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The Game... A virtual reality simulation played by over a billion children around the world. The best players are celebrities, adored and worshiped by countless fans. Zack is a superstar among players. His final play may change the world, forever...


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The Game... A virtual reality simulation played by over a billion children around the world. The best players are celebrities, adored and worshiped by countless fans. Zack is a superstar among players. His final play may change the world, forever...

30 review for The Game

  1. 5 out of 5

    Libbet

    Oh MY god, get an editor. It sounds like it could be a good concept, but I can't deal with the comma splices, run on sentences, spelling errors, and poor grammar enough to get through it. "Alot?" Really? http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com... Honestly. Glad I got it for free. EDIT 1/28 Terry graciously sent me a copy of the edited version for free after I left this snotty 1-star review. Hazards of being an English major - I simply can't cope with poor grammar, no matter the content. That being s Oh MY god, get an editor. It sounds like it could be a good concept, but I can't deal with the comma splices, run on sentences, spelling errors, and poor grammar enough to get through it. "Alot?" Really? http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com... Honestly. Glad I got it for free. EDIT 1/28 Terry graciously sent me a copy of the edited version for free after I left this snotty 1-star review. Hazards of being an English major - I simply can't cope with poor grammar, no matter the content. That being said, his editor did a great job, and I actually love the book now that I've read the edited version. Great concept, gripping plot, bit of a disappointing end but I know it's the set-up for a sequel so I'll let it slide.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    I can just imagine the author sitting down with buddies at a bar just before the book was written: "I have this idea for a book," he began, "it's a little like Matrix and the Hunger Games." The Author then laughed and said, "and iRobot, and Star Trek, and hey, let's just add a little from every sci-fi book I love!" His friends would then tease, "anything in the book going to be your original idea, man?" The Author shrugged his shoulders and replied, "It'll be my words, isn't that enough?" To whi I can just imagine the author sitting down with buddies at a bar just before the book was written: "I have this idea for a book," he began, "it's a little like Matrix and the Hunger Games." The Author then laughed and said, "and iRobot, and Star Trek, and hey, let's just add a little from every sci-fi book I love!" His friends would then tease, "anything in the book going to be your original idea, man?" The Author shrugged his shoulders and replied, "It'll be my words, isn't that enough?" To which his friends warned, "better hire a good editor!" They all chuckled before downing a few shots of Jäger and the conversation was forgotten, especially the advice to get an editor!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stevie Kincade

