web site hit counter While We Run - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

While We Run

Availability: Ready to download

Abdi Taalib thought he was moving to Australia for a music scholarship. But after meeting the beautiful and brazen Tegan Oglietti, his world was turned upside down. Tegan's no ordinary girl - she died in 2027, only to be frozen and brought back to life in Abdi's time, 100 years later. Now, all they want is for things to return to normal (or as normal as they can be), but th Abdi Taalib thought he was moving to Australia for a music scholarship. But after meeting the beautiful and brazen Tegan Oglietti, his world was turned upside down. Tegan's no ordinary girl - she died in 2027, only to be frozen and brought back to life in Abdi's time, 100 years later. Now, all they want is for things to return to normal (or as normal as they can be), but the government has other ideas. Especially since the two just spilled the secrets behind Australia's cryonics project to the world. On the run, Abdi and Tegan have no idea who they can trust, and when they uncover startling new details about Project Ark, they realise thousands of lives may be in their hands. A suspenseful, page-turning sequel to When We Wake that will keep readers on the edge of their seats and make them call into question their own ideas about morality - and mortality, too.


Compare

Abdi Taalib thought he was moving to Australia for a music scholarship. But after meeting the beautiful and brazen Tegan Oglietti, his world was turned upside down. Tegan's no ordinary girl - she died in 2027, only to be frozen and brought back to life in Abdi's time, 100 years later. Now, all they want is for things to return to normal (or as normal as they can be), but th Abdi Taalib thought he was moving to Australia for a music scholarship. But after meeting the beautiful and brazen Tegan Oglietti, his world was turned upside down. Tegan's no ordinary girl - she died in 2027, only to be frozen and brought back to life in Abdi's time, 100 years later. Now, all they want is for things to return to normal (or as normal as they can be), but the government has other ideas. Especially since the two just spilled the secrets behind Australia's cryonics project to the world. On the run, Abdi and Tegan have no idea who they can trust, and when they uncover startling new details about Project Ark, they realise thousands of lives may be in their hands. A suspenseful, page-turning sequel to When We Wake that will keep readers on the edge of their seats and make them call into question their own ideas about morality - and mortality, too.

30 review for While We Run

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chiara

    A copy of this novel was provided by Allen and Unwin in exchange for an honest review. While We Run was so completely different to When We Wake. For one, our protagonist is Abdi, not Tegan. And boy do I have a lot to say about this boy. Abdi’s character voice in While We Run is possibly one of the most unique that I have ever read. He’s bordering on being an unreliable narrator, simply because he is so very unemotional. He looks at everything from a mechanical viewpoint, and is always thinking ab A copy of this novel was provided by Allen and Unwin in exchange for an honest review. While We Run was so completely different to When We Wake. For one, our protagonist is Abdi, not Tegan. And boy do I have a lot to say about this boy. Abdi’s character voice in While We Run is possibly one of the most unique that I have ever read. He’s bordering on being an unreliable narrator, simply because he is so very unemotional. He looks at everything from a mechanical viewpoint, and is always thinking about what he can do and who he can manipulate to get to his endpoint. It’s fascinating, and I want to read more books in this style (and more books about Abdi, let’s be honest here). I think one of the most interesting things to read about from Abdi’s perspective regarded his feelings for Tegan. As I mentioned before, Abdi is not very emotional in his internal monologue and his thoughts about Tegan were no different. He feels betrayed by her throughout pretty much the whole novel because of this thing that she knew but couldn’t tell him, and then the repercussions that this withheld information brought upon Abdi (woo! That was hard to do without any spoilers *pats self on back*). And then when they’re reunited, Abdi is kind of sceptical of his feelings for Tegan. Does he really love her? Can he give her the things she wants and deserves? He doesn’t know, and I actually loved that. It wasn’t a book about how much a guy is in love with a girl. Yes, he cares about her but their world is falling apart, and there have been secrets and lies and confusion, and so he’s confused as well. It was very real to life, and I appreciated it very much. Not a lot happens plot-wise in this novel, but I also liked that. It was really an exploration of the aftermath of the events that took place in When We Wake, which a lot of the time we don’t get in YA novels. It’s usually all: here’s a series of events and no you do not get to see what happens afterwards. So it was wonderful (and also really really depressing) to see what happened to Tegan and Abdi after they shared their information with the world. The characters in While We Run were amazing. Some of them were heinous (looking at you, Diane you beeatch), some of them were confused (yes, you, Lat), some of them were out for their own power (HURFEST), and some of them were just plain shady (those guys towards the end). It was fantastic! I loved being introduced to such a wide range of flawed characters. Not everyone can be trusted, and not everyone is a decent human being and I felt like Healey really captured this in While We Run. The ending was kind of open, but I can understand why. Whilst I would be ridiculously happy with another book to finally let us know if everything turns out okay, I am pleased with how this book ended. I am definitely a Healey fan and look forward to reading her other novels. © 2014, Chiara @ Books for a Delicate Eternity . All rights reserved. Your Turn: Have you ever read a novel with an unreliable or unemotional narrator? Do you think YA books should explore the aftermath more often?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I really enjoyed this! It's deeper, darker and more political than the first, and the problems the MC's are grappling with are so relevant - immigration, environmental collapse, political manipulation, corporate greed etc. And its Aussie YA which is almost as good as Kiwi YA ;) I really enjoyed this! It's deeper, darker and more political than the first, and the problems the MC's are grappling with are so relevant - immigration, environmental collapse, political manipulation, corporate greed etc. And its Aussie YA which is almost as good as Kiwi YA ;)

