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Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures

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When Valentina Tereshkova blasted off aboard Vostok 6 on June 16, 1963, she became the first woman to rocket into space. It would be 19 years before another woman got a chance—cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982—followed by American astronaut Sally Ride a year later. By breaking the stratospheric ceiling, these women forged a path for many female astronauts, cosmonauts, When Valentina Tereshkova blasted off aboard Vostok 6 on June 16, 1963, she became the first woman to rocket into space. It would be 19 years before another woman got a chance—cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982—followed by American astronaut Sally Ride a year later. By breaking the stratospheric ceiling, these women forged a path for many female astronauts, cosmonauts, and mission specialists to follow.             Women in Space profiles 23 pioneers, including Eileen Collins, the first woman to command the space shuttle; Peggy Whitson, who logged more than a year in orbit aboard the International Space Station; and Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space; as well as astronauts from Japan, Canada, Italy, South Korea, France, and more. Readers will also learn about the Mercury 13, American women selected by NASA in the late 1950s to train for spaceflight. Though they matched and sometimes surpassed their male counterparts in performance, they were ultimately denied the opportunity to head out to the launching pad. Their story, and the stories of the pilots, physicists, and doctors who followed them, demonstrate the vital role women have played in the quest for scientific understanding.


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When Valentina Tereshkova blasted off aboard Vostok 6 on June 16, 1963, she became the first woman to rocket into space. It would be 19 years before another woman got a chance—cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982—followed by American astronaut Sally Ride a year later. By breaking the stratospheric ceiling, these women forged a path for many female astronauts, cosmonauts, When Valentina Tereshkova blasted off aboard Vostok 6 on June 16, 1963, she became the first woman to rocket into space. It would be 19 years before another woman got a chance—cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya in 1982—followed by American astronaut Sally Ride a year later. By breaking the stratospheric ceiling, these women forged a path for many female astronauts, cosmonauts, and mission specialists to follow.             Women in Space profiles 23 pioneers, including Eileen Collins, the first woman to command the space shuttle; Peggy Whitson, who logged more than a year in orbit aboard the International Space Station; and Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space; as well as astronauts from Japan, Canada, Italy, South Korea, France, and more. Readers will also learn about the Mercury 13, American women selected by NASA in the late 1950s to train for spaceflight. Though they matched and sometimes surpassed their male counterparts in performance, they were ultimately denied the opportunity to head out to the launching pad. Their story, and the stories of the pilots, physicists, and doctors who followed them, demonstrate the vital role women have played in the quest for scientific understanding.

30 review for Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    The title is indeed literal, so this book showcases women who have actually been in space, not women who have worked on the space program but did not make it into orbit. In addition to those 23, there's also a chapter that briefly but fairly thoroughly talks about the Mercury 13. Most of these women are not going to be readily known to anyone who isn't a hardcore space enthusiast, and it's interesting to see the different paths these women took to get to space. The title is indeed literal, so this book showcases women who have actually been in space, not women who have worked on the space program but did not make it into orbit. In addition to those 23, there's also a chapter that briefly but fairly thoroughly talks about the Mercury 13. Most of these women are not going to be readily known to anyone who isn't a hardcore space enthusiast, and it's interesting to see the different paths these women took to get to space.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ruth McAvinia

    Written for a young adult audience, this book disappoints with its many factual and typographical errors. Although published in 2014, it seems stuck in the shuttle era and feels biased in favour of US missions. Frustrating that the editors didn’t catch mistakes like the assertion that a re-entering shuttle flew “at 25 times the speed of light” or gendered language such as “manned mission”. The women (and men) of space deserve better.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judy & Marianne from Long and Short Reviews

