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IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley, IDEO partner and the author of the bestselling The Art of Innovation, have written a powerful and compelling book on unleashing the creativity that lies within each and every one of us. Too often, companies and individuals assume that creativity and innovation are the domain of the "creative IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley, IDEO partner and the author of the bestselling The Art of Innovation, have written a powerful and compelling book on unleashing the creativity that lies within each and every one of us. Too often, companies and individuals assume that creativity and innovation are the domain of the "creative types."  But two of the leading experts in innovation, design, and creativity on the planet show us that each and every  one of us is creative.  In an incredibly entertaining and inspiring narrative that draws on countless stories from their work at IDEO, the Stanford d.school, and with many of the world's top companies, David and Tom Kelley identify the principles and strategies that will allow us to tap into our creative potential in our work lives, and in our personal lives, and allow us to innovate in terms of how we approach and solve problems.  It is a book that will help each of us be more productive and successful in our lives and in our careers.


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IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley, IDEO partner and the author of the bestselling The Art of Innovation, have written a powerful and compelling book on unleashing the creativity that lies within each and every one of us. Too often, companies and individuals assume that creativity and innovation are the domain of the "creative IDEO founder and Stanford d.school creator David Kelley and his brother Tom Kelley, IDEO partner and the author of the bestselling The Art of Innovation, have written a powerful and compelling book on unleashing the creativity that lies within each and every one of us. Too often, companies and individuals assume that creativity and innovation are the domain of the "creative types."  But two of the leading experts in innovation, design, and creativity on the planet show us that each and every  one of us is creative.  In an incredibly entertaining and inspiring narrative that draws on countless stories from their work at IDEO, the Stanford d.school, and with many of the world's top companies, David and Tom Kelley identify the principles and strategies that will allow us to tap into our creative potential in our work lives, and in our personal lives, and allow us to innovate in terms of how we approach and solve problems.  It is a book that will help each of us be more productive and successful in our lives and in our careers.

