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This new edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, is the product of more than 10 years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. Their dedication and hard work have yielded an authoritative volume that defines and classifies m This new edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, is the product of more than 10 years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. Their dedication and hard work have yielded an authoritative volume that defines and classifies mental disorders in order to improve diagnoses, treatment, and research. The criteria are concise and explicit, intended to facilitate an objective assessment of symptom presentations in a variety of clinical settings -- inpatient, outpatient, partial hospital, consultation-liaison, clinical, private practice, and primary care. New features and enhancements make DSM-5 easier to use across all settings: - The chapter organization reflects a lifespan approach, with disorders typically diagnosed in childhood (such as neurodevelopmental disorders) at the beginning of the manual, and those more typical of older adults (such as neurocognitive disorders) placed at the end. Also included are age-related factors specific to diagnosis. - The latest findings in neuroimaging and genetics have been integrated into each disorder along with gender and cultural considerations.- The revised organizational structure recognizes symptoms that span multiple diagnostic categories, providing new clinical insight in diagnosis. - Specific criteria have been streamlined, consolidated, or clarified to be consistent with clinical practice (including the consolidation of autism disorder, Asperger's syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder into autism spectrum disorder; the streamlined classification of bipolar and depressive disorders; the restructuring of substance use disorders for consistency and clarity; and the enhanced specificity for major and mild neurocognitive disorders).- Dimensional assessments for research and validation of clinical results have been provided.- Both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes are included for each disorder, and the organizational structure is consistent with the new ICD-11 in development. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, is the most comprehensive, current, and critical resource for clinical practice available to today's mental health clinicians and researchers of all orientations. The information contained in the manual is also valuable to other physicians and health professionals, including psychologists, counselors, nurses, and occupational and rehabilitation therapists, as well as social workers and forensic and legal specialists.


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This new edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, is the product of more than 10 years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. Their dedication and hard work have yielded an authoritative volume that defines and classifies m This new edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, is the product of more than 10 years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. Their dedication and hard work have yielded an authoritative volume that defines and classifies mental disorders in order to improve diagnoses, treatment, and research. The criteria are concise and explicit, intended to facilitate an objective assessment of symptom presentations in a variety of clinical settings -- inpatient, outpatient, partial hospital, consultation-liaison, clinical, private practice, and primary care. New features and enhancements make DSM-5 easier to use across all settings: - The chapter organization reflects a lifespan approach, with disorders typically diagnosed in childhood (such as neurodevelopmental disorders) at the beginning of the manual, and those more typical of older adults (such as neurocognitive disorders) placed at the end. Also included are age-related factors specific to diagnosis. - The latest findings in neuroimaging and genetics have been integrated into each disorder along with gender and cultural considerations.- The revised organizational structure recognizes symptoms that span multiple diagnostic categories, providing new clinical insight in diagnosis. - Specific criteria have been streamlined, consolidated, or clarified to be consistent with clinical practice (including the consolidation of autism disorder, Asperger's syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder into autism spectrum disorder; the streamlined classification of bipolar and depressive disorders; the restructuring of substance use disorders for consistency and clarity; and the enhanced specificity for major and mild neurocognitive disorders).- Dimensional assessments for research and validation of clinical results have been provided.- Both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes are included for each disorder, and the organizational structure is consistent with the new ICD-11 in development. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, is the most comprehensive, current, and critical resource for clinical practice available to today's mental health clinicians and researchers of all orientations. The information contained in the manual is also valuable to other physicians and health professionals, including psychologists, counselors, nurses, and occupational and rehabilitation therapists, as well as social workers and forensic and legal specialists.

