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Root-to-Stalk Cooking: The Art of Using the Whole Vegetable

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A cookbook featuring more than 65 recipes that make use of the parts of vegetables that typically get thrown away, including stalks, tops, ribs, fronds, and stems, with creative tips for making the most of seasonal ingredients to stretch the kitchen dollar. Make the Most of Your Produce! Don’t discard those carrot tops, broccoli stalks, potato peels, and pea pods. The secret A cookbook featuring more than 65 recipes that make use of the parts of vegetables that typically get thrown away, including stalks, tops, ribs, fronds, and stems, with creative tips for making the most of seasonal ingredients to stretch the kitchen dollar. Make the Most of Your Produce! Don’t discard those carrot tops, broccoli stalks, potato peels, and pea pods. The secret that creative restaurant chefs and thrifty great-grandmothers share is that these, and other common kitchen scraps, are both edible and wonderfully flavorful. Root-to-Stalk Cooking provides savvy cooks with the inspiration, tips, and techniques to transform trimmings into delicious meals. Corn husks and cobs make for rich Corn-Pancetta Puddings in Corn Husk Baskets, watermelon rinds shine in a crisp and refreshing Thai Watermelon Salad, and velvety green leek tops star in Leek Greens Stir Fry with Salty Pork. Featuring sixty-five recipes that celebrate the whole vegetable, Root-to-Stalk Cooking helps you get the most out of your seasonal ingredients. By using husks, roots, skins, cores, stems, seeds, and rinds to their full potential, you’ll discover a whole new world of flavors while reducing waste and saving money.


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A cookbook featuring more than 65 recipes that make use of the parts of vegetables that typically get thrown away, including stalks, tops, ribs, fronds, and stems, with creative tips for making the most of seasonal ingredients to stretch the kitchen dollar. Make the Most of Your Produce! Don’t discard those carrot tops, broccoli stalks, potato peels, and pea pods. The secret A cookbook featuring more than 65 recipes that make use of the parts of vegetables that typically get thrown away, including stalks, tops, ribs, fronds, and stems, with creative tips for making the most of seasonal ingredients to stretch the kitchen dollar. Make the Most of Your Produce! Don’t discard those carrot tops, broccoli stalks, potato peels, and pea pods. The secret that creative restaurant chefs and thrifty great-grandmothers share is that these, and other common kitchen scraps, are both edible and wonderfully flavorful. Root-to-Stalk Cooking provides savvy cooks with the inspiration, tips, and techniques to transform trimmings into delicious meals. Corn husks and cobs make for rich Corn-Pancetta Puddings in Corn Husk Baskets, watermelon rinds shine in a crisp and refreshing Thai Watermelon Salad, and velvety green leek tops star in Leek Greens Stir Fry with Salty Pork. Featuring sixty-five recipes that celebrate the whole vegetable, Root-to-Stalk Cooking helps you get the most out of your seasonal ingredients. By using husks, roots, skins, cores, stems, seeds, and rinds to their full potential, you’ll discover a whole new world of flavors while reducing waste and saving money.