30 review for Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hanne

    It’s true. All kids are creative, but we are very specific about which adults we label as ‘creative’. It got me thinking and I realized there’s hardly any escaping: As a child, you’re told to “go, and have fun”, you’re encouraged to explore, to fail, to get better, to try again, and again and again. The bumps and bruises aren’t a bad thing, they’re your badge of honour: you’ve tried, you’ve persevered. And then you hit a certain more adult age and you’re told “to be careful, to study/work hard a It’s true. All kids are creative, but we are very specific about which adults we label as ‘creative’. It got me thinking and I realized there’s hardly any escaping: As a child, you’re told to “go, and have fun”, you’re encouraged to explore, to fail, to get better, to try again, and again and again. The bumps and bruises aren’t a bad thing, they’re your badge of honour: you’ve tried, you’ve persevered. And then you hit a certain more adult age and you’re told “to be careful, to study/work hard and to do your best”. Notice the difference? In a way, this book is about that difference. If you want to be creative, you have to play and experiment. It should not feel like 'Work', like something you have to succeed at. Instead, give yourself the permission to fail. “A widely held myth suggests that creative geniuses rarely fail. Yet, the opposite is actually true. Creative geniuses are quite prolific when it comes to failure – they just don’t let that stop them. Research has found that creative people simply do more experiments.” Creativity isn’t only for those who aspire to be featured in a Taschen book. Creativity isn’t necessarily about bringing something new to this world completely on your own. There are many forms, but there's one thing that will always be true: it takes action to get things done. I like how that comes back throughout the book. The chapter names are not buzz words, no fancy vocabulary, but they are action focused: flip, dare, spark, leap, seek, team, move, next. There you go, all eight chapters. This book is well written and easy to read. The authors have enormous passion for the subject, and you can tell. It’s in fact hard not to get infected, and it sparked quite a few new ideas which I had to scribble down on whatever paper was near. I did have to read this book twice though. After finishing the first time, I thought this book was all about case studies of people who managed to do it, but I could still argue that this didn’t mean that I would be able to. Yes, I know you can learn via case studies, and that they are often the best example, but the problem is that you learn about other people and how they achieved it, which doesn’t necessarily help you to get started yourself. Upon re-reading though I realized that I was wrong: it is full of nuggets of advice. It’s just that in my first reading experience the case studies overpowered the general advice. One other criticism is that, on occasion, this book does sound like a long promotion booklet for IDEO and d.school. I’ve done the math: 208 pages, and the company name IDEO is used 167 times and they refer 96 times to the d.school. That means that on average, every page you’ll meet one or the other, and sometimes both. I wish they more often utilized the neutral ‘we’, ‘our students’ or ‘our clients’, instead of banging the company names home. I guess the authors are better marketeers than they think. Those names are branded into my brain after reading this book. I’m a bit annoyed by this now, but in a few weeks I’ll just remember the name, even if I don’t remember from where. Don't let that hold you back though, if you enjoy reading design and innovation books, it's well worth your time! Disclaimer: This book has been provided from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All quotes are taken from the pre-published copy and may be altered or omitted from the final copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    A bit of a disappointment, as much because of my expectations as the book itself. I was hoping "unleashing the creative potential within all of us" would have a lot more application to education than business but it was rather relentlessly corporate in its viewpoint. So in that respect it has a lot of case studies where this CEO and that company employee prove that thinking outside of the rhombus pays off. Much of the material is familiar. Be open-minded. Be willing to take chances. Carry paper f A bit of a disappointment, as much because of my expectations as the book itself. I was hoping "unleashing the creative potential within all of us" would have a lot more application to education than business but it was rather relentlessly corporate in its viewpoint. So in that respect it has a lot of case studies where this CEO and that company employee prove that thinking outside of the rhombus pays off. Much of the material is familiar. Be open-minded. Be willing to take chances. Carry paper for ideas. Do not fear failure, embrace it (I find it too fat to get my arms around). Doodle. Use whiteboards. Use blackboards. Use Sticky-Notes especially. Work alone. Work together. Play. Do not dismiss out of hand any idea. It wasn't until I got to a lonely back-of-the-book chapter, "Move: Creative Confidence To Go," that my buck was walking the $29 walk. Here the Kelley Bros. offer concrete activities (sort of what I hoped the whole book would offer), five of which might come in handy in the classroom. Thus, some gold bits are plucked from the mud. But, safe to say, it'll be a long time before I read another "how to" book on creativity. And if I do, I'll just make it up myself, checking off all the steps. Or not.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A self help book that's really just a long recruitment brochure for the Stanford d.school. A self help book that's really just a long recruitment brochure for the Stanford d.school.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I liked this book! How could I not, it's exactly my kind of thing - design, education, problem-solving, creativity. That sums up some of my favorite topics pretty neatly. I am between rating the book a 3 and a 4, because it was indeed inspiring and thought-provoking...but I just have a particular idea of how perfect the book SHOULD be, and it isn't quite. To give props where they are due - there are lots of great stories in this book. IDEO success stories, D-School success stories, IDEO-influence I liked this book! How could I not, it's exactly my kind of thing - design, education, problem-solving, creativity. That sums up some of my favorite topics pretty neatly. I am between rating the book a 3 and a 4, because it was indeed inspiring and thought-provoking...but I just have a particular idea of how perfect the book SHOULD be, and it isn't quite. To give props where they are due - there are lots of great stories in this book. IDEO success stories, D-School success stories, IDEO-influenced success stories, D-School inspired success stories, and...repeat. I mean, it's cool! The stories are cool. They are just very - "Let's talk about how awesome we are!" Indeed, they are awesome. There are few things I wouldn't do to be part of IDEO, or to take classes at the D-School. Buuut, no matter how fantastic they are, I get pretty tired of people talking about themselves. The Kelleys revealed at the end of the book that the way they outlined the book was using a hub-and-spoke mindweb - and when they said it, I just thought "Ohhhh." Cause really, that's how the book felt. "Here is a core idea: build a strong team! Now here are 5 stories or examples that vaguely demonstrate the importance of teams, and are otherwise largely unrelated to each other, and don't make a larger, persuasive point!" Maybe this was just my reading of the book...but because of the way the book was laid out, I didn't feel like I was being brought along on a journey that helped create some home-hitting transformation in my thinking. Which was what I wanted, I guess. I had also hoped there would be more wisdom imparted. More practical advice on what to do, steps to take, things to try. A lot of the "lessons" that were concluded from the various narratives felt rather weak and contrived. Yeah, when you want to implant Creative Confidence in the culture of a company, you should get the approval of upper management? That is sound advice indeed. Tell me more. There was a nice chapter at the end with a few simple creativity-inducing exercises to try, but I think I was looking more for a handbook of creativity, rather than a series of stories explaining the importance of creativity. Does that distinction make sense? Anyways. It's true - while reading, I would read a few pages, then become inspired to jot down "creative" new ideas, then keep reading and jotting, reading and jotting. It provided fodder for my mind-mill that otherwise would have been fodder-less. It was definitely an interesting book! It's just, I can't say it was particularly well-written or that it taught me anything that another book on creativity couldn't. Sorry, this is a pretty all-over-the-place review, but I wanted to record my thoughts before my mind got lost to other distractions. Overall, read it if you are interested in IDEO and the D-school, and are looking for general inspiration. I'd maybe look elsewhere if you're looking for actionable advice on how to be more creative.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devika

