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The Nine Day Queen: Tudor Historical Fiction

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Tudor blood will see her crowned - and lead to her downfall... Lady Jane Grey is the eldest of the Grey sisters. Shy and scholarly she is happier in the company of her sisters, than with the intrigues of court. But as fourth in line to Henry's throne, Jane is too valuable a pawn not to be played. When her parents' scheme to wed her to Prince Edward fails, they plan a Tudor blood will see her crowned - and lead to her downfall... Lady Jane Grey is the eldest of the Grey sisters. Shy and scholarly she is happier in the company of her sisters, than with the intrigues of court. But as fourth in line to Henry's throne, Jane is too valuable a pawn not to be played. When her parents' scheme to wed her to Prince Edward fails, they plan a far more ambitious - and dangerous - move to make Jane Queen...


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Tudor blood will see her crowned - and lead to her downfall... Lady Jane Grey is the eldest of the Grey sisters. Shy and scholarly she is happier in the company of her sisters, than with the intrigues of court. But as fourth in line to Henry's throne, Jane is too valuable a pawn not to be played. When her parents' scheme to wed her to Prince Edward fails, they plan a Tudor blood will see her crowned - and lead to her downfall... Lady Jane Grey is the eldest of the Grey sisters. Shy and scholarly she is happier in the company of her sisters, than with the intrigues of court. But as fourth in line to Henry's throne, Jane is too valuable a pawn not to be played. When her parents' scheme to wed her to Prince Edward fails, they plan a far more ambitious - and dangerous - move to make Jane Queen...

30 review for The Nine Day Queen: Tudor Historical Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    V.E. Lynne

    The story of the Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine and Mary, would have to be one of the most tragic in english history. Most people are familiar with Jane's tale: forced into marriage with Guildford Dudley, made to accept the crown upon the death of Edward VI, executed at age 16 when all the plotting and scheming of her parents and the Dudleys came to naught. 'The Nine Day Queen' tells Jane's story for the first part of the book and then we move on to her less well known sisters. I must say I enjoy The story of the Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine and Mary, would have to be one of the most tragic in english history. Most people are familiar with Jane's tale: forced into marriage with Guildford Dudley, made to accept the crown upon the death of Edward VI, executed at age 16 when all the plotting and scheming of her parents and the Dudleys came to naught. 'The Nine Day Queen' tells Jane's story for the first part of the book and then we move on to her less well known sisters. I must say I enjoyed Mary Grey, the youngest of the trio, the best. Born with a hunchback in an age when physical deformity was seen as a manifestation of spiritual corruption, she is a brave, spirited girl who tries to make her own life in a society that offers few opportunities for that. The characters of the Dudleys and Frances and Henry Grey are the villains of the piece, as they usually are, but Mary I is portrayed in a positive light whereas her sister and successor, Elizabeth I, is not. Probably not a book for Elizabeth fans but the author, Ella March Chase, offers a good explanation for her portrayal in her notes. Elizabeth's disdain for the Greys was well known and she did have her reasons, though not so much in Mary Grey's case. Overall 'The Nine Day Queen' is a very good novel, well told, absorbing and often heart-breakingly sad.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annette O'grady

    This was a very interesting read . it was not just about her life but her sisters as well the book carried on even after lady Jane greys death

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    It can be difficult to fictionalise historical events but Ella March Chase tackles her topic with sensitivity. She worked with the known historical facts to create three empathetic heroines with strengths and weaknesses. In the days before Edward VI dies we are drawn into conspiracy and treachery. Seen from the view of the Grey girls in shadows and whispers, March creates a believable atmosphere. The pen portrait of Mary Tudor's relationship with the girls is credible as are the fictional turns It can be difficult to fictionalise historical events but Ella March Chase tackles her topic with sensitivity. She worked with the known historical facts to create three empathetic heroines with strengths and weaknesses. In the days before Edward VI dies we are drawn into conspiracy and treachery. Seen from the view of the Grey girls in shadows and whispers, March creates a believable atmosphere. The pen portrait of Mary Tudor's relationship with the girls is credible as are the fictional turns of plot which build Mary Grey from a bit part to a central character. The characterisation of Elizabeth is not conventional - though excellent. I enjoyed this much more than I thought I would. It wasn't a Tudor pot-boiler.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Though I find this w okay read , I was rather disappointed as it was more from other people’s points of view than lady Jane grey. I feel it was very loosely written more around her sisters lives after Jane’s beheading then of the time building up to her reign as queen for nine days .

