is to end existence itself. Prospero himself, gets an interesting amount of depth, easily making him the best antagonist of the series. He is driven by grief for his wife, and blames Shakespeare, who is a god-like figure which basically created the world they inhabit, for her death. He wants to end creation and rebuilt it in his image, so no tragedy could ever be possible. But when Prospero realizes that his memory alone can't rebuild his wife in every detail, and through that, realizes he doesn't have the creativity required to build an entire universe, he suddenly see's the scattering of Miranda's soul, whom had earlier sacrificed herself to save Juliet and her friends. Snapping from the guilt, he kills himself and begs Shakespeare for forgiveness, and his companionship in his dying moments. This scene was a beautiful metaphor for loss and the brutal permanency of death, even in a world with limitless magic. It allows both Shakespeare's passiveness, compassionate and wise nature to flourish as he advises his former student for the last time, and somehow creates sympathy for Prospero, who had been nothing but diabolical before this point. But the ending ruined all of that good will, and left a sour taste in my mouth. You see, in the previous book, it is revealed that Romeo is still alive, creating an awkward situation for Juliet and Hamlet, who had bonded over their mutual losses and started a new romance. Despite the situation being resolved peacefully there, this book digs up the issue and brings it back to life like an even uglier version of Frankenstein's monster. It is established early on that Prospero's island is infected with a sickness that makes people hallucinate about their worst fears and regrets. This affliction is passed on through drinking the water, which the character's stupidly do without thinking. (the fact that they knew this going in, and didn't prepare a bigger stash of provisions and drinking water in advance, is pretty dumb within itself) In everyone's hysterics, they are all separated. Romeo, who has so far taken Juliet's rejection very harshly, finds said ex, now badly hallucinating about her time in the tomb. In this dark state of mind, they temporarily.."fall back into old habits", as it were. The next morning, Juliet has recovered and tells Romeo that the previous night was a mistake, that she wants to be with Hamlet. (So, time and rest allow the person to recover from the water's effects. Keep that in mind.) Awhile later, Romeo and Juliet are separated again, and Lady Macbeth, still disguised as Miranda, finds Romeo and tricks him into drinking the water, then manipulates him into accepting a plan to kill Hamlet in order to secure safe passage for them to leave. That's where it all goes downhill. Naturally, when Romeo and Juliet come across each other in the cave where Hamlet and Othello is being held captive, we get the standard, "Snap out of it, this isn't you!" speech so often used with brainwashing tropes. But Romeo overpowers Juliet, and as he's mocking Hamlet for stealing his girl, Juliet sneaks up behind him and bashes him on the head, knocking him out cold. She rescues Hamlet and Othello, but leaves Romeo behind as she thinks he cannot be saved from his spell, and they are too weak to carry him or subdue him if he acts up again. This is a far cry from the Juliet in the previous book, who fiercely protected Romeo in the battle. Granted, he did hurt her pretty badly and almost killed her new boyfriend, but he was brainwashed, and while she isn't shown to be especially kind, she is reasonable. It isn't believable that she would give up on someone so important to her so easily. Yet, it gets worse. Romeo catches up to them, and by this point in time, after being knocked unconscious, it would be assumed that he would recover from the water's effects, as everyone else, except Othello, has done so far. But Romeo is more spiteful than ever, determined to ruin Juliet and Hamlet's relationship by spilling the beans about their one night stand, then goading her with crude comments into killing him, shattering Hamlet's trust in Juliet. This scene, and the knowledge of how the water's affliction wears off with time, heavily implies that this is how Romeo felt all along, and the stress of everything that happened and being abandoned by Juliet finally pushed him over the edge into becoming a hateful, obsessive, and irredeemable creep. This event completely eradicates the themes that the story seems to have been building up to in this subplot; all this time, I thought the series was expanding on the interpretation of Shakespeare's original tragedy, that Romeo and Juliet was about young love, and the consequences when adults are too busy being consumed by hatred to guide their children through their confusing adolescence. By giving Juliet a new love interest that was based on their previous life experiences, it showcased a natural progression of an average lovelife, from a person's first relationship, where