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Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents: 7 Ways to Stop the Worry Cycle and Raise Courageous and Independent Children

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With anxiety at epidemic levels among our children, Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents offers a contrarian yet effective approach to help children and teens push through their fears, worries, and phobias to ultimately become more resilient, independent, and happy. How do you manage a child who gets stomachaches every school morning, who refuses after-school activities, or who is With anxiety at epidemic levels among our children, Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents offers a contrarian yet effective approach to help children and teens push through their fears, worries, and phobias to ultimately become more resilient, independent, and happy. How do you manage a child who gets stomachaches every school morning, who refuses after-school activities, or who is trapped in the bathroom with compulsive washing? Children like these put a palpable strain on frustrated, helpless parents and teachers. And there is no escaping the problem: One in every five kids suffers from a diagnosable anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, when parents or professionals offer help in traditional ways, they unknowingly reinforce a child's worry and avoidance. From their success with hundreds of organizations, schools, and families, Reid Wilson, PhD, and Lynn Lyons, LICSW, share their unconventional approach of stepping into uncertainty in a way that is currently unfamiliar but infinitely successful. Using current research and contemporary examples, the book exposes the most common anxiety-enhancing patterns—including reassurance, accommodation, avoidance, and poor problem solving—and offers a concrete plan with 7 key principles that foster change. And, since new research reveals how anxious parents typically make for anxious children, the book offers exercises and techniques to change both the children's and the parental patterns of thinking and behaving. This book challenges our basic instincts about how to help fearful kids and will serve as the antidote for an anxious nation of kids and their parents.


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With anxiety at epidemic levels among our children, Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents offers a contrarian yet effective approach to help children and teens push through their fears, worries, and phobias to ultimately become more resilient, independent, and happy. How do you manage a child who gets stomachaches every school morning, who refuses after-school activities, or who is With anxiety at epidemic levels among our children, Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents offers a contrarian yet effective approach to help children and teens push through their fears, worries, and phobias to ultimately become more resilient, independent, and happy. How do you manage a child who gets stomachaches every school morning, who refuses after-school activities, or who is trapped in the bathroom with compulsive washing? Children like these put a palpable strain on frustrated, helpless parents and teachers. And there is no escaping the problem: One in every five kids suffers from a diagnosable anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, when parents or professionals offer help in traditional ways, they unknowingly reinforce a child's worry and avoidance. From their success with hundreds of organizations, schools, and families, Reid Wilson, PhD, and Lynn Lyons, LICSW, share their unconventional approach of stepping into uncertainty in a way that is currently unfamiliar but infinitely successful. Using current research and contemporary examples, the book exposes the most common anxiety-enhancing patterns—including reassurance, accommodation, avoidance, and poor problem solving—and offers a concrete plan with 7 key principles that foster change. And, since new research reveals how anxious parents typically make for anxious children, the book offers exercises and techniques to change both the children's and the parental patterns of thinking and behaving. This book challenges our basic instincts about how to help fearful kids and will serve as the antidote for an anxious nation of kids and their parents.

30 review for Anxious Kids, Anxious Parents: 7 Ways to Stop the Worry Cycle and Raise Courageous and Independent Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    If you have anxious kids this is a MUST read. I've struggled with anxiety my whole life (and taught my kids to be anxious) and have read dozens of books and this one is hands down the best. The authors truly understand anxiety and what works and what doesn't work. One of my biggest take-aways was that while our instinct is frequently to reassure our kids and to try to minimize the problem, that this can actually increase the anxiety. Instead we need to teach them how to expect the unexpected and If you have anxious kids this is a MUST read. I've struggled with anxiety my whole life (and taught my kids to be anxious) and have read dozens of books and this one is hands down the best. The authors truly understand anxiety and what works and what doesn't work. One of my biggest take-aways was that while our instinct is frequently to reassure our kids and to try to minimize the problem, that this can actually increase the anxiety. Instead we need to teach them how to expect the unexpected and face it head on. They explain why we have anxiety, how we let it take control and how to get that control back in 7 simple steps. The skills in this book are applicable to ANY situation no matter what the cause of the anxiety. There is a companion book called "Playing with Anxiety: Casey's Guide for Teens and Kids" that your kids can read or you can read with them. If you ever have the chance to see Lynn Lyons speak I highly recommend going. She is funny and engaging and will put conquering anxiety within reach for you and your kids.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Epp