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.

    3.5 stars. I really enjoyed When We Wake, so I was really excited to read this sequel. Especially seeing as it featured the Somalian protagonist on the cover. Abdi is kind of a hard protagonist to like at times. He's almost clinical in the way he looks at things, totally emotionless a lot of the time. That said, he and Tegan have been through a lot since we last saw them. They're effectively slaves, controlled by the government. They're being tortured regularly, and (view spoiler)[Abdi is raped 3.5 stars. I really enjoyed When We Wake, so I was really excited to read this sequel. Especially seeing as it featured the Somalian protagonist on the cover. Abdi is kind of a hard protagonist to like at times. He's almost clinical in the way he looks at things, totally emotionless a lot of the time. That said, he and Tegan have been through a lot since we last saw them. They're effectively slaves, controlled by the government. They're being tortured regularly, and (view spoiler)[Abdi is raped by his controller, Diane (hide spoiler)] . That said, the story was full of action, and I adore how diverse this book is. So there are definitely plenty of perks, provided you can get past Abdi's clinical attitude a lot of the time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liviania

    Abdi Taalib and his best friend Tegan, who he's very much in love with, are prisoners of the Australian government. They tried to expose the government's wrongdoings when it comes to a cryogenics project, but ended up captured, tortured, and forced to publicly recant their statements and support the project. I haven't read WHEN WE WAKE, but WHILE WE RUN contains plenty of recap. In addition, at the beginning of the novel Abdi doesn't know much about what is going on and is pretty preoccupied with Abdi Taalib and his best friend Tegan, who he's very much in love with, are prisoners of the Australian government. They tried to expose the government's wrongdoings when it comes to a cryogenics project, but ended up captured, tortured, and forced to publicly recant their statements and support the project. I haven't read WHEN WE WAKE, but WHILE WE RUN contains plenty of recap. In addition, at the beginning of the novel Abdi doesn't know much about what is going on and is pretty preoccupied with the mental and physical stress of being a performing monkey with the promise of worse on the horizon. I was really impressed by this opening, which drew me in despite my unfamiliarity with the setting. It is not easy to read, but it is engrossing. Karen Healey does not back away from the horror of the government using Abdi and Tegan as slaves, and the consequences of these months linger throughout the novel. Healey combines strong character work with a plot from a political conspiracy thriller to bring a future world to life. It's not too far in the future - countries and religions of today are still recognizable - but technology and social issues have progressed. The mingling of real-world issues with future tech is very well done. The world of WHILE WE RUN is relevant to today's reader, but doesn't come off as a blatant screed. Actually, several elements prevent WHILE WE RUN from being a blatant screed. For one thing, there are no easy answers. Abdi might not have any fondness for the Australian government, but that doesn't mean that he agrees with the various terrorist/freedom fighters he encounters either. He's very determined to make up his own mind, which forces him to face that there often are no good answers. Then there's the delightful mix of character backgrounds. Abdi is a second-class citizen in Australia, but in his home country he's wealthy and privileged. He's also atheist, but his family thinks he'll come around. The other characters come from a variety of ethnic and economic backgrounds, and represent a variety of sexualities and genders. This diversity helps show how all of the characters come at the issues in question from different angles. I'm quite happy that WHILE WE RUN made the Cybils shortlist in YA Speculative Fiction this year. It's a thought-provoking read that doesn't forget to throw in some action and keep things moving.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roberta R. (Offbeat YA)