their compatibility with their partner didn't matter all that much, as long as they could mutually bask in the euphoria of "love", to the person's search and establishment of a deeper connection, where they fall not for their looks, but for what's on the inside. This would have been an interesting and mature topic to explore, and a creative way to expand on Romeo and Juliet's tragedy, by showing how frivolous their deaths in the original source material were. After all, the best reinterpretations are able to hold a mirror to the original and make the reader ask "what if?" But no, the writers decided to throw that out the window and make Romeo a disgusting caricature of his former self, taking away any depth his character could have had for this melodramatic love triangle. Even worse, the cliffhanger of the book tells us that Juliet is pregnant with Romeo's kid, promising even further drama in the next volume. This is where I felt completely grossed out. This series had an intriguing premise, squandered it with a mediocre, paint by numbers fantasy plot, then started to pick up with this conflict against Prospero, but has now completely collapsed into some hideous form of soap opera. If I wanted to follow a story about infidelity, creepy, failed romances and mistake babies, I'd rot my brain with some Murray. While the series so far has always kept me entertained just enough to see what would happen next, this ending killed any desire I had to continue. This bastardization of Shakespeare's complex characters and subversive storytelling seems to be all too common, and I won't support it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    Wow. I'm not sure how to explain the concept of Kill Shakespeare succinctly without making it sound ridiculous and maybe it is, but here goes: All of Shakespeare's most famous creations, both good and ill, find themselves alive and in the same place-AFTER the events that occurred in the plays they were featured in. Shakespeare is apparently now a god-like figure, worshiped by some and despised by others. It was interesting to see Romeo, Juliet, Lady Macbeth, Prospero and Hamlet interact. No this Wow. I'm not sure how to explain the concept of Kill Shakespeare succinctly without making it sound ridiculous and maybe it is, but here goes: All of Shakespeare's most famous creations, both good and ill, find themselves alive and in the same place-AFTER the events that occurred in the plays they were featured in. Shakespeare is apparently now a god-like figure, worshiped by some and despised by others. It was interesting to see Romeo, Juliet, Lady Macbeth, Prospero and Hamlet interact. No this is not the bard himself, but it was reasonably well written and strange enough to keep me reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dee Robb

    The story gets better with each issue!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Strong

    This volume wasn't what I was expecting but that's not a bad thing. I enjoyed my time reading this, but at times it could be a little hard to read. MVP: Miranda (May be an unpopular opinion, but I really enjoyed her character arc) This volume wasn't what I was expecting but that's not a bad thing. I enjoyed my time reading this, but at times it could be a little hard to read. MVP: Miranda (May be an unpopular opinion, but I really enjoyed her character arc)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Jackson

    Updated review, April 2020: I'm starting to feel like the Kill Shakespeare series would have been better as a standalone work, and not dragged on for four books. I've only just finished the third volume, "The Tide of Blood," and I'm starting to think the series has lost its magic. Everything changed after the defeat of Richard III's army in the second book, and now the third volume seemed only an elaborate telling of a bizarre love triangle between Hamlet, Juliet and Romeo. Throw in some weird ma Updated review, April 2020: I'm starting to feel like the Kill Shakespeare series would have been better as a standalone work, and not dragged on for four books. I've only just finished the third volume, "The Tide of Blood," and I'm starting to think the series has lost its magic. Everything changed after the defeat of Richard III's army in the second book, and now the third volume seemed only an elaborate telling of a bizarre love triangle between Hamlet, Juliet and Romeo. Throw in some weird magic by the wizard Prospero, who came out of freaking nowhere, and you have a strange concoction of truth and myth in the retelling of Shakespeare's characters. I appreciated, as usual, the entwining of all of the characters together, and the parallels between Shakespeare and Prospero and the idea of the mighty wizard-god in general, but it wasn't executed well this time. I also felt that the characters had so much more potential to show their own backstories and desires, but it was the same old trite whininess from before: Romeo pining for Juliet, leading him