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Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google—and how it’s reshaping the way we think about technology The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the business of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of the Android and the iP Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google—and how it’s reshaping the way we think about technology The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the business of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of the Android and the iPad, these corporations are locked in a feud that will play out not just in the marketplace but in the courts and on screens around the world.      Fred Vogelstein has reported on this rivalry for more than a decade and has rare access to its major players. In Dogfight, he takes us into the offices and board rooms where company dogma translates into ruthless business; behind outsize personalities like Steve Jobs, Apple’s now-lionized CEO, and Eric Schmidt, Google’s executive chairman; and inside the deals, lawsuits, and allegations that mold the way we communicate. Apple and Google are poaching each other’s employees. They bid up the price of each other’s acquisitions for spite, and they forge alliances with major players like Facebook and Microsoft in pursuit of market dominance.      Dogfight reads like a novel: vivid nonfiction with never-before-heard details. This is more than a story about what devices will replace our phones and laptops. It’s about who will control the content on those devices and where that content will come from—about the future of media in Silicon Valley, New York, and Hollywood.


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Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google—and how it’s reshaping the way we think about technology The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the business of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of the Android and the iP Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google—and how it’s reshaping the way we think about technology The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the business of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of the Android and the iPad, these corporations are locked in a feud that will play out not just in the marketplace but in the courts and on screens around the world.      Fred Vogelstein has reported on this rivalry for more than a decade and has rare access to its major players. In Dogfight, he takes us into the offices and board rooms where company dogma translates into ruthless business; behind outsize personalities like Steve Jobs, Apple’s now-lionized CEO, and Eric Schmidt, Google’s executive chairman; and inside the deals, lawsuits, and allegations that mold the way we communicate. Apple and Google are poaching each other’s employees. They bid up the price of each other’s acquisitions for spite, and they forge alliances with major players like Facebook and Microsoft in pursuit of market dominance.      Dogfight reads like a novel: vivid nonfiction with never-before-heard details. This is more than a story about what devices will replace our phones and laptops. It’s about who will control the content on those devices and where that content will come from—about the future of media in Silicon Valley, New York, and Hollywood.

30 review for Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Moryl

    The first half the book is an interesting recounting of the development of iOS, the iPhone, the iPad, and Android, and the people surrounding it. The second half is wordcount filler that doesn't say anything you haven't ready 10 times already in the tech press. (Tablets and smartphones are changing the world! Cable companies are doomed! Content is king!) The excerpt published in the NYT--about the development and launch of the iPhone--was one of the more compelling parts of the book. The descript The first half the book is an interesting recounting of the development of iOS, the iPhone, the iPad, and Android, and the people surrounding it. The second half is wordcount filler that doesn't say anything you haven't ready 10 times already in the tech press. (Tablets and smartphones are changing the world! Cable companies are doomed! Content is king!) The excerpt published in the NYT--about the development and launch of the iPhone--was one of the more compelling parts of the book. The description of Android development was just about on par, but by the time Vogelstein gets to iPad development it's more about placing the device in historical context than the actual issues around its development/rollout. From there the lens widens, zooming out from the specifics of strategy, people, and events, to a more macro discussion of the impacts of the devices. It muddies the tone of the book and dilutes the message a bit. Maybe if there was a bit more detail to some of the impact of the devices other than "it was difficult to negotiate with media companies" then it would be more compelling. But going from a detailed description of the first demo to Steve Jobs of a prototype of a touch-based Apple device all the way to talking about Netflix, Spotify, and Flipboard all in the span of a few pages undersells how difficult all this change was. Much like the development of the iPhone was a painful, difficult process, so was the music industry's move from suing downloaders, doubling down on cd sales, and draconian DRM to supporting services like Pandora, Spotify, and iTunes. Including such detail certainly would've made the book significantly longer, but in its current form it suffers from those kinds of exclusions because of the knowledge it assumes. TL;DR: read the first half of the book, about iPhone and Android development, and skip the rest.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julio Ojeda-Zapata