    (Audiobook) (Internal Dialogue) Do I make fun of the fact that this is the 2nd audiobook in a row I have listened to that has a 5 star rating on the cover from Amazon Customer ? This one stating “Holy WOW – Amazon Customer”. Do I wonder how good a book originally published in 2012 and now receiving the 2016 luxury Luke Daniels Audiobook treatment could be if the best review in 4 years came from Amazon Customer ? No? let’s skip the snark? Ok then! “The Game” has quite a bit going for it: a terri (Audiobook) (Internal Dialogue) Do I make fun of the fact that this is the 2nd audiobook in a row I have listened to that has a 5 star rating on the cover from Amazon Customer ? This one stating “Holy WOW – Amazon Customer”. Do I wonder how good a book originally published in 2012 and now receiving the 2016 luxury Luke Daniels Audiobook treatment could be if the best review in 4 years came from Amazon Customer ? No? let’s skip the snark? Ok then! “The Game” has quite a bit going for it: a terrific premise based on simulation theory, Luke fricken Daniels - one of the absolute best narrators-a-narrating, a non-stop pace and some excellent complimentary ideas to go with the central premise. The idea that our entire universe is a complex computer simulation has been around for some time. Arguably it originated in the Hindu philosophy of Maya but let’s credit Nick Bostrum. Bostrum wrote in 2003 that (paraphrasing) if we concede that in the future, computers will be so advanced as to be able to run simulations indistinguishable from reality and that advanced simulations of the past will be run by these future-people – isn’t it kind of arrogant to believe WE exist in the original “biological universe” and are not existing in one of billions of simulations? If we scoff at simulation theory we are denying that humanity will develop the capability to run such complex simulations in the future, which is equally silly. One of the appeals of this theory is that it explains away every one of our significant questions about our universe, since all of our problems can be answered by “we exist inside a simulation”. Similarly all of the problems in plotting a book, such as coincidences and contrivances disappear when our book is set in a simulation! It is probably a little surprising that there aren’t dozens of SF books popping up where OUR world is the simulation being played out by people in the “real world”. While “The Game” may not end up as the definitive Simulation theory novel it at least makes for a highly entertaining ride. To the plot: In “The Game” we find that the real world is quite similar to ours. The main difference is that children aged 5-14 are sent on incarnations into “The Game” to gain experience towards real life. Good scores or performance in the game will earn credits. After the age of 14 players are expected to pay for any further incarnations into the game with the credits they have earned as well as to buy upgrades such as luck, health, focus and the like to improve their chances of high achievement. Players over 14 who have no credits to re-enter the game end up as the dropouts of their society and will be trained as factory workers. Retirement is mandatory at age 21 and credits earned between 14 and 21 can be used in the real world instead of retrying an incarnation on Earth for more. So there is risk/reward involved. In the “real world” society, everyone has become completely obsessed with the game. Popular player’s games are streamed live on exclusive pay-to-view channels. After games are complete people pay for the privilege of “firsting” – experiencing the game from start to finish in first person mode. Businesses are required to supply leave to allow viewers to tune in to their favourite players games. So there are familiar elements of popular SF series from “ready player 1” to “the Hunger Games”. There were a few rough edges to the story from first time author Terry Schott. When a character is asked a question they often answer then go on an extended exposition dump. There were a few story elements that jarred, such as when for the 30th anniversary of the game a billion souls from the real world took an extra shot at incarnating. This is dealt with by having a newscaster on Earth be like “Gee Bob there sure do seem to be a LOT of babies being born in 2012!”. The scoring of the game was never really properly explained, even when at the 90% mark some sort of attempt was made. I also never understood how the “successful” player’s lives were so popular for first-person replay when I would think even a mediocre rockstar or celebrity had more wink wink fun “replayable moments” then our protagonists did. I enjoyed the way Schott tied in phenomena like Déjà vu, synchronicities and ancient technology into his game theory. He mentions that people who conduct internal dialogues in their own heads “self narrators” are attracting followers and credits back in the real world which was cool. Less successful was the attempt to tie in the Mayan doomsday 2012 prophecy (remember that?). I appreciated the message behind the book even if it was a pretty rudimentary “carpe diem baby” ra-ra speech. The book is part of an ongoing series and we don’t get a proper ending here. It seems like there is the potential for a lot of big revelations and I was hoping for at least one at the end of the book. There are plenty of questions for the reader and I have my own theory on where the series is headed (view spoiler)[ I think the big reveal has got to be that the “real world” is just a simulation too and our world is a simulation inside a simulation (hide spoiler)] When you hire Luke Daniels you get a full cast audio out of one actor. I did find his children’s voices to be a bit annoying and sing-songy but that is a minor quibble and probably the technique that gets him cast on actual children’s shows. LD is great and was the deciding factor for me to check this book out. So despite some rough edges I devoured this thing in a day and a half and will no doubt purchase the next book if it comes out as a LD-narrated Audiobook.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Jernigan

