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Dear Reader: When Ryder Sherbrooke finds a child nearly beaten to death in an alley in Eastbourne, he takes her home to Brandon House. She doesn't speak for six months. Her first words, oddly enough, are a haunting song: I dream of beauty and sightless night I dream of strength and fevered might I dream I'm not alone again But I know of his death and her grievous sin. Ah, and ju Dear Reader: When Ryder Sherbrooke finds a child nearly beaten to death in an alley in Eastbourne, he takes her home to Brandon House. She doesn't speak for six months. Her first words, oddly enough, are a haunting song: I dream of beauty and sightless night I dream of strength and fevered might I dream I'm not alone again But I know of his death and her grievous sin. Ah, and just what does this strange song mean that was seemingly imprinted on the child's brain? She names herself Rosalind de La Fontaine since she cannot remember who she is. In her first season in London in 1835, under the aegis of the Sherbrookes, she meets Nicholas Vail, the seventh Earl of Mountjoy, newly arrived from Macau. It is instant fascination on both their parts, but for different reasons. With Grayson Sherbrooke, they are led to an ancient copy of a mysterious book written by a sixteenth-century wizard. The book is written in a baffling code that neither Grayson nor Nicholas can read. But Rosalind can, easily. Strange things start happening. Both Nicholas and Rosalind know it has to do with the old book and, perhaps, even her past, particularly the song she first sang as a child. The urgency builds as they realize Rosalind is the key to a centuries-old mystery. Catherine Coulter (The Author)


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Dear Reader: When Ryder Sherbrooke finds a child nearly beaten to death in an alley in Eastbourne, he takes her home to Brandon House. She doesn't speak for six months. Her first words, oddly enough, are a haunting song: I dream of beauty and sightless night I dream of strength and fevered might I dream I'm not alone again But I know of his death and her grievous sin. Ah, and ju Dear Reader: When Ryder Sherbrooke finds a child nearly beaten to death in an alley in Eastbourne, he takes her home to Brandon House. She doesn't speak for six months. Her first words, oddly enough, are a haunting song: I dream of beauty and sightless night I dream of strength and fevered might I dream I'm not alone again But I know of his death and her grievous sin. Ah, and just what does this strange song mean that was seemingly imprinted on the child's brain? She names herself Rosalind de La Fontaine since she cannot remember who she is. In her first season in London in 1835, under the aegis of the Sherbrookes, she meets Nicholas Vail, the seventh Earl of Mountjoy, newly arrived from Macau. It is instant fascination on both their parts, but for different reasons. With Grayson Sherbrooke, they are led to an ancient copy of a mysterious book written by a sixteenth-century wizard. The book is written in a baffling code that neither Grayson nor Nicholas can read. But Rosalind can, easily. Strange things start happening. Both Nicholas and Rosalind know it has to do with the old book and, perhaps, even her past, particularly the song she first sang as a child. The urgency builds as they realize Rosalind is the key to a centuries-old mystery. Catherine Coulter (The Author)

