web site hit counter Haiti Noir 2: The Classics - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Haiti Noir 2: The Classics

Availability: Ready to download

Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxan Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxane Gay. The original best-selling Haiti Noir comprised all-new stories by today's best Haitian authors. This new volume collects the true classics of Haitian literature—both short stories and excerpts from longer works—and will be an integral piece of understanding how Haitian culture has evolved over the past fifty years. Editor Edwidge Danticat, one of the most respected Haitian writers, has a well-deserved sterling reputation, and here she follows on the success of the original first volume. Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti and moved to the United States when she was twelve. She is the editor of Haiti Noir and author of several books, including Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones, an American Book Award winner; and the novel-in-stories The Dew Breaker. She lives in Miami, Florida.


Compare

Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxan Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxane Gay. The original best-selling Haiti Noir comprised all-new stories by today's best Haitian authors. This new volume collects the true classics of Haitian literature—both short stories and excerpts from longer works—and will be an integral piece of understanding how Haitian culture has evolved over the past fifty years. Editor Edwidge Danticat, one of the most respected Haitian writers, has a well-deserved sterling reputation, and here she follows on the success of the original first volume. Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti and moved to the United States when she was twelve. She is the editor of Haiti Noir and author of several books, including Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones, an American Book Award winner; and the novel-in-stories The Dew Breaker. She lives in Miami, Florida.

30 review for Haiti Noir 2: The Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    Since I discovered the Noir series, I have been trying to read as many as I can. So far I have read Kingston Noir, Trinidad Noir and now I am on Haiti Noir 2: The Classics. Of all the Noir I feel Haiti Noir is the most solid collection I've read so far. I always feel as if Haiti is seen as the bastard child of the Caribbean, even though they did so much in abolishing slavery. I am always so curious about the country and the culture, its no wonder I thoroughly enjoyed reading this collection. My Since I discovered the Noir series, I have been trying to read as many as I can. So far I have read Kingston Noir, Trinidad Noir and now I am on Haiti Noir 2: The Classics. Of all the Noir I feel Haiti Noir is the most solid collection I've read so far. I always feel as if Haiti is seen as the bastard child of the Caribbean, even though they did so much in abolishing slavery. I am always so curious about the country and the culture, its no wonder I thoroughly enjoyed reading this collection. My standouts were: A White House With Pink Curtains in the Downstairs Windows by Jan J Dominique Reve Haitien by Ben Fountain Things I know About Fairy Tales by Roxane Gay The Mission by Marie-Helen Laforest The Port-au-Prince Marriage Special by Edwidge Danticat Children of Heroes by Lyonel Trouillot Oresca by Paulette Poujol Oriol The Enchantd Second Lieutenant by Jacques-Stephen Alexis I basically re-wrote the content page of the book... that goes to show how great the collection is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Woody Chandler

    I found this one to be less compelling than others in the series and it became a bit of a slog. 2 months?!?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tuxlie

