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Lord Horror: Reverbstorm

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Welcome to the nightmare metropolis of Torenbürgen, where New York's Art Deco architecture has fused with the termination machinery of Auschwitz. In this urban inferno Jessie Matthews is singing Sondheim, James Joyce is at work on a new novel and Lord Horror, ex-Nazi propaganda broadcaster and Torenbürgen's model citizen, is stalking the streets in search of fresh victims Welcome to the nightmare metropolis of Torenbürgen, where New York's Art Deco architecture has fused with the termination machinery of Auschwitz. In this urban inferno Jessie Matthews is singing Sondheim, James Joyce is at work on a new novel and Lord Horror, ex-Nazi propaganda broadcaster and Torenbürgen's model citizen, is stalking the streets in search of fresh victims for his razors. Murderous apes infest the alleyways, Ononoes feast on the living and the dead, while above the rooftops the Soul of the Virgin Mary drifts like a swollen Lovecraftian dirigible, picking at bodies destined for the charnel furnaces. Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is a unique graphic collaboration between writer David Britton, the author of four Lord Horror novels, and artist John Coulthart, whose book of Lovecraft-derived comic strips and illustrations, The Haunter of the Dark, featured a collaboration with Alan Moore. Reverbstorm was originally published in serial form and is now being presented in a single volume for the very first time. Britton's debut novel, Lord Horror (1990 ), was the last work of fiction to be banned in the UK; an earlier Lord Horror comic series, Hard Core Horror, was also banned by a British court in 1995. Coulthart's death-camp artwork from the final issue in that series appears in Reverbstorm as a prelude to the main narrative. There's never been a comic like this surreal collision between Modernist art and pulp aesthetics, a world where Finnegans Wake is drenched in Alligator Wine and Picasso's 'Guernica' is invaded by Tarzan's simian hordes. Ambitious, transgressive and meticulously rendered, Reverbstorm is one answer to the eternal question posed by those cultural philosophers, The Cramps: "How far can too far go?"


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Welcome to the nightmare metropolis of Torenbürgen, where New York's Art Deco architecture has fused with the termination machinery of Auschwitz. In this urban inferno Jessie Matthews is singing Sondheim, James Joyce is at work on a new novel and Lord Horror, ex-Nazi propaganda broadcaster and Torenbürgen's model citizen, is stalking the streets in search of fresh victims Welcome to the nightmare metropolis of Torenbürgen, where New York's Art Deco architecture has fused with the termination machinery of Auschwitz. In this urban inferno Jessie Matthews is singing Sondheim, James Joyce is at work on a new novel and Lord Horror, ex-Nazi propaganda broadcaster and Torenbürgen's model citizen, is stalking the streets in search of fresh victims for his razors. Murderous apes infest the alleyways, Ononoes feast on the living and the dead, while above the rooftops the Soul of the Virgin Mary drifts like a swollen Lovecraftian dirigible, picking at bodies destined for the charnel furnaces. Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is a unique graphic collaboration between writer David Britton, the author of four Lord Horror novels, and artist John Coulthart, whose book of Lovecraft-derived comic strips and illustrations, The Haunter of the Dark, featured a collaboration with Alan Moore. Reverbstorm was originally published in serial form and is now being presented in a single volume for the very first time. Britton's debut novel, Lord Horror (1990 ), was the last work of fiction to be banned in the UK; an earlier Lord Horror comic series, Hard Core Horror, was also banned by a British court in 1995. Coulthart's death-camp artwork from the final issue in that series appears in Reverbstorm as a prelude to the main narrative. There's never been a comic like this surreal collision between Modernist art and pulp aesthetics, a world where Finnegans Wake is drenched in Alligator Wine and Picasso's 'Guernica' is invaded by Tarzan's simian hordes. Ambitious, transgressive and meticulously rendered, Reverbstorm is one answer to the eternal question posed by those cultural philosophers, The Cramps: "How far can too far go?"