to drastic measures; Hamlet also being obsessed with Juliet and no longer thinking about his father or so-called destiny; Othello being reduced to the side token black character, it seemed, offering nothing to this plot whatsoever besides another character; and even Will Shakespeare himself being an inconsistent, all-over-the-place person with an incomprehensible personality. Not to mention the most predictable of plot twists for the end. But onto the fourth book, I guess, which I actually never read when I was reading all these others. I can only hope for a strong(ish) finale. Original review, 2013: When I first heard the synopsis for The Tide of Blood, I'll admit I raised one skeptical eyebrow. Really? The creators had to choose Prospero as the typical evil wizard just to continue having any sort of story? They couldn't just keep going with the old conflicts; they had to bring in something completely unrelated? But as I read the book, I realized how perfect the choice was for the Prospero-as-Shakespeare idea and vice versa, and the writers and illustrators of Kill Shakespeare do a fantastic job bringing that idea to life in this third volume. The story continues where it left off in the second volume, after a massive battle to help Will gain his power back into his quill and vanquish Richard III and his enemies. This time the heroes are faced with a magical threat from Prospero on his island, which could expand into something much larger and more dangerous. Both good and evil are trying to reform their ranks to build their power, and the wizards on both sides of the battle are vital. This is, of course, where Shakespeare comes into play in real life. Lots of people read The Tempest as Shakespeare's sort-of retirement from writing a play, and it seems Conor McCreery and Anthony Del Col brought that storyline into the action here, saying that Shakespeare created Prospero, sure, but in doing so he also created some of his own overreaching powers. Both wizards are fantastical magicians in this volume, but they both have their regrets that still haunt them. The meeting between the two of them is fascinating, and I think it stays true to the ideas in The Tempest. All that being said, however, I think the focus for much the story should have remained most on Hamlet. It definitely followed his story, but there was less of his initial angst over his father than I thought should have been included, and more of the bizarre and ever-growing love triangle among Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet. I was saddened that Othello took much more of a backseat in this volume; he was one of my favorite characters in the previous two books. I felt at times like the creators were compensating for not giving some characters (Romeo) enough face-time in the past, so they cut other prominent characters out (Othello) to make up for it. I see how they would want to give all the characters their chance to shine, yes. But the characters didn't seem as real and honest as they felt in previous stories, and more as if they just needed a way — any way — to be included. I did appreciate the direct Shakespeare quotes in the book (or as direct as possible where they could still make sense), as they also provided context for what was going through the characters' minds. It's fun to be able to pick those out and actively remember which plays they are from. The book ended on a major, major cliffhanger, which upon reading it seemed like an easy way out — a Dan Brown way of ending a book, if you will. But I hope this means the next edition will be a wicked fight among both internal and external forces, people who fight for good, evil or even just for themselves.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Yesterday I finished a mystery novel using Shakespeare as the hero detective.  Today, Shakespeare continues to serve as a literary character in a slightly different way. I will admit that I hadn't been much of a comic book reader of late (until I started reading more graphic novels for this review blog), but one of the very few titles that I did read was the Kill Shakespeare series.  This particular book picks up well after I stopped reading the individual comics (I stopped after one year). Here, Yesterday I finished a mystery novel using Shakespeare as the hero detective.  Today, Shakespeare continues to serve as a literary character in a slightly different way. I will admit that I hadn't been much of a comic book reader of late (until I started reading more graphic novels for this review blog), but one of the very few titles that I did read was the Kill Shakespeare series.  This particular book picks up well after I stopped reading the individual comics (I stopped after one year). Here, Shakespeare serves not only the creator of some of the world's most well-known fictional characters, but appears as a character himself, as a bit of a deity -- he is, after all, a creator.    The book centers around Prospero, on his island, as he schemes to bring Shakespeare to him in order to steal Shakespeare's powers.  