    Although this is a parenting book I really felt like this was useful for my teaching practice. It was also really great for self reflection for myself as an anxious person and eventually an anxious teacher/parent/leader

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a fairly quick, simple read, with a lot of practical and immediately usable advice. I liked how concrete it was and how it breaks down behaviors that seem like helpful parenting choices when dealing with an anxious child that are actually reinforcing or contributing to the anxiety. I can’t yet speak to the effectiveness of the advice because it seems like a longer term thing, but there are definitely aspects of this advice that I am already using and finding helpful. The entire final chap This is a fairly quick, simple read, with a lot of practical and immediately usable advice. I liked how concrete it was and how it breaks down behaviors that seem like helpful parenting choices when dealing with an anxious child that are actually reinforcing or contributing to the anxiety. I can’t yet speak to the effectiveness of the advice because it seems like a longer term thing, but there are definitely aspects of this advice that I am already using and finding helpful. The entire final chapter has to do with a companion book for kids that I don’t have yet, and it was a bit frustrating to discover that it’s not really useful until I do. But knowing that this book was helpful of itself, I will get the companion for us to use as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This book is really aimed at children of anxious parents who themselves are being raised, often unconsciously, to be nervous and anxious themselves.  Given the extent to which anxiety is present within contemporary American society there are a great many anxious children who are being raised whose anxieties are unreasonable and intrusive, and some of them even get to speak to the UN or engage in fear-mongering politics for contemporary leftist causes that are driven by irrational fears and anxie This book is really aimed at children of anxious parents who themselves are being raised, often unconsciously, to be nervous and anxious themselves.  Given the extent to which anxiety is present within contemporary American society there are a great many anxious children who are being raised whose anxieties are unreasonable and intrusive, and some of them even get to speak to the UN or engage in fear-mongering politics for contemporary leftist causes that are driven by irrational fears and anxieties.  While this book does not talk about such larger aspects of fear and anxiety, it does give a lot of examples of children whose lives are harmed by anxiety that they have been reared to have by parents, and gives a lot of advice to parents on how children can be encouraged to be bolder and braver, and a lot of ways in which this can be sabotaged by well-meaning but ineffective parents.  I didn't enjoy the book as much as I had hoped to, because the author's perspective was not really what I would have preferred to see, but there is some use for some people with this book. If you include the appendices, which are worth reading, this book is a bit more than 250 pages and is divided into twelve chapters and various supplementary material.  After a short introduction the authors discuss how worry moves in and grows and why it needs to leave children alone (1), after which the authors look at nature and nurture when it comes to child anxiety (2) and the problem of anxiety as a maladaptive strategy to the problems of early childhood helplessness (3).  After that there is a discussion about normalizing worry to deal with it (4) and then responding differently to it (5) and in recognizing the uncertainty of the world without being paralyzed by it (6).  There is a discussion about retraining the brain (showing the authors' CBT interests) (7) as well as a discussion on the need to calm down the body (8) as well as look at the bigger picture (9) of which anxiety tends to focus on only a small part.  There is then a discussion of the attack of amnesia (10) and a plug for the Casey's Guide (11) as well as a look at the need for children to move towards courage and independence (12).  The book then ends with a discussion of Casey's Guide as well as three appendices that deal with anxiety disorders diagnosed in youth, national organizations that identify therapists with particular specialties, and children's books that model what the authors consider to be healthy cognitive styles, after which there are acknowledgements, a discussion on how to find Casey's Guide, and some information about the authors. There are a few aspects about this book that I thought could have been handled a bit better.  For one, the author's views on healthy cognitive styles are a bit cringy, as the authors fancy themselves to be experts on how people should think and this is generally not the best way to deal with such matters, especially given the obvious ways that the authors serve as shills for a particular way of dealing with anxiety.  There are a lot better ways to address the problem of anxiety than simply trying to promote a particular guide and then trying to make parents guilty for the ways that they have encouraged anxiety in their children.  Indeed, the book would have done a better job if it helped adults deal with anxiety better in such a way that the parents could then become positive role models for their children dealing with anxiety in the same kind of fashion.  Still, such a moral worldview is something that would be a bit beyond this book and its approach, unfortunately, making this book not as useful as it could have been otherwise.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Highly recommend for anyone with anxiety.