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Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn: Life's Greatest Lessons Are Gained from Our Losses

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John Maxwell believes that the greatest lessons we learn in life are from our losses. Everyone experiences loss, but not everyone learns from it. In Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn, Dr. Maxwell explores the most common lessons we learn when we experience loss. He then explains how to turn a set-back into a step forward by examining the eleven elements that make up t John Maxwell believes that the greatest lessons we learn in life are from our losses. Everyone experiences loss, but not everyone learns from it. In Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn, Dr. Maxwell explores the most common lessons we learn when we experience loss. He then explains how to turn a set-back into a step forward by examining the eleven elements that make up the DNA of Those Who Learn:1. Humility - The Spirit of Learning 2. Reality - The Foundation of Learning 3. Responsibility - The First Step of Learning 4. Improvement - The Focus of Learning 5. Hope - The Motivation of Learning 6. Teachability - The Pathway of Learning 7. Adversity - The Catalyst of Learning 8. Problems - The Opportunities of Learning9. Bad Experiences - The Perspective for Learning10. Change - The Price of Learning 11. Maturity - The Value of Learning Learning is not easy during down times, it takes discipline to do the right thing when everything is wrong. This book provides a roadmap to doing just that. As John Maxwell often points out--experience isn't the best teacher; evaluated experience is.


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John Maxwell believes that the greatest lessons we learn in life are from our losses. Everyone experiences loss, but not everyone learns from it. In Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn, Dr. Maxwell explores the most common lessons we learn when we experience loss. He then explains how to turn a set-back into a step forward by examining the eleven elements that make up t John Maxwell believes that the greatest lessons we learn in life are from our losses. Everyone experiences loss, but not everyone learns from it. In Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn, Dr. Maxwell explores the most common lessons we learn when we experience loss. He then explains how to turn a set-back into a step forward by examining the eleven elements that make up the DNA of Those Who Learn:1. Humility - The Spirit of Learning 2. Reality - The Foundation of Learning 3. Responsibility - The First Step of Learning 4. Improvement - The Focus of Learning 5. Hope - The Motivation of Learning 6. Teachability - The Pathway of Learning 7. Adversity - The Catalyst of Learning 8. Problems - The Opportunities of Learning9. Bad Experiences - The Perspective for Learning10. Change - The Price of Learning 11. Maturity - The Value of Learning Learning is not easy during down times, it takes discipline to do the right thing when everything is wrong. This book provides a roadmap to doing just that. As John Maxwell often points out--experience isn't the best teacher; evaluated experience is.

30 review for Sometimes You Win--Sometimes You Learn: Life's Greatest Lessons Are Gained from Our Losses

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Book Man

    If you have experienced failure and it still holds onto you, then this book is for YOU! :) I would like to share some of my favorite notes I took while reading, ~ “How does a humble person learn from mistakes? By pausing and reflecting. I strongly believe that experience isn’t the best teacher; evaluated experience is.” ~ “Wisely humble people are never afraid to admit they were wrong. When they do it’s like saying they’re wiser today than they were yesterday.” ~ “Responsibility is the most importa If you have experienced failure and it still holds onto you, then this book is for YOU! :) I would like to share some of my favorite notes I took while reading, ~ “How does a humble person learn from mistakes? By pausing and reflecting. I strongly believe that experience isn’t the best teacher; evaluated experience is.” ~ “Wisely humble people are never afraid to admit they were wrong. When they do it’s like saying they’re wiser today than they were yesterday.” ~ “Responsibility is the most important ability that a person can possess.” ~ “Positive thinking must be followed by positive doing.” ~ “The habits you practice every day will make you or break you. If you want to become a teachable person who learns from losses, then make learning your daily habit. It may not change your life in a day. But it will change your days for life.” ~ “One of life’s important question is ‘Who am I?’ But even more important is ‘Who am I becoming?’” ~ “Winning isn’t everything, but learning is.” P.S: I want you to become a continual winner by being a habital learner.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Farshad Asl

    I truly enjoyed this book. You always can go from " failure" to success but you never can go from "excuses" to success. It's a great book and John is sharing what he has learned from his own and other people's mistakes. I love the book...I would recommend! I truly enjoyed this book. You always can go from " failure" to success but you never can go from "excuses" to success. It's a great book and John is sharing what he has learned from his own and other people's mistakes. I love the book...I would recommend!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Denise Morse