    I found this book for free for the Nook on Barnes and Noble and I took a shot. I am glad I did. I found this to be a Matrix meets Ender's Game meet [insert fav. dystopian novel] and it was fantastic. I have a major book hangover from reading this one! The plot is fantastic and is paced very well. It had me from the very begining and I could not put it down. I read it in half a day. They do not have the second, third or fourth on Barnes and Noble so I will be ordering them from Amazon because I mu I found this book for free for the Nook on Barnes and Noble and I took a shot. I am glad I did. I found this to be a Matrix meets Ender's Game meet [insert fav. dystopian novel] and it was fantastic. I have a major book hangover from reading this one! The plot is fantastic and is paced very well. It had me from the very begining and I could not put it down. I read it in half a day. They do not have the second, third or fourth on Barnes and Noble so I will be ordering them from Amazon because I must know what happens. The story is full of hope, sadness, triumph and loss. I found myself caring for all the main characters involved and hating some that I am still not sure where they fall on the good or evil scale. Talk about cliffhanger! This was one of the best books I have gotten for free with no knowledge of it to begin with.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I like the Matrix type story and the concept. However, the book felt thrown together and lacking in the details. I couldn't get past that the author never addressed how the people on Trew's planet were able to experience the faster time from the computer game of "Earth" in their real time. And the time lapse kept changing throughout the book. Some instances the time was 1:1, but other cases a few hours meant years in the game. There was no consistency. It estimated 5 to 6 weeks for 70 years in " I like the Matrix type story and the concept. However, the book felt thrown together and lacking in the details. I couldn't get past that the author never addressed how the people on Trew's planet were able to experience the faster time from the computer game of "Earth" in their real time. And the time lapse kept changing throughout the book. Some instances the time was 1:1, but other cases a few hours meant years in the game. There was no consistency. It estimated 5 to 6 weeks for 70 years in "Earth," but when Trew was 40 they gave the same time frame for him to live to 70. In order for that to happen, every day on Trew's planet meant 2 years on "Earth." Yet, the author never recognized the math. The characters were poorly developed and the "game" dynamics took over any interest in the characters. The plot also had a ton of holes. It didn't explain why kids, who had parents, were sent to the educational camps that were basically slave labor, instead of home to their parents. And then how those kids lead productive lives after their forced slavery. At no point did the author show what Trew's planet even looked like or how it functioned outside of "Earth." (Other than the poor education and the Game interest.} The other planet was pretty pointless to the plot. Overall, it was an interesting concept that could have been handled a lot better. The author wasn't able to bring it together in an developed way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim Fromm

    A complete surprise. This may be the best philosophical work I have ever read. Of course, on one level it is simply a work of fiction. On another level, I found myself consciously slowing down and taking breaks to ponder the abundance of ideas and wisdom. As a 70 year old man, who has lead an unusually exciting and fulfilling life, I found this book contains a remarkable mixture of inspiring hope and disarming cynicism. There is clearly a message here, and it is written well enough to be sure the A complete surprise. This may be the best philosophical work I have ever read. Of course, on one level it is simply a work of fiction. On another level, I found myself consciously slowing down and taking breaks to ponder the abundance of ideas and wisdom. As a 70 year old man, who has lead an unusually exciting and fulfilling life, I found this book contains a remarkable mixture of inspiring hope and disarming cynicism. There is clearly a message here, and it is written well enough to be sure the message you receive, is your own. Put this on your must read list.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charlie - A Reading Machine