    A book is good when it is well written and offers insight. But a book is amazing when it can actually make a difference to your life, to who you are as an individual. I would put this book in the latter category. I picked it up to get some background on a design thinking role I was hoping to apply for. Amidst these job applications, it's easy for anyone to feel jaded. I was in fact quite morose and skeptical of the value my higher education has created in my life. But the more I read this book, A book is good when it is well written and offers insight. But a book is amazing when it can actually make a difference to your life, to who you are as an individual. I would put this book in the latter category. I picked it up to get some background on a design thinking role I was hoping to apply for. Amidst these job applications, it's easy for anyone to feel jaded. I was in fact quite morose and skeptical of the value my higher education has created in my life. But the more I read this book, the more excited I felt about finding opportunities around me. The Kelley brothers write very simplistically and this is a quick read. They discuss many examples of the difference that design thinking has made to people's lives. One thing that stuck with me was the "curse of competence" that they mention. It is the idea that when you are academically smart, the excessive pragmatism of external influences pushes you in the generic directions most people take in life. For instance, if you're good at sciences then you should go into engineering or medicine. But ever so often your heart will not be in it. Essentially, failure is not only good but a necessary stepping stone to success. This book has helped me in deriving a sense of comfort from failure so that I'll be less afraid to try new things. Historically, all innovators experienced multiple failures till they found their breakthrough. What continues to differentiate them from others is their ability to persevere during the failures- the simple fact that they did not stop trying. This book is also recommended by TED. And now, even I highly recommend it to anyone looking for some inspiration. Happy reading!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul Grech

    Whilst there is a lot of material in here, this is essentially an advertising brochure for the two authors' company IDEO and d.school. A large number of examples come from former students or co-workers and whilst interesting this does not really seem as authoritative. The main benefit of this book lies in the number of practical exercises to help people in the various stages of the creative process but, again, very little was original and most thoughts can be found in most blogs on this subject. Whilst there is a lot of material in here, this is essentially an advertising brochure for the two authors' company IDEO and d.school. A large number of examples come from former students or co-workers and whilst interesting this does not really seem as authoritative. The main benefit of this book lies in the number of practical exercises to help people in the various stages of the creative process but, again, very little was original and most thoughts can be found in most blogs on this subject. Something to read before going on to other books that have more meat on them.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dakshata