30 review for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Justin Dixon

    Terrible plot, no character development. Still good though.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Carter

    After reading through some of these reviews I think that it is safe to say that this manual is very easily misunderstood. The two main critiques seem to be that a) Big pharma and the insurance companies had their hands all over it, and b) we are pathologizing normal human behavior. To address point a, there is not much to be said. It was pretty well established that they were involved. But to suggest that the whole manual is crap because of this is to give no credit to the scientists apart of th After reading through some of these reviews I think that it is safe to say that this manual is very easily misunderstood. The two main critiques seem to be that a) Big pharma and the insurance companies had their hands all over it, and b) we are pathologizing normal human behavior. To address point a, there is not much to be said. It was pretty well established that they were involved. But to suggest that the whole manual is crap because of this is to give no credit to the scientists apart of the individual task forces. Do you really think that they would all roll over and let industry dictate science? If you think yes, then you don't know much about science or scientists. To address point b, there are lots of problems with that critique. First, if you only read the few diagnosis that you care about, you are not trained to identify "clinically significant distress or impairment", or you don't have any idea why that's important, then you don't have the proper level of reference to to make this claim. The most often over looked section in ever diagnosis is the prevalence rate. This is where the pertinent data on prevalence in the general/clinical population is compiled. Most rates are not above single digits, and when you combine this with the high rates of comorbidity, the DSM does not seem to suggest that everyone could be diagnosed with a mental disorder, as many people seem to think. Lastly, I want to say that, yes, psychopharmological drugs are over prescribed, and yes, some normal human behavior can be interpreted as pathological. But these are MISUSES of the DSM, and not a flaw of the manual in itself. The DSM makes it pretty clear in every diagnosis that unless you are a qualified mental health professional, you should probably not be diagnosing people all willy nilly. I'm looking at you GPs. My final note is that just because you are not a psychologist or counselor that does not mean you cannot read and understand this book. But if you approach this trying to find fault so you can dismiss the DSM you will find what you are looking for.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diogenes

    I bestow upon the DSM a 1-star rating. I am a graduate student in a Counseling program, but I am postmodern in my approach and philosophy. To me, the DSM as a THING is the epitome of medical capitalism. If you were to research the creation and manipulation of the DSM over the course of its relatively short lifespan, you'd see the puppet strings reach into the clouds of both Big Pharma and the ultra-powerful insurance consortium. This book directly affects the lives of basically everyone on the p I bestow upon the DSM a 1-star rating. I am a graduate student in a Counseling program, but I am postmodern in my approach and philosophy. To me, the DSM as a THING is the epitome of medical capitalism. If you were to research the creation and manipulation of the DSM over the course of its relatively short lifespan, you'd see the puppet strings reach into the clouds of both Big Pharma and the ultra-powerful insurance consortium. This book directly affects the lives of basically everyone on the planet as a "Westernized" methodology for mental health care sifts into all corners of the globe in the twenty-first century. Psychology is a highly soft science riddled with subjectivities, and the DSM is the cookbook for creating ailments that feed the insurance companies, medical professions, and multinational pharmaceutical industries, all the while hiding beneath a thinly veiled "responsibility" to the millions, if not billions, of people who could use some form of mental health care without being diagnosed, labeled, stigmatized, and marginalized by the almighty and plastic powers that be. I understand my stance is easy and does not come close to fully addressing the Gordian knot of this issue. Nevertheless, the 1-star stands strong.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Lane