Hamlet, Romeo, Juliet, and Othello try to fight Prospero off by taking the fight to the island. Certainly it's difficult to write new stories with characters who are so well known and studied.  Do they behave the way they 'should'?  But examining these characters in this way is pointless.  The worlds in which the characters existed for Shakespeare himself is completely different than the world that authors Connor McCreery and Anthony Del Col have created for this book.  Simply having Hamlet and Romeo and Othello standing side by side has already let the reader know we are in a different reality.  But I do wonder why we see these more famous of characters.  The Shakespeare canon is full of interesting characters.  Instead of a simpering Romeo, where's Orlando?  Need a villainous character?  Why stick with the obvious?  Where's Jachimo? All this is to say that we don't need only the 'name' or obvious characters to make it Shakespeare-related. So to the story: This is a volume three, and clearly much has been missed.  If the reader is not already familiar with what is going on, s/he will be left behind.  Even knowing the earliest part of the story, I still felt lost and out of the loop.  I very ,much like the over-all arc of the story, and dwelling here on Prospero's island, complete with all its magic, was nice, but felt drawn out.  We spend so much time going back and forth on the Hamlet/Juliet/Romeo triangle sub-plot and never getting to the bigger story, that there were times I just didn't want to read any more.  Lady Macbeth's portions of the story were much more interesting and kept my attention much better. The artwork by Andy Belanger was decent.  It's not as strong as other graphic novels I've look at recently, but better than others.  There were times I wasn't sure who was speaking, based simply on the artwork, but it captures the mood of Prospero's island quite well. The concept is strong, and when the writing moves the plot forward, it's captivating, but when it dwells on a sub-plot is drags along. Looking for a good book?  Playing with Shakespeare and his characters is fun and this series has some intriguing moments. This review originally published in the blog Looking For a Good Book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eoghann Irving

    If I wanted to give a comic book reader a quick idea of Kill Shakespeare I'd probably say it's like Fables only with you know... Shakespearian characters. Because, well, it is. Which is cool, because I like Fables. Pulling this off with characters and settings from probably the best known name in western literature is a bit more difficult than shuffling around already heavily used fairy tale characters though. There are certain expectations here. One thing you won't get is full on Shakespearian ve If I wanted to give a comic book reader a quick idea of Kill Shakespeare I'd probably say it's like Fables only with you know... Shakespearian characters. Because, well, it is. Which is cool, because I like Fables. Pulling this off with characters and settings from probably the best known name in western literature is a bit more difficult than shuffling around already heavily used fairy tale characters though. There are certain expectations here. One thing you won't get is full on Shakespearian verse. The writer makes no effort to mimic Shakespeare's writing style in that sense. He does pull out the thees and thous on a regular basis though and also throws in some clever nods and references to various bits of dialogue that most of us will recognize. It's probably for the best. More than that would likely have been distracting. In this universe Shakespeare is a creator. He's the creator of most if not all of the characters we meet and interact with. Being the third volume in the series, you are expected to know something about what is going on by this point, but I found it pretty easy to get up to speed and if you can't... well there's always wikipedia right? The story itself is a fairly simple one, but effectively told and it's interesting to see how the familiar names and characters slowly twist and morph outside of their traditional stories. It doesn't entirely feel like a complete story though. I mean this adventure does reach and end, but it just feels like it's all set up for the next one. A minor criticism. In terms of art, it's quite cartoony and yet seems to fit the material very well. Andy Belanger clearly has a firm grip on storytelling and uses panels effectively on the page. In places it does seem choppy and abrupt, but again that fits with what is happening in the story at the time. Not a must read book, but certainly interesting. I'd say give it a look, particularly if you like things like Fables.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dani Shuping