44 review for Lord Horror: Reverbstorm

  1. 5 out of 5

    Seregil of Rhiminee

    Originally published at Risingshadow. Warning! This graphic novel is only suitable for mature adult readers. It contains so much controversial and disturbing material that it can only be recommended for adults (and especially to adults who aren't easily shocked). Lord Horror: Reverbstorm was a fascinating, unsettling and challenging reading experience for me, because it was totally different from the graphic novels that I had read previously (it was a much darker and more thought-provoking than th Originally published at Risingshadow. Warning! This graphic novel is only suitable for mature adult readers. It contains so much controversial and disturbing material that it can only be recommended for adults (and especially to adults who aren't easily shocked). Lord Horror: Reverbstorm was a fascinating, unsettling and challenging reading experience for me, because it was totally different from the graphic novels that I had read previously (it was a much darker and more thought-provoking than the graphic novels that I had read). Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is an omnibus edition of the Reverbstorm graphic novels. It contains a prelude, 8 parts and an appendix. Parts 1-7 were previously published in serial format, but this is the first time that Part 8 has been published in book format. The events are set in a frightening and nightmarish dreamscape where a weird fantasy version of 1930s New York and the cruel death camps of Auschwitz meet each other in a brutally shocking and surreal way. Several adjectives and terms may be used to describe the contents of Lord Horror: Reverbstorm, but the best way to describe its contents is to say that it's a stunningly original, unforgettably disturbing and thought-provoking graphic novel for adults. David Britton and John Coulthart have created a weird and ruthless graphic novel which will leave readers shocked and stunned by the weirdness of the narrative and artwork. The narrative of this graphic novel differs greatly from other graphic novels, because there isn't a clear narrative. The lack of clear narrative makes the artwork all the more powerful, which is good, because the drawings are as important as the prose. The roots of this graphic novel lie in speculative and surreal fiction, because Torenbürgen is an alternate world in which sadisctic wants and pleasures, modern culture and history meet each other with an explosive power. The power of the exaggerated images and surreal happenings is simply amazing and overwhelming, because the authors make sure that the reader will think about what's going on. Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is an amazing tour de force of science fiction, alternate history and horror elements. The authors of this graphic novel have lots of imagination and aren't afraid to shock readers in unexpected ways by using these elements as tools to push readers out of their comfort zones (the war time horrors that can be found within the pages of this novel are truly disturbing). All the happenings and most of the drawings are full of surreal elements. These surreal elements are intriguing, because they evoke memories in the readers' minds and readers have to think about them in order to understand what their purpose is. The authors have clearly understood that everything doesn't have to be explained and revelead to the readers, because there are lots of intelligent readers who know how to use their brains and are able to figure things out for themselves. The humans in this graphic novel are targets of cruelty and sadistic degradation, so readers who are easily shocked will have a lot to handle. The authors show their readers a stunning range of cruelty from war time horrors to evisceration and from degradation to sadomasochism. This graphic novel is almost like a pitch-black satire about urban decay and decadence gone too far. Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is sexually and violently *very* explicit and it takes the readers as far away from their comfort zones as possible. The authors push the boundaries of good taste, political correctness and horror in unexpected ways and create an unforgettable and harrowing reading experience. The scenes of evisceration and sexual acts are amazingly brutal and explicit, because everything is shown in vivid details. These scenes force the readers to relate to the gritty and sick happenings, which is something that only a handful of artists and authors are capable of achieving. I have to admit I was surprised that the authors had managed to add a few weird fiction elements to the storyline (the whole story is genuinely surreal and weird, but there are certain references to weird fiction). It was interesting to see that weird fiction has inspired David Britton and John Coulthart so much that they've added weird fiction elements to this graphic novel. I have to mention that the Soul of the Virgin Mary that drifted through the sky reminded me of Lovecraftian monsters and also of the grotesque biomechanical monsters created by H. R. Giger. Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is a truly unforgettable, perverse, disturbing and challenging graphic novel that lingers on your mind for a long time after reading it. The biggest part of its power comes from John Coulthart's stunningly beautiful and skillfully made drawings. John Coulthart's art reminds me of Clive Barker's art and Books of Blood stories. Coulthart's art is at times fascinatingly similar to Barker's art, but also different, because the artist has his own drawing style. The artwork by John Coulthart is amazingly detailed and beautiful. His pen and ink drawings are among the best I've ever seen, because they're exquisitely detailed works of art that reveal the raw power of the happenings and draw the reader into a dark and gloomy world. These drawings don't glorify sex and violence in any way, but show all the little details with gut wrenching clarity and make the readers wonder how it is possible that the artist has managed to visualize everything so perfectly. (The artist's official website contains page samples.) I think that John Coulthart's explicit art is excellent, because he has the talent of shocking and seducing readers with his drawings. Because I like John Coulthart's art, I intend to read his Lovecraftian graphic novel in the near future (it has been praised so much that I had to put it on my reading list). I also liked David Britton's brutal and surprising script, because he made me think about the violent happenings and why they are as brutal and rough as they are. In my opinion this graphic novel can be seen as a powerful statement against hate and brutality, but I'll write more about this a bit later. It's amazing how well the authors have added rock'n'roll elements to the story and how many references there are to popular culture. These elements emphasize the weird atmosphere of the story in a fascinating way. For example, David Britton and John Coulthart refer to Picasso, James Joyce, Humpty Dumpty, Tarzan etc. (This novel is stock full of references to popular culture.) Lord Horror: Reverbstorm can be seen as a different kind of an art book and a surreal graphic novel. It succeeds in being both, because it's a unique book. Depending on the reader and his/her views about things it can be interpreted in several different ways. Nothing is clear in this book, because the reader has to make his/her own opinions about the happenings. I'm sure that when readers finish reading Lord Horror: Reverbstorm, they won't forget the drawings they've seen, because they won't be easily forgotten. As I already mentioned, Lord Horror: Reverbstorm can be seen as a powerful statement against brutality and hate. This message may not be found easily, because the drawings and happenings are deeply disturbing, but a careful reader will probably notice that the violent happenings are so surreal and over-the-top that they've been created that way for the purpose of making the readers think about the brutality of the happenings. The readers will probably begin to think how much hate and violence do people have to tolerate and how is it possible that people are beings subjected to cruelty. I have to confess that I was very surprised to see how deeply and uninhibitedly the authors explored hate and all things related to it. I'm sure that Lord Horror: Reverbstorm will split the readership to those who love it and to those who hate it. It will definitely not be to everybody's liking, but why should it please everybody - weird, explicit and thought-provoking art has always managed to shock and annoy people and it will keep on doing so. It's easy to understand why this graphic novel may be a bit too much for certain readers, but readers of dark fiction, horror, bizarro fiction and weird fiction probably won't be shocked by its contents. I think that most horror readers are used to explicit material, because there are a couple of authors who use this kind of controversial material in their stories. The brutal and savage prose highlights the shocking images. This kind of a unique combination of savage prose and shocking elements reminds me quite a lot of bizarro fiction, because bizarro fiction often aims to shock people and challenge their expectations of good taste. I guess I could say that Lord Horror: Reverbstorm is the graphic novel equivalent of a bizarro novel. Before I write the final paragraphs of this review, I'll mention that in my opinion David Britton and John Coulthart have had lots of ambition when they decided to begin working on this graphic novel. It's possible that several other author would've given up easily, but not Britton and Coulthart, because they've done their best to create a memorable and challenging graphic novel. In my opinion Lord Horror: Reverbstorm can be recommended to readers who have read Clive Barker, Philip K. Dick, J. G. Ballard and Harlan Ellison, and are used to controversial material. It can also be recommended to readers who enjoy reading challenging graphic novels and want to read thought-provoking material. This graphic novel isn't a nice and easy-to-read graphic novel (it's far from easy and nice), but it's a rewarding reading experience to those who aren't afraid of stepping out of their comfort zones. If you aren't afraid of being shocked and want to experience something different, you should consider reading Lord Horror: Reverbstorm, because it's definitely something different. It's an unforgettable reading experience for those who have the stomach to tolerate its contents.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Seth King

