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Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell.   In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell.   In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography. This illustrated atlas is perfect for fans of Empire of the Summer Moon, Blood and Thunder, and National Geographic atlases, as well as those fascinated with the Old West. Organized by region, this encyclopedic reference details Indian tribes in these areas: beliefs, sustenance, shelter, alliances and animosities, key historical events, and more. See the linguistic groupings and understand the constantly shifting, overlapping boundaries of the tribes. Follow the movement, growth, decline, and continuity of Indian nations and their lifestyles.


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Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell.   In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is Atlas of Indian Nations is a comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography, this is the story of American Indians that only National Geographic can tell.   In the most comprehensive atlas of Native American history and culture available, the story of the North American Indian is told through maps, photos, art, and archival cartography. This illustrated atlas is perfect for fans of Empire of the Summer Moon, Blood and Thunder, and National Geographic atlases, as well as those fascinated with the Old West. Organized by region, this encyclopedic reference details Indian tribes in these areas: beliefs, sustenance, shelter, alliances and animosities, key historical events, and more. See the linguistic groupings and understand the constantly shifting, overlapping boundaries of the tribes. Follow the movement, growth, decline, and continuity of Indian nations and their lifestyles.

30 review for Atlas of Indian Nations

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kindra

    Was pretty blown away by my own embarrassing lack of knowledge and familiarity with the Native American peoples, and so appreciated the concise yet seemingly thorough, and certainly more inclusive introduction than any I've received so far. I read most of it, although I had to return it to the library before I could fully finish it. Was totally fascinated with the lifestyles and diversity of peoples from the area I'm from (California and Pacific Northwest), and equally appalled at the devastation Was pretty blown away by my own embarrassing lack of knowledge and familiarity with the Native American peoples, and so appreciated the concise yet seemingly thorough, and certainly more inclusive introduction than any I've received so far. I read most of it, although I had to return it to the library before I could fully finish it. Was totally fascinated with the lifestyles and diversity of peoples from the area I'm from (California and Pacific Northwest), and equally appalled at the devastation wreaked by the white introductions and subsequent lack of acknowledgement and attempts to right the wrongs we have done as a nation. Not that we ever really could, of course, but it just made it to clear how little has been done in comparison to what would be seemingly humane to do. In any case, I couldn't read much at once, because I felt so overwhelmed with a feeling of almost responsibility for the massacres etc., and it's such a heavy topic that I just can't take in too much at once without losing an ability to absorb it as I want to. But all that being said, I'm very thankful for coming across this, and for taking the time (about a month) to read through it. I feel I've gained more understanding, respect, and familiarity with the Native American peoples in the month reading this than in the rest of my life combined.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Mccarrick

    This is an excellent book that documents Indian nations in North America very well.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cook Memorial Public Library