    The recent history of Apple and Google is filled with odd, semi-explained incidents. Why did Apple, shortly before releasing its first iPhone, switch from a plastic to a glass screen (and even issue a press release to announce that fact)? Why, when the first Android phone was being released, did CEOs Brin and Page make a surprise appearance on ... Rollerblades? Dafuq? This book fleshes out these and many other stories. The tome is at its most interesting when delves into the birth of the iPhone, The recent history of Apple and Google is filled with odd, semi-explained incidents. Why did Apple, shortly before releasing its first iPhone, switch from a plastic to a glass screen (and even issue a press release to announce that fact)? Why, when the first Android phone was being released, did CEOs Brin and Page make a surprise appearance on ... Rollerblades? Dafuq? This book fleshes out these and many other stories. The tome is at its most interesting when delves into the birth of the iPhone, Android and the like. It loses me a bit when it moves on to lawsuits involving Apple, Samsung and so on. The tail end of the book is a tech-trend regurgitation that reads like a series of blog posts. So, it's an imperfect book, but a spellbinding, must-read book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mirek Jasinski

    I put this book aside when it was first published, as it had negative reviews. Big mistake! Only on reading it, did I realise my error. I thought I’d read all there was to read on Google and Apple so this came as a surprise. The most valuable part is the most obfuscated- concealed in the last chapters and in-between words - the future of patents (ch.8), the future of media (ch.9) and more which, save for an inflated management consultancy fee, I will not divulge here :) I’d recommend this book to I put this book aside when it was first published, as it had negative reviews. Big mistake! Only on reading it, did I realise my error. I thought I’d read all there was to read on Google and Apple so this came as a surprise. The most valuable part is the most obfuscated- concealed in the last chapters and in-between words - the future of patents (ch.8), the future of media (ch.9) and more which, save for an inflated management consultancy fee, I will not divulge here :) I’d recommend this book to anyone who wants to create (or work with) a game changing company. Never mind that the book didn’t make the NYT bestseller list. It was badly marketed. Starting with the title... personally I would have changed "dogfight" into"leapfrogging revolution". But then I discovered that it was republished under a different title "Battle of the Titans. How the Fight to the Death between Apple and Google is Transforming our Lives". Both titles are bad and merely obscure the content. Read it to discover its value, even if the author wasn’t able to to package it Steve Jobs' style.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Noneareleft

