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Murderous Minds: Exploring the Criminal Psychopathic Brain: Neurological Imaging and the Manifestation of Evil

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Is there a biological basis for evil? From neurological imaging to behavioral studies, Dean Haycock's account of the groundbreaking research reveals what scientists are learning about the psychopaths living among us.  How many times have you seen a murder on the news or on a TV show like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and said to yourself, "How could someone do something l Is there a biological basis for evil? From neurological imaging to behavioral studies, Dean Haycock's account of the groundbreaking research reveals what scientists are learning about the psychopaths living among us.  How many times have you seen a murder on the news or on a TV show like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and said to yourself, "How could someone do something like that?" Today, neuroscientists are imaging, mapping, testing and dissecting the source of the worst behavior imaginable in the brains of the people who lack a conscience: psychopaths. Neuroscientist Dean Haycock examines the behavior of real life psychopaths and discusses how their actions can be explained in scientific terms, from research that literally looks inside their brains to understanding how psychopaths, without empathy but very goal-oriented, think and act the way they do. Some don’t commit crimes at all, but rather make use of their skills in the boardroom. But what does this mean for lawyers, judges, psychiatrists, victims and readers--for anyone who has ever wondered how some people can be so bad. Could your nine-year-old be a psychopath? What about your co-worker? The ability to recognize psychopaths using the scientific method has vast implications for society, and yet is still loaded with consequences.


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Is there a biological basis for evil? From neurological imaging to behavioral studies, Dean Haycock's account of the groundbreaking research reveals what scientists are learning about the psychopaths living among us.  How many times have you seen a murder on the news or on a TV show like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and said to yourself, "How could someone do something l Is there a biological basis for evil? From neurological imaging to behavioral studies, Dean Haycock's account of the groundbreaking research reveals what scientists are learning about the psychopaths living among us.  How many times have you seen a murder on the news or on a TV show like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and said to yourself, "How could someone do something like that?" Today, neuroscientists are imaging, mapping, testing and dissecting the source of the worst behavior imaginable in the brains of the people who lack a conscience: psychopaths. Neuroscientist Dean Haycock examines the behavior of real life psychopaths and discusses how their actions can be explained in scientific terms, from research that literally looks inside their brains to understanding how psychopaths, without empathy but very goal-oriented, think and act the way they do. Some don’t commit crimes at all, but rather make use of their skills in the boardroom. But what does this mean for lawyers, judges, psychiatrists, victims and readers--for anyone who has ever wondered how some people can be so bad. Could your nine-year-old be a psychopath? What about your co-worker? The ability to recognize psychopaths using the scientific method has vast implications for society, and yet is still loaded with consequences.

30 review for Murderous Minds: Exploring the Criminal Psychopathic Brain: Neurological Imaging and the Manifestation of Evil

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dee Arr

    “The negative consequences of having a wide gap between the educated and the uneducated are as dangerous as having a wide economic gap between the haves and the have-nots.” The book thus ends with words from the author, Dr. Dean A. Haycock, aptly describing a theme that travels throughout its pages. Throughout, Dr. Haycock seeks to rectify that situation. The intention of the author was to make the information accessible to all, with enough description to allow a layman to understand while still “The negative consequences of having a wide gap between the educated and the uneducated are as dangerous as having a wide economic gap between the haves and the have-nots.” The book thus ends with words from the author, Dr. Dean A. Haycock, aptly describing a theme that travels throughout its pages. Throughout, Dr. Haycock seeks to rectify that situation. The intention of the author was to make the information accessible to all, with enough description to allow a layman to understand while still holding value for those in the field of neuroscience. Being in the former group, while I did struggle a few times grasping some of the terms, nothing was too difficult and at worst I was forced to read a few of the earlier chapters at a slower pace than normal. The accompanying real-life examples of criminal and non-criminal psychopaths was extremely helpful. While the author relates the background info of murderers most of us are familiar with – Eric Harris/Dylan Klebold (Columbine), Jared Loughner (Tucson-Gabby Giffords) – there are also lesser know criminals whose stories will illuminate and help achieve deeper understanding of the subject matter. However, the book is not merely a grouping of definitions and examples. As Dr. Haycock points out, even within the field of neuroscience not everyone agrees with the data that has been compiled. In fact, interpretation of that data is also sometimes debated. Couple those discussions with the legal ramifications and it is easy to see that this book will give readers plenty to think about. The author presents everything in a matter-of-fact way, and is quite fair in presenting all sides of an issue if there is disagreement. Based on the book’s presentation, I would have to say that the goal of educating readers has been achieved. Recommended for those who are interested in the field of neuroscience. Unless you are heavy into the clinical aspects of why people commit murderous crimes, readers of true crime might find this a bit scientific (still a good read). Also recommended as good background info for crime writers. Five stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Highly informative, but a bit repetitive (even though, one should be when trying to empirically prove a point. I wanted a bit more true crime details and examples of successful psychopaths. But, I did walk away with a much more informed way of evaluating the science and validity behind articles claiming that neuroimaging has been able to accurately identify areas in the brain linked to behaviors/emotions. Beware when someone claims that data from neuroimaging can predict criminal behavior. The b Highly informative, but a bit repetitive (even though, one should be when trying to empirically prove a point. I wanted a bit more true crime details and examples of successful psychopaths. But, I did walk away with a much more informed way of evaluating the science and validity behind articles claiming that neuroimaging has been able to accurately identify areas in the brain linked to behaviors/emotions. Beware when someone claims that data from neuroimaging can predict criminal behavior. The brain is always more complicated than it seems.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Henry Manampiring