    It takes a mind of ferocious intent to hold so much darkness and express it so transcendently. Though one wouldn't think transcendence is a word compatible with Britton's writing, this decade long project co-created with artist John Coulthart certainly achieves something along those lines. With all the references to modern art and devilish '50s Rock'n'Roll, one would be forgiven the assumption that the book exists as a frenetic collage of high culture, low entertainment and bad taste. But that w It takes a mind of ferocious intent to hold so much darkness and express it so transcendently. Though one wouldn't think transcendence is a word compatible with Britton's writing, this decade long project co-created with artist John Coulthart certainly achieves something along those lines. With all the references to modern art and devilish '50s Rock'n'Roll, one would be forgiven the assumption that the book exists as a frenetic collage of high culture, low entertainment and bad taste. But that would be easy. And Savoy has never been a publisher of easy material. Plunge into the Reverbstorm, absorb it, and forget what graphic narrative art can do. The scatology isn't just for shock, the hate isn't just for satire. This book captures a raucous hell with such clarity, it deserves to be feared. The Lord Horror mythos has always captured my imagination and Reverbstorm, for me, supersedes almost all that has been written before. The black memory of holocaust and hate has never been examined quite like this. So few modern artists, especially authors, are possessed of enough conviction to make truly dangerous art. Anymore we are all consumed by McSweeny's acolytic fluff, masturbatory fodder for upper-middle class bohemians self-convinced of their exemption from ignorance and pain. Britton's dark heart news is the cancerous heart of our benediction. He has earned his right to have fun with it, most of us have yet to pay our dues.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tez Clayton