    Just like when a trailer shows the best bits of a movie, the excerpt of this article featured on The Atlantic (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology...) is really the best bit of "juicy" detail as far as that stuff goes, otherwise, Vogelstein trails off very quickly from reporting or even composing prose of critical insight and instead seems to opine in a series of unrelated chapters. Worse, however, like Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson, Vogelstein at points seems to get some facts incorrec Just like when a trailer shows the best bits of a movie, the excerpt of this article featured on The Atlantic (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology...) is really the best bit of "juicy" detail as far as that stuff goes, otherwise, Vogelstein trails off very quickly from reporting or even composing prose of critical insight and instead seems to opine in a series of unrelated chapters. Worse, however, like Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson, Vogelstein at points seems to get some facts incorrect. On p. 97 Vegelstein writes, "Jobs had just cut the price of the entry-level iPhone by $ 100— from $ 499 to $ 399—" however, in the United States, the iPhone debuted at $599 (on contract, at which Steve Ballmer famously balked) and the price was cut to $400, which I remember because that was when I bought one. If Vogelstein can get simple facts like this wrong (ones to which the answers are easily searchable) then how is the reader supposed to be able to swallow his statements that cannot be otherwise validated? On p. 115 Vogelstein writes, "As in any divorce, Googlers and Appleites may never agree on how the two started fighting," which may be true, but isn't that the premise of this book? It's in the very title, for crying out loud! Vogelstein also heavily quotes Steven Levy's "In the Plex" and the heretofore mention biography by Isaacson; begging the reader to ask himself if he would not just have been better off to have read those two books and not bothered with Dogfight. Maybe I'm wrong and Vogelstein is just hoping to make a sale off of those who would really like to characterize these two companies as being in a dogfight (see Mat Honan's WIRED article http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2013/0...), but given the author's statement on p. 127 (be. “The press would like to write the sort of teenage model of competition, which is ‘I have a gun, you have a gun, who shoots first?’ The adult way to run a business is to run it more like a country. They have disputes, yet they’ve actually been able to have huge trade with each other. They’re not sending bombs at each other.”) that doesn't seem to be his angle. I would like to say that the book is worth reading, but not re-reading, but I can't bring myself to do that. It's not that it is so much poorly written, because the prose itself is quite readable, if not engaging, but that the author never seems to get to the meat of the very title of the book, and so I'm not sure exactly why it needed to be written, let alone read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A decent but not a great book with a flawed conclusion As someone who has followed the subject matter of this book closely for as many years as the author, if not more, I found this to be a decent book, but far from a great one. It tells the story from both sides, and that was pretty well done as far as it went, but nothing new or extraordinary emerged. One of the central themes in the book is that the winner of any patent wars nearly always becomes the dominant player, and numerous historic exam A decent but not a great book with a flawed conclusion As someone who has followed the subject matter of this book closely for as many years as the author, if not more, I found this to be a decent book, but far from a great one. It tells the story from both sides, and that was pretty well done as far as it went, but nothing new or extraordinary emerged. One of the central themes in the book is that the winner of any patent wars nearly always becomes the dominant player, and numerous historic examples were cited. In the patent wars between iOS and Android, Apple is comprehensively trouncing Google and its Android Licensees yet the author comes to the puzzling conclusion, contrary to his own theory, that Google now has the upper hand. In the short time since this book was published I would suggest that things have moved even more decisively in Apple's favour. Apple have won again at the patent retrial in Northern California. They've also had an incredibly successful global launch of iPhone 5s/5c, iPad Air and Retina iPad Mini, whereas Samsung's Galaxy S4 seems to be performing well below expectations, Samsung themselves appear to have peaked and in the US Apple now commands a greater share of the US Smartphone market than all of the hundreds of Android handsets and their makers combined. In addition Google and its licensees seem to be very scared indeed of the lawsuits that have recently been issued by the Rockstar consortium, and I quote: 'Google's complaint contains a lot of rhetoric, accusing Rockstar of having "placed a cloud on Google's Android platform" and threatening "Google's business and relationships with its customers and partners, as well as its sales of Nexus-branded Android devices".' As I understand it Apple have many, many more patents to wield, and I believe those ones are even stronger than the ones they have used so far against Android. When you also consider that the only way that Android has gained market share is essentially by giving away phones for free, it is a non-contest. If they had to sell them them for anything close to what Apple can and does command they'd get nowhere ... As Microsoft has found out the hard way. Anyone can APPEAR to win in the short term by giving product away. But it hardly ensures the survival of the companies concerned. Apple still maintains a price premium because they deliver cutting edge products that people can always depend on. I therefore disagree with the author's conclusion (not particularly clearly stated) which fails to take these facts into account.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fawaz Abdul rahman

    This book tells the story behind Android and iPhone, and their success and fights. This book released in 2013, so you should not expect much of recent stories, therefore the end of the book kind of useless because, most stories were not success or failure and we can know it exactly in 2018. In general it is great to know about those products which we use or see daily, how they founded and changed the world.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Viet Nguyen

    This book is good until the first half, when it talks about the tempting war between Apple and Google, or the war between their two famous mobile platforms: iPhone/iPad vs. Android. Many good stories have been told about people behind those two platforms, how Apple and Google competed with each other in design, advertising, technology features, patents. I am really impressed about how disruptive the iPad is. Must thank the author for giving me many insights about it. Some nice excerpts: - [When A This book is good until the first half, when it talks about the tempting war between Apple and Google, or the war between their two famous mobile platforms: iPhone/iPad vs. Android. Many good stories have been told about people behind those two platforms, how Apple and Google competed with each other in design, advertising, technology features, patents. I am really impressed about how disruptive the iPad is. Must thank the author for giving me many insights about it. Some nice excerpts: - [When Android was a secret team inside Google] “The idea of a division inside Google that few even knew about was antithetical to its culture. ” - “They [Apple] don’t want people to be on their platform without permission. The benefit of a closed platform is control. But Google has a specific belief that open is the better approach because it leads to more options, competition, and consumer choices.” - [About Google doing advertisement] “this was not an easy adjustment for Google’s and Android’s very engineering-driven culture” - [How disruptive] “The iPod and iTunes changed the way people bought and listened to music. The iPhone changed what people could expect from their cell phones. But the iPad was turning five industries upside down.” - [Jobs's thought about why Bill Gates built such a bad tablet in 2003] “But he discovered Gates’s problem had less to do with a lack of imagination and more to do with the idea’s being ahead of the technology necessary to make it a reality” - [About Jobs and the iPad] “Thirty-five years after starting Apple with Steve Wozniak, Jobs was finally doing what he had set out to do all along: he was transforming what consumers and businesses expected from their computers. ” - “It [Android] allows its manufacturers to abandon the ecosystem” - “And during his two years as Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook has taken pains to point out that Jobs himself had made it clear to him that he didn’t want Cook running Apple the way he thought Jobs would want to but the way Cook thought it should be done.” The second part is rather disappointed. The author gave me an impression that after Jobs died, there are no more interesting stories to be told. The later parts, starting from chapter 8, is much more like fillers. It is mainly about the sue between Apple and Samsung, how the mobile platforms have changed the content provider industry, and the future for Apple and Google. But they are not as interesting as the first part.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Navin Prakash