    Very interesting premise that psychopath may be "born that way", or have a brain that developed into that situation. Very detailed references and studies that may point to that direction. Although the author himself admitted that neuroscience is far from being conclusive about psychopaths, this book is still very intriguing. At parts it may feel tedious and too technical, but persevering readers will feel rewarded. I especially love the end part that hypothesized why psychopaths remain amongst u Very interesting premise that psychopath may be "born that way", or have a brain that developed into that situation. Very detailed references and studies that may point to that direction. Although the author himself admitted that neuroscience is far from being conclusive about psychopaths, this book is still very intriguing. At parts it may feel tedious and too technical, but persevering readers will feel rewarded. I especially love the end part that hypothesized why psychopaths remain amongst us as a species despite its seemingly lack of survival contribution. If you love neuroscience or criminal subjects, this book is recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    An interesting account of the theories, research, controversies, and issues surrounding the construct of psychopathy and those who exhibit psychopathic traits. Fascinating discussion of the differences between “successful” and “unsuccessful” psychopaths, and where they tend to congregate in society. A bit too technical for the average reader who doesn't have a background in the sciences, but I still got a lot out of it. An interesting account of the theories, research, controversies, and issues surrounding the construct of psychopathy and those who exhibit psychopathic traits. Fascinating discussion of the differences between “successful” and “unsuccessful” psychopaths, and where they tend to congregate in society. A bit too technical for the average reader who doesn't have a background in the sciences, but I still got a lot out of it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Fascinating read about psychopathy and how it originates, how it is characterized, how it develops, and it's causes. Combined with the addition of interesting but unsettling examples of real life cases highlight how important and influential research into psychopathy is. Critically it was a bit repetitive on occasions but it was an interesting read, easily understandable for a casual reader but provided further reading that I will hopefully venture into. I would definitely recommend it to those Fascinating read about psychopathy and how it originates, how it is characterized, how it develops, and it's causes. Combined with the addition of interesting but unsettling examples of real life cases highlight how important and influential research into psychopathy is. Critically it was a bit repetitive on occasions but it was an interesting read, easily understandable for a casual reader but provided further reading that I will hopefully venture into. I would definitely recommend it to those interested in understanding psychopaths and the study of them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Highly recommend. The subject is compelling and Haycock is an expert at balancing well-researched, well-explained scientific information with engaging stories. This book will teach you what the word "psychopath" really means. Highly recommend. The subject is compelling and Haycock is an expert at balancing well-researched, well-explained scientific information with engaging stories. This book will teach you what the word "psychopath" really means.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    Amazingly easy and fun to read. I would most definitely read more writings from this author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maike Van