    Five stars for the beautiful art alone. The writing is empty shock, forgettable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    As a Coulthart art project it's absolutely stunning. There isn't any linear narrative at work here, even by the tenuous standards of the Hard Core Horror and even Meng and Ecker books. But there are thematic refrains throughout. I don't know if the whole Lord Horror project really hangs together but the images are still shocking - like S Clay Wilson raised on punk rock and Salo instead of biker rallies and pirate serials. It's not for everyone, or even many people. It's upsetting in a visceral w As a Coulthart art project it's absolutely stunning. There isn't any linear narrative at work here, even by the tenuous standards of the Hard Core Horror and even Meng and Ecker books. But there are thematic refrains throughout. I don't know if the whole Lord Horror project really hangs together but the images are still shocking - like S Clay Wilson raised on punk rock and Salo instead of biker rallies and pirate serials. It's not for everyone, or even many people. It's upsetting in a visceral way. But if you're drawn to Giger, Moorcock, William Burroughs and the like, you may want to scrounge up a copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Justice4George

    Nauseating. A mere second's survey will disgust, distress and dismay you. After five minutes' exposure, some folk will have thrown up, passed out or lapsed into sobbing, shaking, self-soiling hysteria. But enough about the state of my kitchen. Reverbstorm is pretty darn transgressive too. I'll go further. In terms of putrefactive performativity, it is arguably the most toxic textual intervention in counter-cultural chaogeneity of the past twenty years or more. Necrotropism was never nastier. For septic Nauseating. A mere second's survey will disgust, distress and dismay you. After five minutes' exposure, some folk will have thrown up, passed out or lapsed into sobbing, shaking, self-soiling hysteria. But enough about the state of my kitchen. Reverbstorm is pretty darn transgressive too. I'll go further. In terms of putrefactive performativity, it is arguably the most toxic textual intervention in counter-cultural chaogeneity of the past twenty years or more. Necrotropism was never nastier. For septic slay-rides into the abjectional abyss, it doesn't get more terrifying, traumatizing or turbulent than Reverbstorm. Trust me on this...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luke Chaston

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan West

  8. 5 out of 5

    молодо́й челове́к

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donny Lemur

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dav Crabes

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aleksandras Rimdžius

  12. 4 out of 5

    Void

  13. 5 out of 5

    Harrie Harrison

  14. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  15. 4 out of 5

    Edward Jackson

  16. 4 out of 5

    T.N. Allan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  18. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Sheffield

  19. 5 out of 5

    Logan Peterson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aerial Henderson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nefariousbig

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Bernal

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gnome Books

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cities

  25. 4 out of 5

    Antonio

  26. 5 out of 5

    luke

  27. 5 out of 5

    Сергій

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna Morrison

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ratatoskr

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fábio

  31. 5 out of 5

    Tzorvas

  32. 5 out of 5

    Conal Cochran

  33. 4 out of 5

    Chris Smith

  34. 5 out of 5

    Efi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Williams

  36. 4 out of 5

    Scendo

  37. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Cordova

  38. 5 out of 5

    Dan Ionescu

  39. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  40. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  41. 5 out of 5

    Dem

  42. 4 out of 5

    Sandro Sheedy

  43. 4 out of 5

    Matt Piechocinski

  44. 4 out of 5

    Teddy Slick

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