    The book starts off on a great note emphasising how everyone can channelise their creativity in a productive manner. It also gives some guidelines and examples of how design thinking created some great solutions that are interesting to read. The only one downer was that most of these examples were from the Stanford d.school programme, which started the making the book seem too focused on the achievements of one institution than the process as a whole.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    I read this book after taking a few online courses on creativity and design by IDEO. That’s how I found out about Tom & David Kelley and their ingenious d.school at Stanford. Since then I’m a follower. Just the book I’ve needed lately, full of tools to pursue new ideas with confidence and to tackle design problems with simple changes with the premise that anyone can be a creative. The caveat is genetic differentiation. Beneath the umbrella of humanity, there is a subset of us who are wired to ch I read this book after taking a few online courses on creativity and design by IDEO. That’s how I found out about Tom & David Kelley and their ingenious d.school at Stanford. Since then I’m a follower. Just the book I’ve needed lately, full of tools to pursue new ideas with confidence and to tackle design problems with simple changes with the premise that anyone can be a creative. The caveat is genetic differentiation. Beneath the umbrella of humanity, there is a subset of us who are wired to choose to pursue our creativity as a means to an end. So I’d say just dive right in without a second thought and embrace this carefully articulated book to unleash your creativity!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    I loved this book. Although, in full disclosure, perhaps it was the context in which I read it. First, I am embarking on a year of self-discovery/action (i.e. rather than always thinking "I wish I could ..." or "I would like to ...," I'm acting on those things). Second, I'm currently engrossed in a year-long leadership development program for work in which innovation is at the core. Nonetheless, this is a fantastic primer on the concept of design thinking and nurturing your creative self. Everyo I loved this book. Although, in full disclosure, perhaps it was the context in which I read it. First, I am embarking on a year of self-discovery/action (i.e. rather than always thinking "I wish I could ..." or "I would like to ...," I'm acting on those things). Second, I'm currently engrossed in a year-long leadership development program for work in which innovation is at the core. Nonetheless, this is a fantastic primer on the concept of design thinking and nurturing your creative self. Everyone is creative ... or, perhaps I should say, everyone is still creative since, as the authors note, most children are considered inherently creative. It is only as we go through life and gain a few battle scars (read: judgment/criticism/etc.) that suddenly the concept of creativity becomes something that we begin to believe is inherent / genetic rather than something we all possess and can harness. This book outlines the concepts of design thinking and provides exercises to practice your creative thinking - all of which can be easily applied to life in general not just the work world. It is a quick easy read; however, I will warn you that it is definitely not devoid of the current corporate lexicon - the 3 i's - i.e. (intentional use of i.e. here) ideate, innovate, and iterate.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Solid book about the notion that creativity isn't innate but can be trained/coached, with the courage to try new ideas and fail. The worst thing for the creative process is inaction, getting stuck in the planning stage. It provides tons of case studies, ideas, and examples for individuals, organizations, and leaders to improve creativity in yourself and your teams. At the end, it even lists a handful of exercises you can do on your own or with your team to get the creative juices flowing. The one Solid book about the notion that creativity isn't innate but can be trained/coached, with the courage to try new ideas and fail. The worst thing for the creative process is inaction, getting stuck in the planning stage. It provides tons of case studies, ideas, and examples for individuals, organizations, and leaders to improve creativity in yourself and your teams. At the end, it even lists a handful of exercises you can do on your own or with your team to get the creative juices flowing. The one thing I didn't like about this book is that it felt like essentially an advertisement for IDEO and d.school the entire time. Enough, I do not need to hear the names referenced constantly. "We" would suffice to get your ideas across and not distract. Minor nitpick, but it also felt really strong at the start with excellent real-world examples, and it became more boring toward the end as they lost solid real world examples and just started spouting advice. Still good, just not as interesting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adib Hakim

    This book was highly inter-active. I found myself reflecting a lot about how I see problems and the opportunities it presents and immediately saw how powerful a different attitude to such processes could be. In addition, Creative Confidence brings tools that illustrates it's central premise of innovation very well, ultimately helping us on in applying the insights in our unique situations. My wife has seen me reading this book really slowly, and out of curiosity she's asked to read it. I look forw This book was highly inter-active. I found myself reflecting a lot about how I see problems and the opportunities it presents and immediately saw how powerful a different attitude to such processes could be. In addition, Creative Confidence brings tools that illustrates it's central premise of innovation very well, ultimately helping us on in applying the insights in our unique situations. My wife has seen me reading this book really slowly, and out of curiosity she's asked to read it. I look forward to discussing the approaches in this book and eventually applying the concepts in our family building. Thank you Tom, David!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Howard