    This National Geographic book is a wonderful addition to resource materials on the history of Native Americans across the United States. A beautiful coffee table size book with gorgeous illustrations, maps and photographs with commentary and statistical information not easily obtained in one resource. Author Anton Treuer is a member of the Ojibwe tribe and is a distinguished professor and author adding this very valuable resource of interest from high school age through adult. Highly recommended This National Geographic book is a wonderful addition to resource materials on the history of Native Americans across the United States. A beautiful coffee table size book with gorgeous illustrations, maps and photographs with commentary and statistical information not easily obtained in one resource. Author Anton Treuer is a member of the Ojibwe tribe and is a distinguished professor and author adding this very valuable resource of interest from high school age through adult. Highly recommended. --Reviewed by Stephen Check our catalog: http://encore.cooklib.org/iii/encore/...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Reaching my fourth decade and while reading a couple other books about western expansion and Africa of all things, it suddenly hit me that I really had no concept of how many distinct tribes there were in America. American schools, in my day at least, taught about the Pilgrims, the Iroquois League, Custer’s Last Stan’s, Geronimo and Sitting Bull. A simple few step process of meeting a new race, befriending them, trading with them, fighting, and eventually conquest and relocation. It’s a horrific Reaching my fourth decade and while reading a couple other books about western expansion and Africa of all things, it suddenly hit me that I really had no concept of how many distinct tribes there were in America. American schools, in my day at least, taught about the Pilgrims, the Iroquois League, Custer’s Last Stan’s, Geronimo and Sitting Bull. A simple few step process of meeting a new race, befriending them, trading with them, fighting, and eventually conquest and relocation. It’s a horrific legacy we’re never taught or asked to question. Pop culture is no better, native peoples are almost always an enemy to be conquered. At least many writers have named their tribes they write of, which is probably what first piqued my interest. Who were the Chiricahua or Papago? What made the Cheyenne different from the Apache or Seminole? So in realization that I was woefully uninformed about a massive section of this continent’s history and peoples, I set off to find a book that would help me understand who these people were, and where they traditionally had lived. At my local book store I came across this work, Atlas of Indian Nations, and it was exactly the type of book I was looking for. Chock full of helpful maps and illustrations, it gives both an overview of native cultures distinctive to each geographical region and the interactions between natives and white explorers and settlers. Additionally, there is a summary of each tribe in each geographical region. It’s a large book, coffee table size, and thus it’s no easy thing to get through quickly. I managed about one section per reading. The section overviews give a history of the region and the main players in each area’s history. This is followed by several in depth articles depicting specific people or battles instrumental in the tribal histories of that section. Finally comes the lists of major tribes or leagues of tribes and a shorter history of each one. The book is a fascinating read, with tons of information. It’s by no means an exhaustive history, it can’t be, but it does its job quite well. I came away with a much better understanding of the different tribes of America. It’s also a heartbreaking book as time and again these people are marginalized and set aside as somehow less human or with less right to live here than the white man. We see tribes that fought hard, tribes that tried diplomacy, and tribes that managed to fly under the radar for the most part. Some tribes were relocated, some managed to stay on or near their traditional home grounds, and some were mercilessly wiped out. Additionally, the book shares where these people now reside and their current tribal status. It was perhaps most illuminating to learn that some of these tribes are still fighting to have their tribes legally recognized to this day. I’m so glad I found this book and educated myself about this massive part of the American story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    M. Powell

    Citation by: M. Powell Citation: Treuer, A. (2013). Atlas of Indian nations. Reference Type: Atlas Call Number: G1106.E1 Cost: $25.00 Professional Review: Atlas of Indian nations. (Book Review). 2014. Publisher's Weekly, retrieved from, http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1... Content Scope: A comprehensive collection of Native American history, culture, battles, tribal lands, massacres, and the quest for independence. The resource contains maps, photos, art, and cartography and discusses Native Ame Citation by: M. Powell Citation: Treuer, A. (2013). Atlas of Indian nations. Reference Type: Atlas Call Number: G1106.E1 Cost: $25.00 Professional Review: Atlas of Indian nations. (Book Review). 2014. Publisher's Weekly, retrieved from, http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1... Content Scope: A comprehensive collection of Native American history, culture, battles, tribal lands, massacres, and the quest for independence. The resource contains maps, photos, art, and cartography and discusses Native American nations from the Northeast, Southeast, Plains, Arctic and Sub-Artic lands. Accuracy, Authority, Bias: The reference does not have a bias. It shows the Native Americans in a true light. It provides a well rounded view of the tribes histories and cultures. It shows them as victims of violence and the perpetrators of violent acts. It does classify conflicts as battles, wars, and massacres. Massacres of innocent people were unfortunate results of the years of conflicts as was the death of Native Americans and their culture by the invasion of people and their diseases. The work does not portray the Native Americans as helpless victims but it does not shy away from the hardships, death, and destruction they went through. Arrangement and Presentation: The work is divided into sections. Each sections covers a different geographic location and discusses the history, battles, maps, culture, etc. of the nations that lived in that area. Since this is an atlas, it has many maps most of them historical. There are many beautiful pictures as well which make the work appear more than just a book of maps. Relation to Similar Works: There are other works in the library that focus on specific nations. This work is the only one that is an atlas. It provides a wide variety of maps which could be used in tandem with other books which focus more on culture and history. Timeliness and Permanence: This would be a book that would stay with a collection. It is labelled as an atlas and it serves that function very well but it has wonderful historical pictures as well as histories and cultural information. Accessibility/Diversity: The book is diverse in that it covers all prominent Native American nations. It also shows the differences and similarities that existed among the different nations. The work can be used to dispel old stereotypes that exist about Native Americans as a whole by showcasing the uniqueness of each nation.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    This really gorgeous book is more than an atlas, per se. It's a history and examination of Indian nations in the present day including where they are and tracing where they came from. There's texts, inserts looking at interesting topics/events/people, maps, timelines, snapshots of various tribes in the regions, etc. The book is divided by looking at the indigenous peoples of North America. In terms of format, it's a bit cookie cutter in the sense that it follows the same pattern: a history of th This really gorgeous book is more than an atlas, per se. It's a history and examination of Indian nations in the present day including where they are and tracing where they came from. There's texts, inserts looking at interesting topics/events/people, maps, timelines, snapshots of various tribes in the regions, etc. The book is divided by looking at the indigenous peoples of North America. In terms of format, it's a bit cookie cutter in the sense that it follows the same pattern: a history of the region, including major events, sections looking at famous battles, personas, objects plus brief summaries of various tribes. The information is a bit overwhelming to take in and I found out how little I know about Native Americans. Some of the criticism is understandable: the text is viewed solely through the lens of what happened to these people and their contacts with settlers. It is depressing but it's also what happened and explains why many descendants live on reservations (and why many don't). Some of the information is painfully relevant to current events. Overall, though, I thought in some ways it was an excellent overview. I was not aware (for example) of the effects of how horses changed hunting buffalo, for example. I did not know about Russian colonization and how it affected the indigenous people of Alaska, Canada, the Artic, etc. I was struck by how the stories of the gold rush and the Oregon Trail talk about the white settlers traveling to the area and sometimes talk about the Chinese people who also came for the gold rush but not the indigenous people displaced, murdered, raped, forced into slavery, etc. As an aside I appreciated the thought into the layout: some books of this nature will interrupt the text for a page or two for inserts which annoys me. Thankfully the reader does not have to go and skip around to complete the section before going back to read the insert if they choose. Definitely would recommend it. It's not a happy read, if you couldn't tell, though. And I'm not sure if it's a book you'd necessarily want for purchase although it would make an excellent reference and would make a good "coffee table book." Got it from the library and that was the best method for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chase Parsley