    Everything I thought I knew about the space program went out the window when I read this book. This is a YA book, but it’s easily enjoyable by readers of all ages. The writing flows well and hooked me right away. I learned a lot about the women who’ve been to space. Not just that the US sent women, but the first women in Russia and across the globe. Sure, there is a large portion on US astronauts, but it’s balanced by plenty of stories about other female astronauts. Each chapter is easily understo Everything I thought I knew about the space program went out the window when I read this book. This is a YA book, but it’s easily enjoyable by readers of all ages. The writing flows well and hooked me right away. I learned a lot about the women who’ve been to space. Not just that the US sent women, but the first women in Russia and across the globe. Sure, there is a large portion on US astronauts, but it’s balanced by plenty of stories about other female astronauts. Each chapter is easily understood and well-written. I liked how the author made the women interesting and understandable. It’s not just a story where there is information and it’s presented blandly. Instead, it’s told in a bouncy way that drew me in. I’m glad I read this book. I’ve wanted to know more about female astronauts and the space program, so this was a perfect piece to add to that puzzle. If you’re interested in the full story of space, this is one book you won’t want to miss.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I found a handful of typos in this book, but I really enjoyed learning about women astronauts, many of whom I'd never heard of. I also enjoyed getting some background on the Mercury 13 and the space race. I found a handful of typos in this book, but I really enjoyed learning about women astronauts, many of whom I'd never heard of. I also enjoyed getting some background on the Mercury 13 and the space race.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Meg Marie

    How have I been so into the space race a d never known about the Mercury 13? (Probably because men are trash.) This is a great primer that honors all the women with the Right Stuff, and I'm going to read it to my daughter. How have I been so into the space race a d never known about the Mercury 13? (Probably because men are trash.) This is a great primer that honors all the women with the Right Stuff, and I'm going to read it to my daughter.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thom

    Started reading this aloud with my daughter during Women's History Month, and it started off well. However, most of the 23 entries read like encyclopedia entries, or perhaps a middle school report. My middle schooler complained that she got lost in the words at times. Editing was a problem also, with several errors spotted over the course of the book. On the plus side, now she really wants to learn more about Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. Disclaimer - I haven't read any other "W Started reading this aloud with my daughter during Women's History Month, and it started off well. However, most of the 23 entries read like encyclopedia entries, or perhaps a middle school report. My middle schooler complained that she got lost in the words at times. Editing was a problem also, with several errors spotted over the course of the book. On the plus side, now she really wants to learn more about Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. Disclaimer - I haven't read any other "Women of Action" series books. Recommended as a reference, or source material for school reports. I can't think of any young adults that would enjoy reading this cover to cover.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theresaharris

    This book is listed in our local library as a Young Adult book, perhaps because of its simplicity; but it’s easily enjoyable by readers of all ages. The actual writing itself is a little stilted, making it sometimes difficult to get into a smooth reader’s flow, but if you are interested in achievement of women, the essence will send you into orbit! Women In Space profiles 23 pioneers and provides terrific basics that will leave you wanting to know more and conveniently, the book also provides si This book is listed in our local library as a Young Adult book, perhaps because of its simplicity; but it’s easily enjoyable by readers of all ages. The actual writing itself is a little stilted, making it sometimes difficult to get into a smooth reader’s flow, but if you are interested in achievement of women, the essence will send you into orbit! Women In Space profiles 23 pioneers and provides terrific basics that will leave you wanting to know more and conveniently, the book also provides sidebars of additional information and suggests further reading with references including internet links. The stories demonstrate the vital role women have played in the quest for scientific understanding and ignite a flame of interest in space programs for all readers. Divided into four sections: The Apollo 13 Women, Cosmonauts, American Astronauts, and World Astronauts, it includes Eileen Collins, born in Elmira, New York in 1956, graduated from Syracuse University in 1978, who became the first woman to command the space shuttle; Peggy Whitson, who logged more than a year in orbit aboard the International Space Station; and Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space; as well as astronauts from Japan, Canada, Italy, South Korea, France, and more. The book is filled with fact and also dotted with interesting anecdotes such as when the first African American female astronaut, Mae Jemison, who loved astronomy and science fiction stories as a girl told her kindergarten teacher she wanted to be a scientist, her teacher said, “You mean a nurse.” These women are “SHEroes”…the names and stories of whom we all should be familiar. I encourage you to pick up a copy of this book and be inspired and proud of women’s stories. It will help you understand the reasons why Zonta International chooses to award (35) US$10,000 Fellowships annually to women pursuing Ph.D./doctoral degrees in aerospace engineering and space sciences, to be used at any university or college offering accredited post-graduate courses and degrees in these fields.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures is written by Karen Bush Gibson and pays homage to twenty-three amazing women astronauts/cosmonauts who ventured into the Final Frontier. This book is divided into four chapters: The Apollo 13 Women, Cosmonauts, American Astronauts, and World Astronauts. Gibson has written powerful, riveting, and concise biographies for each and every one of these women astronauts/cosmonauts and advancing scientific Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures is written by Karen Bush Gibson and pays homage to twenty-three amazing women astronauts/cosmonauts who ventured into the Final Frontier. This book is divided into four chapters: The Apollo 13 Women, Cosmonauts, American Astronauts, and World Astronauts. Gibson has written powerful, riveting, and concise biographies for each and every one of these women astronauts/cosmonauts and advancing scientific frontiers. Gibson has meticulously written and researched the women rather well. It was sobering to read about the Apollo 13 – about the astronauts that may have been. It was also sobering to read about Judith Resnik and Kalpana Chawla their lives to the space program. All in all, Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures is a wonderfully written book of mini-biographies about twenty-three amazing astronauts and cosmonauts, who happens to be women. It is a good read and reference book for anyone who wants to learn more about women in history.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bob Crawford