    I thoroughly enjoyed Dean Haycock's book, Murderous Minds. It was well referenced and showcased viewpoints from differing perspectives. I did not have a difficult time understanding the book, considering my background in research in psychiatry, however I think it could be quite difficult to read this book if an individual does not have any background in research or neuroscience/psychiatry. I thoroughly enjoyed Dean Haycock's book, Murderous Minds. It was well referenced and showcased viewpoints from differing perspectives. I did not have a difficult time understanding the book, considering my background in research in psychiatry, however I think it could be quite difficult to read this book if an individual does not have any background in research or neuroscience/psychiatry.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Murderous Minds is a fantastic book. It is an engaging, thoughtful, and informative read about the inner workings of the devious psychopathic mind. Each chapter begins with an anecdote that demands one's attention. Then, Haycock goes on to expertly explain psychopathic behavior using fascinating information gleaned from scientific studies. This is the perfect book for the reader who is interested in learning why and how some people are able to murder in cold blood. I give this book my highest po Murderous Minds is a fantastic book. It is an engaging, thoughtful, and informative read about the inner workings of the devious psychopathic mind. Each chapter begins with an anecdote that demands one's attention. Then, Haycock goes on to expertly explain psychopathic behavior using fascinating information gleaned from scientific studies. This is the perfect book for the reader who is interested in learning why and how some people are able to murder in cold blood. I give this book my highest possible recommendation!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This book examines what neuroscience can tell us about the psychopathic mind, and how that compares to what other disciplines – such as psychology and genetics – have been telling us. This is no simple task because there remains a great deal of disagreement about what psychopathy is and how it relates to other behavioral conditions, like sociopathy. The book begins with front matter (a Preface and an Introduction) that sets the stage for a reader who may have only a vague and Hollywood-inspired This book examines what neuroscience can tell us about the psychopathic mind, and how that compares to what other disciplines – such as psychology and genetics – have been telling us. This is no simple task because there remains a great deal of disagreement about what psychopathy is and how it relates to other behavioral conditions, like sociopathy. The book begins with front matter (a Preface and an Introduction) that sets the stage for a reader who may have only a vague and Hollywood-inspired notion of what psychopathy is and who may confuse it with any number of psychiatric conditions. Chapter 1 builds intrigue and offers a narrative introduction to psychopathy by telling the story of the architects of the Columbine shooting, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris. The Columbine shooting gives the reader an ability to compare and contrast, because the two shooters had quite different psychological profiles. The chapter also uses the case of Jared Loughner, a Tucson shooter who killed or wounded almost twenty people – most famously Congressional Representative Gabrielle Giffords. Chapter 2 dives into the controversial questions of what a psychopath is, how effectively can psychopathy be measured, and how it compares to conditions that have the same or similar symptoms. The obvious point of comparison is Sociopathy, about which a controversy remains as to whether it’s a distinct condition. However, the more interesting comparison is to “Kunlangeta,” which is a term from an Inuit tribe. The Kunlangeta – psychopathy comparison gets to the fact that aberrant behavior isn’t new. It’s just how these actions are viewed and responded to that has changed. Chapter 3 describes the strengths and limitations of brain imaging as a tool for understanding the psychopath. We find that neuro-imaging has revealed tendencies – notably a reduction of gray matter in parts of the frontal and temporal cortex. However, we also discover that there remains much to be learned. Chapter 4 is entitled “A Problem Behind the Forehead” and it continues the discussion of the neurological connection to psychopathy – particularly by considering the case of Jim Fallon (the neuroscientist who stumbled onto the fact that he had the brain of a psychopath -- not to be confused with the late night talk show host.) The consideration of Fallon’s case foreshadows a discussion that is detailed in Chapter 8 about psychopaths who function just fine in society and who don’t kill people with axes. Chapter 5 examines competing explanations for psychopathy that are more likely to be complementary to neuroscience than competitors – notably genetics and childhood abuse. This chapter highlights the fact that criminal psychopathy has complex causes and there is as of yet no single silver bullet that links to psychopathic behavior. The idea in chapter 5 leads nicely into the next chapter (ch. 6) which considers to what degree we have enough (or will ever have enough) information to be able to predict who is likely to engage in bad behavior. Is a real world “Minority Report” scenario likely in which someday we’ll be able to know who’s going to commit violent felonies before they do (at least for some cases.) Chapter 7 explores the most notable symptoms of psychopathic behavior, including the inability to empathize and a lack of fear. Chapter 8, as mentioned, explores the fact that not everyone who has psychopathic traits runs afoul of the law. In fact, many lead productive lives running companies or performing surgeries. The next two chapters reflect upon questions that may be of great interest to readers. Chapter 9 asks whether one can become a psychopath late in life. In other words, once one has lived out an abuse-free childhood, grown a fully developed brain, and reached an age where the relevant genes have or haven’t flipped on is one safe? Or, is there some way – an injury or ailment, perhaps – that one might become the victim of adult-onset psychopathy? The penultimate chapter asks whether one’s child might be a psychopath in the making. The last chapter discusses how criminal justice works if it turns out that at least some individuals commit crimes because they got a bad brain. While there may be controversies over the death penalty, most people feel at ease with harsh sentencing and with locking convicted criminals away for life. However, if some individuals had no choice but to do what they did by virtue of a brain defect, it’s much harder to be confident one has taken a fair and reasonable course of action. There’s a brief epilogue which presents a common fixture in science books: the scholarly rant about how the field is underfunded. The book has a number of color and black-and-white graphics including photos, diagrams, brain scans, and brain cross-section pictures. There’s a recommended reading section in addition to the bibliographic notes. I read the Kindle version of the book, and it had excellent hyperlinks for the notes as well as in the index. I’d recommend this book for anyone who is interested in the question of the degree to which brains determine who engages in criminally aberrant behavior. The author uses stories of famous cases of psychopathy to present a book that is very readable and doesn’t get lost in scientific minutiae. It’s a quick and fascinating read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    It was very heavy on science and light on specific case studies, which is more what I was looking for, but it was very interesting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Very interesting book on the neurobiology of psychopathology. Since two of my degrees are in neuroscience, I really wanted more understanding in this particular problem in psychology. I always tell my students that psychiatric illnesses have a very real physical problem going on in the brain, and this book by Haycock proves my point. I knew about some studies concerning the amygdala which is involved in emotion and compassion, but this book explained what MRI studies have found concerning this a Very interesting book on the neurobiology of psychopathology. Since two of my degrees are in neuroscience, I really wanted more understanding in this particular problem in psychology. I always tell my students that psychiatric illnesses have a very real physical problem going on in the brain, and this book by Haycock proves my point. I knew about some studies concerning the amygdala which is involved in emotion and compassion, but this book explained what MRI studies have found concerning this area of the brain (the limbic system). I was intrigued by the information Haycock provides about successful versus unsuccessful psychopaths. Not all of them kill. Many of the successful ones are in business. Haycock skirted around naming any of these guys, but you get the general idea of who is probably one of these. As he said about the unsuccessful psychopaths..."they are in jail!" I was somewhat disappointed at the end of the book. I wanted more information medically, and the last chapter was not on medicine. I would have liked more specifics about the studies done on the brain in these guys (mostly), but he did provide information about some psychopaths such as Jared Loughner. Because of this book, I will probably look for more books specifically about the neurobiology of different psychiatric disorders. This book is definitely worth a read if you are more interested in the brain (and not so much in true crime junk).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Liz Barton