30 review for Wizard's Daughter

  1. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    Coulter is a prolific and hugely popular (bestselling) author, primarily of sensuous romances, which she produces in various genres. (This one is a fantasy, set primarily in the England of 1835, but partly in an invented fantasy world called the Pale.) She wasn't really on my radar to read, but knowing my liking for speculative fiction, my wife saw and snagged this volume at a flea market as a Christmas present for me a few years ago. Recently, I pulled it out of the TBR piles as a "car book," t Coulter is a prolific and hugely popular (bestselling) author, primarily of sensuous romances, which she produces in various genres. (This one is a fantasy, set primarily in the England of 1835, but partly in an invented fantasy world called the Pale.) She wasn't really on my radar to read, but knowing my liking for speculative fiction, my wife saw and snagged this volume at a flea market as a Christmas present for me a few years ago. Recently, I pulled it out of the TBR piles as a "car book," to read aloud to her while we're between installments of a series we both like. (This actually is also part of a series, the Sherbrooke Brides, though Barb didn't know that when she bought it. But this installment at least reads perfectly well as a standalone, and that's how we approached it.) The Goodreads description just repeats the cover copy, which the author herself wrote. IMO, however, that cover copy was a misstep, because it gives us a lot of backstory which in the text of the book is gradually disclosed for effect; that effect is simply lost when you already know about it. It also gives details about plot developments that most readers would prefer to discover as they occur. Suffice it to say that we have an enigmatic prologue, which a reference to "Queen Bess" pegs as set in the late 1500s, where we meet shipwrecked sea captain Jared Vail, who takes on an unspecified "debt" to a mysterious sorcerer, and are also introduced to a beautiful little girl with a strange song, who tells him "I am your debt." Leaving us with more questions than answers, we then skip down to a London ballroom in 1835, where two people with secrets, 18-year-old Rosalind de la Fontaine and Jared's descendant Nicholas, the new Earl of Mountjoy, meet for the first time. There's romantic attraction, but there's another agenda as well, and several layers of mystery. Barb, by her own statement, would have rated this at five stars, but she experienced it in a censored version --when I read aloud to her, I ignore (or, if necessary, paraphrase or note, without repeating) the cussing, and omit the explicit sex scenes. To be fair, however, the cussing here is of the d-word sort and only occasional, and the sex all takes place in marriage. (Coulter does endow both Nicholas and Rosalind's foster brother Grayson with a background of womanizing dalliances, which is apparently supposed to establish to female readers that they're sexually desirable; astute female readers might be more apt to just roll their eyes.) At least one reviewer complained that the main characters had too much sex, but given that they were newlyweds, that's simply realistic. My only complaint would be that the explicitness wasn't necessary; it violated the couple's privacy for no real narrative purpose. (I admit that I did, just now, read/skim the parts I omitted in the first reading, but not with any salacious intent; rather, just to verify, for review purposes, that the couple weren't doing anything disgusting or vile --just things they'd prefer to be alone for.) My own reaction was less gushing, though I did like the book to a point. Coulter does do a good job of creating multiple webs of mystery, and pulling the reader's interest into them early on. Her characterizations are sharp (across the board, not just of the two main characters) and she has a dry sense of humor that several times had Barb laughing out loud, though the book isn't a comedy. In places, it's a masterful novel of manners (Jane Austen would have loved one dialogue in particular). The sympathetic characters were basically likeable (and the unsympathetic ones thoroughly dis-likable). Rosalind has more spice and sand to her than the usual Victorian heroine (Victoria would actually come to the throne in 1837) --that may be what one reviewer was referring to when he complained that the book is "anachronistic." In that respect, that's probably not a wholly fair criticism; human nature was the same in 1835 as it is now, and not all real-life Victorian females were subdued milksops. The Pale is a rather original fantasy world, with a genuine sense of alien strangeness. The ending (Epilogue) was also very well done. On the negative side, much of the dialogue here is unrealistic in places; people would never say