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This book is about helping children to live with the fact that “life is full of surprises and discomforts, big and small” without becoming trapped in a pattern of overly cautious, hesitant and avoidant behaviour. To develop a more active, adventurous, flexible mentality, the authors recommend coaching children through a 7-part plan: 1. Expect to worry (“it’s normal, it’s common, and it can be helpful”) 2. Talk to your worry (externalise it and answer back to it) 3. Be unsure and uncomfortable on pu This book is about helping children to live with the fact that “life is full of surprises and discomforts, big and small” without becoming trapped in a pattern of overly cautious, hesitant and avoidant behaviour. To develop a more active, adventurous, flexible mentality, the authors recommend coaching children through a 7-part plan: 1. Expect to worry (“it’s normal, it’s common, and it can be helpful”) 2. Talk to your worry (externalise it and answer back to it) 3. Be unsure and uncomfortable on purpose (focus on promoting independence, “step into the unknown”, and retrain the brain by deliberately choosing anxiety-inducing experiences while reminding yourself you can handle the feelings they produce) 4. Breathe! (learn simple calming techniques to help when facing challenging situations) 5. Know what you want (find motivation by identifying anxiety-inducing goals, or desirable activities that anxiety interferes with) 6. Bridge back to your successes (remember previous successes to reassure yourself that you can handle new challenges) 7. Take action on your plan (“work as a team to apply these strategies to your child’s specific anxious situations”) As a parent, the best feature of this book was probably the counterintuitive advice it gave about the negative impact of reassurance and accommodations – I’ve definitely found myself using this to avoid providing additional details and guarantees to my children, and instead focus on problem-solving how they’d cope (& whether it would even be so bad!) if their fears materialized. I also liked the book’s emphasis on normalizing feelings of worry: “our goal is not to prevent worries; it is to keep anxious fears from dominating our families”. This was helpful when my daughter told me she was nervous before a dance performance – rather than trying to talk her out of her feelings, I was able to calmly remind her that they were normal and natural, and ask whether she also felt a little excited. (She did!). The book includes suggested follow-up actions at the end of each chapter, to help in reflecting on and putting into practice the concepts introduced – for example, after a prompt about considering how we model responses to anxiety, I made a point of actively talking to the children about my feelings and how I handle them in situations that I find stressful, such as driving in an unfamiliar location. There’s also a (free) ebook that presents the same concepts in a more child-friendly way, although I didn’t feel the need to use this (and in fact found the excessive references to it rather grating). Despite the obvious hint about “parents” in the title, I was still surprised that the person in our family who benefited most from the book was me – I was reading it at a challenging time (having just agreed to a transatlantic move!) and found myself using the book’s concept of "uncertainty and discomfort” as a kind of mantra to deal with the stresses of preparing for the move. This really helped me avoid catastrophic thinking, as most of the possible “disasters” I imagined could be described as a combination of these two factors, helping me realize that they would be survivable, if unpleasant. I’d recommend this to anyone who struggles with worry or anxiety within their family, and indeed to any parent – after all, who doesn’t hope, as the book’s subtitle suggests, to “raise courageous & independent children”?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    This is an excellent practical book for guiding children to understand and alleviate anxiety. Not only did I learn more about what anxiety is, I gained tools for recognizing what I do that enables it as well as tools for reducing it. Now I’m going to work through the hands-on accompanying ebook with my child.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    It would be more accurate to say I skimmed this book, reading passages that seemed interesting and relevant to our family. After our first (and only) visit with a child therapist, we decided to take a do-it-yourself approach to addressing our daughter's anxiety. So the first step was to check out this book. I gleaned many useful tips and have seen progress as I've adopted them to the way we talk about and deal with her worries and concerns. I really appreciated their recommendation of looking in It would be more accurate to say I skimmed this book, reading passages that seemed interesting and relevant to our family. After our first (and only) visit with a child therapist, we decided to take a do-it-yourself approach to addressing our daughter's anxiety. So the first step was to check out this book. I gleaned many useful tips and have seen progress as I've adopted them to the way we talk about and deal with her worries and concerns. I really appreciated their recommendation of looking inward at your own worries and anxieties as an adult. Considering this seems crucial because children mirror parents. As a result, I'm trying to be more cognizant of the example I set to my kids when it comes to stepping out of my comfort zone, letting worry drive my actions, or adjusting when plans deviate. The book outlines the 7 keys to solving the worry puzzle: know what you want, bridge back to your successes, expect to worry, talk to worry, be unsure and uncomfortable on purpose, take action on your plan, and breathe! Here are the highlights for me: 1. "Believing that your task in life is to eliminate or control all risk for yourself or your anxious child perpetuates the fearful stance that say, 'Stop! You can't handle this!'... If you only teach your children how to remain safe and comfortable, and if you preempt any difficulties coming toward them, then they will have no experience with or confidence in using their own abilities to manage problems." 2. "When we promote problem solving in our families, then we teach our children to think when facing a difficult event rather than simply reacting with panic and avoidance." 3. Look for "ways to become unsure and uncomfortable on purpose, looking for opportunities, large or small, where you can practice tolerating doubt and distress. Those arenas will be where each of you grow." 4. "Nothing is more desirable than to be released from an affliction, but nothing is more frightening than to be divested of a crutch." - James Baldwin 5. "Success in new situations often depends not on knowing absolutes but on translating the skills we had over there to a related experience over here." 6. "Our job as parents is to create an atmosphere that encourages our children to make decisions, develop their own opinions and views, and become self-reliant." 7. "When children are exposed to constructive parental arguments that are resolved with affection, they develop a greater sense of security, learn how to compromise, and have better social interactions at school."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    This was an accessible, but not great read. It had good information. However in an effort to not make it too clinical, it became poorly written. This is a great beginning book for a parent with very little background.