    It is a very good focusing on the History of the Smartphone right from the beginning as a prototype within Apple to a device which has conquered the World. Moreover it emphasizes on Google has competed with Apple on this front. How Android evolved over time to rival iPhone. Also never known insights are known about Steve Jobs and how he perceived the smartphone. The walled garden of the telecom carriers are broken by Apple and this has also been discussed.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter C

    Vogelstein is best when he writes about the efforts of both Apple and Google when developing iPhone and Android respectively. The inside view, both from a product development and design perspective is quite interesting. The final part of his books isn't that engrossing, since it contains most of what you can find in many tech magazines. However, it does complement the book quite well. Vogelstein is best when he writes about the efforts of both Apple and Google when developing iPhone and Android respectively. The inside view, both from a product development and design perspective is quite interesting. The final part of his books isn't that engrossing, since it contains most of what you can find in many tech magazines. However, it does complement the book quite well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Neithercott

    An interesting look at the fight between Apple & Google!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mihir Kumar

    New book . extremely interesting - reads like a novel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sandro Felipe

    If you read this book you will see that nothing important are built with just kindness even those products from Google Inc.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Onder Guler

    Great way to understand how the world has changed by the friendship turning into a competition between Jobs and Sergei-Larry Duo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Victor

    Review: Fred Vogelstein's Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution - 3 out of 5 stars Warning: minor spoilers follow. Despite the fact that I normally stray away from nonfiction, the premise of this book was interesting enough for me to read it. I wasn't disappointed - this book is quite solid - but at the same time, the book left me with a sense of incompleteness, and I kept feeling like something was missing from the book that I couldn't quite put my finger on. Let's st Review: Fred Vogelstein's Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution - 3 out of 5 stars Warning: minor spoilers follow. Despite the fact that I normally stray away from nonfiction, the premise of this book was interesting enough for me to read it. I wasn't disappointed - this book is quite solid - but at the same time, the book left me with a sense of incompleteness, and I kept feeling like something was missing from the book that I couldn't quite put my finger on. Let's start with what Vogelstein does right here. It reads well. Extremely well - particularly for the first half or so of the book where the iPhone vs. Android race is being described. The author paints a clear picture of how the difference between the two companies goes far beyond their products and source of revenue - Apple and Google have an intrinsically different 'personality' so to speak. Reading about Steve Jobs's dedication as portrayed through an inner look at his preparations for product unveilings, etc. was definitely interesting as well. I could also easily tell that there was a huge amount of research done underlying this book in order to weave together such a cohesive narrative. The book is also super up-to-date, with the most recent bit of information from August 2013 as far as I could tell. However, there were quite a few things that kept this book from reaching 4-star status for me. I feel like the book loses focus towards the end. That is, there was definitely sufficient description of both iPhone and Android in the early part of the book, but I felt like Vogelstein jumped between topics too much towards the end. I had a hard time keeping track of why new TV shows and movies had to do with the tablet war, for example. I'm not sure if it was relevant and it almost seemed like in the penultimate chapter (Chapter 9) the focus had been shifted away from Apple and Google to Hollywood. Given that the author was talking about tablets, perhaps talking about the Microsoft Surface would have been interesting (given that Microsoft is mentioned occasionally throughout the book anyway). I also felt like giving a few charts/figures instead of making everything prose would have helped the author get across his opinion on the current status of the Apple vs. Google war. Overall, it's a solid book - but not without faults - that you should pick up if you're interested in learning more about the major players in the smartphone and tablet industry. Thanks to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, and Goodreads for providing me with a free copy of the book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott Holstad