    Rated 4.5 really. Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Strong, mostly diverse characters with distinctive voices, often dealing with moral dilemmas and hard decisions to make. Never a dull moment, even when the pace gets slower. Cons: A few familiar tropes/premises. WARNING! Offscreen torture (but we also get a few glimpses of it) and rape. Some gruesome deaths. Will appeal to: Readers who care about the state our world is in. Readers who like a thrilling yet romantic a Rated 4.5 really. Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Strong, mostly diverse characters with distinctive voices, often dealing with moral dilemmas and hard decisions to make. Never a dull moment, even when the pace gets slower. Cons: A few familiar tropes/premises. WARNING! Offscreen torture (but we also get a few glimpses of it) and rape. Some gruesome deaths. Will appeal to: Readers who care about the state our world is in. Readers who like a thrilling yet romantic adventure. I'm ordinarily all for books without tropes, or employing as little of them as it's humanly possible - but sometimes an author can breath new life into an old concept, or make up for a familiar scenario with a great execution. Both things happen in While We Run - hence my rating. (Also, for your information, this one is set in Australia, which is a nice change from your usual all-American scenario). A DIFFERENT ANGLE For books with such a meaty sci-fi premise, both While We Run and its predecessor When We Wake are, at their core, good old dystopians, but with an unusually strong SJW vein, dealing with ethical, environmental, and even political issues. And the latter is especially true about WWR, since its main character Abdi (who was Tegan's sidekick in When We Wake) is a Djibouti immigrate, whose politician mother has indoctrinated him since a very young age with the tricks of her trade. This duology may be built on a few tropes, but it's entirely its own thing, and one we rarely see in YA. Especially WWR, with its diverse lead and his peculiar outlook. Abdi is a thinker, an observer, even a manipulator if need be (but he questions himself and realises it's not ethical to act like that around friends). He's also an atheist, unlike Tegan and Bethari (and most of his family, not to mention country), and while believers might find him harsh, he's a fascinating, complex character with a conscience, if not a creed. And he does struggle with doing the right thing, or choosing the lesser of two evils, which makes him stand out among your usual holier-than-thou or (most often) one-track-mind characters. [...] Whole review here.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Dixon

    I read the first in this series last year or the year before, and so a lot of the plot had slipped my memory. However, there is enough given within the plot of this one that it didn't matter. And bits came back to me throughout. This is a fast-paced teen novel set in Australia's future. Tegan is the first successful cryogenic re-awakening (killed by a sniper's bullet meant for somebody else, a hundred years ago (which is also in our future)); Abdi is a Somali student on scholarship to Australia. I read the first in this series last year or the year before, and so a lot of the plot had slipped my memory. However, there is enough given within the plot of this one that it didn't matter. And bits came back to me throughout. This is a fast-paced teen novel set in Australia's future. Tegan is the first successful cryogenic re-awakening (killed by a sniper's bullet meant for somebody else, a hundred years ago (which is also in our future)); Abdi is a Somali student on scholarship to Australia. They meet, etc. etc. But they are also caught up in torture and political manoeuvring. Just who can you trust, when you are starting to believe the lies they are forcing you to tell?!

  7. 4 out of 5

    TheBookSmugglers

    squee I can't wait and I love this cover so much squee I can't wait and I love this cover so much

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    4.5 stars. A great addition to the first book, which I loved. Abdi is a complicated, interesting narrator and I just love all the characters from the first book that returned. The plot of this book feels a bit thinner than the first one, but it deals with more personal consequences of trauma than the first on. I know this book is probably the last one in the series, and it came to an end, but I feel like there's just so much more potential in this world that I want to read more of it! 4.5 stars. A great addition to the first book, which I loved. Abdi is a complicated, interesting narrator and I just love all the characters from the first book that returned. The plot of this book feels a bit thinner than the first one, but it deals with more personal consequences of trauma than the first on. I know this book is probably the last one in the series, and it came to an end, but I feel like there's just so much more potential in this world that I want to read more of it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa (i swim for oceans)