  5. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Reeves

    A very moving portrait of the Grey sisters and a very good account of the politics of the time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Éowyn

    Quite an engaging story of the three Grey sisters, but still some elementary errors, for example Courtenay was a scion of York, not Lancaster.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I knew very little about Last Jane Grey but even less about her two sisters each of whom had to deal with their heritage and the ambitions of others.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Wijntjes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. One of the many characters I found interesting in this book was Lady Katherine Grey. I enjoyed her story, particularly her transforming from the pet beauty of the family to an outcast in disgrace. Kat (as she was known to family) was a pretty, people-pleasing girl. She looked forward to her marriage, and loved being of royal blood. I liked reading about her especially when she starts to break apart from her usual attitude, and doesn't just follow rules she disagrees with. This makes her characte One of the many characters I found interesting in this book was Lady Katherine Grey. I enjoyed her story, particularly her transforming from the pet beauty of the family to an outcast in disgrace. Kat (as she was known to family) was a pretty, people-pleasing girl. She looked forward to her marriage, and loved being of royal blood. I liked reading about her especially when she starts to break apart from her usual attitude, and doesn't just follow rules she disagrees with. This makes her character interesting to read about and watch develop. A quote that I thought explained a lot in this book, was 'I wager three maids for a crown.' I found this quote interesting because it clearly explained the Duke of Suffolk's true motives. It showed that him and his wife would willingly risk all three of their daughters to be able to get one of them to be queen, so they could rule through them. This is sad because it was just one of The Duke of Suffolk's many quotes that helps us understand that he values power, status, and rank over the love of his family. One of the things I learned from reading this book was that you should always try to surround yourself with loyal people. For example, when Jane was forced to take the crown despite what she thought, she quickly got overthrown by her cousin who was declared queen by the people of the country. When she got punished for treason, her entire family was put to shame, and left to save themselves rather than help Jane. Her parents got Kat and her sister Mary to be ladies in waiting for the new queen, and saw the queen to beg pardon, while Jane was on her own, still sticking to her own faith which was partially responsible for her execution. A similar scenario happened to Kat, when her husband Henry Herbert left her when the Grey's were put to shame. Both of these examples show we should keep reliable friends around us, even if these situations happened centuries ago.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    When King Edward VI dies unmarried and childless in 1553, there are several claimants to the throne. One of these is Lady Jane Grey, who has Tudor blood through her mother, Frances Brandon, a niece of Henry VIII’s. Finding herself at the centre of a plot by her parents and the Duke of Northumberland (the father of her husband, Guildford Dudley), Jane becomes Queen of England…but only for nine days. Deposed by Edward’s Catholic half-sister, Queen Mary, Jane is imprisoned in the Tower of London an When King Edward VI dies unmarried and childless in 1553, there are several claimants to the throne. One of these is Lady Jane Grey, who has Tudor blood through her mother, Frances Brandon, a niece of Henry VIII’s. Finding herself at the centre of a plot by her parents and the Duke of Northumberland (the father of her husband, Guildford Dudley), Jane becomes Queen of England…but only for nine days. Deposed by Edward’s Catholic half-sister, Queen Mary, Jane is imprisoned in the Tower of London and eventually beheaded. The story of Jane’s short reign and tragic fate forms part of this historical fiction novel by Ella March Chase, but this is not just Jane’s story – it’s also the story of her two younger sisters, Katherine and Mary. On the same day that Jane married Guildford Dudley, Katherine was married to Henry Herbert, son of the Earl of Pembroke, but after Jane’s downfall the Herberts want to break their ties with the Grey family, so Katherine and Henry’s marriage is annulled. Later, Katherine falls in love with Edward Seymour but their secret romance incurs the wrath of the new queen, Elizabeth I, and Katherine finds that her own life could be in danger. Although the youngest Grey sister, Mary, is not such a central part of her parents’ plotting (possibly because she suffers from what sounds like a severe form of spinal curvature), she is still affected by Jane’s death and Katherine’s misfortunes. This fictional account of the Grey sisters is a great introduction to Mary and Katherine for those of us who know very little about them! I had a good idea of what I could expect from The Nine Day Queen, having read another book last year by this author, The Virgin Queen’s Daughter, which I enjoyed. I knew it wouldn’t be a particularly 'literary' historical novel (you can probably guess that from the cover, though it’s not always fair to make assumptions) but not as light and fluffy as some. I can’t really say much about the accuracy of the book as I’ve only read one other novel about Lady Jane Grey (Innocent Traitor by Alison Weir) and no non-fiction beyond the few brief paragraphs she is usually given in books about the Tudors. As far as I could tell the story does stick to the basic facts, with some obvious inventions, as you would expect in a book that is fiction rather than non-fiction – and the author does use her Author’s Note at the end to explain where she has deviated away from the known facts. The sisters are given such different personalities – Jane is sensible, studious and a devout Protestant, Katherine warm, compassionate and pretty, and Mary outspoken and impulsive – and with each girl narrating her own chapters of the book, the opportunity was there for the author to develop a different narrative voice and style for each of them. I was disappointed that she didn’t make the most of this opportunity and the voices of the three