    When I began reading this book, I thought I was really going to enjoy it. Early on, there's an attention-grabbing description of two famous cases of what were in some ways similar crimes but with a key big difference. In case, the perpetrator was a psychopath; in the other, the perpetrator was psychotic. The author does a nice job explaining the difference in a way that's understandable for the average person. After a strong start, the book kind of fizzles. I will say, it's very well referenced, When I began reading this book, I thought I was really going to enjoy it. Early on, there's an attention-grabbing description of two famous cases of what were in some ways similar crimes but with a key big difference. In case, the perpetrator was a psychopath; in the other, the perpetrator was psychotic. The author does a nice job explaining the difference in a way that's understandable for the average person. After a strong start, the book kind of fizzles. I will say, it's very well referenced, so if you are the type that likes to delve deeper into source materials, there's a lot to explore. Ultimately, though, while some of the science discussed and the cases presented are interesting, the writing is distractingly bad. My attention kept drifting away from the book's actual subject matter because I couldn't keep myself from mentally writing the prose to make it understandable. To be clear, the book's problem is not an excess of highly specialized technical jargon but rather poor syntax.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Quinn Ellory

    This book is ideal for those who enjoy and appreciate a wealth of scientific and technical information. While short on "story" it does explain psychopathy, what it means and what it doesn't in great detail. While lay people may struggle with the text (the author does have a PhD while most of us don't) a thorough knowledge of scientific and psychological/psychiatric vocabulary will help the reader move through the body of work. Reccommend for those who work or study in the fields pertaining to th This book is ideal for those who enjoy and appreciate a wealth of scientific and technical information. While short on "story" it does explain psychopathy, what it means and what it doesn't in great detail. While lay people may struggle with the text (the author does have a PhD while most of us don't) a thorough knowledge of scientific and psychological/psychiatric vocabulary will help the reader move through the body of work. Reccommend for those who work or study in the fields pertaining to the subject matter.