    There’s so much more to tell I’m 70 and a long-time space exploration enthusiast. I was excited to read about the lives and careers of female astronauts. But this book is clearly targeted at teen and pre-teen readers. There’s nothing wrong with that but I wish I had known. For an adult reader, especially a space enthusiast, there is so much more to tell about these brave and accomplished women. In fact, with each chapter I learned more by reading a Wikipedia entry for the specific astronaut than I There’s so much more to tell I’m 70 and a long-time space exploration enthusiast. I was excited to read about the lives and careers of female astronauts. But this book is clearly targeted at teen and pre-teen readers. There’s nothing wrong with that but I wish I had known. For an adult reader, especially a space enthusiast, there is so much more to tell about these brave and accomplished women. In fact, with each chapter I learned more by reading a Wikipedia entry for the specific astronaut than I did from the book. While this easy read may encourage pre-teen girls to pursue STEM studies, it is not a complete or nuanced portrayal of these groundbreaking women.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Given up on the astronaut Barbie page about 20% through after scanning the index for relevant protips. Honestly, right now I am now watching a lady interviewing from the International Space Station, the link for which I received from this book. I think that made it worthwhile to borrow this book! I didn't really care for the emotional blah-de-blah of the disappointments it discusses, but I am now stoked to learn more about physics, mathematics and what it really means to move with grace and digni Given up on the astronaut Barbie page about 20% through after scanning the index for relevant protips. Honestly, right now I am now watching a lady interviewing from the International Space Station, the link for which I received from this book. I think that made it worthwhile to borrow this book! I didn't really care for the emotional blah-de-blah of the disappointments it discusses, but I am now stoked to learn more about physics, mathematics and what it really means to move with grace and dignity.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    A good entry book into the subject. A few bios really caught my attention. The notes provided at the end of each chapter are helpful and will provide further reading material with a more in-depth take on the subject at hand. Some errors in the book, but I'm overlooking them due to this book being a gateway to further reading. A good entry book into the subject. A few bios really caught my attention. The notes provided at the end of each chapter are helpful and will provide further reading material with a more in-depth take on the subject at hand. Some errors in the book, but I'm overlooking them due to this book being a gateway to further reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    This book was informative, but it's unfortunate that no one took the time to proofread it. The many glaring typographical errors were distracting, including misspelled words, writing "South Korea" as "SouthKorea," and claiming that shuttle speed upon reentry is "25 times the speed of light" when it clearly should have been "25 times the speed of sound." This book was informative, but it's unfortunate that no one took the time to proofread it. The many glaring typographical errors were distracting, including misspelled words, writing "South Korea" as "SouthKorea," and claiming that shuttle speed upon reentry is "25 times the speed of light" when it clearly should have been "25 times the speed of sound."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annika Brock