    Praise for the original Haiti Noir: "Danticat has succeeded in assembling a group portrait of Haitian culture and resilience that is cause for celebration." - Publishers Weekly "This anthology will give American readers a complex and nuanced portrait of the real Haiti not seen on the evening news and introduce them to some original and wonderful writers." - Library Journal "While the publisher defines the term 'noir' broadly - requiring sinister tales or crime stories that evoke a stro Praise for the original Haiti Noir: "Danticat has succeeded in assembling a group portrait of Haitian culture and resilience that is cause for celebration." - Publishers Weekly "This anthology will give American readers a complex and nuanced portrait of the real Haiti not seen on the evening news and introduce them to some original and wonderful writers." - Library Journal "While the publisher defines the term 'noir' broadly - requiring sinister tales or crime stories that evoke a strong sense of place and do not have happy endings - the Haiti book offers its own spin with plenty of grisly crime, dire poverty, and references to magic and religion. There is also some tenderness." - The New York Times Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxane Gay. The original best-selling Haiti Noir comprised all-new stories by today's best Haitian authors. This new volume collects the true classics of Haitian literature - both short stories and excerpts from longer works - and will be an integral piece of understanding how Haitian culture has evolved over the past fifty years. Editor Edwidge Danticat, one of the most respected Haitian writers, has a well-deserved sterling reputation, and here she follows on the success of the original first volume. Edwidge Danticat was born in Haiti and moved to the United States when she was twelve. She is the editor of Haiti Noir and author of several books, including Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones, an American Book Award winner; and the novel-in-stories The Dew Breaker. She lives in Miami, Florida. Edwidge Danticat's short story from Haiti Noir 2: The Classics, "The Port-au-Prince Marriage Special," was included in Ms. Magazine's Fall 2013 issue. "A worthy sequel that skillfully uses a popular genre to help us better understand an often frustratingly complex and indecipherable society." --Miami Herald "There is danger and regret and fear in these stories, as characters try to negotiate a complex and often confounding land." --Miami Herald, Feature on Haiti Noir 2 Miami launch "Presents an excellent array of writers, primarily Haitian, whose graphic descriptions portray a country ravaged by corruption, crime, and mystery....This selection of Haitian classics is a must read for everyone." --The Caribbean Writer "Just when you thought you have read it all and have experienced the best of literary brilliance, there comes along an unrivaled work of narrative intensity, penned with a spellbinding authenticity. Haiti Noir 2 is just that work of art....A rare gem." --Kaieteur News Online "Quite a collection...a multi-generational tour of Haiti's literature...It makes you feel as if some things out to have Part twos." --Kreyolicious "This is a great collection of stories set in Haiti." --Book Nerd Praise for the original Haiti Noir: "Danticat has succeeded in assembling a group portrait of Haitian culture and resilience that is cause for celebration." --Publishers Weekly "This anthology will give American readers a complex and nuanced portrait of the real Haiti not seen on the evening news and introduce them to some original and wonderful writers." --Library Journal "While the publisher defines the term 'noir' broadly--requiring sinister tales or crime stories that evoke a strong sense of place and do not have happy endings--the Haiti book offers its own spin with plenty of grisly crime, dire poverty, and references to magic and religion. There is also some tenderness." --New York Times Launched with the summer '04 award-winning best seller Brooklyn Noir, Akashic Books continues its groundbreaking series of original noir anthologies. Each book is comprised of all-new stories, each one set in a distinct neighborhood or location within the city of the book. Classic stories by: Danielle Legros Georges, Jacques Roumain, Ida Faubert, Jacques-Stephen Alexis, Jan J. Dominique, Paulette Poujol Oriol, Lyonel Trouillot, Emmelie Prophète, Ben Fountain, Dany Laferrière, Georges Anglade, Edwidge Danticat, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin, Èzili Dantò, Marie-Hélène Laforest, Nick Stone, Marilène Phipps-Kettlewell, Myriam J.A. Chancey, and Roxane Gay. From the introduction by Edwidge Danticat: "How often are you asked to put together an amazing literary party? In my case, a mind-blowing two times. The lit party of my dreams has been Haiti Noir, and lo and behold, I get asked to do it again...After the first Haiti Noir was published, people kept asking if I wasn't contributing to a negative image of the country by editing a book filled with so many 'dark' stories about Haiti. My answer was, and remains, that showing the brilliance of our writers and their ability to address Haiti's difficulties through their art can only contribute to a more nuanced and complex presentation of Haitian lives. After all, the writers here are not Haiti virgins, to paraphrase from 'Heading South,' Dany Laferrière's story, included here, of sex tourism gone wrong. They are all old hats, either by blood or their deep love for Haiti...This is not just a party, folks, but also a costume party, a noir party. The author of each story, poem, or novel excerpt has shed his or her skin and has sunk into the deepest and most revealing places of the human heart."**

