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This beautiful volume celebrates one of the twentieth century's most important photographers, Dorothea Lange. Led off by an authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge (Lange's goddaughter), the book goes on to showcase Lange's work in over a hundred glorious plates. Dorothea Lange is the only career-spanning monograph of this major photographer's oeuvre in pri This beautiful volume celebrates one of the twentieth century's most important photographers, Dorothea Lange. Led off by an authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge (Lange's goddaughter), the book goes on to showcase Lange's work in over a hundred glorious plates. Dorothea Lange is the only career-spanning monograph of this major photographer's oeuvre in print, and features images ranging from her iconic Depression-era photograph "Migrant Mother" to lesser-known images from her global travels later in life. Presented as the companion book to a PBS American Masters episode that will air in 2014, this deluxe hardcover offers an intimate and unparalleled view into the life and work of one of our most cherished documentary photographers.


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This beautiful volume celebrates one of the twentieth century's most important photographers, Dorothea Lange. Led off by an authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge (Lange's goddaughter), the book goes on to showcase Lange's work in over a hundred glorious plates. Dorothea Lange is the only career-spanning monograph of this major photographer's oeuvre in pri This beautiful volume celebrates one of the twentieth century's most important photographers, Dorothea Lange. Led off by an authoritative biographical essay by Elizabeth Partridge (Lange's goddaughter), the book goes on to showcase Lange's work in over a hundred glorious plates. Dorothea Lange is the only career-spanning monograph of this major photographer's oeuvre in print, and features images ranging from her iconic Depression-era photograph "Migrant Mother" to lesser-known images from her global travels later in life. Presented as the companion book to a PBS American Masters episode that will air in 2014, this deluxe hardcover offers an intimate and unparalleled view into the life and work of one of our most cherished documentary photographers.

30 review for Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning

  1. 5 out of 5

    E. G.

    --Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning Endnotes Image Credits Quotation Sources for Photographic Plates Acknowledgments Index

  2. 5 out of 5

    William West

    This is in response to the great exhibit of Lange's work at the Oakland Museum of California, "The Politics of Seeing", composed of a wealth of prints Lange donated to the museum late in life. Lange's images of the urban unemployed during the Depression are, of course, singularly powerful testaments of that age, and they earned her a job working as a New Deal documentary photographer, resulting in her most iconic work: her documentation of the struggles of Dust Bowl migrants. But her most heroic This is in response to the great exhibit of Lange's work at the Oakland Museum of California, "The Politics of Seeing", composed of a wealth of prints Lange donated to the museum late in life. Lange's images of the urban unemployed during the Depression are, of course, singularly powerful testaments of that age, and they earned her a job working as a New Deal documentary photographer, resulting in her most iconic work: her documentation of the struggles of Dust Bowl migrants. But her most heroic and, for me, powerful images are those her government employers censored. Ordered to document WHITE poverty by the FDR Administration, Lange documented the abusive conditions suffered by Black farm-workers in the Jim Crowe South. Many of these images the Roosevelt administration, those paragons of progress, cropped to omit the Black faces thus making the White overseers seem respectably self-reliant. Lange bit even harder at the hand that fed her when she documented the fascistic disenfranchisement and internment of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. Refusing orders to stop taking pictures she knew would never see the light of day, Lange and the U.S government parted ways. The last section of the exhibit was composed of Lange's photos from the 1950's, documenting the destruction of nature and displacement of oppressed communities that resulted from the construction of what became Californian suburban sprawl. The final image of a terrified, lost horse galloping through its destroyed, violated terrain, seems a fair metaphor for American subjectivity as captured by Lange's camera.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I recently saw the American Masters film on the life of Dorothea Lange on PBS, and I knew that I had to read and view (view definitely being the operative word) this companion volume. The book consists of a short biographical essay, followed by many of Lange's most memorable photographs. Her most famous, Migrant Mother is here, of course, but there were others that tell other devastating stories: unemployed men in San Fransisco, Japanese children in internment camps, black sharecroppers in the S I recently saw the American Masters film on the life of Dorothea Lange on PBS, and I knew that I had to read and view (view definitely being the operative word) this companion volume. The book consists of a short biographical essay, followed by many of Lange's most memorable photographs. Her most famous, Migrant Mother is here, of course, but there were others that tell other devastating stories: unemployed men in San Fransisco, Japanese children in internment camps, black sharecroppers in the South. The photographs are all visually stunning, but this quote of Lange's resonated with me the most: One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind. To live a visual life is an enormous undertaking, practically unattainable. I have only touched it, just touched it. Update: I read this book again In 2020 after reading Learning to See, because I wanted to refresh my memory on the actual details of her life and immerse myself once again in her photography.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caelie