    Despite the fact that no one bothered to edit this, or fact check the science at all (see: "reentered the atmosphere at 25 times the speed of light"), it's a good starting point if nothing else. Despite the fact that no one bothered to edit this, or fact check the science at all (see: "reentered the atmosphere at 25 times the speed of light"), it's a good starting point if nothing else.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    3.5/5 stars. Like other reviewers, I'm disappointed with all the typos in this book. I will say, they did fix the "25 times the speed of light" typo in my edition. This book was fine. I'd recommend it for anyone looking for an introduction to women in space. 3.5/5 stars. Like other reviewers, I'm disappointed with all the typos in this book. I will say, they did fix the "25 times the speed of light" typo in my edition. This book was fine. I'd recommend it for anyone looking for an introduction to women in space.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Read selections from this (out loud) while doing space unit with 12yo. She loved the chapters we read. It was the perfect level for her to get a lot out of it (great for upper middle to high schoolers).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel S

    Reads like encyclopedic entries after a while - I would have preferred it if they had read slightly more personal. There were also some editing issues/typos but the book was a great starter point in introducing a lot of incredible, well-accomplished women.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katie R.

    This book was amazing! I loved it because I really love space, and I want to work for N.A.S.A when I grow up just like the 23 women in this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Burgod

    Okay but a bit boring.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tettyk