    This book couldn’t have come at a better time for me. I was dealing with a difficult work situation and getting very angry and reading this book helped put it all into perspective. Life isnt easy but it can be better and more fulfilling if you look at negatives as a way to learn and grow. It is all about perspective and looking forwards to self improvement. From the opening beautiful into by the late John Wooden through the amazingly inspirational quotes sprinkled throughout, John C. Maxwell doe This book couldn’t have come at a better time for me. I was dealing with a difficult work situation and getting very angry and reading this book helped put it all into perspective. Life isnt easy but it can be better and more fulfilling if you look at negatives as a way to learn and grow. It is all about perspective and looking forwards to self improvement. From the opening beautiful into by the late John Wooden through the amazingly inspirational quotes sprinkled throughout, John C. Maxwell does a wonderful job of laying out the case for learning and growing through failures and disappointments. I really loved how the book was set-up with each section being specific to one of his eleven elements that make up people who learn from mistakes: 1. Humility - The Spirit of Learning 2. Reality - The Foundation of Learning 3. Responsibility - The First Step of Learning 4. Improvement - The Focus of Learning 5. Hope - The Motivation of Learning 6. Teachability - The Pathway of Learning 7. Adversity - The Catalyst of Learning 8. Problems - The Opportunities of Learning 9. Bad Experiences - The Perspective for Learning 10. Change - The Price of Learning 11. Maturity - The Value of Learning One of the most important takeaways is the need for personal accountability which is a trait that is sorely lacking from American society. I truly feel like I have a better handle on how to tackle change, problems and failures thanks to this book, and I know that I will be re-reading this often. I also plan on purchasing at least one copy for the office as well as for my coworkers, this is an important book especially during turbulent times. http://anovelnosh.com/book-review-som...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Thompson

    While there were some great nuggets in this book, there is nothing new or original. In fact, the author spends most of his time quoting others. The title could be "Everything Everyone Else Said About Learning". While there were some great nuggets in this book, there is nothing new or original. In fact, the author spends most of his time quoting others. The title could be "Everything Everyone Else Said About Learning".

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Milanovic

    As always very practical and very encouraging book on self-development and self-growth. I read it as a part of Master Mind class. The whole experience was something new and interesting for me and it really pushed me to be more intentional in learning and developing throught life. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to be encouraged when going through loses; to anyone who wants to keep working on themself; to anyone who needs a motivation to turn loses into succsesses. Great and easy As always very practical and very encouraging book on self-development and self-growth. I read it as a part of Master Mind class. The whole experience was something new and interesting for me and it really pushed me to be more intentional in learning and developing throught life. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to be encouraged when going through loses; to anyone who wants to keep working on themself; to anyone who needs a motivation to turn loses into succsesses. Great and easy read - that goes deeper than one would expect!

  6. 4 out of 5

    LAMONT D

    ONE OF HIS BETTER BOOKS THAT I AM SURE I HAD READ BEFORE; GOOD TO READ IT AGAIN. ALWAYS CHALLENGING IN HIS THINGS TO DO AND NOT TO DO, YOU CAN APPLY THESE TO YOUR LIFE TO BECOME A BETTER LEADER AND PERSON. HE ALWAYS GIVES YOU LOTS OF STORIES AND QUOTES THAT REINFORCES THE POINTS HE IS TRYING TO MAKE - HOW TO LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    2/18/18 $1.99 for Kindle.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gh .

    Thank u Dr.Rana

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Fallon

    Reading a book by Maxwell is like panning for gold - you have to go through a lot of sand and mud to find a few nuggets. A few are worth the hunt.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Coble

    Good inspiration and reminders that we control more than we think and that everyone fails. If you aren't failing, you aren't trying. Good inspiration and reminders that we control more than we think and that everyone fails. If you aren't failing, you aren't trying.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Some books are good, others are great! I pretty much underlined the whole book. The hardest part is applying it. I hope I can learn from my mistakes!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Howe

