web site hit counter Intelligence and Surprise Attack: Failure and Success from Pearl Harbor to 9/11 and Beyond - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Intelligence and Surprise Attack: Failure and Success from Pearl Harbor to 9/11 and Beyond

Availability: Ready to download

Why do surprise attacks-whether from terrorists or from conventional enemies-succeed even when some advance warning frequently seems clear in hindsight? Ever since Pearl Harbor the conventional wisdom has been that surprise attacks succeed because intelligence and national security officials lack the imagination or capacity to "connect the dots" from the available informat Why do surprise attacks-whether from terrorists or from conventional enemies-succeed even when some advance warning frequently seems clear in hindsight? Ever since Pearl Harbor the conventional wisdom has been that surprise attacks succeed because intelligence and national security officials lack the imagination or capacity to "connect the dots" from the available information or lack "game-changing" strategic intelligence. But this work argues that the conventional wisdom is wrong: by comparing cases where intelligence failed to anticipate and stop a surprise attack with cases where intelligence did prevent the attack, Dahl find that the key to success is not more imagination. Rather the acquisition of specific, tactical-level intelligence, combined with the presence of decisionmakers who are receptive to the warnings they are given makes the difference. Strategic intelligence is often what decisionmakres say they want, but Dahl finds that in practice, strategic intelligence is generally non-specific and thus doesn't foster a sense of urgency to act. This book offers a theory of preventive action and advances the literatures on intelligence and surprise attack.


Compare

Why do surprise attacks-whether from terrorists or from conventional enemies-succeed even when some advance warning frequently seems clear in hindsight? Ever since Pearl Harbor the conventional wisdom has been that surprise attacks succeed because intelligence and national security officials lack the imagination or capacity to "connect the dots" from the available informat Why do surprise attacks-whether from terrorists or from conventional enemies-succeed even when some advance warning frequently seems clear in hindsight? Ever since Pearl Harbor the conventional wisdom has been that surprise attacks succeed because intelligence and national security officials lack the imagination or capacity to "connect the dots" from the available information or lack "game-changing" strategic intelligence. But this work argues that the conventional wisdom is wrong: by comparing cases where intelligence failed to anticipate and stop a surprise attack with cases where intelligence did prevent the attack, Dahl find that the key to success is not more imagination. Rather the acquisition of specific, tactical-level intelligence, combined with the presence of decisionmakers who are receptive to the warnings they are given makes the difference. Strategic intelligence is often what decisionmakres say they want, but Dahl finds that in practice, strategic intelligence is generally non-specific and thus doesn't foster a sense of urgency to act. This book offers a theory of preventive action and advances the literatures on intelligence and surprise attack.

48 review for Intelligence and Surprise Attack: Failure and Success from Pearl Harbor to 9/11 and Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kingsley

    As both a non-American and someone with little to no knowledge or background of the Intelligence industry I found this book highly engaging and thoroughly enjoyable. It is well researched, while providing the right level of information and explanation for 'entry level' understanding. Right from the start Dahl sets out a clear roadmap of what the book aims to achieve and how it is going to get there. He provides a thesis and then what each chapter will contain and how it pertains to that thesis. I As both a non-American and someone with little to no knowledge or background of the Intelligence industry I found this book highly engaging and thoroughly enjoyable. It is well researched, while providing the right level of information and explanation for 'entry level' understanding. Right from the start Dahl sets out a clear roadmap of what the book aims to achieve and how it is going to get there. He provides a thesis and then what each chapter will contain and how it pertains to that thesis. It straight away gives a good idea of where he is going and helps the reader start to put things together. Dahl, while referencing reports and dozens of other studies on intelligence, works through a variety of Intelligence 'successes' and 'failures' (although as he states those terms are argued about and are sometimes hard to pin down) starting with Pearl Harbour and moving through things like Midway, the Korean War, embassy bombings, the NYC 'Day of Terror' and September 11. The looks as the event and the intelligence leading up to each event, as well as how those in charge dealt with said intelligence. Dahl puts three factors together for successful Intelligence - strategic information, specific information, and willingness to act on that information. He suggests that in almost every case we have high level strategic information but not always specific information that can be actioned (my understanding is that strategic information probably informs our "levels of preparedness" nowadays, such as if we are on 'general high alert' but cannot details of where and when attacks will occurs). Many argue that it is lack of specific information that causes Intelligence failures. While this is often the case, Dahl argues (and shows through research) that it is also often a failure of willingness to act on the Intelligence (both strategic and specific) that causes failure. Intelligence itself is not enough for success, you need people to act on it. I really enjoyed the mix of history and analysis. The listened to the audiobook version, read by John N. Gully. Gully does well with the reading. He is clear, precise and easy to listen to. I enjoyed his work.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Teressa

