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I Believe You Are a Star: Interviews with New Zealand Musicians, Djs and Artists

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I BELIEVE YOU ARE A STAR is a collection of magazine articles written between 1992 and 2003 by Peter McLennan. He talked to New Zealand musicians just starting their recording careers (P-Money, Stellar, SJD, Black Seeds), through to established artists (Salmonella Dub, Shayne Carter, Bailter Space). They are fascinating insights of where these artists were at, and provide I BELIEVE YOU ARE A STAR is a collection of magazine articles written between 1992 and 2003 by Peter McLennan. He talked to New Zealand musicians just starting their recording careers (P-Money, Stellar, SJD, Black Seeds), through to established artists (Salmonella Dub, Shayne Carter, Bailter Space). They are fascinating insights of where these artists were at, and provide a look into their creative process. INTERVIEWS WITH: Shayne Carter/Dimmer, Salmonella Dub, Sola Rosa, SJD, Pitch Black, Bailter Space, P-Money, Dawn Raid, HDU, Black Seeds & Paddy Free on remixing, Paul Crowther, Darcy Clay, Graffiti art in Aotearoa: DLT, Otis Frizzell, Dan Tippett, Roger Perry, Kog Transmissions, JPSE, Stellar, Stereo Bus, Subliminals, Solid Gold Hell, Weta, Hinewehi Mohi, Kaya, Babel (Kieren Cooney & Andy 'Submariner' Morton), Stinky Jim, Mark de Clive-Lowe, Sheelahroc (Ladi6, Voodoo, Tyra Hammond), Fiona McDonald, Tigi Ness, Phase 5, Cloudboy, Epsilon Blue, Day One, Jakob, DJ Sir-vere and the ITF DJ champs, PLUS: articles on the Aotearoa Hiphop Summit 2001, The state of NZ music videos 1992, 1999.' Reviews: "Lots of interviews and features, decently written by someone who knows the score - what more could you wish for? The price is nice too, stupidly nice."- Stinky Jim "With a stylistically diverse range of performers and the earliest interviews carried out two decades ago, "I Believe You Are A Star" gives an overview of sounds, scenes and careers that have changed phenomenally since the original pieces were written. From noise rock to electronica, reggae to hiphop, te reo Maori music to chart pop, much ground is covered on McLennan's magical mystery tour, and you're only too happy to tag along for the ride." -Grant Smithies, Sunday Star Times ..". The title is borrowed from Shayne Carter's first album as Dimmer, and McLennan's 2001 interview with Carter opens the book. It's a good way to set the scene for the pieces that follow, which are about the difficult business of making music in New Zealand as much as they are about the creative output."- Philip Matthews, The Press/Dominion Post


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I BELIEVE YOU ARE A STAR is a collection of magazine articles written between 1992 and 2003 by Peter McLennan. He talked to New Zealand musicians just starting their recording careers (P-Money, Stellar, SJD, Black Seeds), through to established artists (Salmonella Dub, Shayne Carter, Bailter Space). They are fascinating insights of where these artists were at, and provide I BELIEVE YOU ARE A STAR is a collection of magazine articles written between 1992 and 2003 by Peter McLennan. He talked to New Zealand musicians just starting their recording careers (P-Money, Stellar, SJD, Black Seeds), through to established artists (Salmonella Dub, Shayne Carter, Bailter Space). They are fascinating insights of where these artists were at, and provide a look into their creative process. INTERVIEWS WITH: Shayne Carter/Dimmer, Salmonella Dub, Sola Rosa, SJD, Pitch Black, Bailter Space, P-Money, Dawn Raid, HDU, Black Seeds & Paddy Free on remixing, Paul Crowther, Darcy Clay, Graffiti art in Aotearoa: DLT, Otis Frizzell, Dan Tippett, Roger Perry, Kog Transmissions, JPSE, Stellar, Stereo Bus, Subliminals, Solid Gold Hell, Weta, Hinewehi Mohi, Kaya, Babel (Kieren Cooney & Andy 'Submariner' Morton), Stinky Jim, Mark de Clive-Lowe, Sheelahroc (Ladi6, Voodoo, Tyra Hammond), Fiona McDonald, Tigi Ness, Phase 5, Cloudboy, Epsilon Blue, Day One, Jakob, DJ Sir-vere and the ITF DJ champs, PLUS: articles on the Aotearoa Hiphop Summit 2001, The state of NZ music videos 1992, 1999.' Reviews: "Lots of interviews and features, decently written by someone who knows the score - what more could you wish for? The price is nice too, stupidly nice."- Stinky Jim "With a stylistically diverse range of performers and the earliest interviews carried out two decades ago, "I Believe You Are A Star" gives an overview of sounds, scenes and careers that have changed phenomenally since the original pieces were written. From noise rock to electronica, reggae to hiphop, te reo Maori music to chart pop, much ground is covered on McLennan's magical mystery tour, and you're only too happy to tag along for the ride." -Grant Smithies, Sunday Star Times ..". The title is borrowed from Shayne Carter's first album as Dimmer, and McLennan's 2001 interview with Carter opens the book. It's a good way to set the scene for the pieces that follow, which are about the difficult business of making music in New Zealand as much as they are about the creative output."- Philip Matthews, The Press/Dominion Post

9 review for I Believe You Are a Star: Interviews with New Zealand Musicians, Djs and Artists

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lee Wallace

    Good things: - A great insight into local bands and acts and singers from the era. Also sad, as most of the artists predicted great things for the future (next up, an album, we will go overseas soon, the follow-up album, how great it is working with a major label), and in retrospect the majority of these goals and relationships soured. I learned a lot even now, such as who was in what band and its offshoots. Not so good: - A lot of errors. This shows how the magazines of the day were a little lax Good things: - A great insight into local bands and acts and singers from the era. Also sad, as most of the artists predicted great things for the future (next up, an album, we will go overseas soon, the follow-up album, how great it is working with a major label), and in retrospect the majority of these goals and relationships soured. I learned a lot even now, such as who was in what band and its offshoots. Not so good: - A lot of errors. This shows how the magazines of the day were a little lax on the editing. It's fine to keep these mistakes in for posterity, however the acknowledgements section does mention that additional proofing was carried out. So it has fallen down in that regard.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vera

  3. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

  4. 4 out of 5

    James

  5. 5 out of 5

    NIVIN

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Pritchett

  7. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alma

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jobber

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