    ARC provided by NetGalley Richard III and Lady Macbeth have been defeated, but Titus remains. Hamlet and Juliet have continued to hold them off without the help of their maker will Shakespeare, but they may soon be overrun. And they face an even greater danger, Prospero, one of Will's first children has awoken and he means to destroy all creation. Only the Shadow King can stop him and hopefully the won't be too late. And perhaps, just perhaps, Romeo will prove himself. If you're a fan of Shakespea ARC provided by NetGalley Richard III and Lady Macbeth have been defeated, but Titus remains. Hamlet and Juliet have continued to hold them off without the help of their maker will Shakespeare, but they may soon be overrun. And they face an even greater danger, Prospero, one of Will's first children has awoken and he means to destroy all creation. Only the Shadow King can stop him and hopefully the won't be too late. And perhaps, just perhaps, Romeo will prove himself. If you're a fan of Shakespeare and a fan of the Fables series by Bill Willingham, then this comic should be right up your alley. The authors take the world of Shakespeare and turn it upside down. The characters are self aware and break the bonds of their own stories. In the previous two volumes the looked for...and found Master Shakespeare. Now they battle to save their world from the rouge wizard. One of the biggest problems that I had with the first two volumes is that I felt like I had to know all of Shakespeare to follow things, but that's been improved in this volume. Here the characters, while still somewhat attached to their stories, aren't hindered by their past. They live and breathe on their own, which makes it easier to follow them. The artwork isn't bad, and they finally, finally get to show emotions other than being angry! We actually see them smile. The characters are well drawn out and they've got a new colorist for this volume who is able to actually make the characters separate from the backgrounds and carry the same characteristics throughout the story, which is nice. All in all this is a great improvement upon the first two volumes, while still keeping alive the idea of Shakespeare's characters being alive. I look forward to seeing where it this story will go next. I give it 4 out of 5 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    Kill Shakespeare is an interesting idea for a comic book series. Take a bunch of fictional, well known characters and put them in a place where they meet, interact and have conflict. It's been done with fairy tale characters in Fables and the Brothers Grimm characters as well. The difference here is using characters that are well rounded, studied and written about in works by William Shakespeare. The characters would seem to have to act in accordance within their inner guidance and motives. It w Kill Shakespeare is an interesting idea for a comic book series. Take a bunch of fictional, well known characters and put them in a place where they meet, interact and have conflict. It's been done with fairy tale characters in Fables and the Brothers Grimm characters as well. The difference here is using characters that are well rounded, studied and written about in works by William Shakespeare. The characters would seem to have to act in accordance within their inner guidance and motives. It works here somewhat. In a land where William Shakespeare is the all powerful creator, his characters all exist together. This book has Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet and Othello all teaming up to fight a crazy plot by Prospero hatched on his crazy island backed up by Lady Macbeth. Prospero is trying to draw Shakespeare back so he can steal his powers. What he finds out is a lesson in the true cost of creating things. It's an interesting idea that left me a little conflicted. Since the characters are so well known, I wanted them to be somewhat truer to their nature. This is the third volume, so it's possible that was dealt with in earlier volumes. The speech is a passable dialect giving nods to original work while maintaining readability for modern readers. The art by Andy Belanger is really superb and I found myself poring over the details on the pages. I was given a review copy of this book by Diamond Book Distributors and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for letting me review this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I think I would have enjoyed it more if I had read the other two volumes in the series first. Much of the back-story that is needed to understand all the characters and their motivation happens before this volume starts. I recognized many of the players - Romeo, Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, Lady Macbeth, Prospero, Caliban. It was the rivalries and relationships that I was missing some of the pieces to understand. That being said... It is interesting to watch characters from different plays interact I think I would have enjoyed it more if I had read the other two volumes in the series first. Much of the back-story that is needed to understand all the characters and their