    Rarely has a book incensed me the way this one has. First of all, let me announce that I am an iPhone lover and Android hater. No need to take pot shots at me. Just the facts. If you don't like it, read something else. Anyway, I thought this book was going to be a reasonably objective look into the war between Apple and Google on smart phones and tablets. Boy, was I wrong. The author lets us know right away where he stands. He starts by mocking Apple and Steve Jobs as they get set to introduce t Rarely has a book incensed me the way this one has. First of all, let me announce that I am an iPhone lover and Android hater. No need to take pot shots at me. Just the facts. If you don't like it, read something else. Anyway, I thought this book was going to be a reasonably objective look into the war between Apple and Google on smart phones and tablets. Boy, was I wrong. The author lets us know right away where he stands. He starts by mocking Apple and Steve Jobs as they get set to introduce the iPhone to the public, making them look like total dunces and then pulling one over on the public's eyes with a brilliant demo. Then, poor Google. They loved the iPhone. They loved Apple. So imagine how hurt they were when Jobs and Apple got wind of their development of the Android and didn't appreciate it, of how badly their feelings were hurt. They even went for walks with Jobs assuring him that they weren't going to go ahead with Android -- only to do it. And this was somehow justified by the author. The author also went out of his way to explain that Apple has never sued Google, just the phone and tablet manufacturers. Okay. Nonetheless, Apple has the patents and it's winning. This is a hatchet job disguised as journalism and it pisses me off. It also pisses me off that I spent good money on this damn book thinking I was getting one thing when in fact I was getting something else. If I wanted to read something by a Google cheerleader, I would have bought something else. So too, if I had wanted to read of a Jobs smear job on Google, I would have bought that -- but I didn't. I wanted something balanced. This was not. So I didn't finish it. I made it to the seventh chapter before giving up. I'm trying to get my blood pressure down now. I can't believe what a crock this book is. What a Google lover this author is. How open software trumps closed systems every time, which isn't necessarily the case -- look at the facts. Of all of the books I've not recommended, this comes in at the top of my list. Most definitely not recommended!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I have seen this stated in other reviews and it held true for me after reading the book myself, that the first two-thirds of the book is the best part of the book and that it tails off after that. I read the first two-thirds of the book over the course of five days and it took me another week to finish the last third of the book. The first seven chapters make up the telling of the creation of the iPhone, Android, and the iPad and the battle that takes place between Apple and Google once Apple le I have seen this stated in other reviews and it held true for me after reading the book myself, that the first two-thirds of the book is the best part of the book and that it tails off after that. I read the first two-thirds of the book over the course of five days and it took me another week to finish the last third of the book. The first seven chapters make up the telling of the creation of the iPhone, Android, and the iPad and the battle that takes place between Apple and Google once Apple learns about Android. Those first seven chapters are the strongest and where we learn most interesting details about the inside stories of the two most popular mobile operating systems. It is in the telling of the back and forth story between Apple and Google where Fred Vogelstein shines in the book. The chapter covering the trial between Samsung and Apple was alright, just did not grab me as much as the previous seven chapters. It did not cover as many interesting details which I guess is not a huge surprise given it was focused on a patent trial. The next two chapters are a bit different than the rest of the book, focusing on the more industry-wide effects that iOS and Android devices have had on the world of technology. From how it has effected websites, to media publishing, and the entertainment industry of movies and TV among other things. While there is some good information in this section it just is a bit of a different turn for the book after a much closer look at a smaller set of topics in only two companies and topics in the first seven chapters. Overall if you enjoy reading about technology and parts of the inside stories surrounding Apple and Google, there is enough good information I think to read this book in the end. Although it is interesting after reading this book and now several weeks after I have finished it, a lot of the details from it have not stuck with me as well as I might have thought since I have just so recently read it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Some good insights but Vogelstein insists on arguing that Market Share, instead of Profit Share is what matters in Mobile. That may have been true for the PC market of the 90s and early 2000s, but technology companies have learned that healthy platforms exist where healthy margins exist. Yes, Android may have a significant market share lead over iOS, but many of those phones are sub-$100 phones in developing markets without a dedicated data plan. Another large set of devices are ones without Goo Some good insights but Vogelstein insists on arguing that Market Share, instead of Profit Share is what matters in Mobile. That may have been true for the PC market of the 90s and early 2000s, but technology companies have learned that healthy platforms exist where healthy margins exist. Yes, Android may have a significant market share lead over iOS, but many of those phones are sub-$100 phones in developing markets without a dedicated data plan. Another large set of devices are ones without Google services (i.e. Chinese Android phones). That limits the value that Google can retrieve from these devices. Still, this is a very interesting book which contains a lot of anecdotes that until now had not been publicly reported. Another quibble, the audio version is ruined by the narrator's insistence on mispronouncing terms such as "iOS" and "OSX" and "RIM".