  10. 5 out of 5

    PaulA Ghosh

    Would like to give it 4.4 coz it was relatable to one of my friend situation. It was just not a book that I picked but was like an essential guide to complicated worry and anxiety problems. Now feel more equipped to exchange the tools with the friend to resolve this particular parenting issue.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti Call

    Very practical advice and easy to understand, with concrete ways to approach anxiety.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Claudiu

    Spoilers and very brief ideas summary below: Embrace your amygdala. Live with it. You can't remove it, anyway. I felt this book was stretched- had some good main ideas, but a lot of filler words in between, and a lot of repetition of those main ideas. It could have been written in a much more succinct form. It gets and almost 3 stars from me. Long story short, with an anxious kid, you should try to: -- Teach them worry is common, and normal, and at times, to be expected. -- Personalize your worry- g Spoilers and very brief ideas summary below: Embrace your amygdala. Live with it. You can't remove it, anyway. I felt this book was stretched- had some good main ideas, but a lot of filler words in between, and a lot of repetition of those main ideas. It could have been written in a much more succinct form. It gets and almost 3 stars from me. Long story short, with an anxious kid, you should try to: -- Teach them worry is common, and normal, and at times, to be expected. -- Personalize your worry- give it a name, talk to it, and maybe even boss it around sometimes. -- Teach the kid to expect the unexpected. -- Regularly expose the anxious child to uncomfortable situations, from which they can learn how to manage their anxieties, (make sure it's not counterproductive). -- Remind kids about their success in similar situations, they are now anxious about. -- Remember, reassurance almost never works as a long term plan for anxiety management. -- Teach the kid the habit of calm breathing. -- Support the child's autonomy, as frequent as possible. Expose them to new situations.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    One of my kids has been displaying a tendency towards anxiety since toddlerhood - she had some medical challenges early in her life that make her somewhat more likely to develop anxiety and I was also a kind of anxious kid, so it wasn't really surprising. But I didn't know what to do about it, and my default reactions were definitely not helpful. I've read all the books I could find on the topic and this one stands out for its authoritative voice, practical steps and tips for responding, and gen One of my kids has been displaying a tendency towards anxiety since toddlerhood - she had some medical challenges early in her life that make her somewhat more likely to develop anxiety and I was also a kind of anxious kid, so it wasn't really surprising. But I didn't know what to do about it, and my default reactions were definitely not helpful. I've read all the books I could find on the topic and this one stands out for its authoritative voice, practical steps and tips for responding, and general calming tone. My child is a bit younger still than the recommended age range covered by the book so we haven't been able to really apply all the activities for kids to do (like writing down their worries or positive notes to themselves) but the body-calming activities are great, and I also feel like I have some tools in my arsenal for as she gets older. And a big part of helping a child through their anxiety is simply lowering your own anxiety level in your reactions to them, and that's where this book really shines in my opinion.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nami Stone