    The Kelley brothers inspired and convinced me of our universal creativity. There aren't "creative" types and everybody else. Creativity requires two things: an ability to solve a problem in a new or unconventional way, and an ability to empathize. This is Design Thinking. All problem solving should be human-centered and driven by empathy for the end user, whatever the product or service may be. Regardless of our educational background, professional choices, or college major, we should and can de The Kelley brothers inspired and convinced me of our universal creativity. There aren't "creative" types and everybody else. Creativity requires two things: an ability to solve a problem in a new or unconventional way, and an ability to empathize. This is Design Thinking. All problem solving should be human-centered and driven by empathy for the end user, whatever the product or service may be. Regardless of our educational background, professional choices, or college major, we should and can develop Creative Confidence. The Kelleys highlight stories from IDEO and the D.School--both are founded by them--demonstrating the eclectic teams they draft to tackle any variety of problems. In one example they enlisted a team to redesign a shopping car---using Design Thinking. This team included an anthropologist, an engineer, a computer scientist, and a graphic designer. Each person brings a special, but creative skill-set to a problem. When they adopt Design Thinking, magic happens: human creativity is unleashed and human lives are improved. Creative Confidence crystallized my professional direction--before it I was mired in uncertainty about whether I had what it takes to assume more creative roles professionally. I have carried it around for the past few weeks, a new manifesto or professional bible. I also came away with dozens of action items. I have already put several in place. I recommend this book to anybody, in any firm, doing anything that touches the human world--it is especially relevant for people in the "start-up" landscape. This book is filled with engaging success stories across all industries with people using Design Thinking. At times the book felt like a promotional for IDEO and the D.School--which it is--or a series of "shout-outs" to the Kelley brothers' friends and successful entrepreneurs--and their books. Each of us has creativity within: "creativity comes into play wherever you have the opportunity to generate new ideas, solutions, or approaches. And we believe everyone should have access to that resource." On Design Thinking they say "being human-centered is at the core of our innovation process. Deep empathy for people makes our observations powerful sources of inspiration. We aim to understand why people do what they currently do, with the goal of understanding what they might do in the future...An empathetic approach fuels our process by ensuring we never forget we're designing for real people...Design thinking relies on the natural--and coachable--human ability to be intuitive, to recognize patterns, and to construct ideas that are emotionally meaningful as well as functional. We'ere not suggesting that anyone base a career or run an organization solely on feeling, intuition, and inspiration. But an over-reliance on the rational and the analytical can be just as risky." Creative confidence becomes a way of life "by adopting the eyes of a traveler and a beginner's mindset, you will notice a lot of details that you normally might have overlooked. You put aside assumptions and are fully immersed in the world around you." By the time you finish this book, you will want to have your entire house and office space covered in white boards, and a notebook in every pocket. Creative Confidence means being prepared to capture all the amazing ideas that pass through your limitless mind. Once you start doing this, be prepared to swim in a pool of creative flourishing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Sun