  15. 5 out of 5

    M

    Expected more about neuroimaging. Kindle version needs illustrations and/or photos I bought the Audible and Kindle versions, and both were accessible but neither was exceptional. After finishing the book, I agree with other reviewers who mentioned the amount of repetition, and I expected more information and discussion about neuroimaging. I have background in sciences and associated medical fields, so I didn’t have problems with comprehension. That said, for a book discussing fMRIs, there no pho Expected more about neuroimaging. Kindle version needs illustrations and/or photos I bought the Audible and Kindle versions, and both were accessible but neither was exceptional. After finishing the book, I agree with other reviewers who mentioned the amount of repetition, and I expected more information and discussion about neuroimaging. I have background in sciences and associated medical fields, so I didn’t have problems with comprehension. That said, for a book discussing fMRIs, there no photos, illustrations, and/or figures included with the Kindle version.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julia Harris

    An informative and holistic look at psychopathy and the science and research surrounding it. It is the ideal starting point for anyone looking to understand the subject more by not only discussing symptoms and research but helping the reader clearly understand the implications and context of those things as well as providing lucid commentary on the struggles and short comings of those attempting to further research the subject professionally.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michaela Crutcher-Lord

    Well written & gives excellent analysis of real life cases dealing with psychopaths. There was a balance between explaining the science behind psychopathic tendencies and informing the audience of examples. I also liked how the author distinguished terms that are known to be synonymous with each other.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Interesting info on: identifying psychopaths via Dr. Robert Hare's developed tests, biological deformity markers, fMRI verifications, & current funding into Psychopaths vs. Schizophrenia. This book deserves a Nobel prize, imo. Very much a good learning tool in understanding the dynamics of the unhealed human mind. Interesting info on: identifying psychopaths via Dr. Robert Hare's developed tests, biological deformity markers, fMRI verifications, & current funding into Psychopaths vs. Schizophrenia. This book deserves a Nobel prize, imo. Very much a good learning tool in understanding the dynamics of the unhealed human mind.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Very interesting book, definitely a challenging read for those not versed in general psychology concepts. There were parts I couldn't fully grasp, however, the author takes time to describe his findings and it was a fascinating read (if you like this kind of stuff). Very interesting book, definitely a challenging read for those not versed in general psychology concepts. There were parts I couldn't fully grasp, however, the author takes time to describe his findings and it was a fascinating read (if you like this kind of stuff).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judi

    DNF. Really wanted to read this as I thought it would give insight into why people commit these unspeakable acts. I slogged through 1/5 of this book, but it was like reading a medical journal. I was disappointed

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    It leaves a lot of room for guesswork about who among us is psychotic!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nyssy

    A vivid book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vu Ba

    Very good

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shianne

    It was Ok, I enjoyed the information being given within a story line, however there were points that were very repeatitive and others that were unbearably dull

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hemen Kalita

    I enjoyed reading this one. A thorough exploration on psychopathy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chel ✨💫