    My fave quote and take away: "You can't do people in trouble without photographing people who are not in trouble, too. You have to have those contrasts." My fave quote and take away: "You can't do people in trouble without photographing people who are not in trouble, too. You have to have those contrasts."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Terry Kuny

    This is a stunning volume. Partridge's text really performs the task of letting Lange speak of her own life and work. It feels like a good balance between life story and art story. The photos are presented well and the captions (something Lange herself was attentive too) refine the photo, placing it into its vital context. The humanity of her work never ceases to come through and Lange is anything but a dispassionate eye of loss and hardship and the casual brutality of economics and politics. La This is a stunning volume. Partridge's text really performs the task of letting Lange speak of her own life and work. It feels like a good balance between life story and art story. The photos are presented well and the captions (something Lange herself was attentive too) refine the photo, placing it into its vital context. The humanity of her work never ceases to come through and Lange is anything but a dispassionate eye of loss and hardship and the casual brutality of economics and politics. Lange's own observations about photography and her subjects are well documented here and enrich our understanding of her art and the context of its creation. This is a terrific survey of a seminal American photographer whose works resonate as much today as they did when they were taken.

  6. 4 out of 5

    False

    An oversized book with the major works of Lange. A nicely written history in the introduction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Outstanding Photography Book about Dorothy's Lange This is a great YA photography biography of Dorothea Lange. Contains a biography of her life with many of poignant quotes and beautiful photographs of hers displayed in a lovely way. My only caveat is that I wish I could have seen photographs of her family, not just her photographs. Outstanding Photography Book about Dorothy's Lange This is a great YA photography biography of Dorothea Lange. Contains a biography of her life with many of poignant quotes and beautiful photographs of hers displayed in a lovely way. My only caveat is that I wish I could have seen photographs of her family, not just her photographs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Juanita De Vittorio

    The story of Lange is one of compassion. The polio that struck her when she was seven was, as she said, was the defining event that shaped her life. As she approached the marginal and poverty-stricken to record their lives on film, she found that, "...to be a crippled person...gives an immense advantage...It puts you on a different level than if you go into a situation whole and secure." Her experience of pain and humanity created a huge monument, not a heavy one of rock and cement of the Statue The story of Lange is one of compassion. The polio that struck her when she was seven was, as she said, was the defining event that shaped her life. As she approached the marginal and poverty-stricken to record their lives on film, she found that, "...to be a crippled person...gives an immense advantage...It puts you on a different level than if you go into a situation whole and secure." Her experience of pain and humanity created a huge monument, not a heavy one of rock and cement of the Statue of Liberty that her grandparents followed, but one that opens up spaciousness and compassion in the heart and the American landscape.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jan Weishaar

    The story of Dorothea Lange's life and her body of creative work is so much more than her well-known photograph of the Migrant Mother. This book chronicles a time in the United States that was not so great for those who were poor and treated unfairly. It is relevant today. The story of Lange's personal life is told, as well as her professional life. Also chronicled here are her thoughts on humanity, as she traveled and photographed people in several countries. The second half of the book is the The story of Dorothea Lange's life and her body of creative work is so much more than her well-known photograph of the Migrant Mother. This book chronicles a time in the United States that was not so great for those who were poor and treated unfairly. It is relevant today. The story of Lange's personal life is told, as well as her professional life. Also chronicled here are her thoughts on humanity, as she traveled and photographed people in several countries. The second half of the book is the photo exhibit she put together as she was dying.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pat Loughery

    Before reading this book, I knew something of Dorothea Lange, but not much. This peek into her social documentary photography was powerful... And watching her grow into her vision and voice was astounding. She's now one of my artistic heroes, and photographic heroes. I will be studying more of her work, as much as I can find. Before reading this book, I knew something of Dorothea Lange, but not much. This peek into her social documentary photography was powerful... And watching her grow into her vision and voice was astounding. She's now one of my artistic heroes, and photographic heroes. I will be studying more of her work, as much as I can find.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BiblioBrandie