    As a psychologist, I use this manual often. So far, what I like: * No more multiaxial diagnosis! *cheers* I really don't think Axes III, IV, and V added much so I'm glad to see them gone. * The Major Depressive Disorder specifier of "Anxious Distress". It seems somewhat common to see depression and anxiety co-occur, and this is a better way to diagnose depressed folks with an anxious edge. * Adding the "Negative Thoughts/Mood" criterion to the diagnosis for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Finally an As a psychologist, I use this manual often. So far, what I like: * No more multiaxial diagnosis! *cheers* I really don't think Axes III, IV, and V added much so I'm glad to see them gone. * The Major Depressive Disorder specifier of "Anxious Distress". It seems somewhat common to see depression and anxiety co-occur, and this is a better way to diagnose depressed folks with an anxious edge. * Adding the "Negative Thoughts/Mood" criterion to the diagnosis for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Finally an acknowledgement of the ubiquitous "It's my fault" or "I'm bad" beliefs that occur after trauma. * Adding Binge Eating Disorder as a diagnosis, and making the Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa diagnoses less stringent/ more real world. It's nice not to diagnose 2/3 of eating disorder clients with the vague Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. I haven't found changes I dislike yet, though as I get to know the new manual better, those may be forthcoming.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    You can't exactly "read" this, but you certainly need to understand it if you're going to work in mental health. You can't exactly "read" this, but you certainly need to understand it if you're going to work in mental health.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    I am in awe; what legitimacy could the moon possibly have, when "ordering" a man to kill?? Can that happen? But now psychiatrists say it has/can. The DSM has been updated to incorporate the "lunar motivated homicidal impulse syndrome".* Some time ago a psychologist tried a "similar" coup, this time around focusing, as so many did/do, on "the Donald". Who knows, maybe the DSM will incorporate, as well, the Epstein "diagnosis": "Sympathetic audience control and a small time window"** *https://ww I am in awe; what legitimacy could the moon possibly have, when "ordering" a man to kill?? Can that happen? But now psychiatrists say it has/can. The DSM has been updated to incorporate the "lunar motivated homicidal impulse syndrome".* Some time ago a psychologist tried a "similar" coup, this time around focusing, as so many did/do, on "the Donald". Who knows, maybe the DSM will incorporate, as well, the Epstein "diagnosis": "Sympathetic audience control and a small time window"** *https://www.theonion.com/dsm-5-update... **https://eu.usatoday.com/story/opinion... Further on mental disorders: https://numerons.files.wordpress.com/...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ignatius Vonnegut

    Still a lot to wish for, but hell of a trip anyway.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    No, I didn't read every word. I read all the introductory material and all the reasons for the changes and all the changed stuff. As a nosology, it's cumbersome and sometimes awkward, but at the moment it's what we have. Read Nancy McWilliams and add that to your diagnostic understandings is my recommendation, folks. No, I didn't read every word. I read all the introductory material and all the reasons for the changes and all the changed stuff. As a nosology, it's cumbersome and sometimes awkward, but at the moment it's what we have. Read Nancy McWilliams and add that to your diagnostic understandings is my recommendation, folks.

  9. 5 out of 5

    T-Man

    A great reference book for clustering symptoms to make up a disorder... The main question I was left with... Is a mental disorder a disease that should be targeted at its roots, or is it a constellation of symptoms used in an attempt to categorise individuals? Well, if we alleviate the symptoms, then there is no longer a diagnosis. Is the person then "fixed"? This reference book is a must have for clinicians, but I suspect that in future there may be major shifts in how we think about mental hea A great reference book for clustering symptoms to make up a disorder... The main question I was left with... Is a mental disorder a disease that should be targeted at its roots, or is it a constellation of symptoms used in an attempt to categorise individuals? Well, if we alleviate the symptoms, then there is no longer a diagnosis. Is the person then "fixed"? This reference book is a must have for clinicians, but I suspect that in future there may be major shifts in how we think about mental health. This will come as neuroscience evolves and mental health is forced to move with the times. For now, however, this book is working tirelessly at streamlining treatments and research. With the addition, or attempted addition, of cultural syndromes, at least there are changes happening :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shay

    IT'S OVER D: SUMMER SEMESTER IS OVER...I SURVIVED IT'S OVER D: SUMMER SEMESTER IS OVER...I SURVIVED

  11. 5 out of 5

    Salam Orabi

    I studied this valuable book while I was getting my Master's in Forensic Psychology. It was probably the most enjoyable subject I had to study and this book was a great help! I studied this valuable book while I was getting my Master's in Forensic Psychology. It was probably the most enjoyable subject I had to study and this book was a great help!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Relatable, but dense. Pretty dull, too. No plot, characters were all very 2D, and there was a lot of telling, not showing. There was also no dialogue, which is something I look for in a good book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Campbell