    3/5 stars. This beautiful coffee table book is a combination of an atlas, history, and reference tool. It is divided into 8 sections by geography - so there is a chapter about Pacific Northwest American Indians, American Indians of the Plains, and so on. It focuses on the time period involving European/US expansion more than anything else. I liked the visuals, maps, and in-depth look at the history around the European and American settlement era. It is a sad and wretched story with much about dis 3/5 stars. This beautiful coffee table book is a combination of an atlas, history, and reference tool. It is divided into 8 sections by geography - so there is a chapter about Pacific Northwest American Indians, American Indians of the Plains, and so on. It focuses on the time period involving European/US expansion more than anything else. I liked the visuals, maps, and in-depth look at the history around the European and American settlement era. It is a sad and wretched story with much about disease, wars, assimilation, and treaties that don't last. However, I wish there was more writing on the cultural aspects of each tribe (there was some but it was really lacking I thought), the history of the tribes since the US expansion period, and more about the current situations and demographics of the tribes today. A good book overall though. PS this book was written by Anton Treuer - apparently an Ojibwe member who earned a PhD at Princeton and works in Minnesota. I notice how the author on this review says "National Geographic Society" only. The narration feels like it is from an American Indian's point of view.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul Peterson

    Indian history and culture have always fascinated me, so this was an easy choice when I came across it in the book store and it did not disappoint. This is a reference book, divided into geographic sections of North America but made for good reading, front to back. Interesting to note, the book did not use the term "Native American" once...it used the word Indian throughout. Indian history and culture have always fascinated me, so this was an easy choice when I came across it in the book store and it did not disappoint. This is a reference book, divided into geographic sections of North America but made for good reading, front to back. Interesting to note, the book did not use the term "Native American" once...it used the word Indian throughout.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard Isaacs

    The scope of historical detail & photos, original maps & illustrations factually describe the enormous number & lifestyles of the true 1st Americans!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Darek Makowski