    Months of therapy for my 8 year old didn’t make a difference in her anxiety, but this book helped her conquer her issues. The information and tasks are straightforward and easy to implement, and truly worked for us. I believe having a child address and work through their problems best equips them for life, and this book gave us the tools to do so in an effective manner. It involves caregivers working with the child, and empowers the child to take control of their thoughts once the practices are Months of therapy for my 8 year old didn’t make a difference in her anxiety, but this book helped her conquer her issues. The information and tasks are straightforward and easy to implement, and truly worked for us. I believe having a child address and work through their problems best equips them for life, and this book gave us the tools to do so in an effective manner. It involves caregivers working with the child, and empowers the child to take control of their thoughts once the practices are learned. The child learns to recognize what is happening during an anxiety or panic attack, and is able to eventually face and control it. This is all done in a way that is still conducive to empathetic and loving parenting. I’m very thankful for the research behind and the presentation of the authors’ work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jinna

    Made me realize I was a very anxious child Wish my mother ir myself read this book growing up. I never thought of myself as an anxious person, but after reading this book a lot of struggles I had made sense. I gave up very easily, and I had very difficult time with being separated from mom as a young child. I think I've developed somewhat healthy compensation skills by always having a to do list. I've been goal driven. But I still have anxiety in random places, like talking to a (Male, older) bos Made me realize I was a very anxious child Wish my mother ir myself read this book growing up. I never thought of myself as an anxious person, but after reading this book a lot of struggles I had made sense. I gave up very easily, and I had very difficult time with being separated from mom as a young child. I think I've developed somewhat healthy compensation skills by always having a to do list. I've been goal driven. But I still have anxiety in random places, like talking to a (Male, older) boss figures for fear of being humiliated. I still hate public speaking. For my kids I have to do 2 things. 1. instead of worrying about it, i have to model how to talk to your worry, and worrying is normal. 2. Fostering more independence- instead of "have-to" change the conversation to "want-to" ie you want to stop sucking your thumb because... instead of you have to.

  16. 4 out of 5

    MariLee

    As parents, we do what we can to help our children, especially when they have fears or worries. Unfortunately, we can sometimes inadvertently reinforce those fears and worries by how we manage our own anxieties and how we help our children with theirs. This books helps parents to recognize how they are helping or hindering their kids in dealing with their anxieties and provides some techniques and skills to empower our children in managing anxiety. I wish I'd had this book years ago when our kid As parents, we do what we can to help our children, especially when they have fears or worries. Unfortunately, we can sometimes inadvertently reinforce those fears and worries by how we manage our own anxieties and how we help our children with theirs. This books helps parents to recognize how they are helping or hindering their kids in dealing with their anxieties and provides some techniques and skills to empower our children in managing anxiety. I wish I'd had this book years ago when our kids still lived at home. The techniques and skills set forth here are probably most effectively taught when children are younger (before leaving home), although I still found it valuable regarding my young adult children.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jen (bookscoffeedogs)

    I'll add to to others reviews, that this one is a tad repetitive. And that was OK with me. It is a lot to remember all the time if you are dealing with a child that has worries, so the repetition helped solidify the information in my brain. Overall, it had some nice succinct ideas for helping a child through anxiety. It also has a book for the child to read alone or for you to read to them that I just got with questions to go over with them that I will read alongside my worried kiddo. I'll revie I'll add to to others reviews, that this one is a tad repetitive. And that was OK with me. It is a lot to remember all the time if you are dealing with a child that has worries, so the repetition helped solidify the information in my brain. Overall, it had some nice succinct ideas for helping a child through anxiety. It also has a book for the child to read alone or for you to read to them that I just got with questions to go over with them that I will read alongside my worried kiddo. I'll review that when we are done with it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Scarbrough