some of these things in real life. The problem isn't so much that they're "anachronistic" --although in 1835, servants didn't talk to employers, nor total strangers to each other, as frankly as some of them do here-- as that they're inane or unrealistic in the context, as much so in 2016 as in 1835. Another major problem is that the "resolution" doesn't resolve a whole lot in some ways. There's a great deal of use of time relativity paradoxes, stopping time, blurring of identity between characters in ways that doesn't make sense. (This might appeal to Dr. Who fans, but I've never been a Whovian.) The sorcerer Sarimund can communicate with our world and influence events when the writer needs him to for the plot, but can't when she needs him to be unable to --there doesn't seem to be any other consistent law governing when he can or can't. Despite the buildup, the climactic showdown doesn't really involve any major challenge or difficulty; in that respect, it's more anticlimactic. One character also undergoes a significant attitude change, but without any convincing explanation for it. I think this was probably a passable introduction to Coulter's work, at least in this genre. As I said, I liked it (for what it is, time-passing entertainment). But I didn't like it intensely enough that I'd seek out any more of her corpus.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    When requesting a book on Paperbackswap a while back, I checked the poster’s shelf to see if there was anything else I might want. For some reason – possibly a vitamin deficiency, or lack of oxygen to the brain– I added this book to my request. Wizard’s Daughter, by “New York Times bestselling author” Catherine Coulter. This is a woman who has been writing for-virtually-ever. The “also by this author” page at the front of the book is double columned, smallish print, full. Goodreads lists “120 di When requesting a book on Paperbackswap a while back, I checked the poster’s shelf to see if there was anything else I might want. For some reason – possibly a vitamin deficiency, or lack of oxygen to the brain– I added this book to my request. Wizard’s Daughter, by “New York Times bestselling author” Catherine Coulter. This is a woman who has been writing for-virtually-ever. The “also by this author” page at the front of the book is double columned, smallish print, full. Goodreads lists “120 distinct works”. I mean, none of that really means anything to me; two words: Harper Lee. But there should be a reason for that kind of longevity. I know mainstream romances tend toward the dreadful; I once wrote a letter after being stuck on my break at work with nothing to read but a borrowed romance. I read about thirty pages, and it was a two-page letter. (You’re not surprised, are you?) So why did I request Wizard’s Daughter? I’m a sucker for the words “romantic fantasy” (or “fantasy romance”). I know better. I do. It’s just that the descriptions always seem so promising – like a cupcake with creamy icing piled high. Then you find out the baker used salt instead of sugar in the frosting and the cupcake is like styrofoam. I refer to a bit of this book as “THE dumbest thing I have ever read”. If you’ve read other reviews of mine, you’ll know I’ve read some stunningly stupid things. I’ve gotten myself into some ARCs and Netgalley books and LibraryThing Early Reviewer books that were not quite half-baked - which needed a few more months in the oven. But this. This wins all the prizes. This is, legitimately, hands down, the most absurd, dumbest, silliest – well, I’ll prove it. It was going along in mediocre enough fashion; it was repetitive, and tell-don’t-show, and heavy-handed, but I was mildly curious. I’d pick it up and read a couple of pages now and then. (All right, I admit: it was my bathroom book.) Then came page 43, what I can only assume is a dream sequence (I’m not reading further to find out): “An old man walked toward her, his long white robe brushing his sandals… She saw large white toes.” Now, I need to break in here to question that. My eyebrows quirked when I hit that line. I don’t believe in the hundreds (thousands?) of books I’ve read in my lifetime that I have ever seen toes mentioned in the initial description of a character – unless maybe it was a girl with painted toenails, or it was a character with talons or claws or cloven hooves or something? I don’t know. “Large white toes” just seemed a bit outré. But back to the description. Waaaait for it. “He smiled at her, his teeth shining as white as his toes.” AS HIS TOES. Mary had a little lamb; its fleece was white as toes. Toe White and the Seven Dwarfs. Brush with Crest - your teeth will shine as white as your toes! “NYT Bestselling Author Catherine Coulter”. Which of those is the most ridiculous statement?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Temaris