    View the full review here: http://www.iswimforoceans.org/2014/05... When I read book one in this series, When We Wake, I remember being distinctly impressed by the crossover nature of the novel, perfectly merging science fiction and dystopia into a melting pot of drama. So, naturally, as a series this excited me even more. Author, Karen Healey, has crafted a story in which our protagonists are out of touch with the reality in which they're now forced to live, giving readers a distinct "out of body View the full review here: http://www.iswimforoceans.org/2014/05... When I read book one in this series, When We Wake, I remember being distinctly impressed by the crossover nature of the novel, perfectly merging science fiction and dystopia into a melting pot of drama. So, naturally, as a series this excited me even more. Author, Karen Healey, has crafted a story in which our protagonists are out of touch with the reality in which they're now forced to live, giving readers a distinct "out of body" sort of impression with her novels. And, while book one offered us the world from Tegan's point of view, While We Run changes things up a little, and we now get to see the world through Abdi's eyes. I've always been a fan of the male perspective for young adult novels, in large part because I find it too rare. The voice in While We Run is certainly no exception. Abdi was a hauntingly unique character, and he's one that made it almost a little difficult to trust his voice, offering us a bit of a catch-twenty-two as we're exploring the world and the fallout of Project Ark. In the world in which Tegan and Abdi live, it's difficult, if not impossible, to trust anyone - especially each other. There is a distinct, acrid note of distrust in Abdi's viewpoint, and reading through his eyes, it was amazing to see the ability he had to truly manipulate a situation in his favor when necessary. He could break things, people and events into their tiniest counterparts, analyze them, and rearrange them to benefit him whenever needed, which made him a fascinating but dangerous character to follow. What I loved most about While We Run though, was that it's more of a follow-up novel to its predecessor than most sequels I've ever read before. Rather than simply throwing us into the melee of a new problem or dilemma, this sequel explores much of the aftermath of the events of the former novel, as well as its significant impact on our characters today. I will say that it frustrated me, at times, to lack the action with whim I'm so familiar in sequels, simply because the stakes are already raised. However, it's a very internalized sort of novel in which you can't help but read, absorb and understand that while, yes, the fallout is happening all around, it's most definitely strongest for Abdi and Tegan, and that's where the power lies. While We Run is a bit of an outlier in terms of sequels, simply because it gives us a more open-ended finish than many of us might be used to. While we get a sense of resolution and conclusion, there's also a lot left unfinished, which gives us hope, nerves and undeniable curiosity for what happened next. It's a powerful and well-done tool of Ms. Healey's, and it might be the only time I'll ever enjoy an ending like that. I give this novel a strong 4 out of 5, and I definitely recommend it to fans of YA, especially those who enjoy science-fiction and dystopian novels, as well as a male POV. I received this book free of charge from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This, in no way, affected my opinion or review of this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brooke ♥booklife4life♥

    Title: While We Run Series: When We Wake #2 Author: Karen Healey Format: Hardback, 336 pages Rating: 4.25 stars Recommend it to: Science Fiction fans :] My review: Wow. This was a perfect sequel, it flowed perfect from the first book. This one thou is from Abdi's POV, which was awesome. I loved seeing his view on the issues and how he saw the others. The action is this book was sick, in a good way :] there was lots of it and i loved it all. The plot twist was nice :] and now i badly need to se Title: While We Run Series: When We Wake #2 Author: Karen Healey Format: Hardback, 336 pages Rating: 4.25 stars Recommend it to: Science Fiction fans :] My review: Wow. This was a perfect sequel, it flowed perfect from the first book. This one thou is from Abdi's POV, which was awesome. I loved seeing his view on the issues and how he saw the others. The action is this book was sick, in a good way :] there was lots of it and i loved it all. The plot twist was nice :] and now i badly need to see how this series will end. The only issue i had was that i wish there was more of a development in Abdi and Tegan's relationship.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alison James

    Wow, just wow! This was amazing. The first, maybe second time where I liked the sequel better that the first. Abdi, Abdi, Abdi. He was a amazing, he was strong, and broke down which made him stronger. I actually really like this book. The heavy stuff was well woven into the plot. Great job, Healey. And. . . thanks for the shout out for K-Drama fans. Double trouble isn't a real drama yet, right? Just for that this book has made my special shelf. Wow, just wow! This was amazing. The first, maybe second time where I liked the sequel better that the first. Abdi, Abdi, Abdi. He was a amazing, he was strong, and broke down which made him stronger. I actually really like this book. The heavy stuff was well woven into the plot. Great job, Healey. And. . . thanks for the shout out for K-Drama fans. Double trouble isn't a real drama yet, right? Just for that this book has made my special shelf.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Moonbeamkrw

    Yay!!! I loved When We Wake:)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julianne