    Very interesting take on the explanation on what psychopathy is

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana Mendez

    it was to sciencey for me

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Oleksiw

    Dean Haycock, PhD, is a science writer who has the ability to translate dense technical material into accessible language without sacrificing many of the nuances scientists must deal with, especially in the neurosciences. In this book Haycock traces the development of our understanding of psychopaths, those who are apparently born without the ability to feel empathy and compassion and are a terrifying mystery to the rest of us. There may be some standard features in the lives of these individual Dean Haycock, PhD, is a science writer who has the ability to translate dense technical material into accessible language without sacrificing many of the nuances scientists must deal with, especially in the neurosciences. In this book Haycock traces the development of our understanding of psychopaths, those who are apparently born without the ability to feel empathy and compassion and are a terrifying mystery to the rest of us. There may be some standard features in the lives of these individuals--bed-wetting, cruelty to animals, lack of empathy for others, fire-setting--but many criminals engage in some of these behaviors without being psychopaths. Haycock relies on standard scales for identifying psychopathic individuals, and establishes grounds for comparisons across relevant studies. Some of the earliest case studies cited by Haycock date from the 19th century, including an Italian child and an Inuit hunter. Over the centuries scientists have tried various ways to identify and categorize, without success, people who engaged in horrendous criminal behavior, at one time called "moral insanity." With a greater awareness of the characteristics of the psychopath today, Haycock divides these individuals into two groups--the successful and unsuccessful psychopaths (unsuccessful are the ones who got caught and sent to prison). Haycock discusses the research of numerous figures involved in the developing understanding of what happens when parts of a brain fail to develop, which parts, and the consequences. Some but not all such children with brain developmental issues, raised in abusive homes, will become the criminals whose life stories give the rest of us chills, and others who are raised in loving and supportive homes will go on to have successful careers, moderating their psychopathic tendencies but sometimes creating miserable work environments or home lives. The tool for this new understanding of the brain of the psychopathic individual is the fMRI--functional magnetic resonance imaging--which has the ability to record areas of the brain that are active while patients are responding to verbal or visual images. Haycock spends considerable time on the fascinating results of groups of patients who agreed to have their brains scanned. Haycock discusses some of the most heinous crimes committed by psychopaths but throughout he is aware, and keeps the reader aware, of the damage that is done to those victimized by such people. In addition he explores the disturbing legal questions raised by our new understanding of brain development. Does being born with a psychopathic brain lead to questions of diminished legal responsibility for those who have committed horrible crimes?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Embry

    With a background both in neurobiology and science writing, Dean A. Haycock takes a broad view of the roots of psychopathic personalities in Murderous Minds: Exploring the Criminal Psychopathic Brain: Neurological Imaging and the Manifestation of Evil. Although psychopaths have become infamous as conscienceless killers, influenced by their prominence in studies of criminals, many -- what some scientists term "successful" psychopaths -- never see the inside of a prison. In accounts of some of toda With a background both in neurobiology and science writing, Dean A. Haycock takes a broad view of the roots of psychopathic personalities in Murderous Minds: Exploring the Criminal Psychopathic Brain: Neurological Imaging and the Manifestation of Evil. Although psychopaths have become infamous as conscienceless killers, influenced by their prominence in studies of criminals, many -- what some scientists term "successful" psychopaths -- never see the inside of a prison. In accounts of some of today's most heinous murders, Haycock explores the differences between the too easily confused terms "psychotic" and "psychopathic," between what appear to be inborn traits and those shaped by external circumstances such as physical injury, between brain structure and underlying genetic indicators. And he asks whether some traits associated with psychopathy -- boldness and risk-taking, even lack of empathy and guilt -- may actually lead to success in certain fields. Along the way we meet people such as the shooters of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and the Columbine High School massacre (one schizophrenic, one probably depressive -- and only one most likely a psychopath); successful neuroscientist James Fallon (who was surprised to discover similarities between scans of his brain and those of murderers); and 19th century railroad worker Phineas Gage, transformed from a respected young man into what doctors of the day termed one of the morally insane after a freak accident sent an iron rod through his head. Written in accessible language, Murderous Minds is a thoughtful and humane journey through the history and science of a fascinating, often terrifying, 1 percent of humanity known as psychopaths.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elia Liz

    How does the criminal mind connect to the violent behavior? In my journey researching i hoped to better understand the makings of a criminal psychopath. Neurobiologist Haycock made me feel as if I stepped into the mind of a psychopath. While reading I began to analyze empathy, morals, and the way society portrays psychopathy and psychosis. His scientific evidence was brought to life with the connections he made to real life stories. As an undergrad student in biology, I enjoyed the ease made for How does the criminal mind connect to the violent behavior? In my journey researching i hoped to better understand the makings of a criminal psychopath. Neurobiologist Haycock made me feel as if I stepped into the mind of a psychopath. While reading I began to analyze empathy, morals, and the way society portrays psychopathy and psychosis. His scientific evidence was brought to life with the connections he made to real life stories. As an undergrad student in biology, I enjoyed the ease made for any reader to understand, yet kept the up-most integrity of medical terminology, history and facts. I completed the read in a little over a day because he kept me eagerly engaged. Soon after reading the book I had the pleasure of speaking with Haycock where he graciously expanded on a few areas. He was a delight and I appreciated the courtesy he extended me. Not only are you a great author and Neurobiologist, but also a very intelligent and genuinely kind Individual. I would highly recommend Haycock's book to anyone who has interest in the Criminal mind. Elia Lizcano

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