    This was a great book and a timely read. It’s hard for me to let go of my desire to be perfect and to try new things that I might get wrong, but that’s such an important part of learning and growing. Recently I’ve been doing a lot of things that I’m unfamiliar with, and giving myself permission to not always be right, but to learn from my mistakes, is important. I highly recommend Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn and think it’s one of the best John Maxwell books I’ve read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book was full of cliches. At times I was like hey did this dude sit down at my last training for work and takes notes cause the stuff he was presenting in this book is super similar. Add to that that he relies a lot on quotes from others (who often say his point better than he does) and it's like right all of this has been said before. Not to give him no credit at times the information is presented in an interesting way. And there are some useful things in here. But overall this is nothing This book was full of cliches. At times I was like hey did this dude sit down at my last training for work and takes notes cause the stuff he was presenting in this book is super similar. Add to that that he relies a lot on quotes from others (who often say his point better than he does) and it's like right all of this has been said before. Not to give him no credit at times the information is presented in an interesting way. And there are some useful things in here. But overall this is nothing new. He tells a lot of stories which really up the page count. And didn't always feel necessary. Further, this dude glorifies adversity and yet seems super disconnected from what others experience. He points out that some folks would say that "it's more difficult for people who are underprivileged, facing adversity, or suffering pain", but he doesn't think so. And you are like, but it would be more difficult. I used to work 70 hours a week. Commuting 1.5 hours to work. I had no time to even think. I was tired all the time and it would have been super difficult to meet his guidelines for being teachable. It's shows his privilege in him assuming that folks have time for this stuff. He talks a big game about adversity, but his examples of his struggles just don't click. You spent 20k to have a passport delivered to you? Cool thats about what I make in a year. You lost a million dollars in a bad decision you made and you couldn't really afford to lose so much money and had to sell some of your investments? I've never had a million dollars to invest. I won't say losing your mother isn't a struggle, but you had her for 62 years of your life. You are an adult and thats a lot of love you got to receive. And it is part of life that parents die. I just see a lot of privilege, a lot of wealth and a disconnect from the lives that others lead in this book. He brings up depression in passing, but doesn't really address how a depressed person might be able to utilize his advice (just that they lack energy because they have no hope). Overall, he came off as someone who isn't presenting anything really new, he rehashed his own ideas multiple times throughout the book and he seems disconnected from others experiences. It just wasn't what I had hoped to read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bill Donhiser

    Another great book by John Maxwell. I am impressed by this author with every new book he writes. Easy to read full of easy to understand information. It is a great resource for those of us who have to lead and any one who wishes to be a leader

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Lots of positive advice and practical suggestions for learning everyday. Filled with several humorous and touching antidotes about real people. The ultimate learning experience is evaluating and proceeding forward with a flexible plan. The title was attention - getting for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Learned alot with this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Albrecht

    Short, simple, profound, phenomenal. If you have experienced failure and it still holds onto you, read this. This book is the one. And it's funny! Short, simple, profound, phenomenal. If you have experienced failure and it still holds onto you, read this. This book is the one. And it's funny!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Rwabose

    Brilliant book on #Learning, especially from setbacks. John Maxwell shares 13 key fundamentals about learning. No.2 spoke to me the most: HIMILITY: The spirit of learning

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jad Dizon

    Life Changing Read! :D

  20. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Another Impact Theory reading list book. I've never read John C. Maxwell, but apparently he's written over 70 books on leadership (and he lets you know that!). Given his long history with the subject, he is full of research and quotes and insights... from other people. There's nothing wrong with synthesizing information, especially nowadays in our world of information overload. As Tony Robbins said, "We're drowning in information, but we're starving for wisdom" (Tony is no stranger to using ideas Another Impact Theory reading list book. I've never read John C. Maxwell, but apparently he's written over 70 books on leadership (and he lets you know that!). Given his long history with the subject, he is full of research and quotes and insights... from other people. There's nothing wrong with synthesizing information, especially nowadays in our world of information overload. As Tony Robbins said, "We're drowning in information, but we're starving for wisdom" (Tony is no stranger to using ideas and concepts from others, too). So we need people to curate all the information on a subject and provide us the cream of the crop. That's what this book does for the topic learning from your failures. Learning from failure is nothing new. There are numerous cliches about needing to fail to succeed. More and more people have accepted the "growth mindset" laid out in Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Even ancient wisdom acknowledged this concept, notably the Stoics described in The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph. I felt like this book was like Grit. The core concept is pretty much common sense now. The big lesson is laid out in the introduction. Then the rest of the book is just elaboration and repetition. In this case, it's a lot of anecdotes and quotes from a wide range of people. I did appreciate the gamut of sources cited. It's not just a bunch of scientists or CEOs or authors. I think the eleven topics improved as the book went on. The last two chapters, Change and Maturity, in particular contained all the gold I mined from this book. 1. Humility - The Spirit of Learning 2. Reality - The Foundation of Learning 3. Responsibility - The First Step of Learning 4. Improvement - The Focus of Learning 5. Hope - The Motivation of Learning 6. Teachability - The Pathway of Learning 7. Adversity - The Catalyst of Learning 8. Problems - The Opportunities of Learning 9. Bad Experiences - The Perspective for Learning 10. Change - The Price of Learning 11. Maturity - The Value of Learning It's a quick enough read that contains enough entertainment to be worth a read. If you're not already familiar with the growth mindset and other leadership topics, then you'll likely gain way more than I did.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tuba