    What a refreshing shocker! The story ends in 2 books! It was very good. I'd give it 4.5 stars. What a refreshing shocker! The story ends in 2 books! It was very good. I'd give it 4.5 stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    This is a really good book, and together with the prequel it makes an even better set. Thought provoking in the way SF is supposed to be, and ethically complex. It's a really good book. This is a really good book, and together with the prequel it makes an even better set. Thought provoking in the way SF is supposed to be, and ethically complex. It's a really good book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This book was in Abdi's point of view, which was very cool. I love the way these books handle political events of the present and the way they could evolve in the future! This book was in Abdi's point of view, which was very cool. I love the way these books handle political events of the present and the way they could evolve in the future!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Hall

    GOD okay no offense but... I LOVE Abdi WAY more then Tegan!!! GOD okay no offense but... I LOVE Abdi WAY more then Tegan!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    http://www.bookwormblues.net/2014/08/... http://www.bookwormblues.net/2014/08/...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    3.5 stars A satisfying sequel to "When We Wake". 3.5 stars A satisfying sequel to "When We Wake".

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elly Herrmann

    Ahhhh! Tegan and Abdi’s story just hits my heart right in the worst but best way. I felt so much for these two characters, especially Abdi in this book, throughout the whole book and I just wanted my babies safe and not to be harmed ever again. But alas that was not to be so. “While We Run” really tore at my heartstrings and omg. You know a book is really good and the author has written the characters really well when you’re visibly crying for the characters and feeling their pain and just wanti Ahhhh! Tegan and Abdi’s story just hits my heart right in the worst but best way. I felt so much for these two characters, especially Abdi in this book, throughout the whole book and I just wanted my babies safe and not to be harmed ever again. But alas that was not to be so. “While We Run” really tore at my heartstrings and omg. You know a book is really good and the author has written the characters really well when you’re visibly crying for the characters and feeling their pain and just wanting them to be safe. In this book we continue Tegan and Abdi’s story from the perspective of Abdi. Firstly, I found his perspective really refreshing and his view on certain things really interesting, while also different to Tegan’s. We got a bit of a glimpse of his background and his family and t was interesting to see a different and, at times, completely opposite, view on things, especially on country relations and the politics and the government. I found that side interesting, while also not being too heavy. Secondly, Harley’s characterisation of Abdi and the way she cleverly made him not just feel so real and come alive, but how his characterisation made me really invested in his character and invested in his life and his health and I just felt myself thinking, at multiple points throughout the story, about what certain things might do to his mental health and I just felt his pain and suffering. I definitely have to commend the author on her characterisation of Abdi. Thirdly, his relationships with other characters was much more fleshed out in this story (obviously as it was from his perspective this time) and the history between him and Josh, and Bethari even, was properly explained. Seeing these characters in new eyes was interesting, especially to see the differences and what Abdi noticed compared to what Tegan did I’m the first book. Moving on to the plot, I feel like this book really progressed the story and explored the world more. We finally got out of Melbourne, even if for a bit, in this book, and it was interesting to see what was happening outside of Melbourne, and also to hear about other places more in this book. The characters mentioned things happening in other areas (Adelaide was even mentioned! Like what? No one mentions Adelaide 😂), and in other countries. Again, Abdi’s perspective really helped out here, with his home country especially. I don’t even want to go into my feelings about the actual plot and everything that happened as I’m still furious and upset about what Abdi and Tegan, but especially Abdi, had to go through. Don’t even get me started with Diana. Let’s character was interesting, but I can’t say anything aborted him cause spoilers 😬. Then there were the unexpected characters that showed about two thirds in and while, at first, they seemed like they were going to get in the way and ruin all the plans, I’m happy with how it all worked out. The ending was satisfying I will say. If you’ve read it, I think we can all agree there was one particular scene that was particularly very satisfying. I may have read that scene a few times firstly to make sure it did indeed just happen, but also because of the sheer satisfaction of it. And the sheer genius of Abdi and his plan that could very well have gone very wrong but fortunately didn’t was just a laugh out loud kind of moment. Mostly because of the fact it worked but also because you could just tell how smug and proud Abdi was that it did work out and he did get one over all the people (no spoilers!). Ahhh I just loved this story! I really wish there was more! I just wanna know what Tegan and Abdi are up to now!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura Martinelli