    Important and Lifesaving Book!! Between intensive therapy and this book, which her therapist recommended, my daughter and I are getting our lives back! Anxiety has systematically been wrecking everything, but we are getting over things and I’ve never felt more encouraged and excited! This is a wonderful system for dealing with anxiety and phobias, easy to understand, and actually fun to implement. Our lives were at a complete standstill, but this book and her wonderful therapist have brought bac Important and Lifesaving Book!! Between intensive therapy and this book, which her therapist recommended, my daughter and I are getting our lives back! Anxiety has systematically been wrecking everything, but we are getting over things and I’ve never felt more encouraged and excited! This is a wonderful system for dealing with anxiety and phobias, easy to understand, and actually fun to implement. Our lives were at a complete standstill, but this book and her wonderful therapist have brought back the sunshine and happiness. Highly recommend!!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Whitehead

    I thought this book was really well-written and straight forward. So much practical advice for handling anxiety in your family was included. The authors did a great job at giving simple and easily understood explanations on anxiety, what it is, why it happens, why it is important, and how to handle it. They provide a simple step-by-step process to help your child (and you) walk through the process of moving forward in life and doing difficult activities without allowing anxiety to take over.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Super helpful, actionable advice. It really changed a lot about how I talk to my kids and we have made some huge strides with anxiety. I am only giving it four stars though because the first part felt very “if your kid is anxious, it’s your fault.” I don’t tend to worry in front of my kids and I don’t think they developed anxiety from that. But it still showed me how to help, and move beyond comforting them.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dewin Anguas Barnette

    I highly recommend this book to anyone of any age who is dealing with anxiety. It is written in a clear, non-condescending manner and gives clear, useable advice that is realistic and tackles almost every single aspect of anxiety. Its companion book, Playing with Anxiety, is equally useful and compelling. It is written for young children and teens, but I found it extremely helpful as an adult.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    Such a good book for me. I struggle with anxiety, and this book offers strategies to help both anxious kids and their (often anxious) parents. Basically, it’s all about how to expect and accept your worries and then to face your fears anyway—and how to help kids do the same. Highly recommended for parents and teachers of anxious kids as well as for anxious adults.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Treasure Box Of Books

    A good book for the age group mentioned. I, however, have a 2 and a 4 year old and was hoping this book may have even a few tips for little kids with anxiety, and I was disappointed. I was able to take away maybe a few small points to try for my little kids but this book is just as it says: for kids between 8 through teenage ages.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Arlene Mullen

    This book was easy to read. It talked about anxiety in children and how to help them. Alot of these things I learned for myself in therapy. So it was nice to see that what I have been trying is a good thing. Good read if you have a child with anxiety

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jess Wilson

    Pretty interesting book. I went to their conference and wanted to read the book before I suggested it to parents. I'm not sure it's the right book for every parent as some of the concepts might be confusing on how to impalement, but some parents would love it. Pretty interesting book. I went to their conference and wanted to read the book before I suggested it to parents. I'm not sure it's the right book for every parent as some of the concepts might be confusing on how to impalement, but some parents would love it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    I would highly recommend this book if anyone in your family is prone to worry or anxiety. The authors give a step by step plan to solve the puzzle of anxious kids. Also helps parents to understand the part they might be feeding into the "worry cycle". I would highly recommend this book if anyone in your family is prone to worry or anxiety. The authors give a step by step plan to solve the puzzle of anxious kids. Also helps parents to understand the part they might be feeding into the "worry cycle".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jen D.

    I only read the fist few chapters but already it is full of terrible advice! The “just get over it” kind of advice. The authors seem to have never felt any anxiety in their life. If they didn’t claim otherwise in the introduction, i would doubt they had ever really known someone who does.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I started this book last August and for some reason just never finished the last few chapters. It was really good and useful information on dealing with your own anxiety as well as your child's and it addresses how you may be feeding into a child's anxiety or passing it on to them. I started this book last August and for some reason just never finished the last few chapters. It was really good and useful information on dealing with your own anxiety as well as your child's and it addresses how you may be feeding into a child's anxiety or passing it on to them.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Candice DeLeeuw

    I highly recommend this book. It is full of insightful and practical steps to take with your child. I have gleaned so much from this book and we have begun to implement with positive results. Must read for parents with anxious kids!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hoko

    Very informative and concise. Definitely one of those books you have to read again as it gives lots of useful step-by-step tools to approach your child’s anxiety as well as your own anxious behaviors. I decided to purchase the kids edition after listening to the coverage chapter on Casey’s guide.

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