    It's one of the best books I've ever read. I like it and I definitely recommend it to every person who wants to improve his/her self. But there are 2 things which I didn't like about: 1 - It's somehow too long so I couldn't read it day after day so after I finished reading almost half of it, I started another book then I returned back to it and continued reading ^^ 2 - In 2 chapters of it the author used MUCH MUCH of quotes so that made me feel bored. IT'S APPROPRIATE FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS SPECIAL It's one of the best books I've ever read. I like it and I definitely recommend it to every person who wants to improve his/her self. But there are 2 things which I didn't like about: 1 - It's somehow too long so I couldn't read it day after day so after I finished reading almost half of it, I started another book then I returned back to it and continued reading ^^ 2 - In 2 chapters of it the author used MUCH MUCH of quotes so that made me feel bored. IT'S APPROPRIATE FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS SPECIALLY WHO'S IN THE INTERMEDIATE LEVEL IN READING AS I AM. الكتاب رائع واحد من أفضل الكتب اللي قرأتها في حياتي في مجال تطوير الذات .. تقريباً شغلتين ما حبيتهم فيه أولاً : الكتاب عدد صفحاته كثير فما قدرت آقراه كامل بشكل متواصل وفي منتصف الكتاب توقفت عن قرائته وقريت كتاب ثاني و من ثم رجعت له ثانياً : في فصلين من فصول الكتاب الكاتب استدل بأقوال شخصيات أخرى بشكل مبالغ فيه بصراحة فحسيت فيهم بملل ولكن بشكل عام الكتاب لا يفوت .. الأشخاص متعلمين اللغة مثلي واللي في المستوى المتوسط تقريباً أو فوق المتوسط الكتاب سهل الفهم ومناسب جداً بشكل عام أنصح بالكتاب وبشدة ..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jellian

    This is the first book that I’ve read from this author, Sir John Maxwell. There’s a pang of regret on my part, why I only started reading his works now. I am fully grateful for the inspiration and hope that this book has given me. It is good and relieving to know that successful people also make numerous mistakes and stupidities. However, what set them apart from ordinary people is how they deal with them. One of my favorite quotes from the book is this: “We need to expect mistakes, failures, an This is the first book that I’ve read from this author, Sir John Maxwell. There’s a pang of regret on my part, why I only started reading his works now. I am fully grateful for the inspiration and hope that this book has given me. It is good and relieving to know that successful people also make numerous mistakes and stupidities. However, what set them apart from ordinary people is how they deal with them. One of my favorite quotes from the book is this: “We need to expect mistakes, failures, and losses in life, since each of us will face many of them. But we need to take them as they come, not allow them to build up.”

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is my first John Maxwell book and it's like having an educational chat with your kindly, older pastor, experienced in psychology and humanity. The message of the book is in the title. Maxwell outlines 11 traits that successful people develop to learn from their mistakes and losses to create a successful life. The text is liberally sprinkled with quotes and stories and his outline is clear and easy to follow. Worth the read, though not destined to be a classic in the personal growth genre. This is my first John Maxwell book and it's like having an educational chat with your kindly, older pastor, experienced in psychology and humanity. The message of the book is in the title. Maxwell outlines 11 traits that successful people develop to learn from their mistakes and losses to create a successful life. The text is liberally sprinkled with quotes and stories and his outline is clear and easy to follow. Worth the read, though not destined to be a classic in the personal growth genre.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jane Paula