    Now, this really *was* a first draft. Rife with anachronisms, the entire interesting part of the plot relegated to the last 40 pages, while the first 250 are devoted to the hero and heroine meeting, falling in *something*, getting married and screwing like their lives depended on it. It doesn't, btw. It would have been more interesting if it had. The author's prevailing flaw appears to be laziness, she can't bear to follow up threads, so leaves them dangling in the breeze. And every now and then Now, this really *was* a first draft. Rife with anachronisms, the entire interesting part of the plot relegated to the last 40 pages, while the first 250 are devoted to the hero and heroine meeting, falling in *something*, getting married and screwing like their lives depended on it. It doesn't, btw. It would have been more interesting if it had. The author's prevailing flaw appears to be laziness, she can't bear to follow up threads, so leaves them dangling in the breeze. And every now and then she has the characters ask questions like 'why did X get such and such', when it is quite possible that the author has no idea herself beyond, 'he was hanging around doing nothing and my editor told me to remove him or give him something to do'. Disappointing use of an intersting idea to shoehorn in a Mills and Boon quality romance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cherise

    This book was really boring to me. The characters were interesting enough and even the plot held major potential. The problem was it seemed to take forever to get anywhere in the story. The dialogue was really awkward and the jumping narratives a little confusing from time to time. I had high hopes for this book based on the back cover description, but I just could not get into it, it never delivered what it promised. It took me forever to read and when it was done I was vastly relieved!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Parker

    Catherine Coulter is one of those authors that if I see her name on the cover or spine of a book, I'm buying the book. However, I personally find this book disappointing, in comparison to her other works, and the plot itself convoluted. This one was just not up to scratch. The characters were shallow. She was very wishy washy on some of the details. The couples relationship was very rushed and there was hardly any wooing or bonding. The audio book is read by Anne Flosnik. I didnt care for her na Catherine Coulter is one of those authors that if I see her name on the cover or spine of a book, I'm buying the book. However, I personally find this book disappointing, in comparison to her other works, and the plot itself convoluted. This one was just not up to scratch. The characters were shallow. She was very wishy washy on some of the details. The couples relationship was very rushed and there was hardly any wooing or bonding. The audio book is read by Anne Flosnik. I didnt care for her narration of the story and I am unsure if it is because I dont care for the story or just her narration.

  6. 5 out of 5

    K

    I truly enjoyed Wizard's Daughter and revisiting the Sherbrooke family. I felt Coulter created a wonderful story that pulls you into the world of two individuals, their destinies, and the mysterious, magical world of the pale. Ofcourse, being a romance novel, there are those infamous "love" scenes; however, they compose only a small part of the story. The story really focuses on Rosalind and Nicholas, and their quest to solve the mystery of Rosalind's past and the pale. I felt the characters and I truly enjoyed Wizard's Daughter and revisiting the Sherbrooke family. I felt Coulter created a wonderful story that pulls you into the world of two individuals, their destinies, and the mysterious, magical world of the pale. Ofcourse, being a romance novel, there are those infamous "love" scenes; however, they compose only a small part of the story. The story really focuses on Rosalind and Nicholas, and their quest to solve the mystery of Rosalind's past and the pale. I felt the characters and scenery were brought to life; with many twists and turns throughout the story that kept the reader guessing and captivated. Coulter has you rooting for Rosalind and Nicholas from their first meeting to the end. As many Catherine Coulter fans know, Wizard's Daughter is the next book in the Sherbrooke family saga that began with the Sherbrooke Bride. As with all of Catherine Coulter's books, Wizard's Daughter can stand on it's own as a story. If you liked Wizard's Daughter, then I would encourage you to read the stories of the other members of the Sherbrooke family. I guarantee their antics will have you laughing and their stories will captivate you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lizabeth Tucker

    The most current entry in the Sherbrooke series delves more deeply into the supernatural than previous books. When Nicholas Vail, the Earl of Mountjoy, returned to England for the first time since the age of 12, he never expected to find love with Rosalind de la Fontaine, the debt of the Vail family. Rosalind, a ward of Ryder and Sophia Sherbrooke, had been found at the age of eight, badly beaten and unable to remember anything of her life, including her name. The only thing that remained was a The most current entry in the Sherbrooke series delves more deeply into the supernatural than previous books. When Nicholas Vail, the Earl of Mountjoy, returned to England for the first time since the age of 12, he never expected to find love with Rosalind de la Fontaine, the debt of the Vail family. Rosalind, a ward of Ryder and Sophia Sherbrooke, had been found at the age of eight, badly beaten and unable to remember anything of her life, including her name. The only thing that remained was a mysterious song. Although well-written, as with all of Coulter's historicals, I would have preferred that this book wasn't part of the Sherbrooke saga. The mystical aspects go too far afield for this series and the book doesn't have the same humor as all the others. It is so far afield that a person starting with this book would get a completely incorrect idea about the series. I have to say that I was vastly disappointed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I didn't know anything about the author or any previous saga when I picked this book up at the library on CD. Now that I have finished with it, I am perusing the other reviews and I have to say that fellow readers who have given this 1 or 2 stars share my exact sentiments. The plot could have been interesting, but it didn't pick up until the last 15% of the novel. The rest of it just felt aimless, it would begin to become intriguing only to let me down after a paragraph or two. My curiosity woul I didn't know anything about the author or any previous saga when I picked this book up at the library on CD. Now that I have finished with it, I am perusing the other reviews and I have to say that fellow readers who have given this 1 or 2 stars share my exact sentiments. The plot could have been interesting, but it didn't pick up until the last 15% of the novel. The rest of it just felt aimless, it would begin to become intriguing only to let me down after a paragraph or two. My curiosity would pique again, and once again, "eh". It was almost painful to get through, but if it were not for the fact that I drive 1 hour each day back and forth to work, I wouldn't have finished it. I'm a captive listener who is bored with the radio.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jane(Janelba)