30 review for Root-to-Stalk Cooking: The Art of Using the Whole Vegetable

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This is a pretty cookbook that focuses on how to make the most of all of your produce rather than tossing things like stems, leaves, etc. The recipes tend towards simple gourmet and there are photos of about 1/3 to 1/2 of the recipes. Gluten free folks are likely to be able to use it easily (very little flour is used and pasta recipes can just use GF pasta), though vegetarians and vegans especially will have to skip a fair number of the recipes since there's quite a lot of the use of bacon and o This is a pretty cookbook that focuses on how to make the most of all of your produce rather than tossing things like stems, leaves, etc. The recipes tend towards simple gourmet and there are photos of about 1/3 to 1/2 of the recipes. Gluten free folks are likely to be able to use it easily (very little flour is used and pasta recipes can just use GF pasta), though vegetarians and vegans especially will have to skip a fair number of the recipes since there's quite a lot of the use of bacon and other meats, dairy, etc. I already use most of my produce, which I think most of us who grow our own veggies or buy from CSAs and farmers' markets have learned to do. I didn't find much that was new to me and a lot of it is very specific (use this part of this veggie and add it to these ingredients you'll have to go out and buy) rather than simple ideas for lots of ways to use all the various parts that so frequently get wasted. There were a few basic recipes that will be good for that sort of thing for those who are new to use-it-all cooking, such as how to make scrap broth and citrus zest. Mostly, however, this is just a cookbook that has a few recipes for odd parts of each kind of veggie. No nutritional information is provided. One small quibble-- the author says in the asparagus section that wild asparagus is a variety that is "more vine-like" with tiny, thin spears (she says she gets it in trendy San Francisco restaurants in early spring). That's nonsense. Wild asparagus is simply asparagus that has spread to the wild, which it does quite easily and all over the country (check along fence lines, in ditches and near abandoned homesteads). Our family forages up to 60 pounds of wild asparagus every spring and I can assure you that it's the same plant and comes in all sizes depending on when in the season you are. If you want to look for some of your own, here's some info on finding and foraging it: http://magicalchildhood.com/life/2017... All in all, this is a fun book that would be especially helpful for foodies who are looking for ways to make use of their CSA produce.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    I don't know-I think I had higher expectations or maybe I already eat more of the vegetable than others do but I didn't find much that was surprising other than the pea pod pudding (which I intend on making after my pea harvest!) However, if you're the sort who only uses the white part of a leek, doesn't use the stalk of cauliflower, or peels their potatoes and apples, you'd find much more use out of this cookbook than me. I don't know-I think I had higher expectations or maybe I already eat more of the vegetable than others do but I didn't find much that was surprising other than the pea pod pudding (which I intend on making after my pea harvest!) However, if you're the sort who only uses the white part of a leek, doesn't use the stalk of cauliflower, or peels their potatoes and apples, you'd find much more use out of this cookbook than me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    There are certainly some good tips in here, and the recipes look alright, but this wasn't the comprehensive "use the whole plant completely" guide that I was hoping for (and that I feel was advertised by the title). Not a lot of generalizable tips, still many parts of the plant that go unused, etc. There are certainly some good tips in here, and the recipes look alright, but this wasn't the comprehensive "use the whole plant completely" guide that I was hoping for (and that I feel was advertised by the title). Not a lot of generalizable tips, still many parts of the plant that go unused, etc.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    While I enjoy the idea behind this, I don't think I'll use many of these recipes. A lot of them use ingredients I don't like, and many of them weren't too appealing to me. While I enjoy the idea behind this, I don't think I'll use many of these recipes. A lot of them use ingredients I don't like, and many of them weren't too appealing to me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Excellent creative recipes for such odds and ends as chard stalks (sigh, definitely not my fave), leek greens, asparagus stalks, and apple peels. Definitely recommend for thrifty cooks!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    although most of the recipies did not interest me I was interested in the use of the whole vegetable - especially using stalks.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    This book managed to grab this reviewer's attention and have him thinking a bit about the subject under consideration… a no mean feat on a late Friday afternoon when thoughts are more aimed at the weekend. In short, how to use the parts of vegetables that we may routinely throw away! To the (probably) older members of society who learned to waste not, want not maybe this book will not teach them so much, but for the rest of us it is a very capable, thought provoking book. One could wax lyrically This book managed to grab this reviewer's attention and have him thinking a bit about the subject under consideration… a no mean feat on a late Friday afternoon when thoughts are more aimed at the weekend. In short, how to use the parts of vegetables that we may routinely throw away! To the (probably) older members of society who learned to waste not, want not maybe this book will not teach them so much, but for the rest of us it is a very capable, thought provoking book. One could wax lyrically about being environmentally-friendly, green, saving money and the like, but for this reviewer just learning something "new" was the biggest benefit and the offer of many rather yummy-looking recipes was an extra bonus. If you like looking at great food photography as well you won't be disappointed. So after a brief introduction it is on to the recipes, split into chapters for roots, bulbs & stems, leaves, flowers, seeds and finally fruits. Each vegetable is covered once, so artichokes are referenced under flowers, apples under fruits, turnips under roots and so forth. Throughout the book there is a plethora of advice and guidance so it is something you should take time out to read sequentially at least once to get the most out of the subject before you dip in and out for recipes when in the kitchen. The recipes are very clearly written, contain all of the key information and thanks for the aforementioned excellent food photography you really do want to get in the kitchen and try some of the recipes that you might not have ordinarily tried if you had just read a line of text. Potato skin-bacon fat chips, for example, doesn't sound the most appetising… Carrot Slaw with Greek Yoghurt is a bit better. But what do you know if you don't try them? Sadly there is no estimation of a typical preparation and cooking time for each recipe -- our typical niggles - and the recipes are presented in sole U.S. imperial measures and the conversion chart at the back of the book is no real acceptable solution today. One can imagine that this book will spur on many similar titles in the future. Me-toos if you will. This was a pleasant surprise to examine and something that many of us would probably skip on by at a bookstore. The title makes it sound a little "hippyish" or extreme when the reality is a lot different. If you are needing to save a little in your household budget or if you just fancy doing something different in the kitchen, take a long and hard look at this book. Overall there is a remarkable lack of meat in these recipes, which is understandable when the key focus is on reusing vegetable parts. You can always add meat to many of the recipes should you so desire as an additional complement, yet it didn't feel to be a missing link either. It took a lot of checking to realise just how few recipes there were that featured meat, so it goes to show you can find many great recipes without meat if you just look in the right places. One can strongly recommend a closer look at this book! Root-to-Stalk Cooking, written by Tara Duggan and published by Ten Speed Press. ISBN 9781607744122, 208 pages. Typical price: USD22. YYYYY. // This review appeared in YUM.fi and is reproduced here in full with permission of YUM.fi. YUM.fi celebrates the worldwide diversity of food and drink, as presented through the humble book. Whether you call it a cookery book, cook book, recipe book or something else (in the language of your choice) YUM will provide you with news and reviews of the latest books on the marketplace. //