    The common theme of this book is the value of learning. We all experience losses and failures, but not all of us harness the lessons from such experiences. John Maxwell reminds us of the value of actively seeking the lessons from everyone of such experiences. By seeking to learn continually, we grow, and by growing, recovering from our losses and, eventually winning, is inevitable. I was inspired very much with the many wise quotes on the subject of learning throughout the book. Its a great read The common theme of this book is the value of learning. We all experience losses and failures, but not all of us harness the lessons from such experiences. John Maxwell reminds us of the value of actively seeking the lessons from everyone of such experiences. By seeking to learn continually, we grow, and by growing, recovering from our losses and, eventually winning, is inevitable. I was inspired very much with the many wise quotes on the subject of learning throughout the book. Its a great read!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shirin

    "Optimism is the belief that things will get better. Hope is the faith that, together we can make things better. Optimism is a passive virtue, hope an active one. It takes no courage to be an optimist, but it takes a great deal of courage to have hope."_ This is only one of the many inspirational quotes in Maxwell's book that deeply touches the soul. Highly recommended for anyone facing hardships in career, life etc. and needs positive mentoring. "Optimism is the belief that things will get better. Hope is the faith that, together we can make things better. Optimism is a passive virtue, hope an active one. It takes no courage to be an optimist, but it takes a great deal of courage to have hope."_ This is only one of the many inspirational quotes in Maxwell's book that deeply touches the soul. Highly recommended for anyone facing hardships in career, life etc. and needs positive mentoring.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Toby Brennen

    John Maxwell in “Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn” presents the case that our learning comes from our failures and to be successful we need to be able to learn from our mistakes. Filled with every ‘positivity quote’ that I’ve heard over the past 15 years, it is uplifting, thought provoking and motivational. Although an easy read, I found the style stiff and formal - like I was reading a puffed up outline.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Rivas

    I enjoyed the theory behind this book because it turns hard moments into something of great value. We all experience failure, but it is essential to learn from the failures, which in most cases is more valuable than winning. All the case studies that support his theory are fascinating, and most of the advice is practical enough to apply in most failures we all experience. As a father, this is a strategy that I'll teach my kids and use myself. I enjoyed the theory behind this book because it turns hard moments into something of great value. We all experience failure, but it is essential to learn from the failures, which in most cases is more valuable than winning. All the case studies that support his theory are fascinating, and most of the advice is practical enough to apply in most failures we all experience. As a father, this is a strategy that I'll teach my kids and use myself.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Darshan

    "Standard" self improvement maxims but sometimes that's all you need. There's a reason John is such a well respected figure in the area of leadership - the way he elucidates his ideas is easy to digest and makes you want to keep reading. The many quotes and personal and historical anecdotes breakup the would be monotony. Definitely a fantastic read that I would recommend to anyone willing to work on themselves. "Standard" self improvement maxims but sometimes that's all you need. There's a reason John is such a well respected figure in the area of leadership - the way he elucidates his ideas is easy to digest and makes you want to keep reading. The many quotes and personal and historical anecdotes breakup the would be monotony. Definitely a fantastic read that I would recommend to anyone willing to work on themselves.

  29. 4 out of 5

    CinderBelle615

    This book could not have come at a better time for me this year. Maybe I'm being biased with the 5 star rating, I will have to read it again next year to see if my rating changes from 5 star to 4, or even 3 star ratings but overall it wasn't a dull read. The author provided what you really need when you are in this current mood, humor. He provided good humor accompanied by uplifting words that make you reconsider looking at a "failed situation" with a different perspective. This book could not have come at a better time for me this year. Maybe I'm being biased with the 5 star rating, I will have to read it again next year to see if my rating changes from 5 star to 4, or even 3 star ratings but overall it wasn't a dull read. The author provided what you really need when you are in this current mood, humor. He provided good humor accompanied by uplifting words that make you reconsider looking at a "failed situation" with a different perspective.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maxim

    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn from citations. The book exploits Authority Bias at large scale. The amount of citations is overwhelming and [unnecessary and egoistically] skewed towards the American culture. Another downside is the repetitiveness: the book could be rephrased in 10 pages without losing any lesson. On the upside, it makes a lot of sense and brings a lot of valuable information; you just need to be ready to plow through the redundancy.

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