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A generally dry book with a couple of very entertaining parts. I believe this book is a collection of earlier articles. At least, it reads that way. As such, there isn't an overriding narrative on how different players at Apple felt about moves at Google, and vice versa. Instead you get an Apple focused piece, then a Google focused piece, then an Apple focused piece. How the executives at each company reacted to what the other did in the previous section is only lightly touched on. Still, the ent A generally dry book with a couple of very entertaining parts. I believe this book is a collection of earlier articles. At least, it reads that way. As such, there isn't an overriding narrative on how different players at Apple felt about moves at Google, and vice versa. Instead you get an Apple focused piece, then a Google focused piece, then an Apple focused piece. How the executives at each company reacted to what the other did in the previous section is only lightly touched on. Still, the entertaining pieces were very entertaining. The book opens with a bang, in my opinion, recounting the frantic behind the scenes scrambling that occurred in the months, weeks, days, hours, and finally minutes leading up to Jobs' introduction of the first iPhone. Having watched that keynote, it is amazing how smooth it went considering all that was going on.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Murley

    I really enjoyed and appreciated this book. Fred Vogelstein, an experienced journalist covering Silicon Valley, has produced an interesting and succinct narrative focused on Apples's development of the IPhone/IPad and Google's development of Android. Each of these topics deserve their own exhaustive story but I just don't have time to read 600 page books delving into the depths. What Vogelstein delivered was just perfect--a nice balance of summary history, the important personalities and battles I really enjoyed and appreciated this book. Fred Vogelstein, an experienced journalist covering Silicon Valley, has produced an interesting and succinct narrative focused on Apples's development of the IPhone/IPad and Google's development of Android. Each of these topics deserve their own exhaustive story but I just don't have time to read 600 page books delving into the depths. What Vogelstein delivered was just perfect--a nice balance of summary history, the important personalities and battles they fought, and enough technical information for the reader to fully appreciate the technologies at hand. Most of all it gave me a true appreciation of the tens of thousands of hours spent by motivated, innovative, and dedicated people in both companies who worked so hard to deliver these revolutionary technologies to us. Well worth your time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This book is decent but all the good stuff was excerpted in the NYT article “And Then Steve Said, ‘Let There Be an iPhone’”. It’s a fine account of this period, roughly 2007-2012, for posterity but if you follow technology as I do this is mostly a rehashing of very recent history. And a lot of it is fluff with some broad editorializing about the significance of recent news flare-ups, particularly when Vogelstein trots out the old “Can Apple survive without Steve Jobs” chestnut. The best bits are This book is decent but all the good stuff was excerpted in the NYT article “And Then Steve Said, ‘Let There Be an iPhone’”. It’s a fine account of this period, roughly 2007-2012, for posterity but if you follow technology as I do this is mostly a rehashing of very recent history. And a lot of it is fluff with some broad editorializing about the significance of recent news flare-ups, particularly when Vogelstein trots out the old “Can Apple survive without Steve Jobs” chestnut. The best bits are the revelations from engineers and executives that haven’t spoken publicly until now. Like I said, though, you get a lot of that in the linked NYT article.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Osamah