    I love Dorothea Lange and this is a wonderful collection of words and images. Probably one that I need to own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gremrien

    I have read the book within my resolution to read more books about art. I love Dorothea Lange’s style a lot, plus I am interested in the Great Depression — bingo! This book presents a short description of her life and work and several dozens of photographs. Previously I knew nothing about Dorothea Lange; I only always marked for myself how beautiful her pictures are. They are very recognizable and idiosyncratic even now, after so many photographers imitated her style. What interesting things I lea I have read the book within my resolution to read more books about art. I love Dorothea Lange’s style a lot, plus I am interested in the Great Depression — bingo! This book presents a short description of her life and work and several dozens of photographs. Previously I knew nothing about Dorothea Lange; I only always marked for myself how beautiful her pictures are. They are very recognizable and idiosyncratic even now, after so many photographers imitated her style. What interesting things I learned: 1. Her famous photographs about the Great Depression were not a lyric personal project, you know (and one can easily make such a conclusion looking at them, because they look like exquisite and meticulous art). It was not only simple documentary photography — it was actually quite routine work. Dorothea Lange was an official employee (among other similar photographers and reporters) of a state organization who documented dismal conditions of life and work of internal migrants during the Great Depression. The goal of this work was to help these people on the basis of these reports. This was called “a social observer.” Quote: “Stryker’s mandate was to show the desperate conditions of the rural poor to Americans, and to persuade political leaders to allocate aid. He set up a darkroom and studio in Washington, DC, and hired a staff of photographers, among them Jack Delano, Walker Evans, Russell Lee, Gordon Parks, Arthur Rothstein, Ben Shahn, and Marion Post Wolcott. Newspapers and magazines ran their photos, along with stories explaining the plight of the migrants, the causes of the dust bowl, and the need for government programs to fund loans and assist farmers to relocate.” As a result of this work, thousands of migrants were placed into clean and organized camps, which were specially built for them. Quote: “Paul Taylor immediately submitted reports using Dorothea’s photographs, recommending the government build camps to provide decent housing for the migrants. Farm owners were bitterly opposed to the camps, afraid they would be used by the migrants to organize. Hostile townspeople wanted migrants to keep moving. But Paul persevered, and money was allocated to a statewide program. In Nipomo, land was scraped off and leveled to build a camp before the next winter’s cold, wet pea-picking season. By June, two camps in California were set up with tents, running water, toilets, and a place to gather.” This was a direct result of Dorothea Lange’s work. She was not a journalistic vulture hunting for “dramatic photographs.” She loved and respected these people and wanted to help them eagerly, that’s why she was collecting all those grim pictures of their poor life. She took their problems very close to her heart and exhausted herself over these reports. She was very devoted to this work, and it was hard work because she shoud have had not only to drive to different places every day and then walk among migrants, talk to them, write down their words, photograph them, but also later describe all this and send the reports with her photographs into the central office. Every day, as many reports as possible, to facilitate the necessary help. Quote: “Letters between Stryker and Dorothea flew back and forth, her pages bursting with reports on field conditions, camaraderie, irritation, insistent needs for travel funds, special allowances for doing her own printing, and urgent appeals for approval to cover new tragedies as they unfolded.” This love and respect are obvious from her pictures, I believe, although she could have just made simple bleak photographs of “living conditions,” without all those gorgeous faces and eyes, and it would be enough for her practical purposes. Quote: “But Dorothea didn’t photograph to show them as broken, busted, in need of handouts. She searched to portray their courage and strength, trying to find it in their postures, the ingenuity of their shelters, their willingness to work hard, and their valiant attempts to care for their children.” In her own words: Quote: “Their roots were all torn out. The only background they had was a background of utter poverty. It’s very hard to photograph a proud man against a background like that, because it doesn’t show what he’s proud about. I had to get my camera to register the things about those people that were more important than how poor they were — their pride, their strength, their spirit.” I agree: this is the most valuable feature of all her photographs, although I did not realize it previously so clearly. Dorothea Lange is a case when dry documentary photography becomes luxurious art and captured history in all its glory. 