motivation happens before this volume starts. I recognized many of the players - Romeo, Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, Lady Macbeth, Prospero, Caliban. It was the rivalries and relationships that I was missing some of the pieces to understand. That being said... It is interesting to watch characters from different plays interact with each other. The villains are still plotting and manipulating everyone. The heroes are still plagued by guilt and the ghosts of their pasts. The whole premise is very imaginative. Readers who enjoy a good remix and don't find it blasphemous that Shakespeare has been re-imagined in this way will enjoy the series immensely. And with all the plots twists and turns, it may create a whole new generation of fans for the bard. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Shakespeare has returned and Prospero has risen once more. He is intent on destroying Shakespeare, and rebuilding the world according to his own designs. Juliet, Hamlet, Othello and Romeo travel to Prospero's island intent on stopping him. The island, and indeed, Prospero, are filled with poison that will threaten everything. I picked this book up because the other two volumes were so much fun. How could I resist the third? I finished this book because the way the works and words of Shakespeare ar Shakespeare has returned and Prospero has risen once more. He is intent on destroying Shakespeare, and rebuilding the world according to his own designs. Juliet, Hamlet, Othello and Romeo travel to Prospero's island intent on stopping him. The island, and indeed, Prospero, are filled with poison that will threaten everything. I picked this book up because the other two volumes were so much fun. How could I resist the third? I finished this book because the way the works and words of Shakespeare are used to create a new story is quite intriguing. I would recommend this to high school English teachers who may have too many preconceived notions about the bard, and could use this to rekindle their love for his words.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Pierre Vidrine

    The creators of the first two Kill Shakespeare volumes prove that there is a lot to explore in the worlds of Shakespeare. Like the first story, the real strength here lies in the unexpected interactions of the characters. Prospero is a natural villain, but pitting him against -- not saying -- is a thrill to read. The enmity between Romeo and Hamlet makes for finer drama than I would have imagined. Andy Belanger's art is as lively as it should be for a story combining action, fantasy, and horror The creators of the first two Kill Shakespeare volumes prove that there is a lot to explore in the worlds of Shakespeare. Like the first story, the real strength here lies in the unexpected interactions of the characters. Prospero is a natural villain, but pitting him against -- not saying -- is a thrill to read. The enmity between Romeo and Hamlet makes for finer drama than I would have imagined. Andy Belanger's art is as lively as it should be for a story combining action, fantasy, and horror such as this. This collection features a nice short tale by Carrie J. Cole and Vivian Ng that gives some unexpected background on one character and her motives. Whether the Bard would approve or if he's spinning in his grave, I can't be sure. But this Shakespeare buff sure loves it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    So the Tempest might be my favorite Shakespeare play (though I was Prospero in college, so I'm more intimate with it than most others), meaning I can't be truly objective in my review of this volume. The wizard himself was written as wonderfully complex (as he is in the original) and there were some creative twists with regard to other characters from the original. I enjoyed the love triangle part of the story and thought it added some great tension to an already tense setting. McCreery is reall So the Tempest might be my favorite Shakespeare play (though I was Prospero in college, so I'm more intimate with it than most others), meaning I can't be truly objective in my review of this volume. The wizard himself was written as wonderfully complex (as he is in the original) and there were some creative twists with regard to other characters from the original. I enjoyed the love triangle part of the story and thought it added some great tension to an already tense setting. McCreery is really starting to get a good handle on his characterizations of at least the main characters and I'm looking forward to reading the next installment. I missed othello in this volume, though. We should've seen and heard more from him.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Starr