girls were very similar, so much so that there were times when I found it hard to tell who was narrating the chapter I was reading and had to look back at the chapter heading to remind myself. I did like the fact that the story was told from the perspective of all three Grey sisters, though, and I was surprised to find that Jane’s death comes not near the end of the book as you might expect, but in the middle. The focus is then on Katherine and Mary for the remainder of the novel and I thought this was good because while Jane’s story is well known, the other two sisters have been largely forgotten by history and it was nice to have an opportunity to learn more about them both. Another thing that was surprising was the portrayal of the two queens, Mary I and Elizabeth I. In a reversal of what you would usually expect, Mary is portrayed as kind and considerate whereas Elizabeth comes across as spiteful and vindictive. They both felt more like caricatures than realistic characters to me, but it was interesting to see such a different perspective!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The Nine Day Queen tells the story of the Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine and Mary. A novel based on true events, the story shows how Jane and Katherine are used as pawns by their parents in order to gain the great power of seating Jane on the throne and ruling the country through her. Lady Jane Grey becomes Queen for just nine days, before Mary Tudor claims her right to the throne and Jane is locked in the Tower of London. Despite the promises of Mary Tudor to Mary Grey, Jane meets a terrible end The Nine Day Queen tells the story of the Grey sisters, Jane, Katherine and Mary. A novel based on true events, the story shows how Jane and Katherine are used as pawns by their parents in order to gain the great power of seating Jane on the throne and ruling the country through her. Lady Jane Grey becomes Queen for just nine days, before Mary Tudor claims her right to the throne and Jane is locked in the Tower of London. Despite the promises of Mary Tudor to Mary Grey, Jane meets a terrible end. The story continues to follow Katherine and Mary, both of whom served Mary Tudor, and then Elizabeth I when she came to the throne. They both in turn defied Elizabeth by marrying without permission, and the story follows their fates at the hands of Elizabeth. [return][return]An enjoyable novel about lesser known members of the Tudor Royalty. It was interesting to learn more about the lives of these young ladies, and I was pleased to read the author note that showed that only one small change to historical fact had been made, the rest of the book based on real events. Having read this, I now intend to read Ella March Chase's other book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I wasn't sure when I started to read this one, how much I warmed to this tale of the misfortunes of the three Grey daughters, born into one of England's most powerful noble families (they were by far anything but noble or great!) By the end though, the author had me weeping as her tale spun to its bittersweet conclusion of the sisters' fates. Women she drew as such real characters, deserving of admiration and respect for their courage and unity in the face of danger, uncertainty and others' ambit I wasn't sure when I started to read this one, how much I warmed to this tale of the misfortunes of the three Grey daughters, born into one of England's most powerful noble families (they were by far anything but noble or great!) By the end though, the author had me weeping as her tale spun to its bittersweet conclusion of the sisters' fates. Women she drew as such real characters, deserving of admiration and respect for their courage and unity in the face of danger, uncertainty and others' ambition for their place in the world and of empathy for their human weakness and suffering at others' cruelty. An evil duke, a deluded spinster queen, another jealous, frightened, insecure and vicious, this book certainly has its share of villains! Not to mention the continual plots and intrigue. March Chase gives a clear impression of the stressful, turbulent times through which these women lived. Give me freedom and anonymity any time!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really liked this. It didn't feel like a fictional historical novel, instead it felt like a non-fiction book. You can really feel the research and dedication that has gone into making this book. Ella March Chase has done her homework and heck, it's paid off. I didn't know much about Jane Grey or her sisters even though I'm in love with the Tudor world. Despite being from 3 people's point of view, the book flows nicely. The saddest thing about the book is the fact that none of the sisters really I really liked this. It didn't feel like a fictional historical novel, instead it felt like a non-fiction book. You can really feel the research and dedication that has gone into making this book. Ella March Chase has done her homework and heck, it's paid off. I didn't know much about Jane Grey or her sisters even though I'm in love with the Tudor world. Despite being from 3 people's point of view, the book flows nicely. The saddest thing about the book is the fact that none of the sisters really had a happy life. Well worth the read and I can't wait to read more of Ella March Chase's books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    OK, engaging enough, with some very sad moments. Could have been better, though. Some unforgivable Americanisms - there's no place for them in English historical fiction! And what on earth was that bird supposed to be, that Mary saves from the fox? Some species never seen in England before or since? Title was a bit misleading - it's more about Katherine and Mary Grey than Lady Jane, simply because she dies so early on. All in all - readable if you like this sort of thing, but there are much bette OK, engaging enough, with some very sad moments. Could have been better, though. Some unforgivable Americanisms - there's no place for them in English historical fiction! And what on earth was that bird supposed to be, that Mary saves from the fox? Some species never seen in England before or since? Title was a bit misleading - it's more about Katherine and Mary Grey than Lady Jane, simply because she dies so early on. All in all - readable if you like this sort of thing, but there are much better written examples.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Louise Fry