    I discovered this book this morning and finished it in 4 hours after barely stopping to take a breathe. It's simply a really good read and right down my alley in terms of personal interests. I stumbled upon this through Book Barbarian and their daily email that alerts me to a couple of free or cheap books going on Amazon. The idea of The Game immediately appealed to me in the same way Ready Player One by Ernie Cline did. It involves sending children into a virtual reality world to essentially lea I discovered this book this morning and finished it in 4 hours after barely stopping to take a breathe. It's simply a really good read and right down my alley in terms of personal interests. I stumbled upon this through Book Barbarian and their daily email that alerts me to a couple of free or cheap books going on Amazon. The idea of The Game immediately appealed to me in the same way Ready Player One by Ernie Cline did. It involves sending children into a virtual reality world to essentially lead practice lives so that they may be productive and wise human beings by the time they become adults. It has replaced school as the primary source of education and rewards players with credits for achievements that they can spend to play again or purchase upgrades like luck. The twist on this is that right now, you and I are playing through one of our practice lives and could at any time wake up in the real world. The mainframe that controls the simulation has come to be known by it’s players as God and the name of the simulation is Educational Avatar Reality Training Habitat or E.A.R.T.H. for short. Our story revolves around a boy called Zack who is weeks away from his 18th birthday and has time for one more game. He is a fantastic player who has just finished a game at the age of 76 virtual years, is ranked 2nd and has decided to invest every credit he has on making sure his last game is the best ever and will let him retire as number one. I'm still getting my thoughts together but fuck me for a free book it was a real treat.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    I feel like the concept of this book had so much potential that just wasn't explored. I didn't feel connected to any of the characters and I felt like every plot device raised more questions than it answered. The amount of things not explained to the reader was infuriating. That's not to mention the poor grammar and spelling. Sorry, just didn't feel it. I feel like the concept of this book had so much potential that just wasn't explored. I didn't feel connected to any of the characters and I felt like every plot device raised more questions than it answered. The amount of things not explained to the reader was infuriating. That's not to mention the poor grammar and spelling. Sorry, just didn't feel it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    “The Game” by Terry Schott Do not read the end of this book just before bed. You will not be able to sleep unless you can turn off the millions of questions that come to mind when you finish reading. This is the first book in a series and it definitely needs a sequel. The problem is, it isn't published yet! That being said, on to the review. Synopsis: “We live in a game. Somewhere 'out' there, our real bodies are plugged into a very real virtual reality simulation. Earth isn't real, but it's import “The Game” by Terry Schott Do not read the end of this book just before bed. You will not be able to sleep unless you can turn off the millions of questions that come to mind when you finish reading. This is the first book in a series and it definitely needs a sequel. The problem is, it isn't published yet! That being said, on to the review. Synopsis: “We live in a game. Somewhere 'out' there, our real bodies are plugged into a very real virtual reality simulation. Earth isn't real, but it's important to those running the game. What we call God, or Allah, or the Universe, or whatever spiritual name religion gives it...is simply the super computer that runs our universe. How can I be so sure of this? Because I've spoken to it. And it has spoken to me...”- “The Game” by Terry Schott Life on Earth is just a game created by Brandon Strayne . This game was created to replace the government school system on Tygon. Children are given credits to purchase what they need in the game. They are then put “in statis” to live their life from beginning to end on Earth, which is just a mega-computer. As one of the Eternals (angels) says, “Here's the basic idea; you log into the Game and you're born. You live your life as best you can and, when you die, you return to your real body taking the lessons you learned and the memories of the experiences you had. Many return to live multiple lifetimes, many do not. You have no memory of the real world, or at least you're not supposed to.” Zack is one of the top players in the world and he enters The Game for the last time. His goal is to retire from the game as the #1 player. All of Tygon will be watching to see if he succeeds. Alexandra failed miserably a year ago when she last entered The Game and has been sent to one of the best government schools (read: Oliver Twist-like living conditions and working in sewers and other lovely places like them). Because this year is the 30th anniversary of The Game, a free play is awarded to a random contestant. Alex is chosen. One last note, the last time Zack and Alexandra were in The Game together, they tried hard to find each other in The Game and get married. They failed, Alex's avatar died, and Zack could not find Alex when he came out of statis. Brandon Strayne is Zack's patron. He has a hidden agenda somewhere in this 30th anniversary edition of The Game, but it has not yet been revealed. All we know is that time is running out... Review: The Writing: The writing is very good. The editing is so-so. A few well-spent dollars would have gone a long way toward making this good book excellent. There were not a lot of typos, but there were enough to be occasionally distracting. The author has an engaging writing style. I cannot say that I could not put this book down, but it was not because I did not want to know what was happening. It was because I had to give my brain a break. Some of the stuff that happens is so mind-boggling, you just need to set the book aside for awhile and come back to it later. Spiritual Content: Good and bad. There are some things I really love about the spirituality in this book. Other things...not so much. In The Game, Zack and Alex's avatars are big into spirituality. Unfortunately, they are into the “all roads lead to heaven” mentality. This is obviously where the author himself leans and he makes that a decent sized theme of the book. This turns me off slightly, but since it is not discussed at length, I am willing to look past it. However, because of this, I would recommend that only mature Christians read this book. Sexual Content: The sexual content was kept behind closed doors or was barely hinted at. Two people “make out”, but that's all that is said. A reporter flirts and sends suggestive hints to Brandon with her eyes. Personally, I think these could have been left out, but they weren't. None of them are in detail and, as I said, only suggested, so it would not deter me from reading it again or recommending it to others. Language: There are a few four letter words, mostly (if not all) d—n. They are spattered through sparsely, so unless you have a “no-swear words allowed” rule, it does not detract from the book. Conclusion: I recommend this book to mature readers for three reasons: 1. the spiritual content issues mentioned above, 2. the mind-boggling aspects of this book, some teens and tweens would have a hard time truly appreciating the book, 3. the language and sexual content should be an issue for the parents of teens and tweens. The main problem that I had with it is that the second book isn't out yet! The ending is powerful and makes you desperately want more. The author makes it very obvious that a sequel was planned. After all, time is still running out...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Chinnici