    I wanted to love a book about both space pioneers and women as I am both a feminist and a space nerd. But the writing in this book is so so shoddy. At one point, Discovery reenters the atmosphere at 25x the speed of light. THE SPEED OF LIGHT. The author is obviously not an engineer or scientist and writes as if this is one of a series of books to inspire middle school girls, but did they not ask any scientists or engineers to fact check this book? Nobody caught the mother of all violations of th I wanted to love a book about both space pioneers and women as I am both a feminist and a space nerd. But the writing in this book is so so shoddy. At one point, Discovery reenters the atmosphere at 25x the speed of light. THE SPEED OF LIGHT. The author is obviously not an engineer or scientist and writes as if this is one of a series of books to inspire middle school girls, but did they not ask any scientists or engineers to fact check this book? Nobody caught the mother of all violations of the laws of physics? I would have thrown the book across the room except I can't spare my Kindle and I was on an airplane.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Chicago Review Press adds to their “Women of Action” series with this compendium of vignettes about the remarkable women who became part of the space program. (While more than fifty women have now traveled into outer space, 23 are profiled in depth in this book.) There are many interesting anecdotes in this book, such as the fact that the television series “Star Trek” was originally envisioned by Gene Roddenberry as having a female captain, but sponsors refused to sign on unless the captain was a Chicago Review Press adds to their “Women of Action” series with this compendium of vignettes about the remarkable women who became part of the space program. (While more than fifty women have now traveled into outer space, 23 are profiled in depth in this book.) There are many interesting anecdotes in this book, such as the fact that the television series “Star Trek” was originally envisioned by Gene Roddenberry as having a female captain, but sponsors refused to sign on unless the captain was a man. Roddenberry acceded to their demands, and the Enterprise was commanded by William Shatner as James T. Kirk. Nichelle Nichols, who played Lieutenant Uhura on “Star Trek,” was tempted to leave the show after one year to pursue a Broadway career. She reported that a conversation with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., changed her mind. He urged her to stay, telling her she was providing a vital role model for black children and young women across the country. When “Star Trek” was cancelled, Nichols went around to high schools and colleges to encourage women and minorities to apply to be astronauts. It was she who recruited Guion Bluford, Jr., who became the first African American in space. Mae Jemison also said that Nichols influenced her desire to be an astronaut. Mae Jemison, the first African American female astronaut, loved astronomy and science fiction stories as a girl. But when she told her kindergarten teacher she wanted to be a scientist, her teacher said, “You mean a nurse.” Somehow, in spite of all the discouragement, Jemison persevered, starting Stanford at just age 16 in the chemical engineering department. She went on to Cornell Medical School, the Peace Corps, and graduate studies in engineering courses before applying successfully to the astronaut program in 1987. Barbara Morgan’s story would make anyone think twice about a career in space. First, she was chosen as an alternate for Christa McAuliffe to be the first teacher in space. Christa McAuliffe was part of the flight that blew up on television when the space shuttle Challenger exploded on January 28, 1986, killing all of its crew. The Teacher In Space program was discontinued, so then Barbara trained to be an astronaut and graduated her class in 1998. In 2002, she was assigned to a November, 2003 mission on the Columbia shuttle, but it exploded on reentry on February 1, 2003, killing all crew members. You would think she would step back, but she too was persistent, and finally got safely into space and back in 2007 on the Endeavour. At the end of each chapter, resources are provided to learn more about the woman being profiled. There are also occasional sidebars with supplementary information like listings of types of jobs in space, summaries of other NASA projects, and the effects of space on aging. A glossary and bibliography are appended. Evaluation: It’s hard not to be inspired by the stories in this book. In spite of a huge amount of discouragement from society, these women vowed to stop at nothing to achieve their dreams.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    Women in Space is a nonfiction novel about the women who have become astronauts and is geared towards young adults. I picked this up for two reasons, one I fully believe in another life I would have been an astronaut (if math didn’t make me cry and I didn’t get stick with anxiety & depression) and two because I really want to read more about Kalpana who despite being India’s first female astronaut doesn’t have a lot written about her. Even in this book she doesn’t get a lot of pages. Overall I li Women in Space is a nonfiction novel about the women who have become astronauts and is geared towards young adults. I picked this up for two reasons, one I fully believe in another life I would have been an astronaut (if math didn’t make me cry and I didn’t get stick with anxiety & depression) and two because I really want to read more about Kalpana who despite being India’s first female astronaut doesn’t have a lot written about her. Even in this book she doesn’t get a lot of pages. Overall I liked it. It’s simplistic in format and covers a wide range of astronauts, and even if some of the women didn’t get full bios they usually popped up in another person’s bio as well. There were some small editing issues that were a tad annoying to read in a finished book, and the way it’s written makes the work seem a lot of denser than it actually is. I really hated that a lot of bios were structured as: interesting mid career explanation, jump unannounced back to her past, and then move back through her whole career. It would have worked if the first paragraph had explained her importance to the mission or country, and then moved back to her past…but some of these mid career stories lasted several paragraphs and then without warning I’d be reading about something that happened 15 years in the past. It was very discombobulating. It’s not a book that should have taken me longer than a few days, but I had to keep taking breaks due to the writing style and it lasted me over a week. I do think it has a lot of value as far as educational purposes go for younger readers and there is a lot of great info in it, and not just on the women themselves but also about the space stations and life up there. There are a lot of teachable moments and plenty of extra sources and reading material that can lead to independent study as well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meg - A Bookish Affair