    i read this trying to find a diagnosis for one of my teachers

  14. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    The book starts off with a bang. 1% of the population is "retarded"! Has there ever been a book that tries harder to come off as objective? I haven't read it if there is. Maybe I would believe it if i had 8 more years of school to convince me its true. But I got a bad gut feeling about this. Its implied in the title: "fifth edition", that our ideas about mental health have changed a bit in the last hundred years and will likely change in the future. But i do respect this book more than i did bef The book starts off with a bang. 1% of the population is "retarded"! Has there ever been a book that tries harder to come off as objective? I haven't read it if there is. Maybe I would believe it if i had 8 more years of school to convince me its true. But I got a bad gut feeling about this. Its implied in the title: "fifth edition", that our ideas about mental health have changed a bit in the last hundred years and will likely change in the future. But i do respect this book more than i did before i read it in its entirety. the word "disorder" is whats at stake. It sounds like something you cant control, or aren't responsible for. Someone who has schizophrenia and regularly hallucinates certainly does seem like a victim. But to say a jerk isn't willfully selfish, but someone suffering from antisocial personality disorder, well. . .maybe it is the case that 3% of the population is so arrogant that it causes problems and distress in their lives and we should call it narcissistic personality disorder, (as the DSM does). But I was happy to read that they do admit that what is an affront to the order of one society may not be a violation of the taboos or norms of another and thus the term disorder is relative. Now i admit I dont have a phd in this stuff but if im not mistaken i have: mild depression mild anxiety mild intellectual disability disorder mild social anxiety disorder mild autism spectrum disorder mild panic disorder mild neurocognitive disorder mild general personality disorder just a touch of anhedonia and a survivor of: childhood OCD and nightmare disorder but i have never had rumination disorder- wherein you chew your own cud (thank goodness!) here are some sweet "facts": boys are 50% more likely to be retarded 85% of stutterers start by age 6, and 75% recover heritability rates for autism range from 37-90% low birth rate gives a 2 to 3 fold risk for ADHD 5% of kids have ADHD 10% of kids have a learning disorder and they are 7xs as likely to have one if a close relative has one tourettes is 3xs more prevalent in males you are less likely to get schizophrenia if you were born in the fall and live rurally 3% of men are pedophiles 10% of women have never had an orgasm 7% of the population is depressed females are twice as likely as men to have depression or anxiety 8% of U.S. has a phobia, and 16% of teens do only 3% of people in 3rd world countries have phobias 7% of U.S. has social anxiety disorder but only 2.5% of Europe 11% of U.S. had a panic attack in the last year, 3 % of Europe compulsive hair pulling (trichotillomania) is 10:1 more likely in women 5% of people are hypochondriacs over 1% of young women are bulemic 1/3 of adults have insomnia girls are more likley to wet their pants during the day, boys are more likely to wet their pants at night male transvestites are more likely to have an older brother a girl being a tomboy is less likely an indicator of future sexual inclinations than is a boy being a girlyman 10% of e. europe are alchoholics (highest) 1% in africa (lowest) 1 in 5 emergency room admissions are alchohol related females outnumber male kleptomaniacs 3:1

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Very thorough and informative

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jason Dias

    There are serious epistemological problems with this work, maybe best elucidated by Allen Frances (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/allen-f...). It is a move from the DSM-IV's theoretical agnosticism to a more definite theoretical framework - one influenced by money and specifically big pharma money. We have new diagnoses without adequate scientific basis and the broadening of some categories to the point of absurdity, as well as a definitive move towards making problems of living into problems of There are serious epistemological problems with this work, maybe best elucidated by Allen Frances (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/allen-f...). It is a move from the DSM-IV's theoretical agnosticism to a more definite theoretical framework - one influenced by money and specifically big pharma money. We have new diagnoses without adequate scientific basis and the broadening of some categories to the point of absurdity, as well as a definitive move towards making problems of living into problems of brain chemistry. The solutions to these problems are increasingly those of medicine rather than of compassion. There are better ways - many better ways - to approach problems of living such as grief, sadness, attentional problems and non-consensus reality interactions than prescribing drugs. The drug companies often provide the only evidence for our epistemologies: that brain chemistry imbalances cause mental illnesses. These statements are extremely problematic not only for their lack of scientific validation but for their consequences - such as a grieving person being offered drugs of dubious efficacy and with high side effect profiles as a first intervention.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amber Koppenhofer