    The Game is a young adult dystopian with a concept that strongly reminds me of The Matrix. “The extraordinary is simply that—a little bit extra than ordinary. There is great power in that little bit extra.” In this book, life on Earth is a virtual reality game that children plug into, gaining experience and learning from living life over and over instead of attending traditional school. Although the idea is not wholly original, the way the world is built out is unique, with references to historica The Game is a young adult dystopian with a concept that strongly reminds me of The Matrix. “The extraordinary is simply that—a little bit extra than ordinary. There is great power in that little bit extra.” In this book, life on Earth is a virtual reality game that children plug into, gaining experience and learning from living life over and over instead of attending traditional school. Although the idea is not wholly original, the way the world is built out is unique, with references to historical figures, facts, and landmarks to help ground the concept in reality. It also includes nods to notions of déjà vu and past lives, but then delves deeper into discussions of faith, belief, and religion in a way I hadn’t expected but did appreciate. The author clearly put a lot of effort into building a world (and world within a world) to expand on his premise, and it shows. Every small detail helped to add depth and make it easy to visualize. And these were, by far, the strongest parts of the book for me, leaving the plot and characters to be wanting in comparison. As the first book in a series, I hope that these elements improve in later books to match the strength of the concept and world building in order to not lose traction. In the end, The Game was effective at compelling me to want to know more. I might try the next book in this series with the expectation that it further fleshes out the ideas that intrigued me so much here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicolinia Spurgeon

    WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This a truly horrible book. Let me explain it this way: have you ever seen a young kid at the beach? A kid who tries to build a sand castle a little too close to the water? So, they're working with over saturated wet sand and the waves are crashing in taking bits of the foundation little by little. But they're just a kid so they just keep trying to pile more and more crap sand on top and things that don't make sense like twigs, rocks and maybe some seaweed because it's there. You ever seen that? This a truly horrible book. Let me explain it this way: have you ever seen a young kid at the beach? A kid who tries to build a sand castle a little too close to the water? So, they're working with over saturated wet sand and the waves are crashing in taking bits of the foundation little by little. But they're just a kid so they just keep trying to pile more and more crap sand on top and things that don't make sense like twigs, rocks and maybe some seaweed because it's there. You ever seen that? Well that's what this book is. Synopsis: The world went to hell so a guy decided to build a matrix to teach kids about life I guess. Kids (5-18) are placed inside the matrix for a few weeks to live out entire lifetimes. The catch? They don't know they're in the matrix when they get put into the matrix. When they come out they're supposed to have life skills and whatever career skills they learned while in this matrix game. They also (hope to) earn credits during game play so that they can go back into the matrix otherwise they go to schools so terrible the author couldn't even describe them. The Wave: And light spoilers (view spoiler)[ 1. The world decided it was a great idea for kids as young as 5 years old to learn about and experience sexual and emotional relationships, the hardships of being an adult, suicide, murder, mental health issues, drugs and all the rest. 2. Adults can tune into kids matrix lives. They pay to view them as if they're subscribing to a youtube channel. They also get paid days off to watch major events in these kids lives. 3. 5 year olds get 5 free game plays (which equal to about one year of play) before they have to rely on credits to get back into the game. The author makes a point of telling you that the matrix world is better than the real world which is why people over 18 can't play. Because jobs I guess. You earn credits by getting lots of subscribers and also by affecting other users in the matrix. So Jesus would earn more credits than a hermit. Unless the hermit's life was crazy interesting and they got a lot of subscribers. 4. A players life cannot be DVR'ed, recorded, rewound or paused so you have to watch it "real-time". 5. Time is magical. A lifetime lasts between 6-8 weeks. A decade is approximately 10 days. You can do the math but watching anything at that speed is ludicrous. Especially if you're subscribed to multiple people and can't rewind the feed ever. To combat this they made players talk to themselves in their heads in order to be able to understand better but even that is sped up so I'm sure it's like listening to The Chimpunks at 1000x times their usual speed. (hide spoiler)] And that's just SOME of the issues with the foundation of the book itself. The writing is worse. In the book women are just accessories and have no real personalities. The male character we follow him when he leaves the house, when he visits his parents, when he buys a car, when he goes to lunch with friends. The female character we only see through the lens of her affect on the male character. We don't really see her outside the house. We don't see her doing mundane adult chores. We don't see her at a job. How does the author get around this? He just talks about her life in passing or she's in the presence of the male character and they do things together. Everyone talks the same way whether they are 8 or 88. We're supposed to fall in love with the main character because he's supposed to be charismatic and humble. But he comes off as a pretentious dick. It's hard to like someone who has no faults or worries in life. He's rich, handsome, he has great parents, he has a beautiful wife and does not want for anything. He feels the need to tell us this time and time again. Because he's humble. The author also occasionally forgets about some of his characters so they pop up once and you never hear about them again. Or they pop up once at the beginning and then don't pop up until the very end. Even then they only get a throw away line just so the author can remind the reader that "Hey, I totally remembered this character I swear." Then there's stuff about religion but it isn't well written so it's whatever. And stuff about "angels" and "demons" but it's the matrix so...what? And it gets explained but it's dumb so it doesn't really explain much. Then there's stuff about an in game weapon that also makes no sense but you know it's cool because reasons. I could go on and on and on about the issues I had with this book but I'll let you get on with your day and read literally anything else. How about the back of the cereal box...yea that sounds good. Do that instead.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jordon Greene

    I really enjoyed Schott's The Game. He does a great job coelascing the the two worlds in the story together and coming up with reasons for the everyday to the unusual in our world. Just be aware it ends with a major cliffhanger. I really enjoyed Schott's The Game. He does a great job coelascing the the two worlds in the story together and coming up with reasons for the everyday to the unusual in our world. Just be aware it ends with a major cliffhanger.

  14. 4 out of 5

    вяαт

    Imagine that we're living on Earth right now, but we're just computer generated avatars controlled by players in another reality. Badass, right? Right. Free ebooks are usually a hit or miss, so I'm typically weary when I start reading one. This was possibly the best free ebook I've ever read! It's got me feeling some type of way. I really cannot explain how philosophical this book really was. I'm sure that sounds goofy as fuck, but there are things in the book that honestly make you think. No, th Imagine that we're living on Earth right now, but we're just computer generated avatars controlled by players in another reality. Badass, right? Right. Free ebooks are usually a hit or miss, so I'm typically weary when I start reading one. This was possibly the best free ebook I've ever read! It's got me feeling some type of way. I really cannot explain how philosophical this book really was. I'm sure that sounds goofy as fuck, but there are things in the book that honestly make you think. No, the writing wasn't extraordinary but the author definitely knew how to keep me on the edge of my seat. I did not want to put this book down and I've never been more excited to purchase the rest of a series. The plot and pacing were great. It does end of some-what of a cliffhanger, but not really. I'm definitely itching to finish the series. I forgot to highlight more quotes; however, these are two of my favorite ones that I ran across that really hit home for me. "Such a shame, to get stuck doing something for the rest of your life that you don't love, simply because you invested time or money." "When you encounter the happy, live in that moment for as long as you can. Smile and tuck it away in your memory to be looked at whenever needed. When you encounter the bad, don't live in the moment. Let it pass as quickly as it can, don't focus on it, and whatever you do, don't grab onto it and tuck it away in your memory."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicolette

    So I guess I got the edited version, because I didn't see the same sort of grammar twitchiness that others did, and I'm a pretty huge stickler for that stuff. But...wow. I don't know if it was because of the total immersion in the characters' lives/heads, but I felt an instant connection with Zack and Alex (or rather, Trew and Danni) that I often found myself gasping or on the verge of tears - and I am not a crier. The end of the book before the last chapter made me actually say out loud, "But t So I guess I got the edited version, because I didn't see the same sort of grammar twitchiness that others did, and I'm a pretty huge stickler for that stuff. But...wow. I don't know if it was because of the total immersion in the characters' lives/heads, but I felt an instant connection with Zack and Alex (or rather, Trew and Danni) that I often found myself gasping or on the verge of tears - and I am not a crier. The end of the book before the last chapter made me actually say out loud, "But that's not supposed to happen!" and it was just such a great experience. I really liked the characters. The pacing was a little weird for me to adjust to and there were some parts of it I had to go back and re-read to make sure I was understanding it properly, but wow. I am looking forward to the next installments.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I loved this book. Not only is it an amazing science fiction story, it adds in "glimpses of the past" since it takes place in two worlds. When you are born into the virtual reality world, your conscience sits on a table in the real world, Tygon. Earth is nothing more than a simulation. Trew Radfield, played by soon to be - or not - Zack Strayne, grows up in a world with powers, people, and a plan to be the best played there ever was. Are you ready to play The Game? I loved this book. Not only is it an amazing science fiction story, it adds in "glimpses of the past" since it takes place in two worlds. When you are born into the virtual reality world, your conscience sits on a table in the real world, Tygon. Earth is nothing more than a simulation. Trew Radfield, played by soon to be - or not - Zack Strayne, grows up in a world with powers, people, and a plan to be the best played there ever was. Are you ready to play The Game?

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    4.5 stars! This was a very appealing story, full of twists and turns and very fun especially towards the end.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Jones

    This book is terrible.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Coco.V

    FREE on Amazon today (11/17/2017)!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Pax

    I thoroughly enjoyed my time reading The Game. As I read, I found myself hooked and unable to put the book down. The plot idea was very interesting and surprisingly philosophical; however I felt that Schott didn't develop his ideas to their full potential. I would still highly recommend The Game to anyone looking for an entertaining read, similar to that of novels like Ender's Game and The Hunger Games. I thoroughly enjoyed my time reading The Game. As I read, I found myself hooked and unable to put the book down. The plot idea was very interesting and surprisingly philosophical; however I felt that Schott didn't develop his ideas to their full potential. I would still highly recommend The Game to anyone looking for an entertaining read, similar to that of novels like Ender's Game and The Hunger Games.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kenny Bellew

    The people of this planet send their children to school in VR, where they can live on a different time scale. This VR world is our Earth, meaning we're all living in the Matrix, basically. One day is a decade, so a career of knowledge could be obtained in a few days. This led to gaining points based on accomplishments within your life in the Game. The more points you gain the more money your character in real life makes. The author makes you think and ponder a few points. Some of the author's sc The people of this planet send their children to school in VR, where they can live on a different time scale. This VR world is our Earth, meaning we're all living in the Matrix, basically. One day is a decade, so a career of knowledge could be obtained in a few days. This led to gaining points based on accomplishments within your life in the Game. The more points you gain the more money your character in real life makes. The author makes you think and ponder a few points. Some of the author's scenarios where he links special abilities to feats in VR are rediculous but some make you think, and I always appreciate that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steff Fox