2. The photographic oeuvre of Dorothea Lange is not limited to pictures about the Great Depression. I knew that she was famous due to these pictures, but I never presumed that she tried anything else. However, I discovered that she, for example, also did a similar work about concentration camps for Japanese Americans during World War II — another historical phenomenon I am quite interested in. And, again, she was not a simple obserever. She and her husband were among those not-numerous Americans who were genuinely appalled at this decision of the US government, although “The vast majority of Americans supported Roosevelt’s action, some with astonishing vitriol.” Quote: “Henry McLemore wrote the following in the San Francisco Examiner. Herd ’em up, pack ’em off and give ’em the inside room in the badlands. Let ’em be pinched, hurt, hungry and dead up against it . . . Let us have no patience with the enemy or with anyone whose veins carry his blood . . . Personally, I hate the Japanese. Paul and Dorothea were deeply opposed to the evacuation, but there was little they could do. “This was wartime,” said Paul. “You couldn’t challenge the government decision to evacuate Japanese once it was made.” His main recourse was to join the newly formed Committee on American Principles and Fair Play. He and the other members could “remind people that the evacuees were not convicted, were not found guilty of anything, that they were entitled to every consideration under American principle and fair play.” Along with several other photographers, Dorothea was asked to work for the War Relocation Authority (WRA) photographing the internment. Presumably the government wanted to show how orderly the process was, and how humanely the internees were treated. Despite her opposition, she took the job. “She wanted to do it,” Paul said. After years of documentary work, Dorothea knew the value of visual records.” She also traveled a lot later, including Soviet Russia (I did not know that!), but mostly to Asia. She made a lot of fascinating photographs there, too. 3. She was a kind and very thoughtful person overall. Maybe this “thoughtfulness” appeal to me the most in her. She always looked at things carefully, respecting them, loving them, trying to understand them and present them to other people in such manner to help them understand something too. She took other people’s fears and problems close to her heart. She was ill due to it and had a severe peptic ulcer exacerbating from all this nervous work, due to which she had massive internal bleedings, multiple surgeries, blood transfusions, and emergency hospitalizations; later, on this basis, she got an esophagus cancer, which became the cause of her death in 1965. Quote: “…when the pain from her ulcers became nearly unbearable. A doctor suggested she take it easy. “Take it easy?” she responded. “How can a photographer take it easy?” Yes, this was the main principle of her artistic development. Although her “observer’s work” was very hard, time-consuming, leaving her not much opportunity for art and not-limited creativity per se, Dorothea made a lot of beautiful series of photographs on her own. However, there was always a similar cry for help, understanding, respect and love, not just beautiful pictures. Quote: “One of these connections was Dorothea’s “strong feelings about women.” In 1948, she was asked to contribute to an exhibition in Paris with the theme “a cry for peace and the struggle of women in all countries for democracy.” She was eager to see what she had in her files. “We need to be reminded these days about what women have been, and can be,” she said. “It’s a question of their really deep and fundamental place in society. I have a feeling that women need to be reminded of it. They are needed.” Dorothea began pairing her photographs of American women with photographs of their home or environment.” I would like to look at this series (“American Country Woman”). Unfortunately, I did not find such photographs of hers. I am also very interested in another her series, “Walking wounded.” Quote: “Walking wounded” included both inner and outer scars. “There are many, many people on the streets today who are ‘walking wounded,’” she said. “I see the ‘walking wounded’ in myself and in my friends.” It was, she acknowledged, a “recurrent theme in my pictures.” But againg, it’s difficult to find anything specific on this theme: although Dorothea Lange left thousands of photographs, somehow the Internet is full only with her pictures about the Great Depression. She found deap meanings in everything she saw. She was always “deeply aware of the message the show would contain.” I love these her words, for example: Quote: “In the past, events have always played a major role in the work I’ve done. First there was the depression, then the dustbowl, then the war. All of these were big, harsh, powerful things, and it was related to them that I tried to photograph people. Now I’m trying to get at something else. Instead of photographing men in relation to events, today I’m trying to probe the exchanges and communications between people, to discover what they mean to each other and to themselves. Usually too, I’m trying to do this in the most ordinary, familiar, usual kind of a way. Almost all of them are very subdued and subtle, things you have to look very hard to see, because they have been taken for granted not only by our eyes but, often, by our hearts as well.” 4. In 1964, Dorothea Lange was asked to present a two-year exhibition of her works in the famous Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). At that time, “No woman had been asked to do a one-person photography show at MoMA, and only five men: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, Edward Steichen, Paul Strand, and Edward Weston.” She was a genius of her time, yes. She was terminally ill then and spend her last days selecting pictures for the show. She died three months before opening this exhibition at MoMA.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patricia N. McLaughlin