    If you follow the tech blogs and are interested in the Apple vs Google story you probably know everything that's in this book. I bought the book on the strength of the first chapter which was excerpted in the NYT (I think), however the rest of the book didn't live up to the first chapter and didn't provide much new. And it isn't very well written either. The author bounces all over the place often dropping opinions or statements without any corroboration. I read this book on and off over the cou If you follow the tech blogs and are interested in the Apple vs Google story you probably know everything that's in this book. I bought the book on the strength of the first chapter which was excerpted in the NYT (I think), however the rest of the book didn't live up to the first chapter and didn't provide much new. And it isn't very well written either. The author bounces all over the place often dropping opinions or statements without any corroboration. I read this book on and off over the course of a year pushing myself to read a chapter or two between other books. I wouldn't recommend except to those who are looking for a single book primer on the story and are willing to forgive the weaknesses in the writing and reporting.

  22. 5 out of 5

    YHC

    This book is a must read one if you are an Apple fan, or Jobs fan, but for someone neutral, then it's more like the whole story in detail about how these 2 big giants fought for the leading place. Each small function on our cell phone that w took for granted today, such as the lock function for cell phone, except key in the pass word, we have drawing pattern one with 3x3 or 4x4 dots..that used to be a battle of property right. Innovation is very very expensive, but stealing ideas is very common in This book is a must read one if you are an Apple fan, or Jobs fan, but for someone neutral, then it's more like the whole story in detail about how these 2 big giants fought for the leading place. Each small function on our cell phone that w took for granted today, such as the lock function for cell phone, except key in the pass word, we have drawing pattern one with 3x3 or 4x4 dots..that used to be a battle of property right. Innovation is very very expensive, but stealing ideas is very common in the technology field. The past 10 years, our communication device has updated to a speed that we consumers could hardly catch up. But that is ok? as long as you stand firm on your feet, you don't need to follow so closely to each new model of cell phone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Murilo Silva

    Interesting, but rather boring sometimes, book about how Apple and Google competed over the mobile industry. It also details that their race against each other was full of botches, deadlines and even betrayals. Furthermore, the book presents very nice perspectives on how the development and competition happened as the years went by. My major problem with the book is that it often (especially in the last few chapters) gets trapped on how the internet, TV, cable, magazine and related industries are Interesting, but rather boring sometimes, book about how Apple and Google competed over the mobile industry. It also details that their race against each other was full of botches, deadlines and even betrayals. Furthermore, the book presents very nice perspectives on how the development and competition happened as the years went by. My major problem with the book is that it often (especially in the last few chapters) gets trapped on how the internet, TV, cable, magazine and related industries are being changes. This part was very boring. One of the coolest things about this book was to see the author’s perspective years ago on the future expectations of how the market would look like. Very interesting.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lee Vermeulen

    Most interesting parts were on how the conflict between Google and Apple started once Android started to take off. Very dramatic and insightful, and a good look at some of the developers who weren’t normally in the spotlight (from both Google and Apple) Besides that though, this is just a extended version of the online NY times article, with a lot of the material coming from other books like Steve Job’s biography and In The Plex. It completely falls apart in the end when the writer just ran out o Most interesting parts were on how the conflict between Google and Apple started once Android started to take off. Very dramatic and insightful, and a good look at some of the developers who weren’t normally in the spotlight (from both Google and Apple) Besides that though, this is just a extended version of the online NY times article, with a lot of the material coming from other books like Steve Job’s biography and In The Plex. It completely falls apart in the end when the writer just ran out of material and spent the last quarter of the book just giving a general summary on the state of the entire tech industry.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Terrell Sanzone

    I received this book as a giveaway on Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. I wasn't sure what to expect when I entered the drawing but am happy to say that I have found this book interesting, witty and quite informative. Not only are many questions answered but there were quite a few tidbits which I hadn't even thought to ask. For geeks like us this book gives great insight to how things are done in this highly competitive field. I enjoyed it so much I had my boyfriend read it and he is r I received this book as a giveaway on Goodreads in exchange for an honest review. I wasn't sure what to expect when I entered the drawing but am happy to say that I have found this book interesting, witty and quite informative. Not only are many questions answered but there were quite a few tidbits which I hadn't even thought to ask. For geeks like us this book gives great insight to how things are done in this highly competitive field. I enjoyed it so much I had my boyfriend read it and he is recounting things to me as he makes his way through the pages. Wonderful read!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Camilleri