    A incredible book about Native American cultures

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

    While this book had a lot of good points, I was disappointed with it on the whole. The maps were fantastic and the artwork and photographs were top-notch. I would expect nothing else from National Geographic. It was clearly laid out and I am sure I will use it as a reference book for years to come. What I found lacking in the book were details about the daily lives of the tribes. I wanted to know about tribal structure, folk-lore, and their day-to-day lives, all of which were sorely lacking throu While this book had a lot of good points, I was disappointed with it on the whole. The maps were fantastic and the artwork and photographs were top-notch. I would expect nothing else from National Geographic. It was clearly laid out and I am sure I will use it as a reference book for years to come. What I found lacking in the book were details about the daily lives of the tribes. I wanted to know about tribal structure, folk-lore, and their day-to-day lives, all of which were sorely lacking throughout the text. In fact there was almost nothing about the way Native Americans lived prior to the arrival of Europeans. Unfortunately that was the part that I was most interested in learning about when I picked the book up. Instead the book focused almost entirely on the brutal subjugation of the tribes and their way of life. This part was definitely enlightening. While I was certainly aware of many of the injustices perpetrated against the Native Americans, this book really brought home how insidiously it was carried out. From the Spanish missionaries turning their “flock” into slave laborers, to broken treaties, to massacres, to reservations, to boarding schools, and on to such practices as allotment and termination, each move became more and more odious. Together these things became a devious and certain plan to break a people and ensure they are crushed forever. It was a sad history, and one well worth remembering. My problem with it in this book was that virtually all other aspects of Native American life and the tribes were absent. Those items that were there were only viewed in the reflected light of these atrocities. I would have liked learning about the tribes in their glory, and not narrowly defined by the disgraceful abuses they endured.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary K

    Treuer, A. (2013). Atlas of Indian nations (1st edition.). Washington, DC: National Geographic Books. Citation by: Mary K Smith Type of Reference: Geographical Reference Content/Scope: Comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, and art. Accuracy/Authority/Bias: Author is a professor of Ojibwe at Minnesota's Bemidji State University. He has written 9 books, and two were selected as "Minnesota's Best Read of the Year." He has also wo Treuer, A. (2013). Atlas of Indian nations (1st edition.). Washington, DC: National Geographic Books. Citation by: Mary K Smith Type of Reference: Geographical Reference Content/Scope: Comprehensive resource for those interested in Native American history and culture. Told through maps, photos, and art. Accuracy/Authority/Bias: Author is a professor of Ojibwe at Minnesota's Bemidji State University. He has written 9 books, and two were selected as "Minnesota's Best Read of the Year." He has also won awards from the National Science Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Bush Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Arrangement/Presentation: The book is divided into 8 chapters based based on geographical region. Relation to other works: The photos and maps of this atlas make it one of the most comprehensive atlas' of Native American life. Accessibility/Diversity: Atlas represents culture and life from a now minority population. Cost: $40 Professional Review: http://www.booksinprint.com.libsrv.wk...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    This book was very disappointing, dreary and repetitive, yawn inducing kind of book. Knowing this book was from National Geographic, I didn't set my expectations too high. And honestly, I bought this book for its pictures and maps. And I didn't get even that! I expect the book will show me how these tribe live, where they live, what their house look like, how they built it, how they farm or hunt, etc. Instead, I got boring account of war after war written in dull text without proper citations. I This book was very disappointing, dreary and repetitive, yawn inducing kind of book. Knowing this book was from National Geographic, I didn't set my expectations too high. And honestly, I bought this book for its pictures and maps. And I didn't get even that! I expect the book will show me how these tribe live, where they live, what their house look like, how they built it, how they farm or hunt, etc. Instead, I got boring account of war after war written in dull text without proper citations. It bothers me especially when he disputes previously historical claims and states his opinion like it is a fact. Sorry, if you want people to buy your narrative you have to proof that you're unquestionably right, otherwise it's a mere speculation/opinion, regardless of your doctoral degree.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Sly

    This gets an 'it was ok' for me... 2.5 stars if I could. There's a lot of great material in here and much of it is interesting. However, it ultimately feels very repetitive in all of the regional and tribal accounts, and most of the history described is very superficial. Many of the historical maps, paintings, and photos are presented with little context - where did they come from? How historically accurate are they? This gets an 'it was ok' for me... 2.5 stars if I could. There's a lot of great material in here and much of it is interesting. However, it ultimately feels very repetitive in all of the regional and tribal accounts, and most of the history described is very superficial. Many of the historical maps, paintings, and photos are presented with little context - where did they come from? How historically accurate are they?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    Indian good, white man evil...that is the theme of the book. There is very little offered in this book if you are interested in N.A. culture.

  16. 4 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    SM

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brooke Carlson Mankevich

  18. 5 out of 5

    PAMELA A AMICO

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maryalice Mowry

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nola

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beth Hiley constantine

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard George

  25. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hae-yu

  29. 5 out of 5

    Randy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Blake

    This book is almost dizzying in its scope and the amount of information it provides. Organized by region, the historic details into tribes, culture and historical events - all provided with full page colorful illustrations - is astounding! I use it as a resource for writing but it is a must buy for anyone interested in Native American/Old West history.

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