    This is my first book by Catherine Coulter and although it is a final book in the Sherebrooke series, it is also a stand alone book. I didn't feel to have missed out on any background at all. It was a beautiful book with strong characters and mystery with a dose of wizardry and magic included. I will definitely read more books by this author. This is my first book by Catherine Coulter and although it is a final book in the Sherebrooke series, it is also a stand alone book. I didn't feel to have missed out on any background at all. It was a beautiful book with strong characters and mystery with a dose of wizardry and magic included. I will definitely read more books by this author.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I struggled with this one. The plot was a bit like that children's game where you pull the string and the arrow points to an animal that makes that sound. That was what it was like trying to follow the plot. I actually skimmed through the end just so I could be done. My first Catherine Coulter book...I think I may have chosen poorly. I struggled with this one. The plot was a bit like that children's game where you pull the string and the arrow points to an animal that makes that sound. That was what it was like trying to follow the plot. I actually skimmed through the end just so I could be done. My first Catherine Coulter book...I think I may have chosen poorly.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline J

    I made it about halfway through this but finally it just got too silly for me. The butler wears old clothes because he likes them shiny, and he can see his face in them? Impossible, I don't care how old and shiny they are. And to add to that I just wasn't interested in the whole magic element so there didn't seem to be any point in continuing to read. I made it about halfway through this but finally it just got too silly for me. The butler wears old clothes because he likes them shiny, and he can see his face in them? Impossible, I don't care how old and shiny they are. And to add to that I just wasn't interested in the whole magic element so there didn't seem to be any point in continuing to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    Tenth in the Sherbrooke historical fantasy series set in 19th century London, England. The Story Almost dying in a massive storm at sea, Captain Jared Vail is rescued by a magical being at the time of Queen Elizabeth's reign and promises to pay his debt. By the time Vail dies, he has served his queen well, been rewarded with an earldom, and built a fine house in the middle of Sussex but not paid his debt. Some 300 years later, the debt is still not paid when his descendant, Nicholas Vail, returns t Tenth in the Sherbrooke historical fantasy series set in 19th century London, England. The Story Almost dying in a massive storm at sea, Captain Jared Vail is rescued by a magical being at the time of Queen Elizabeth's reign and promises to pay his debt. By the time Vail dies, he has served his queen well, been rewarded with an earldom, and built a fine house in the middle of Sussex but not paid his debt. Some 300 years later, the debt is still not paid when his descendant, Nicholas Vail, returns to England when he inherits the earldom. It's been years since Nichols fled England at age 12. His father had remarried when Nicholas was five and when step-mama delivered a son of her own, she stepped up her campaign to get rid of young Nick. Living with his grandfather for the next seven years, Nick was out of luck when granddad died and his father inherited. Now he's back and searching for the woman of his dreams—literally. Almost all his life, Nicholas has had the same dream. A girl telling him she was his debt. He meets the 18-year-old Rosalind at a ball and, knowing she's the one, immediately calls on her guardians the next morning. Ryder and Sophie Sherbrooke are skeptical of the new earl but acknowledge that this reserve is due to their acquaintance with his father. And, knowing Rosalind, they may as well allow this meeting. The true start of this story is the promenade of Rosalind and Nicholas with Grayson Sherbrooke as chaperon in Hyde Park to explore an artists' fair where Grayson comes across a book by Sarimund, The Rules of the Pale. Eventually, the trio discovers that only Rosalind can read the encoded publication and together they transcribe it into a standard form of English all three can read. It's Nicholas and Rosalind's betrothal, which stimulates the first attack—aimed at Rosalind but actually hurting the woman, Lorelei, for whom Grayson is falling. The clues Lorelei can remember sets Nicholas in a rage sending him to his half-brothers' house where neither Richard nor Lancelot deny his accusations. The encounter simply confirms how much his half-brothers despise him. (Their mother has so denigrated Nicholas over the years and their belief in his death so well-entrenched that Richard had believed he would be the next Earl of Mountjoy. Even styling himself with the viscount title that traditionally was used by the heir.) Unfortunately for Nicholas, Rosalind has her own depressing secret and is determined to tell Nicholas before their betrothal continues any longer. Fully prepared to see him walk away, so shocked is Rosalind when Nicholas indicates his determination to wed her, that Rosalind herself runs away instead. Between their understanding of The Rules and with a determined Nicholas and a very concerned Ryder, the wedding is moved up and Nicholas and Rosalind soon arrive at Wyverly Chase where Rosalind soon discovers the truth behind Nicholas' determination. Then a terrifying true dream reconciles the couple and they are determined to enter the pale where they learn how their fates have been intertwined waiting for fulfillment for the past 300 years. Rosalind also discovers the truth about her parents and the events that left her battered nearly to death ten years before. The Characters Nicholas Vail, Earl of Mountjoy, was tossed out of his father's home at age 5 upon the birth of his half-brother, Richard. At age 12, his refuge disappeared when his grandfather died and his father inherited. Nicholas made his way to Portugal and then, eventually, Macau where he built his fortune. Rosalind de La Fontaine was born 10 years ago when Ryder Sherbrooke found her dying in an alley. She had no memory of her earlier life nor why she had been beaten. Ryder and Sophie Sherbrooke have made it a part of their life to rescue disadvantaged children going so far as to take Rosalind in as their ward and raise her alongside their son, Grayson. The adult Grayson is known for his ghost stories and is fascinated by books on the occult. Lady Mountjoy and two of her sons, Richard and Lancelot, hate Nicholas enough to attempt assassination and kidnapping. Both parents did their best in encouraging their sons to hate Nicholas. Aubrey Vail is the youngest son and is a scholar ensconced at Oxford, the only brother who appears to like Nicholas. Sarimund is a wizard with a plan to save the Pale. A plan he set in motion with his rescue of Captain Jared Vail and his promise to "pay his debt". Part of this plan included his