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The thing that I get most disappointed when it comes to Karen Healey isn’t anything that she’s doing in her writing, but really just how relatively unpopular she is in North America. Because she’s doing all of these fantastic things with her writing and characters and setting (even when she’s not 100% perfect at it), and it’s great and I want to buy all the things, and it’s everything that I want to see happening in YA literature. I’m not ignoring the other authors who are doing the same things The thing that I get most disappointed when it comes to Karen Healey isn’t anything that she’s doing in her writing, but really just how relatively unpopular she is in North America. Because she’s doing all of these fantastic things with her writing and characters and setting (even when she’s not 100% perfect at it), and it’s great and I want to buy all the things, and it’s everything that I want to see happening in YA literature. I’m not ignoring the other authors who are doing the same things as Healey does, but it’s frustrating that it’s not getting the sales or attention. Because the When We Wake/While We Run duology should very well fit into the current spate of sci-fi dystopian thrillers still going strong in the post-Hunger Games/Divergent wake, but Healey’s doing something different in her series. We have a straight futuristic set-up with a world-building that feels more plausible than just “Unspecified war and/or natural disaster” plus the fact that the socio-political climate hasn’t really changed for better or worse. There’s a the whole saying that’s been going on for a year that “Dystopic fiction is about when all the bad stuff that goes on in the world finally happens to white people” and While We Run absolutely hits that nail on the head. (Of the two books, While We Run is closer to a dystopic government setting, but also deals with global ramifications.) This is a book that talks very frankly about privilege and what it means for certain characters and the situations that they’ve been placed in. What helps is that While We Run’s narration isn’t a continuation of Tegan’s point of view, but rather picks up several months after the end of When We Wake with Abdi’s viewpoint. Which makes the ending of the first book’s more of a downer considering that both Tegan and Abdi are acting as governmental mouthpieces, claiming that the conspiracy they’ve uncovered was just a misunderstanding and those refugees are totally volunteering for the completely safe cryosis, so all the rich white people should pay to be put on ice as well! And that the way Abdi and Tegan can say that with a smiling face is because they’ve been implanted with torture devices. Which are used on them frequently. There are actual villains in this book, people who are willing to use Tegan and Abdi for their own sadistic pleasures, rather than just being evil for evil’s sake. I’m specifically talking about Diane here: Diane is outwardly evil, yes. But the way she talks to Abdi, the psychological torture she inflicts on him, and it’s said, “You don’t want to be bad; you want to be a good boy, don’t you? You don’t want me to hurt you” and the near Stockholm Syndrome that Abdi (and Tegan to an extant) develops is frightening. I think it also works to couch Abdi’s torture in that abusive language because it does put so much more realism to the situation. (view spoiler)[If there’s anything that really gave me pause about Diane’s abuse, it is the revelation that she did rape Abdi. For one thing, I don’t like that the threat of rape is brought up in Tegan’s situation, but for either case, it does seem like a lazy characterization. Abdi being sold to Ruby Simons for the night didn’t bother me as much, mainly because I think it doesn’t go all the way, but it’s still a problematic trope. I will say it is an interesting turn, because we do expect that it’s Tegan’s who should have been raped in the circumstances. (hide spoiler)] This is also one of the more politically gray books that I have read, in which that the devious nature of politics are discussed and explored by someone who knows exactly how the game works. The situation that’s been set-up in the first novel—humanity’s dying, so we have a starship that’ll colonize other planets, except rich white people are dicks and are going to forcibly send refugees to do the colonization for us—is a black and white scenario. But realistically, overthrowing corrupt governments usually doesn’t end particularly well most of the time and sometimes we end up with something worse. Abdi calls this outright several times throughout the book. And not only that, but we see the consequences that Hurfurt and the Save Tegan movement have caused in the work of the greater good. And said consequences actually affect and contribute to the characters; decisions—once Tegan learns about how destructive the EMP Bethari constructed is, both Tegan and Bethari are incredibly upset and guilty about what’s been going on behind the scenes. And it might be easier to ignore everything, but that’s what I love about Tegan is that she doesn’t want to take the easy way. One of the other things that I really loved about this book is that it frankly talks about privilege, and specifically, how much easier it is for Tegan, Joph and Bethari to live than it is for Abdi or the number of faceless refugees. This is something that you really don’t see in a lot of the more popular YA dystopias—the closest is probably Marie Lu’s Legend; while class is a major factor in The Hunger Games, by the series’ end it’s not as much as a motivator. Parts of it are mentioned in the first book, but we do see that in comparison to the rest of his countrymen, Abdi is very privileged in Somali, that it’s one of the factors that he gets to go to Australia. But he’s treated like a third class citizen with very real prejudices that he has to face being a “thirdie.” And that it’s his privilege that helps save the day and help possibly make a better future for those forced into cryosis by the Australian government. It’s also how the characters are even able to make their own stand—out of everyone in their group, Abdi’s family is the only one that can pay for outside resources to rescue him (and even then, we learn about the financial toll that they have to take). I also need to talk about Tegan here, and this is my big Hunger Games comparison: this is the anti-Mockingjay. While Katniss and Tegan are both prodded into the spokesperson role for whatever faction they’re currently stuck with, Tegan is the one who breaks free of her ties and does things on her own terms. She doesn’t want to be identified with any movement, or any government lies, she just wants to live her life. And I really like that nothing is really taken away from Tegan in the end. She’s the one who makes her decision at the end, with no prodding from Marie or Abdi or Bethari, and I like that she never breaks down and goes along with someone else’s plans. Tegan can be naïve, specifically whenever it came to Lat’s character, but given what she’s been through up until that point, it makes sense that she’ll trust Lat. I want to see more dystopia/sci-fi/futuristic stories like this, where there’s no absolutely good or evil sides, where the politics are still complicated, and things are still immensely problematic. (Actually, what I want is more positive sci-fi, especially in YA, because look, everything sucks now. I get that the world isn’t perfect and probably won’t ever be perfect, but I want to see more positive progress. And again, especially in YA, because being jaded all the time is kinda tiring and not fun.) But also dealing with the fact that most lead characters are in a better position than the people they’re setting out to free from the oppressive government chains. As for the story itself, I think that yet again, Healey has knocked this out of the park, and really, this is just one of the best YA sci-fi duology/series/what have you out there right now.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In When We Wake, Tegan awakes over a hundred years after her body was cryogenically frozen, to a completely different future where everyone she knew and loved has died and resources are scarce. In fact, some people in her country (Australia) believe she shouldn’t have been revived. When Tegan and her friends learn the truth about the government’s cryogenic experiments their attempts to reveal it to the world at large fail. They are captured and Tegan and Abdi are tortured and forced to promote t In When We Wake, Tegan awakes over a hundred years after her body was cryogenically frozen, to a completely different future where everyone she knew and loved has died and resources are scarce. In fact, some people in her country (Australia) believe she shouldn’t have been revived. When Tegan and her friends learn the truth about the government’s cryogenic experiments their attempts to reveal it to the world at large fail. They are captured and Tegan and Abdi are tortured and forced to promote the process (and the Ark program which promises to freeze people and then send them into space to found new human civilizations on new worlds) against their wills. When they finally escape it’s too late to save most of the people who have been frozen, but they are able to find some leverage to prevent further damage. Carrying out their plan may prove to be deadly. Suspenseful and intense, some readers may find the descriptions of the torture Tegan and Abdi (especially Abdi) endure to be disturbing. The first half of the book drags somewhat, while the ending races along at light speed. Fans of the first book will find the continuing story of interest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katlyn