    Very slow start made it boring at times and couldn't grasp liking of the author however when it starting going mainly after jane's execution made it interesting and exciting along with fast paced ! It was also interesting to know more about Mary as I do not know much about her as I do the other two sisters - overall interesting read Very slow start made it boring at times and couldn't grasp liking of the author however when it starting going mainly after jane's execution made it interesting and exciting along with fast paced ! It was also interesting to know more about Mary as I do not know much about her as I do the other two sisters - overall interesting read

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jodie (J.C.T)

    this was really an intersting book not to sure on how true it all was but I reeally did enjoy it. Only problem is I sometimes forgot whobwas whonand had to reread bits but im like thatbwith anything frombthis time period as their is alot of smilar or the same names.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    this book was so heart wrenching. by the end my heart broke for the poor grey sisters, used so cruelly. this story was so beautifully written. chase managed to weave historical facts with her own fancy seamlessly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Georgina

    Another brilliant book by Ellen March Chase ,this is the second book I have read ,as the saying goes could not put it down, all three Grey sisters tell their own story . I really became so wrapped up in their individual plights .Well worth reading into the small hours

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    4.5

  19. 5 out of 5

    Book-shelf Shelf

    Explores the power politics and the personal relationships behind Mary Tudors court on a way which will draw the reader in. A thoroughly enjoyable read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judith Drew

    Loved it! Could not put this book down. Gave me a completely different view of Elizabeth 1, how selfish and vain she was and that she could be as ruthless as her father.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Baker

    briliant

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nikky

    A completely different telling of the tragic Grey sisters from their own perspectives.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Watson

    I loved the story that fitted around the history. Three sisters with no control over their lives vs the royal power struggle of the time.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kazimiera pendrey

    this was a good book at the start however i feel that it just went on a few chapters too long but this is only in my opinion

  25. 5 out of 5

    Corinna

  26. 4 out of 5

    Palandreas

  27. 5 out of 5

    M E Shaw

  28. 5 out of 5

    WILLIAM HARDING

  29. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Pickard

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