    I received a copy of this, free, in exchange for my honest opinion. I know that when I started reading this set of graphic novels, I was really excited about it. I got the first two volumes but then I had to wait for volume 3. I got a digital copy, free, from Netgalley and kind of forgot about it. So needless to say my excitement for it has dwindled some, but I did still enjoy it. Not sure what was going to happen with Shakespeare and his creation was a part of it. There is still impossible seem I received a copy of this, free, in exchange for my honest opinion. I know that when I started reading this set of graphic novels, I was really excited about it. I got the first two volumes but then I had to wait for volume 3. I got a digital copy, free, from Netgalley and kind of forgot about it. So needless to say my excitement for it has dwindled some, but I did still enjoy it. Not sure what was going to happen with Shakespeare and his creation was a part of it. There is still impossible seeming battles fought and no one comes away without scars. I am not sure if this is close to the end or if it will be long running, but I am looking forward to it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Soup

    ARC from Net Galley I've heard about this series for awhile, but this is the first time I've had an opportunity to actually read it. Jumping in mid-story was only slightly confusing (certainly not confusing enough that other new readers should avoid this title) and the plot laid out in this volume was compelling, gritty stuff. I'm not normally a fan of dark comics/graphics novels but I was genuinely intrigued by the dark elements presented. My favorite bit was the interesting ways in which Shakes ARC from Net Galley I've heard about this series for awhile, but this is the first time I've had an opportunity to actually read it. Jumping in mid-story was only slightly confusing (certainly not confusing enough that other new readers should avoid this title) and the plot laid out in this volume was compelling, gritty stuff. I'm not normally a fan of dark comics/graphics novels but I was genuinely intrigued by the dark elements presented. My favorite bit was the interesting ways in which Shakespeare's text has been re-purposed. Lines that are iconic and seem almost written in stone change drastically when presented in different contexts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: Read ARC via Netgalley. I should note before I move into this review that I have not read the first two volumes. I love the idea behind this. The characters of Shakespeare worshipping Shakespeare. I love that. I also love how the characters of Hamlet and Juliet are portrayed. I love how Romeo is done. The art, while not bad, didn’t particularly grab me. I also didn’t like the traditional good and bad girl stereotypes. What was particularly interesting was the use of the Tempest, in Disclaimer: Read ARC via Netgalley. I should note before I move into this review that I have not read the first two volumes. I love the idea behind this. The characters of Shakespeare worshipping Shakespeare. I love that. I also love how the characters of Hamlet and Juliet are portrayed. I love how Romeo is done. The art, while not bad, didn’t particularly grab me. I also didn’t like the traditional good and bad girl stereotypes. What was particularly interesting was the use of the Tempest, in particular the island. The twists here were rather unique and made up for the somewhat predictable plot.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lilja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The author seems to have grown in his mastery of faux Shakespeare prose. It reads much easier than volume one. The artist and colorist continue to be inventive and thrilling. Their page layouts are especially impressive. A lot of time is spent with Romeo in this book, which I thought was a shame because while his story was tragic and well written for many scenes, it felt over wrought in others. I would have preferred some balance struck by exploring more of Miranda's story. It felt like the auth The author seems to have grown in his mastery of faux Shakespeare prose. It reads much easier than volume one. The artist and colorist continue to be inventive and thrilling. Their page layouts are especially impressive. A lot of time is spent with Romeo in this book, which I thought was a shame because while his story was tragic and well written for many scenes, it felt over wrought in others. I would have preferred some balance struck by exploring more of Miranda's story. It felt like the author was leaving too much of her backstory out for me to appropriately connected with her, and have her sacrifice at the end be emotionally earned.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Opalenik