    I find this book hard to rate. It was really slow and hard for me to get into in the beginning, but it did pick up. The tone was very different. Much darker and political! I liked it a bit less than the first book. It's hard to say why. I think maybe I actually enjoyed the lighter tone and I've never liked dystopian novels that involve a lot of running and politics. I think the author dealt with the whole torture situation pretty well. The characters are still healing and they will be for a whil I find this book hard to rate. It was really slow and hard for me to get into in the beginning, but it did pick up. The tone was very different. Much darker and political! I liked it a bit less than the first book. It's hard to say why. I think maybe I actually enjoyed the lighter tone and I've never liked dystopian novels that involve a lot of running and politics. I think the author dealt with the whole torture situation pretty well. The characters are still healing and they will be for a while. I found it really annoying that Abdi was so intolerant of religion. I'm not religious in the slightest, but he was rather annoying on that front! I feel like the narrator screwed with my rating of the book a bit. He didn't do the best job in my opinion. The book picked up at the end for sure though! I liked this, but I'm not sure if I would read it again. 3.25/5 Nov. 12 2017

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I enjoyed the first book in this series more than this book, but I still liked it and enjoyed returning to the world of Tegan and Abdi. Lines from the book I appreciated: "Experience had taught me that people were willing to abandon hard truth in favor of comforting falsehood in almost every circumstance." "Those people hadn't seemed stupid, and far from evil. Just lacking a lot of information and maybe a wider view. They were concerned with what touched them closest. For most people, you had to ma I enjoyed the first book in this series more than this book, but I still liked it and enjoyed returning to the world of Tegan and Abdi. Lines from the book I appreciated: "Experience had taught me that people were willing to abandon hard truth in favor of comforting falsehood in almost every circumstance." "Those people hadn't seemed stupid, and far from evil. Just lacking a lot of information and maybe a wider view. They were concerned with what touched them closest. For most people, you had to make something come home to make it real." "I was going to have to make decisions like this often. I'd have to compromise and haggle and choose between bad options and worse ones, over and over again." "Was that what it meant to be free of people having power over me? Did I have to trade it for having power over others?"