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    *ARC received for an honest opinion review also at booknerdloleotodoblogspot.com I loved “Breath, Eyes, Memory “ by Edwidge Danticat so anything with her name on it, I think, will be a hit. This is a great collection of stories set in Haiti. I love that the stories all take place in different parts of Haiti so readers are able to learn about the geography, history and culture of that particular area. One of my favorite short stories was “True Life” by Michéle Voltaire Marcelin. Her opening sentenc *ARC received for an honest opinion review also at booknerdloleotodoblogspot.com I loved “Breath, Eyes, Memory “ by Edwidge Danticat so anything with her name on it, I think, will be a hit. This is a great collection of stories set in Haiti. I love that the stories all take place in different parts of Haiti so readers are able to learn about the geography, history and culture of that particular area. One of my favorite short stories was “True Life” by Michéle Voltaire Marcelin. Her opening sentence was so impacting, “my mother weeps. And the continuous murmur of her tears is so intense that it’s impossible not to hear it all over the world” (p.176). I think it’s the small island setting that reminded me of Sydney Poitiers’ autobiography “ The Measure of a Man” . Although all authors in this collection have their own styles (some write in the first person) each one adds an insight into the culture of Haiti. I personally love when literature tells a story within a story. By hearing about the Spanish influences, we are reminded about the history of Haiti. This book should be added as part of a college course somewhere, it’s so rich in culture and literature.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Calvert

    I received this as an Early Reviewer book from LibraryThing. This was a different sort of read for me and such a unique treat! It's a collection of short stories based in Haiti from a variety of authors. I enjoyed every story and poem that I read; each vibrating with the passion of Haiti. It was a journey through chilling, terrifying and moving tales that left me wanting to learn even more about Haiti and its history and read more from each of the writers. I even dreamt of tidbits of these stori I received this as an Early Reviewer book from LibraryThing. This was a different sort of read for me and such a unique treat! It's a collection of short stories based in Haiti from a variety of authors. I enjoyed every story and poem that I read; each vibrating with the passion of Haiti. It was a journey through chilling, terrifying and moving tales that left me wanting to learn even more about Haiti and its history and read more from each of the writers. I even dreamt of tidbits of these stories in my sleep. People will quite often overlook something that isn't of their normal reading material, but I recommend broadening your horizon with a book like this. I felt I was grasping each writers hand as they walked me down a hall opening secret doors to things of shadows and light; love and lust; beauty and terror; real and raw. Thank you for sharing your work!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fara Marthone

    It was refreshing to read about places that I am familiar with, to understand nuances wrapped in Haitian culture. I enjoy most of the short stories in this book, but Dany Laferriere is my favorite along Jan J. Dominique. The last story in the book is beautifully written... I am left hungry for something more, new...away from revolution or political engagement. What makes us great aside from November 1804, the countless fights for power that followed. We are plagued with social issues, but our po It was refreshing to read about places that I am familiar with, to understand nuances wrapped in Haitian culture. I enjoy most of the short stories in this book, but Dany Laferriere is my favorite along Jan J. Dominique. The last story in the book is beautifully written... I am left hungry for something more, new...away from revolution or political engagement. What makes us great aside from November 1804, the countless fights for power that followed. We are plagued with social issues, but our political reality is so Noir, that it doesn't allow much examination of anything else. May be interested haven't come across of it in literature.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Purple Iris

    I'm not even going to finish this. Didn't love the first one, loved this one less than that. Roxane Gay is an author to watch.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amabelle

    I really enjoyed reading the stories. I preferred the more classic writers than the contemporary writers. But I love the last story with the embedded Disney stories