writing the The Rules of the Pale. My Take An overly elaborate series of unfortunate events that are poorly connected with very little tension and much unfelt, mostly intellectual passion. Oh, Coulter uses the words but she doesn't create the sense. Once Rosalind finds out why Nicholas has actually married her, the emotion Rosalind "expresses" is rote. There is no sense of how hurt she is nor does Nicholas make a convincing argument for loving her. It's more as though Coulter would have to write more pages to portray the passion and emotion of Nicholas' realization of his love so Coulter skipped right over to the reunion. Which, true to form, was also passionless. Coulter gives no reason for Nicholas leaving England at age 12. What impels him to leave the country? Why didn't his grandfather make provisions for this unloved grandson? There was a mention, once, of the grandfather giving Nicholas a sum of money. What happened to it? Coulter's math is off as well. She writes that Nicholas and Rosalind leave their wedding reception at 1pm for a 6-hour ride to Wyverly Chase in Sussex and has them arriving before 6pm. Why does Coulter call The Rules of the Pale a book? Yeah, yeah, I'm being picky, but The Rules are more of a pamphlet or booklet. At least, that's my opinion as the time spent reading the book aloud and transcribing it into a readable English takes very little time. And even less time for another of Sarimund's books found at Wyverly Chase. Then there's Nicholas' half-brothers and stepmother. Coulter portrays Matilda, Lady Mountjoy, with such a vicious pen which certainly establishes the woman's character but she paints her so shrewishly and stupid that it's more of a horrid caricature. Her constant implication of Lancelot as being gay to emphasize how evil Lance is comes across as more homophobic than anything else. And Richard's sudden concern for Nicholas' safety just does not ring true. I wonder, too, why step-mom and Lance come along?? Could someone explain what a "nanny finger" is??? My last peeve is Coulter's unevenness in applying the culture, mores, and language of the period. Admittedly, the way she has her characters address each other is minor, but once I reach a certain level of irritation, I get picky. I mean, she has Lady Mountjoy screaming at Rosalind in Rosalind's own house calling her "missy". WTF??! Coulter has no clue as to the different types of language/slang used by the various classes in society. Or even which terms are used exclusively by men or women. No man, let alone one in an earl's family, would ever say "lawks". Nor would they use such terms as "gullet", "tip over arse", or "nailed him but good" in polite company. Mayhap not even in the early 19th century. Then there's Coulter's actual writing. Parochial and abrupt. "Haven't things happened in your life you can't explain? You may begin with your dreams of me." The following is true, but how did Rosalind figure it out?? Unless she had some giant leap of intuition to which we are not privy… "…I'm quite real. I was out of time for captain Jared, but not for you." Oh, yeah, I'm feelin' the passion here… "He looked at those long narrow feet of hers, the nice arches. He wanted to lick her toes." The Cover Gorgeous cover—goes to show "don't judge a book by its cover". A handsome young man looking over his shoulder at us wearing a white linen shirt with sleeves rolled up, black trousers, and a hooded black cloak with a stream winding its way to a plantation-style house in the background on the right. On the left, in the background, is a castle atop oa steep peak with two bloodred moons segueing to a normal sliver of a moon on the right. The odd bit is that the plantation-style house, obviously set in Nicholas and Rosalind's world, is not described in the book as being on the flat and it would be more appropriate if there were three bloodred moons. The title is suggestive, but more subtle than I expected as Rosalind is not Sarimund's daughter.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this quickly. I enjoyed the characters, but they could have benefited from more development. The plot took quite a while to get to the point. If I had to read this over a long time period. I probably would have abandoned the book. The plot also needed some refining. The bit with the dream where Rosalind kills Nicholas seems like it was thrown in for no reason other than the author wanted his family around for conflict. Also the matter of someone attempting to shoot Nicholas was never deal I read this quickly. I enjoyed the characters, but they could have benefited from more development. The plot took quite a while to get to the point. If I had to read this over a long time period. I probably would have abandoned the book. The plot also needed some refining. The bit with the dream where Rosalind kills Nicholas seems like it was thrown in for no reason other than the author wanted his family around for conflict. Also the matter of someone attempting to shoot Nicholas was never dealt with. The sex scene was standard, but mildly amusing. Rosalind's foster brother involvement in the plot should have either been increased, or lessened. He just kind of disappeared from the book, with no resolution for his rather boring romantic troubles, or his part in why/how the book made it's way to him. I would have liked more about Rosalind's family. I feel like that was the most interesting part of the whole book, and it was glossed over. But all in all, this book amused me, and entertained me while I read it. Not something I am ever going to reread, but not a total waste of time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Got it as an audio book at the Salvation Army for 86 cents. As a car companion it was fine. As a book I would have probably given up. Great descriptions but how in Victorian England would a titled gentry (however roguish) be allowed a ward to marry in less than a week and really not for good reasons. I just knew we were meant to be together, really? Trying to tie up all the ends once they get to the pale just felt rushed and didn't really gel together as a fully formed story. Looking at some of t Got it as an audio book at the Salvation Army for 86 cents. As a car companion it was fine. As a book I would have probably given up. Great descriptions but how in Victorian England would a titled gentry (however roguish) be allowed a ward to marry in less than a week and really not for good reasons. I just knew we were meant to be together, really? Trying to tie up all the ends once they get to the pale just felt rushed and didn't really gel together as a fully formed story. Looking at some of the reviews before doing mine, many agree with me. It's truly a fluff read. What really did me in was the whole exchange about that Rosiland couldn't pick her clothes but could decorate, and Nicholas' choosing her clothes had to be approved by Ryder as "test" of his worthiness as a husband?!?!?!?!!?!?!?? And because this entire store literally takes place over the course of less than 2 weeks - she never decorates anything. Just one example of random stuff that didn't make sense.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Purvis