    Nice birthday read. I've always liked IDEO's processes and philosophies when engaging below surface level with them, but "design thinking" just *sounds* like bullshit. Design is the creative process of commercial entities, mainly. Thinking here is a mental posture. Design + Thinking just didn't seem to be more than the sum of its parts, the parts being two lackluster words. Tom and David Kelley would be the first to tell you that names matter, and so by their own standards the whole enterprise se Nice birthday read. I've always liked IDEO's processes and philosophies when engaging below surface level with them, but "design thinking" just *sounds* like bullshit. Design is the creative process of commercial entities, mainly. Thinking here is a mental posture. Design + Thinking just didn't seem to be more than the sum of its parts, the parts being two lackluster words. Tom and David Kelley would be the first to tell you that names matter, and so by their own standards the whole enterprise seems suspect. The phrase "Creative Confidence" doesn't do much for me either, but this is a book written in the wake of David Kelley's survival of a serious bout of cancer, and that backdrop, although only fleetingly discussed in this book, gives the discussion of unleashing everyone's inherent creativity including yours! some much needed gravitas. It's short, and they did a good job of picking stories from their long oeuvre to illustrate the principles they wanted to lay out. Take action, try, fail, learn, grow, believe - these are all things that we know, but if you need reminding of them, as I did when I picked up this book (Trump *cough* Trump), this is a good way to do that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    David and Tom Kelley, as part of the design firm Ideo, believe in the importance of bringing creativity to business. Their enthusiastic passion for the process of creativity and design shows through in Creative Confidence, a book in which they explore what it takes to bring out and nurture creativity in business. This book offers an exploration of the activities and concepts that have helped guide them in their own business, as well as activities that can help guide you in your own company. The David and Tom Kelley, as part of the design firm Ideo, believe in the importance of bringing creativity to business. Their enthusiastic passion for the process of creativity and design shows through in Creative Confidence, a book in which they explore what it takes to bring out and nurture creativity in business. This book offers an exploration of the activities and concepts that have helped guide them in their own business, as well as activities that can help guide you in your own company. The ideas of role playing and rapid prototyping are ones that should be considered by ALL companies before investing tons of money in new systems, processes and products. Highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Morgane

    I'm lucky enough to have parents who let me be me - even if that meant drawing all over my books as a kid - and I never doubted I was creative. I even did a stint in art school. But I've met so many people who "can't draw" or who are "totally left-brain" or whatever. And that's never true. We all create! We can all draw and think outside the box and push the boundaries. And being creative doesn't mean being a graphic designer. It means not stopping at the first possible solution, and not being a I'm lucky enough to have parents who let me be me - even if that meant drawing all over my books as a kid - and I never doubted I was creative. I even did a stint in art school. But I've met so many people who "can't draw" or who are "totally left-brain" or whatever. And that's never true. We all create! We can all draw and think outside the box and push the boundaries. And being creative doesn't mean being a graphic designer. It means not stopping at the first possible solution, and not being afraid to fail. It's about always exploring. Unless you are okay living in mediocrity and never realizing your creative potential (or that of your employees), you need to read this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Khushboo

    Totally bordering on self-help. Got really annoying after the fifth chapter. At one point, felt like throwing it away but kindle!! Became preachy and started feeling like a long advertisement for IDEO and d.school. The practical activities suggested came as a relief in the seventh chapter. So I mostly skimmed through chapter 8 and 6(to be fair it's more relevant if you are in a leadership position in an organisation) , but then for people who claim to focus on human-empathy, I don't see how they Totally bordering on self-help. Got really annoying after the fifth chapter. At one point, felt like throwing it away but kindle!! Became preachy and started feeling like a long advertisement for IDEO and d.school. The practical activities suggested came as a relief in the seventh chapter. So I mostly skimmed through chapter 8 and 6(to be fair it's more relevant if you are in a leadership position in an organisation) , but then for people who claim to focus on human-empathy, I don't see how they failed to see the average end-user desirability for this chapter. Need to revisit chapter 7 later when I have some scope to actually practice few of those activities.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Let's put it this way: this book has far more highlighted passages in my Kindle than any other book I've read! I found it to be a good combo of inspiring and practical. The authors did a great job of making creative thinking accessible for everyone. They include plenty of research and real-world examples that help give their ideas context. I love the focus on taking action -- rather than pondering what might be, they advocate jumping in and starting. And it's through the process of iterating tha Let's put it this way: this book has far more highlighted passages in my Kindle than any other book I've read! I found it to be a good combo of inspiring and practical. The authors did a great job of making creative thinking accessible for everyone. They include plenty of research and real-world examples that help give their ideas context. I love the focus on taking action -- rather than pondering what might be, they advocate jumping in and starting. And it's through the process of iterating that work becomes great.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Corina