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Richardson

    Even though the short stories are works of fiction, this anthology collection creates distinct imagery of Haitian culture. As the author notes in the introduction after being asked about contributing to negative ideas of Haiti, “Showing the brilliance of our writers and their ability to address Haiti’s difficulties through their art can only contribute to a more nuanced and complex presentation of Haitian lives.” With tales like Ida Faubert’s A Strange Story shedding light on the darkness of voo Even though the short stories are works of fiction, this anthology collection creates distinct imagery of Haitian culture. As the author notes in the introduction after being asked about contributing to negative ideas of Haiti, “Showing the brilliance of our writers and their ability to address Haiti’s difficulties through their art can only contribute to a more nuanced and complex presentation of Haitian lives.” With tales like Ida Faubert’s A Strange Story shedding light on the darkness of voodoo and Jan J. Dominique’s A White House With Pink Curtains in the Downstairs Windows creatively presenting paranormal themes, I truly enjoyed reading these noir stories because although I knew it was fiction I still got a sense of what it could be like to live in the country. The editor explains, “The author of each story, poem, or novel excerpt has shed his or her skin and has sunk into the deepest and most revealing places of the human heart.” After reading every story in the collection, I agree that the authors are displaying their passion and dedication to promote Haiti in a positive light (even though not all of the stories have a happy ending). On the back cover is a note that reads, “A portion of the profits from Haiti Noir 2: The Classics will be donated to FotoKonbit, a nonprofit organization created to empower Haitians to tell their own stories through photography.” It is apparent that the authors and editors of this book wanted to give back to this country as a token of appreciation for the personal impact the Haitian culture has had on them. I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Haiti or to those who have enjoyed other noir collections.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Naori

    (3.5 stars) I wanted to like this as much as I loved the first one. I wanted to burrow into every story and come out slightly changed by them. But I couldn’t. And I am so ashamed to say it is because a.) they attempted to include an entire century of historical Haitian writers, and b.) they didn’t allow any repeat writers from the original collection, which was basically a carnival of the best Haitian writers out there. Don’t get me wrong, I’m always excited to get introduced to new voices, but (3.5 stars) I wanted to like this as much as I loved the first one. I wanted to burrow into every story and come out slightly changed by them. But I couldn’t. And I am so ashamed to say it is because a.) they attempted to include an entire century of historical Haitian writers, and b.) they didn’t allow any repeat writers from the original collection, which was basically a carnival of the best Haitian writers out there. Don’t get me wrong, I’m always excited to get introduced to new voices, but some of the stories were simply flaccid, especially the older ones. I am saying this conditionally because this was not every story; however in the original collection the pieces were “noir” not just because of the characters and the plot, but because of the whole atmosphere of the story. In these pieces it seems it can be just one character who has a darker side, especially in the older pieces, that is neither seen nor acted upon towards the other characters and thus doesn’t influence the plot. I understand wanting to make a concerted efforts to bring in older and lesser known Haitian voices, but under the title of “The Classics” I think it would be more appropriate to have a collection of the most widely enjoyed stories, despite by whom and when they were written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I enjoyed the book and that it got me to read some different writers. However, some of the translations fell flat, particularly the translations of the older work. The stories, their writing in particular, gets better in the second half of the book. Some of the pieces are exceptional, and contain sentiments and experiences that have been shared with me by Haitians in the diaspora. - A White House with Pink Curtains in the Downstairs Windows by Jan J. Dominique - Oresca by Paulette Poujol Oriol - I enjoyed the book and that it got me to read some different writers. However, some of the translations fell flat, particularly the translations of the older work. The stories, their writing in particular, gets better in the second half of the book. Some of the pieces are exceptional, and contain sentiments and experiences that have been shared with me by Haitians in the diaspora. - A White House with Pink Curtains in the Downstairs Windows by Jan J. Dominique - Oresca by Paulette Poujol Oriol - Children of Heroes by Lyonel Trouillot - The Port-Au-Prince Marriage Special by Edwidge Danticat - The Mission by Marie Helene Laforest - Surrender by Myriam J.A. Chancy - Things I know about Fairy Tales by Roxane Gay

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Short stories by Haitian authors - great sense of place (all set in Haiti), some politics, some Vodou, some human nature. All good stories. Would do well as something sipped, vs reading straight through like I did.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    So lovely.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Louella Mahabir

    How do Caribbean people do it? Break your heart but still make you laugh.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Anthony

  16. 5 out of 5

    Msbishop

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amelia B. Thompson

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Furan

  19. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  20. 4 out of 5

    mary Banks

  21. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Fischer

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Caribbean Writer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Hdnsm

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ted Oswald

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roy Wano

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anton Lau Lavær

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lori

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gizelle

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.