    "Women in Space" is another book in the fantastic Women in Action series. This is a non-fiction series geared for young adult readers and it is really fantastic. "Women in Space" is a collection of stories of the women who dared to go to the final frontier: space. I was drawn to this book by my own fascination with space and those people that were brave enough to explore it. I was not disappointed with this book at all. When I was little, I wanted to be an astronaut and I grew up looking up to so "Women in Space" is another book in the fantastic Women in Action series. This is a non-fiction series geared for young adult readers and it is really fantastic. "Women in Space" is a collection of stories of the women who dared to go to the final frontier: space. I was drawn to this book by my own fascination with space and those people that were brave enough to explore it. I was not disappointed with this book at all. When I was little, I wanted to be an astronaut and I grew up looking up to so many of these women. This was a great collection and although I knew about some of these women, there were many that I did not know about. I love learning something new when I'm reading. This book was well written and would be a great introduction for young adult readers who want an overview of these truly amazing women. Each story is a short overview of a certain person or even group of people (did you know that there were women who trained for the Mercury flights??? I had no idea). The book covers both American women and women from other countries who traveled to space. This book definitely whetted my appetite to learn more about some of these women! Overall, this is another great addition to this series!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    The subtitle telling you that it is a book of 23 stories of first flights, scientific missions, and gravity-breaking adventures is spot on because one of the only disappointments in the book is that the chronology wasn't clearly defined in terms of the stories. I would get in to a chapter and think, didn't I read a bit about this already, but not because it was built upon from a previous chapter, rather mentioned in terms of another story, event, or person. Absolutely integral in playing up STEM The subtitle telling you that it is a book of 23 stories of first flights, scientific missions, and gravity-breaking adventures is spot on because one of the only disappointments in the book is that the chronology wasn't clearly defined in terms of the stories. I would get in to a chapter and think, didn't I read a bit about this already, but not because it was built upon from a previous chapter, rather mentioned in terms of another story, event, or person. Absolutely integral in playing up STEM to girls, there is so much empowerment already that snippets of chapters like these do well to say, hey, they did it, so can I. And the chapters of these women's stories don't gloss over the hard-fought battles they had, rather it showed their strength, determination, and grit. It gives a bit of history on each of the women's childhood, education, technical experience and their experience with NASA, both in terms of triumph but also tragedy. My favorite parts were the sidenotes littering the stories that taught me so much about space exploration. Invaluable tool and sadly more historical because of the US' position in stopping funding NASA's space programs.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This book had a ton of great info about a large number of astronauts, and was engaging and interesting, but it REALLY needed a better editor! It appears that the chapters were written in isolation, and then not edited when put together - info was often strangely repeated or not properly explained in adjacent chapters. Also, the book seems to have a problem with Russian history and/or geography -- in the introduction, the Soviet Union is referred to in the present tense as the current launch site This book had a ton of great info about a large number of astronauts, and was engaging and interesting, but it REALLY needed a better editor! It appears that the chapters were written in isolation, and then not edited when put together - info was often strangely repeated or not properly explained in adjacent chapters. Also, the book seems to have a problem with Russian history and/or geography -- in the introduction, the Soviet Union is referred to in the present tense as the current launch site of Soyuz space capsules. Also, Baikonur, Russia is referred to in one chapter, and in the next chapter, it is referred to as Baikonur, Kazakhstan (the correct country.) How could these things have gotten past the author and editor?!

  25. 5 out of 5

    BookishBat

    This was an interesting and informative book about some of the most famous women to have gone into space or trained to do so. I was shocked to learn about the Mercury 13, a group of women I had never heard of before, and very impressed by their durability and determination. I liked how the countries are separated by sections and each woman has her own chapter. I would have enjoyed a few more pictures of the women being discussed, but all in all I gained some new historical knowledge and it was f This was an interesting and informative book about some of the most famous women to have gone into space or trained to do so. I was shocked to learn about the Mercury 13, a group of women I had never heard of before, and very impressed by their durability and determination. I liked how the countries are separated by sections and each woman has her own chapter. I would have enjoyed a few more pictures of the women being discussed, but all in all I gained some new historical knowledge and it was fun to read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    A quick and interesting read about women in space: from the first women who went through training but were denied a chance to fly into space, to Sally Ride, Shannon Lucid, Eileen Collins and many others who have lead the way for women in space.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Shepherd

    A lot of research went into the writing here. There is so much I did not about the women who aspired to go into space and those who actually realized their dreams. I would recommend this book to all young readers interested in space, the astronaut programs.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    Reviewed for professional publication.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Fine for what it was, but a bit tedious and took me two months to get through. The profiles were generally all really similar and I could only read one or two at a time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Targeted to young girls, about 11-15 years old. Unfortunately reads like a very dry collection of biographies.

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