    Informative and necessary for my field of work, but this book is by no means entertaining. I have read the majority of the pages in this book, and have skimmed the ones I didn't read word for word. I'm sure many are inclined to compare this edition of the DSM to the DSM-IV, but seeing as I am just entering the field of counseling, it was not necessary for me to read the DSM-IV, so I cannot fairly make a comparison. I know that there are many differences, that disorders have been added and remove Informative and necessary for my field of work, but this book is by no means entertaining. I have read the majority of the pages in this book, and have skimmed the ones I didn't read word for word. I'm sure many are inclined to compare this edition of the DSM to the DSM-IV, but seeing as I am just entering the field of counseling, it was not necessary for me to read the DSM-IV, so I cannot fairly make a comparison. I know that there are many differences, that disorders have been added and removed, that they've also been grouped together into spectrum disorders. The axes system has also been removed, much to the dismay of many who have been practicing in this field for years. As one of my professors said, this stuff is all made up. It's a guideline for grouping people with similar "issues" under a "title." It's meant to inform treatment, but unfortunately the result is labeling people. For me, it is a tool to help people get the services they need to improve their general functioning and have a better life.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elari

    This book holds the questions to all the answers we think we have regarding sanity, normality, medical ethics, and human dignity. Let us put aside the irresolvable concerns with the nature of Pathos (is it passion or pathology; is it psychosis or creativity?). It is still fascinating to delve into the minute details that can cluster together within the self and mold a person’s life. Whether good or bad, traits, schemas, and habits cage the mind in such ways that I will never truly feel the terro This book holds the questions to all the answers we think we have regarding sanity, normality, medical ethics, and human dignity. Let us put aside the irresolvable concerns with the nature of Pathos (is it passion or pathology; is it psychosis or creativity?). It is still fascinating to delve into the minute details that can cluster together within the self and mold a person’s life. Whether good or bad, traits, schemas, and habits cage the mind in such ways that I will never truly feel the terror of persecutory delusions, nor will any-other ever feel the oppression of my very own depressive anergia. It is a shame that this book should be reserved to the "professionals". One should not read it with a detached, inhuman, or rigid mindset. Without defending its categorization and labeling, I recommend it to the mis- and philanthropist alike.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristie

    I thought this book was very well formatted. I love the sections that explain the diagnostic criteria, as well as the sections for differential diagnosis. I think that a lot of the new shifts have been very beneficial. I am concerned with a few of the typos in the book that make a big difference. I feel that the book should have been edited much more carefully due to its importance in diagnosing. Also, I was surprised by a coupe of diagnostic changes that didn't make sense to me. Overall, I love I thought this book was very well formatted. I love the sections that explain the diagnostic criteria, as well as the sections for differential diagnosis. I think that a lot of the new shifts have been very beneficial. I am concerned with a few of the typos in the book that make a big difference. I feel that the book should have been edited much more carefully due to its importance in diagnosing. Also, I was surprised by a coupe of diagnostic changes that didn't make sense to me. Overall, I love the way the book is set up and it gives a lot of great information.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stella

    I devoured the DSM in my Abnormal Psych course this semester. It's not perfect, but it is incredibly fascinating. I devoured the DSM in my Abnormal Psych course this semester. It's not perfect, but it is incredibly fascinating.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert Weckesser

    Great for Self Diagnosis. Even better for diagnosing friends and family members as borderline narcissists.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ricky

    surprisingly engaging read

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pascal

    Give me back my multiaxial framework... I respectfully disagree with the changes from the DSM IV. Important book tho. People are not objects.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Agapi Gregoriou Loreléy