    I think it's pretty good. Check it out ;) I think it's pretty good. Check it out ;)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    Good practical examples of what it means to build confidence to be more creative with purpose.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Holmes

    Really enjoyed this book. Though it isn’t a leadership book, i think this book is a great resource for leaders who either have a creative edge to their personality, or leaders who want to integrate more innovation in their work, or their teams. You have to get over the massive amount of IDEO and d.school name drops in the book (it could definitely feel like a 250 page promotional book), but if you’re able to not get distracted by that, the innovation concepts they talk through could be greatly i Really enjoyed this book. Though it isn’t a leadership book, i think this book is a great resource for leaders who either have a creative edge to their personality, or leaders who want to integrate more innovation in their work, or their teams. You have to get over the massive amount of IDEO and d.school name drops in the book (it could definitely feel like a 250 page promotional book), but if you’re able to not get distracted by that, the innovation concepts they talk through could be greatly inspiring and for you and your leadership. Chapter 7 is particularly and practically helpful, as they list a number of potential activities to do by yourself and with others to spark creativity and innovation. This is definitely a book to go back to and adopt some concepts.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Neelam Babul

    Whilst there is a lot of useful information on creativity and how to nurture it in one's life, I felt that essentially it was an advertising brochure for the two authors' company IDEO and d.school. A large number of examples come from former students or co-workers and whilst interesting this does not really seem as authoritative. The main benefit of this book lies in the number of practical exercises to help people in the various stages of the creative process but, again, very little was origina Whilst there is a lot of useful information on creativity and how to nurture it in one's life, I felt that essentially it was an advertising brochure for the two authors' company IDEO and d.school. A large number of examples come from former students or co-workers and whilst interesting this does not really seem as authoritative. The main benefit of this book lies in the number of practical exercises to help people in the various stages of the creative process but, again, very little was original and most thoughts can be found in most blogs on this subject. Something to read before going on to other books that have more to offer on creativity.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I liked the positive, upbeat vibe of this one. When I first started this one, I wasn't sure if I'd like it. But once the intros and explanations were over, it became more interesting. Some readers have shelved this as a self-help book, but it didn't seem to fill that niche for me. It was entertaining and I liked this use of examples. So 4 stars. I liked the positive, upbeat vibe of this one. When I first started this one, I wasn't sure if I'd like it. But once the intros and explanations were over, it became more interesting. Some readers have shelved this as a self-help book, but it didn't seem to fill that niche for me. It was entertaining and I liked this use of examples. So 4 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I almost didn't start this one but I'm glad I did. What it lacks in originality it makes up for in energy. You can definitely feel the Kelley brothers' enthusiasm for their subject. There are a few practical tips, lots of stories, and a clear passion for giving adults more creativity. But...not really anything new if you keep up with popular trends in marketing/business/inspiring your employees. I almost didn't start this one but I'm glad I did. What it lacks in originality it makes up for in energy. You can definitely feel the Kelley brothers' enthusiasm for their subject. There are a few practical tips, lots of stories, and a clear passion for giving adults more creativity. But...not really anything new if you keep up with popular trends in marketing/business/inspiring your employees.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ari

    This book made me miss Olin and in person collaboration so much.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Badghaish

    Good one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Grant Baker

    Decently written and chock full of examples, Creative Confidence is the quick read you need to get you out of the rut. The book contains exercises to try, case studies to share, and an excitement that’s contagious. Recommended for anyone looking for a way to break out of the same old way of doing things.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fernando De los Rios

    Inspiring Open your mind to new and disrupting ideas and different ways to see the world and how you design solutions for everyday simple or complex problems, leading teams to innovate confidently

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vivek Arun

    Reduced it by a star since I was already well versed with the whole idea of design thinking workshops (having conducted some myself). The whole book, in a way, is basically promoting IDEO’s famous design thinking approach to solving problems - user centric, empathy mapping, personas etc. The book does a good job at introducing this to someone new to this field though. Would recommend it to newbies.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sidharth Mishra