    “To live a visual life is an enormous undertaking, practically unattainable. I have only touched it, just touched it.” —Dorothea Lange Touched it, indeed. Partridge’s biography of Lange’s life and work often reads like a college term paper, but the photographs speak for themselves and their creator: iconic images of the twentieth century as seen through the eyes of a Zen master “living with the camera.” Favorite photos include “Dorothea Lange Working in the MoMA Exhibition” “Korean Child” “Camp Near “To live a visual life is an enormous undertaking, practically unattainable. I have only touched it, just touched it.” —Dorothea Lange Touched it, indeed. Partridge’s biography of Lange’s life and work often reads like a college term paper, but the photographs speak for themselves and their creator: iconic images of the twentieth century as seen through the eyes of a Zen master “living with the camera.” Favorite photos include “Dorothea Lange Working in the MoMA Exhibition” “Korean Child” “Camp Near Shafter” “Hopi Indian During Snake Dance” “White Angel Breadline” “Man Beside Wheelbarrow” “Migrant Mother” “Dust Storm” “Migratory Cotton Picker” “Woman of the High Plains” “Enforcement of Executive Order 9066” “Child and Father Attending Hurling Game”

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Beautifully curated collection The essay that accompanies the photographs is a wonderful view into Lange's interior world and gives both a deeper and a broader perspective on the work she created over the course of her lifetime, going beyond the Depression era photographs for which she is most famous. I am so glad I bought this book! Beautifully curated collection The essay that accompanies the photographs is a wonderful view into Lange's interior world and gives both a deeper and a broader perspective on the work she created over the course of her lifetime, going beyond the Depression era photographs for which she is most famous. I am so glad I bought this book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sharienne

    lots of pictures without distraction. The book retains the feel of a museum show where the photographs aren't buried by an author trying to present context.... as if the artist has lost the ability to communicate. lots of pictures without distraction. The book retains the feel of a museum show where the photographs aren't buried by an author trying to present context.... as if the artist has lost the ability to communicate.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Warren

    Short but information with beautiful photos throughout. If you're interested in learning more about this master photographer I highly recommend this book. Short but information with beautiful photos throughout. If you're interested in learning more about this master photographer I highly recommend this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ✨ Anna ✨ | ReadAllNight

    Good intro about this remarkable woman and her work. Includes many photos.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Excellent

  19. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Book M13 chose for extra credit. Select quotes: "I have photographs of the trees that I live with here. The photographs are in different moods. This photograph's dark, and big, and troubled. A lot has gone on here under these trees. The life that goes on under the trees represents things that I love very much: my children, and my children's children." "One should really use a camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind. To live a visual life is an enormous undertaking, practically unattaina Book M13 chose for extra credit. Select quotes: "I have photographs of the trees that I live with here. The photographs are in different moods. This photograph's dark, and big, and troubled. A lot has gone on here under these trees. The life that goes on under the trees represents things that I love very much: my children, and my children's children." "One should really use a camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind. To live a visual life is an enormous undertaking, practically unattainable. I have only touched it, just touched it." "I will set myself a big problem. I will go there, I will photograph this thing, I will come back, and develop it. I will print it, and I will mount it and I will put it on the wall, all in twenty-four hours. I will do this, to see if I can just grab a hunk of lightning." "The camera is a great teacher, and the more people who use it the more aware they become of the possibilities of the visual world. The disciplines and the difficulties of obtaining this are immense. You wake up with it in the morning and you sustain it. You live it. You breathe it. You're cut off from the moorings of people around you. You actually are nourished and sustained by your eyesight. You look into everything, not only what it looks like but what it feels like. On that sort of attention great photographs will be made, and the best of the photographers have it once and awhile." "You can't do people in trouble without photographing people who are not in trouble, too. You have to have those contrasts." "When I said I am trying to get lost again, I really expressed a very critical point of departure. And not very easy to do. Because you always have to do practical things: be home at 4:30, remember to get the butter, or get to the post office before they close. To get lost again is something that I have been able to do only a few times in my whole life. Only a few times. It should have been much more often."