    About the narcissistic personality disorder watch THIS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfvhd... ....especially if you're a survivor of narcissistic abuse!!! About the narcissistic personality disorder watch THIS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfvhd... ....especially if you're a survivor of narcissistic abuse!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Blue Book Corner

    Do not read if you're not a psych nerd. Do not read if you're not a psych nerd.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott Holstad

    I honestly have to say I have mixed feelings about this version of the DSM. I think too many changes were made between version 5 and version 4 and I guess I feel more confident in the accuracy of 4 than 5. But for me, that's probably subjective. An example though: In DSM-4, there's a major difference in how personality disorders are defined, described and given their official status with DSM-5, and I really feel Version 4 is simply better. Some professionals in the field I've spoken with agree w I honestly have to say I have mixed feelings about this version of the DSM. I think too many changes were made between version 5 and version 4 and I guess I feel more confident in the accuracy of 4 than 5. But for me, that's probably subjective. An example though: In DSM-4, there's a major difference in how personality disorders are defined, described and given their official status with DSM-5, and I really feel Version 4 is simply better. Some professionals in the field I've spoken with agree with me, so I know I'm not alone in thinking this. However, it's a moot point as one has to go with the current version for the current diagnostic criteria, if for no other reason than insurance, which I think is rather sad. In any event, it's a solid reference book for the layperson who has friends or loved ones who battle mental illness and related disorders, or even for functioning consumers themselves, so recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Santiago Soria

    The list of mental issues this book portraits is very extensive and should be helpful for those with professions in the medical/counseling field. The only problem I find, after reading it, is that it seems to be more attached to culture and morals from western societies in some diagnoses ( such as paraphilias or sexual disorders) and not into truly anatomical problems on the brain which could affects patients’ mental health. Overall this guide should be applied carefully depending of the context The list of mental issues this book portraits is very extensive and should be helpful for those with professions in the medical/counseling field. The only problem I find, after reading it, is that it seems to be more attached to culture and morals from western societies in some diagnoses ( such as paraphilias or sexual disorders) and not into truly anatomical problems on the brain which could affects patients’ mental health. Overall this guide should be applied carefully depending of the context and place where you are at.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Doc Sullivan Kaiser-Sterling

    Not going to argue with the fact that this book is an important tool for anyone involved in mental health treatment or research but some of the technicalities, dx criteria, and “below the surface” type of information can be misleading when applied in the wrong ways. This field is a lot better than what it used to be some years ago. Would recommend a copy for anyone actively involved in mental health as a field of work or study, but unfortunately I can’t say that I would suggest it for the general Not going to argue with the fact that this book is an important tool for anyone involved in mental health treatment or research but some of the technicalities, dx criteria, and “below the surface” type of information can be misleading when applied in the wrong ways. This field is a lot better than what it used to be some years ago. Would recommend a copy for anyone actively involved in mental health as a field of work or study, but unfortunately I can’t say that I would suggest it for the general public because there are too many who use it for self-diagnosis and such.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Particularly enjoyable for all who love the Psychology field of expertise. Highly descriptive of the mentioned (mental) disorders in the book, the documentation is easy to follow and understand. It opens a brand new bridge for those studying in Psychological fields, and gives us a better understanding of those that are inflict by these ailments. Best book in my opinion, worth a read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marlon Blackmont

    I'm studying Psychology so this is my bible. I've just finished my final (it was about Hannibal Lecter and booooy that was extense) from Psychopatology 1 and this was my manual since the first day. It's 4:00 a.m. and I just wanna say I love the DSM-5. It's way more my taste and open than the DSM-4 and let's me find everything way faster and learn everything way easier. I'm studying Psychology so this is my bible. I've just finished my final (it was about Hannibal Lecter and booooy that was extense) from Psychopatology 1 and this was my manual since the first day. It's 4:00 a.m. and I just wanna say I love the DSM-5. It's way more my taste and open than the DSM-4 and let's me find everything way faster and learn everything way easier.

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