    I could write a dissertation on what I did not like about this book. The author has no original thoughts, is redundantly repetitive (Yes, I did that on purpose), uses "details" that have nothing to do with anything unless she thinks she is creating red herrings. She is sloppy and contradicts herself and is unable to resolve situations. Her characters must find their way to The Pale and when they get there, they ask if they are in The Pale and decide that they are not. What the heck? But it turns I could write a dissertation on what I did not like about this book. The author has no original thoughts, is redundantly repetitive (Yes, I did that on purpose), uses "details" that have nothing to do with anything unless she thinks she is creating red herrings. She is sloppy and contradicts herself and is unable to resolve situations. Her characters must find their way to The Pale and when they get there, they ask if they are in The Pale and decide that they are not. What the heck? But it turns out that they are indeed in The Pale. A dragon appears but he is a friendly dragon. Whew! He flies them to the mountain. The little girl who lost her memory gets it back but is then stabbed through the heart but then lives b/c "nothing evil can hurt her". Please, make it stop. I must remember never to pick up one of her books again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The "Wizard's Daughter", although part of a series, which I didn't know, I read and it served well as a stand alone book. I'm not quite sure how to feel about this one. I kept reading feverishly for a while and then would drop it down, utterly discouraged at the lack of progress by the characters and the plot and yet intrigued as to how it would end. It took a while for me to finally just get on with it and get the book read. I'm glad I did finish it as the most interesting bits came at the end, The "Wizard's Daughter", although part of a series, which I didn't know, I read and it served well as a stand alone book. I'm not quite sure how to feel about this one. I kept reading feverishly for a while and then would drop it down, utterly discouraged at the lack of progress by the characters and the plot and yet intrigued as to how it would end. It took a while for me to finally just get on with it and get the book read. I'm glad I did finish it as the most interesting bits came at the end, although it was a romanctic fantasy with a lot of time/character displacement and illusion so I'm also somewhat flat about the end because it's a bit confusing. So, I liked it, but I am not going to go out and find more of the author's books based on this read alone.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Yet another great book in Catherine Coulter’s Sherbrooke series! Wizard’s Daughter tells the story of Sherbrooke ward, Rosalind de la Fontaine and Nicholas Vail. Mystery, adventure, romance, this story has it all! Highly recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emmylou Abejuela