    This was an extremely detailed timeline of surprise attacks dating from Pearl Harbor to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. It discusses the intelligence factor of these attacks, whether intelligence dropped the ball or was missed entirely or not acted on even though there may have been advanced warning. While the audiobook was incredibly good, at times it was a little tedious. That doesn't take away from my five stars though because it was informative and did pose some very interesting facts. One of This was an extremely detailed timeline of surprise attacks dating from Pearl Harbor to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. It discusses the intelligence factor of these attacks, whether intelligence dropped the ball or was missed entirely or not acted on even though there may have been advanced warning. While the audiobook was incredibly good, at times it was a little tedious. That doesn't take away from my five stars though because it was informative and did pose some very interesting facts. One of the earlier points made was concerning the intel surrounding Pearl Harbor. My question is if they did indeed know this was an imminent threat, what could have been done to prevent it aside from evacuation. I'm unsure whether or not we had the proper technology to have stopped it. I just don't know. I also thought the timeline of events building up to 9/11 was very interesting. Overall, I thought this was a great audiobook and would definitely recommend it for anyone interested in this subject. Erik J. Dahl provides great examples and extensive research throughout the timeline regarding intel for all these events. John N. Gully did a fantastic job narrating this audiobook. I liked the style he used, informative and reporter like which came across great. He spoke clearly and kept a steady pace. His work was flawless. Audiobook received in exchange for unbiased review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Delta

    This book is excellent. Dahl presents the facts without much bias, opting for the logical reasons behind terrorist attacks instead of the "doomed to fail" approach. He is methodical in his presentation of the facts and his conclusions. I found the book quite interesting and would recommend it to friends and family, no matter their level of understanding of the topic. I listened to the audio version and I found John N. Gully to be very clear and easy to understand. His speed was great. Great read a This book is excellent. Dahl presents the facts without much bias, opting for the logical reasons behind terrorist attacks instead of the "doomed to fail" approach. He is methodical in his presentation of the facts and his conclusions. I found the book quite interesting and would recommend it to friends and family, no matter their level of understanding of the topic. I listened to the audio version and I found John N. Gully to be very clear and easy to understand. His speed was great. Great read and highly interesting. **I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.**

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I listened to the Audible version of this book which I do not recommend but am reviewing the content of the book. Fascinating book that considers intelligence successes as well as failures. Rather than lump responsibility fully on analysts or sometimes policy makes Dahl approaches the subject with more nuance and draws the conclusion that only specific tactical intelligence provided to policy makers is capable of deterring surprise attacks. Excellent breakdown of historic and current case studies I listened to the Audible version of this book which I do not recommend but am reviewing the content of the book. Fascinating book that considers intelligence successes as well as failures. Rather than lump responsibility fully on analysts or sometimes policy makes Dahl approaches the subject with more nuance and draws the conclusion that only specific tactical intelligence provided to policy makers is capable of deterring surprise attacks. Excellent breakdown of historic and current case studies. A must read for any intelligence professional

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sergio Sanchez

  6. 4 out of 5

    P

  7. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Kaserman

  8. 5 out of 5

    John

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mjg

  10. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Joslin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Reidar

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raven

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Ust

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nick Poole

  19. 4 out of 5

    Keegan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tom Timmerman

  21. 5 out of 5

    Blair

  22. 5 out of 5

    Geir

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Starbuck

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Gawlinski

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  26. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  28. 5 out of 5

    Racheile

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mikaela Ellenwood

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tia

  31. 4 out of 5

    Georgetown University Press

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jason Dotson

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Russell

  34. 5 out of 5

    Pbwritr

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mike Harbert

  37. 4 out of 5

    Jayce Nichols

  38. 4 out of 5

    Martin

  39. 5 out of 5

    J. Gibson

  40. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  41. 4 out of 5

    Barry Sierer

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kitty Red-Eye

  44. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  45. 4 out of 5

    Dave Beeman

  46. 4 out of 5

    Dilawar Khan

  47. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  48. 5 out of 5

    Mpampis

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...