    I enjoyed Kill Shakespeare Vol 3 quite a bit. I liked Vol 1 & 2 better, but that's probably because this one is heavily influenced by the play The Tempest, which is probably the Shakespeare play I'm least familiar with. I think I'll read The Tempest and then give this a quick re-read. As always with this series it puts classic Shakespeare characters into a shared world in which they all interact in crazy ways. A Hamlet, Juliet, Romeo love triangle. Prospero trying to steal Shakespeare's creative I enjoyed Kill Shakespeare Vol 3 quite a bit. I liked Vol 1 & 2 better, but that's probably because this one is heavily influenced by the play The Tempest, which is probably the Shakespeare play I'm least familiar with. I think I'll read The Tempest and then give this a quick re-read. As always with this series it puts classic Shakespeare characters into a shared world in which they all interact in crazy ways. A Hamlet, Juliet, Romeo love triangle. Prospero trying to steal Shakespeare's creative powers. Shakespeare himself seen by the inhabitants of his plays as a God. Very fun.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    As a fantasy mash-up of many of Shakespeare's characters, this third volume continues plot lines from previous issues. New readers will have to infer who is chasing and/or connected with whom as the tale unfolds. The main plot line is the trip to Prospero's isle by Hamlet, Juliet, Romeo, Othello and others to stop him from destroying their world. In the end, they succeed with the intervention of Will, but not without fighting, betrayal, and bloodshed laying out conflicts for volumes to come. As a fantasy mash-up of many of Shakespeare's characters, this third volume continues plot lines from previous issues. New readers will have to infer who is chasing and/or connected with whom as the tale unfolds. The main plot line is the trip to Prospero's isle by Hamlet, Juliet, Romeo, Othello and others to stop him from destroying their world. In the end, they succeed with the intervention of Will, but not without fighting, betrayal, and bloodshed laying out conflicts for volumes to come.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I am really loving this series! Spoilers! Volume 3 begins 3 months after the battle of Shrewsbury between Juliet Capulet's rebels and the armies of Richard III and Lady Macbeth. Shakespeare is missing. Romeo is dealing with Juliet's relationship with Hamlet and our travellers encounter the characters from The Tempest - Propero, Miranda and Caliban on Prospero's island. A great read and I had the pleasure of meeting and speaking with the author Conor McCreery at this years Fan Expo in Toronto. I am really loving this series! Spoilers! Volume 3 begins 3 months after the battle of Shrewsbury between Juliet Capulet's rebels and the armies of Richard III and Lady Macbeth. Shakespeare is missing. Romeo is dealing with Juliet's relationship with Hamlet and our travellers encounter the characters from The Tempest - Propero, Miranda and Caliban on Prospero's island. A great read and I had the pleasure of meeting and speaking with the author Conor McCreery at this years Fan Expo in Toronto.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Diane Greiner

    I am not a big fan of graphic novels, I admit, but really thought this one had promise. I have not read the first two novels and that might have helped, but I didn't lose the nature of the story. Bringing in Shakespearean dialogue added to this story, but the violent nature of the illustrations drew me out of the story. This graphic novel is definitely geared to a adult audience, but I found it didn't flow or have purpose. This novel would not compel me to read other volumes in this series. I am not a big fan of graphic novels, I admit, but really thought this one had promise. I have not read the first two novels and that might have helped, but I didn't lose the nature of the story. Bringing in Shakespearean dialogue added to this story, but the violent nature of the illustrations drew me out of the story. This graphic novel is definitely geared to a adult audience, but I found it didn't flow or have purpose. This novel would not compel me to read other volumes in this series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    Shakespeare's Tempest takes a whole new twist. The story picks up after the fall of Richard in the second book as our heroes head off to Prospero's island. More wonderful art work, a cast of Shakespeare's best characters and a story full of treachery and love and violence that he would have been proud of. If you like comics an graphic novels you'll enjoy thi one. Shakespeare's Tempest takes a whole new twist. The story picks up after the fall of Richard in the second book as our heroes head off to Prospero's island. More wonderful art work, a cast of Shakespeare's best characters and a story full of treachery and love and violence that he would have been proud of. If you like comics an graphic novels you'll enjoy thi one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristen McDermott

    Alack. The promise of Vol. 2 is not realized. Unrealistic character choices, repetitive and chaotic art (in the words of Othello, Blood! Blood! Blood!), and the return of bad Shakespearean diction. One episode that might have made the last half of the book make more sense is appended to the end of the volume.

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