  24. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    2 stars (maaaaaaybe 2.5 if I'm being very generous), and that's only because the last third of the book was halfway decent. Honesty time -- I nearly DNF'ed this book, and I never DNF books. The first 50-ish pages were full of (view spoiler)[straight-up physical and sexual torture of a Black teenage boy (hide spoiler)] , which was completely unnecessary. That could've been covered in one chapter. (view spoiler)[It felt like some weird snuff book, and I was NOT here for it. It was pretty heinous. ( 2 stars (maaaaaaybe 2.5 if I'm being very generous), and that's only because the last third of the book was halfway decent. Honesty time -- I nearly DNF'ed this book, and I never DNF books. The first 50-ish pages were full of (view spoiler)[straight-up physical and sexual torture of a Black teenage boy (hide spoiler)] , which was completely unnecessary. That could've been covered in one chapter. (view spoiler)[It felt like some weird snuff book, and I was NOT here for it. It was pretty heinous. (hide spoiler)] The next section of the book painted Abdi as a stubborn, manipulative politician who also happened to be full of teenage angst, which didn't feel all that great, either. Because of the POV change, this book didn't even feel like it was in the same series as its predecessor. Like I said, the ending was decent, but the beginning really ruined the book for me. Heartily disappointed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kes

    This book is about the aftermath of the first book - Abdi and Teegan are both kept captive by the government. They're tortured by pain implants, as well as watching each other be tortured. That keeps them in line to sell the government's spaceship plan to wealthy private donors. Eventually, (view spoiler)[they're rescued, but Abdi has serious trust issues with Teegan. At the same time, he cares about her. (hide spoiler)] A lot of this book is about Abdi's training as a future politician - he thin This book is about the aftermath of the first book - Abdi and Teegan are both kept captive by the government. They're tortured by pain implants, as well as watching each other be tortured. That keeps them in line to sell the government's spaceship plan to wealthy private donors. Eventually, (view spoiler)[they're rescued, but Abdi has serious trust issues with Teegan. At the same time, he cares about her. (hide spoiler)] A lot of this book is about Abdi's training as a future politician - he thinks about things as how to get his way rather than the emotional impact. I thought that was a good contrast to Teegan. I also appreciated that the fear from the torture lingered. This is quite a good series - there's a lot about the trade-offs of certain decisions as well as what the public can accept. 3/5 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    R ♡

    Some parts got a little confusing, but overall, the book was amazing! It’s not everyday that we come across a good book set in Australia, in particular, a dystopian and it discusses many themes and issues! It was interesting to read the story from Abdi’s point of view, to understand how he feels about Tegan and the government and the Ark Project.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mandiann

    It just felt like such a poor follow up to When We Wake. While the torture at the beginning was an interesting start to the story the middle floundered, there was little to no world building and the ending seemed anticlimactic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    While this lacks some of the immediacy and allure of the first book, readers will enjoy following Teagan and her “thirdee” friend as they do their best to save the world - and their lives. Lots of twists and turns on this adventurous futuristic story, with the occasional hints of romance.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    Overall, I'd give this series a 2.5. It was an interesting premise, and I liked the 2nd book, told primarily through Abdi's eyes, better than the first - but the writing is a little too simple and stilted for me to get really involved. Perhaps the younger end of YA readers would enjoy it more. Overall, I'd give this series a 2.5. It was an interesting premise, and I liked the 2nd book, told primarily through Abdi's eyes, better than the first - but the writing is a little too simple and stilted for me to get really involved. Perhaps the younger end of YA readers would enjoy it more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle McNamara

    absoultly loved it. I was very intersesting to see the friendships from Aboits point of veiw and how he tackles things and how it is different from teagons point of view. I really enjoyed reading it. Finnished the book in four day. Shortest time I spent reading a book. Really enjoyed it

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.