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Ward

    Dorthea Lange: “Grab a Hunk of Lightning” - Her Lifetime in Photography by Elizabeth Partridge (Chronicle Books 2014) (770.92). Dorthea Lange was a major documentary photographer active in the U.S. during the Depression era years. Her work is highly regarded today. She is best known for her work among the “Okies” and other migrant farmers. This is the first and best retrospective of her work; the book offers more than a hundred plates of her best work from the 1930's. My rating: 7/10, finished 8 Dorthea Lange: “Grab a Hunk of Lightning” - Her Lifetime in Photography by Elizabeth Partridge (Chronicle Books 2014) (770.92). Dorthea Lange was a major documentary photographer active in the U.S. during the Depression era years. Her work is highly regarded today. She is best known for her work among the “Okies” and other migrant farmers. This is the first and best retrospective of her work; the book offers more than a hundred plates of her best work from the 1930's. My rating: 7/10, finished 8/10/15.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    First of all, I am rating this book by Elizabeth Partridge not Dorothea Lange's images which of course would get a 5. Partridge did a fair job presenting Lange's life, her childhood years were covered a bit chaotically and abruptly, but her adulthood and professional life were well covered. The photographs were as you would expect amazing, but I loved the inclusion of quotes from Lange herself about the images, time, place or her profession. I wish there had been more images of Lange herself as First of all, I am rating this book by Elizabeth Partridge not Dorothea Lange's images which of course would get a 5. Partridge did a fair job presenting Lange's life, her childhood years were covered a bit chaotically and abruptly, but her adulthood and professional life were well covered. The photographs were as you would expect amazing, but I loved the inclusion of quotes from Lange herself about the images, time, place or her profession. I wish there had been more images of Lange herself as well as some of her family as they would have added to her brief biography in the front.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Krusher Basta

    I loved this book. In addition to over 100 images of Dorothea Lange’s work, it included a fascinating narrative of her life, both personal and professional, written by her God Daughter. I am just amazed at what she was able to accomplish with the technology available in the early twentieth century. In addition to overcoming all the logistical obstacles (you couldn’t just hop on a jet and be in another part of the world by late afternoon) and her health issues, she did it as a woman at a time whe I loved this book. In addition to over 100 images of Dorothea Lange’s work, it included a fascinating narrative of her life, both personal and professional, written by her God Daughter. I am just amazed at what she was able to accomplish with the technology available in the early twentieth century. In addition to overcoming all the logistical obstacles (you couldn’t just hop on a jet and be in another part of the world by late afternoon) and her health issues, she did it as a woman at a time when it was clearly a man’s world. What a remarkable person and life.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Philippone

    An absolute delightful look into Dorothea Lange's lesser known negatives. I loved reading such a great overview of her work in the essay at the beginning, and I can't wait to read her biography, which is next on my list. This also accompanies the PBS documentary of the same name, which is additionally next on my viewing list. Will be diving deeper into her work again, and will be focusing on her for a unit in one of photography classes. An absolute delightful look into Dorothea Lange's lesser known negatives. I loved reading such a great overview of her work in the essay at the beginning, and I can't wait to read her biography, which is next on my list. This also accompanies the PBS documentary of the same name, which is additionally next on my viewing list. Will be diving deeper into her work again, and will be focusing on her for a unit in one of photography classes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    The biographical information, written by Dorothea Lange's goddaughter and daughter of her long-time assistant, is excellent. The presentation of the photographs is beautiful. Because I prefer the FSA and dust bowl photographs, I would have preferred more of those and fewer of the photographs from Lange's travels later in life, but that is only personal preference. The biographical information, written by Dorothea Lange's goddaughter and daughter of her long-time assistant, is excellent. The presentation of the photographs is beautiful. Because I prefer the FSA and dust bowl photographs, I would have preferred more of those and fewer of the photographs from Lange's travels later in life, but that is only personal preference.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Powell

    What a spectacular book of Dorothea Lange's photos chronicling a large hunk of the 20th century. Author Elizabeth Partridge has a personal connection as her father as a 17 year old was Dorothea's assistant and the families meshed. Loved it. What a spectacular book of Dorothea Lange's photos chronicling a large hunk of the 20th century. Author Elizabeth Partridge has a personal connection as her father as a 17 year old was Dorothea's assistant and the families meshed. Loved it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Interesting read on Dorothea covering her history. Her photography is simply stunning! Wish there were more pictures in here!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kyla Hunziger

    Wonderful tribute to an amazing photographer.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emmkay

    Extraordinary woman, extraordinary photography.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ron Stafford

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