    Not THAT brilliant, but it gave me a few laughs. The PALE was a bit vague and bordered on the unbelievable, but then again... the Pale was not meant to be understood by us mortals with limited perspectives.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Debi Robertson

    A friend recommends this author. I am surprised, it is not my kind of book at all. Too repetitive for me, but I could see where others would like this. Interesting at different points and a couple of times there was a profound comment.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Blue Rose

    After having hints of supernatural occurrences throughout this series, it was interesting to have one book dedicated to the fantastic. It may be a little out there for some people, but I enjoyed it a lot.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caren

    I really enjoy Catherine Coulter's historical romances, and this was no exception. I would have rated it more highly, but the ending was just a bit strange. Too much wizardry that seemed contrived, and didn't really help the story. I really enjoy Catherine Coulter's historical romances, and this was no exception. I would have rated it more highly, but the ending was just a bit strange. Too much wizardry that seemed contrived, and didn't really help the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gigi Knell

    It was okay but not as compelling as some of the earlier novels. Its been a long time since I read historical romance and I remember reading the early books in this series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Moyle

    What a mess. Yuck. Don’t bother with this one.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    always a great read from a great author

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I liked the characters and the story. However towards the end it did seem to drag on a bit. Overall liked it and the entire series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Very choppily written, especially as it continues. Just a weird premise. I didn't like it. Very choppily written, especially as it continues. Just a weird premise. I didn't like it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Driskill

    Her earlier books are not my favorite.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gigi

    Didn't finish Didn't finish

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adrion Kusant

    Not my type of book. Just a fancy love story with some magic thrown in.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chayong

    I thought it kitschy but I actually liked it. Not too cheesy. Just right. Tee hee!

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