    This starts off fantastically well for anyone interested in the early development of the iPhone and Android. Unfortunately, about halfway through it feels like Vogelstein either ran out of sources or ran out of energy and the reporting devolves into a very general summary of the impact of the iPad on content industries. If you're interested in the development of Apple and Google's smartphones, it's still recommended; it's just a shame the quality of the first half didn't continue through the secon This starts off fantastically well for anyone interested in the early development of the iPhone and Android. Unfortunately, about halfway through it feels like Vogelstein either ran out of sources or ran out of energy and the reporting devolves into a very general summary of the impact of the iPad on content industries. If you're interested in the development of Apple and Google's smartphones, it's still recommended; it's just a shame the quality of the first half didn't continue through the second.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Janyk

    Decent enough book—covers the issues well. I'm somewhat well-versed with what happened at Apple with Steve Jobs and co, but was good to learn about Gundotra and Rubin and Google's shibboleths. The writing isn't particularly gripping and it doesn't add a huge amount of context to what's going on if you've been following the news and/or read the Jobs biography. Except for some of the Google stuff, which basically is just heaping praise on Rubin and Page for being master spin doctors. Not a bad book Decent enough book—covers the issues well. I'm somewhat well-versed with what happened at Apple with Steve Jobs and co, but was good to learn about Gundotra and Rubin and Google's shibboleths. The writing isn't particularly gripping and it doesn't add a huge amount of context to what's going on if you've been following the news and/or read the Jobs biography. Except for some of the Google stuff, which basically is just heaping praise on Rubin and Page for being master spin doctors. Not a bad book, but not great either. Three stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Raja

    An excellent read on the iPhone vs. Android battle. Interesting bits include Steve Jobs having to be convinced by his team to make a phone, Google already having a touchscreen based prototype at the time of the iPhone's launch, Microsoft's touchscreen Surface Tablet was already under development in the 90s, and Gorilla Glass was developed decades ago for fighter jets. Not likely to be a great read for the fruit company's fan boys but highly recommended for those who like to understand the challe An excellent read on the iPhone vs. Android battle. Interesting bits include Steve Jobs having to be convinced by his team to make a phone, Google already having a touchscreen based prototype at the time of the iPhone's launch, Microsoft's touchscreen Surface Tablet was already under development in the 90s, and Gorilla Glass was developed decades ago for fighter jets. Not likely to be a great read for the fruit company's fan boys but highly recommended for those who like to understand the challenges in building a product.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rrrrrron

    Great inside story of the development of the smartphone and 2 of the world's most powerful and innovative technology companies. First, there were visionaries aside from the CEOs of these companies. Second, you have the sense of how great companies adapt and get in front of evolving technological changes, making them happen earlier and being the ones ready to ride the disruption. For instance, google could have served its ads at a higher price per impression to 500 million desktop users - but pus Great inside story of the development of the smartphone and 2 of the world's most powerful and innovative technology companies. First, there were visionaries aside from the CEOs of these companies. Second, you have the sense of how great companies adapt and get in front of evolving technological changes, making them happen earlier and being the ones ready to ride the disruption. For instance, google could have served its ads at a higher price per impression to 500 million desktop users - but pushing into the cloud, it now serves ads to over 1 billion users and soon 2 billion users.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rob Crockett

    Great insight and stories in the first half, but the second half, outside the Apple Samsung trial, turned into a dissertation. Very boring and dry. I feel like I read a broad summary of hundreds of tech stories from 2010 to the present. I've read all those before. I didn't hear any new ideas. Maybe someone who hadn't followed tech news during these years might find it interesting. The author also points out many obvious observations. I will admit, I did not finish it. I was too bored, and I felt Great insight and stories in the first half, but the second half, outside the Apple Samsung trial, turned into a dissertation. Very boring and dry. I feel like I read a broad summary of hundreds of tech stories from 2010 to the present. I've read all those before. I didn't hear any new ideas. Maybe someone who hadn't followed tech news during these years might find it interesting. The author also points out many obvious observations. I will admit, I did not finish it. I was too bored, and I felt I was wasting time. Snoozefest.

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