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    Celery leaves are delicious. Broccoli stalks are delectable. If you don't believe me, then definitely try this fun, inspirational cookbook, and let the enthusiastic author convince you. Recipes range from fairly standard (use leftover leaves for salsa verde or pesto) to mind-bendingly weird-sounding - eg, pea pudding and romaine leaf soup. Celery leaves are delicious. Broccoli stalks are delectable. If you don't believe me, then definitely try this fun, inspirational cookbook, and let the enthusiastic author convince you. Recipes range from fairly standard (use leftover leaves for salsa verde or pesto) to mind-bendingly weird-sounding - eg, pea pudding and romaine leaf soup.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kym

    I liked the idea of use the whole plant when cooking, and not just the more common bits. Duggan has certainly done her homework on how to incorporate the various other parts. Some the recipes looked pretty interesting, but many just sounded uninteresting. I will consider using some of the other parts of plants when cooking, though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Johnida

    Bought this cookbook because we get a lot of vegetables from our CSA with the tops still intact. I always feel wasteful not cooking them (although we do compost everything). I've already used this cookbook several times to cook various veggies. The cauliflower steaks are my current favorite. Bought this cookbook because we get a lot of vegetables from our CSA with the tops still intact. I always feel wasteful not cooking them (although we do compost everything). I've already used this cookbook several times to cook various veggies. The cauliflower steaks are my current favorite.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    Excellent cookbook that shows how to use all the usually discarded parts of vegetables, like radish and carrot leaves. The recipes seem yummy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angelina Justice

    This is an excellent concept and recipe book. I look forward to employing what I've learned this growing season. This is an excellent concept and recipe book. I look forward to employing what I've learned this growing season.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I've always been a big fan of using the whole vegetable and this book gave me some new good ideas for what to make with whole cauliflower and cabbage and who ever heard of chard stalk hummus?! I've always been a big fan of using the whole vegetable and this book gave me some new good ideas for what to make with whole cauliflower and cabbage and who ever heard of chard stalk hummus?!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Frances

  16. 5 out of 5

    Olya

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pinky

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chelsa Yoder

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charles C

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  22. 4 out of 5

    T.L.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scribblingsquid

  25. 4 out of 5

    Love & Flour

  26. 4 out of 5

    Al Fields

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ramona Springer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Maier

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emma

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