    A must read book for everyone. Splendidly written, highly insightful and hard to put down. The authors - the men behind Ideo share their pearls of wisdom about creativity. The book helps one realize that everyone has a latent creative potential waiting to be unleashed. And creativity is not limited to writing, painting, creating crafts and other such artistic stuffs. Creativity is at play almost all around us. From looking at a problem differently, to discovering experiences that can be improved A must read book for everyone. Splendidly written, highly insightful and hard to put down. The authors - the men behind Ideo share their pearls of wisdom about creativity. The book helps one realize that everyone has a latent creative potential waiting to be unleashed. And creativity is not limited to writing, painting, creating crafts and other such artistic stuffs. Creativity is at play almost all around us. From looking at a problem differently, to discovering experiences that can be improved, to coming up with varied solutions for varied solutions - creativity is all around us. Apart from making the reader realize the role of creativity in our lives, the authors give very easy to implement ideas of how one can develop their creativity muscle (yes, after reading the book you will agree with me that it is a muscle which can be developed rather than a skill one is born with) both individually and in teams. The book is interspersed with real life stories of people who used their creative confidence, followed the principles listed in the book - of acting, of incorporating feedback, of being divergent in their thinking, of reframing the questions, of thinking from first principles, trusting one's instincts etc to create wonderful experiences, designs and products! Upon reading those examples one can clearly understand that how through applying these principles people have gone to achieve great things in life, more importantly feel great about themselves - which in itself is a pursuit worthy goal in life!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Neville

    David Kelley, who co-wrote 'Creative Confidence' with his brother Tom, had worked with, and was a close friend of the late Steve Jobs. In the book, we learn that, "Steve had a deep sense of creative confidence. He believed -- he knew -- that you can achieve audacious goals if you have the courage and perseverance to pursue them." The intention of the book is to dispel the notion that only some of us were born with creativity in our genes, when in fact, we all have the ability to be creative, desp David Kelley, who co-wrote 'Creative Confidence' with his brother Tom, had worked with, and was a close friend of the late Steve Jobs. In the book, we learn that, "Steve had a deep sense of creative confidence. He believed -- he knew -- that you can achieve audacious goals if you have the courage and perseverance to pursue them." The intention of the book is to dispel the notion that only some of us were born with creativity in our genes, when in fact, we all have the ability to be creative, despite what we might have been told and taught over the years. We can all achieve "audacious goals," just like Steve did, or at least to believe in our own ability to change our world in some way. It's explained that we came into the world with creativity and fearlessness, but as time passes we encounter others who shake our confidence by saying we're not creative, including schools where we learn to think too constructively -- that there can only be one right answer. So, we unlearn creativity and lose our confidence, fearful of what others might think. Sir Ken Robinson's TED Talk, "Do Schools Kill Creativity" is mentioned as a must-see and as an example of how traditional education has, well, killed creativity. The book inspires us with examples of people who were overly analytical: accountants, scientists and lawyers who didn't have a bias toward action. Even companies that suffered from inertia; bogged down with data and decisions by committee. But by unleashing their creativity, they have learned to conjure up and consider a myriad of solutions to problems, no matter how absurd, and to learn by doing. There's also an emphasis on empathy and human-centered design. How important it is to observe customers and end-users when designing solutions and products instead of burying heads into spreadsheets and dreaming up things we think will work. The authors share the experiences of many students who've attended their d.school at Stanford University. It's a fast-paced, team-based learning environment where students, young and old, and from diverse backgrounds, are asked to find human-centered solutions. A popular project is figuring out how the experience of a daily train commute from San Francisco to Palo Alto can be improved for passengers, from waiting on the platform to disembarking at their destination. The book not only focuses on inspiring individuals to build their creative confidence, but also delves into the importance of working in teams and provides case studies where entire companies have embraced creative confidence to improve the experience of workers and customers. Written in a friendly conversational tone and filled with real human stories and experiences, 'Creative Confidence' was a pleasure to read, and having finished it, I've realized I've highlighted so many passages to read again.

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