    | Reader Fox Blog | So, it's been a long time since I DNFed The Game by Terry Schott. In not wanting to re-familiarize myself with all the reasons I put this book down by picking it up again--gosh, that just sounds awful--I skimmed through a few reviews to remind myself what my reasons were. Then, I decided I'd write this as a quick and, admittedly, somewhat incomplete review for a book I couldn't bring myself to finish. Cause the truth is that The Game is really somewhat like it's cover; a | Reader Fox Blog | So, it's been a long time since I DNFed The Game by Terry Schott. In not wanting to re-familiarize myself with all the reasons I put this book down by picking it up again--gosh, that just sounds awful--I skimmed through a few reviews to remind myself what my reasons were. Then, I decided I'd write this as a quick and, admittedly, somewhat incomplete review for a book I couldn't bring myself to finish. Cause the truth is that The Game is really somewhat like it's cover; a nice idea with rather poor execution. Imagine a video game in which you can live your entire life. Then imagine that some people doing this are only 5 years old, but living out an entire lifetime from the experiences of a teenager all the way through adulthood and then being elderly before waking up five years old again once you've "died." Imagine that the world outside the game is awful and decimated. Add in some terrible writing, one-dimensional afterthought female characters who are really only there to support the main male, and an incomprehensible jumble of several science fiction films and books that the author likes and you've pretty much got The Game in a nutshell. What I remember most about this book is that I couldn't deal with how poorly written it was. And this fact had its hands in everything. It wasn't just that the writing was bad, but the character development was bad. The character development wasn't the only thing that was awful, the world-building was awful. And the truth is that I could go on and on here. I won't. The premise wasn't bad, in fact, there have been many occasions where I've wanted to read more books like this. But somewhere along the way, the author simply couldn't write the story that would work. Ultimately, I feel like I could have read this book and enjoyed it if I was seven or younger. And that's a big part of my problem. I was powering through 2-3 Nancy Drew novels a week when I was that young. For me to have to be a kid with little knowledge of better books to enjoy this made it incredibly hard for me to appreciate much about it at all. And sure, I think some people might like it. But the audience has to be sparing or young. And to have a five-year-old living out an entire lifetime in the span of enough time that they will still be five years old when they die in the game and return to their real life is a bit disturbing when you really sit down to think about it. | Twitter | Instagram | Reader Fox Blog | Bloglovin’ | Facebook |

  23. 5 out of 5

    AudioBookReviewer

    My original The Game audiobook review and many others can be found at Audiobook Reviewer. Not by the synopsis alone. I preordered The Game. From an unknown to me author. With the backing of one of my go-to narrators and a publisher, that does a really good job of picking up extraordinary titles. The summary pulls at the questions at the back of my mind. Why are we here? How did we get here? What is the point of life? Well, what if the point of life was to do your best at it. All the while scoring My original The Game audiobook review and many others can be found at Audiobook Reviewer. Not by the synopsis alone. I preordered The Game. From an unknown to me author. With the backing of one of my go-to narrators and a publisher, that does a really good job of picking up extraordinary titles. The summary pulls at the questions at the back of my mind. Why are we here? How did we get here? What is the point of life? Well, what if the point of life was to do your best at it. All the while scoring points in the game called life. Wouldn’t that be something? That is exactly where Zach, the protagonist, finds himself. Albeit with a twist. Tygon is a world very similar to Earth. Pretty much everything is very similar, technology, corporations, and the media rule. However, the one major difference is this. At a very young age, every child is plugged into “The Game”. Think of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game, similar to World of Warcraft. The world where the game takes place is a different planet called Earth. Everyone there is playing the game. Then everyone’s game life is available for the public to watch. If you get more fans and followers, when you come out of The Game you are rewarded with fame and fortune. But only if you have a fan base and can place in the ranking of all of the other players. The Game follows one such player, Zach, through his “waking up” from a game and starting another instance. We get to follow his game life, from birth to his 40th birthday. Because in the game 1 day on Tygon is 1 year on Earth. This happens pretty quickly. I do not want to give too much away here, so let me say this. What if while in The Game you found a book that you wrote in your last game, and have no memory of writing, explaining that life is just a game. Along with that, what if you started to tell people this and they believed you? Schott’s idea here is so perfectly epic. Yet so simple as well. Written in a way that makes sense to me. I was engrossed from beginning to end. Not wanting to stop listening for anything. I had to know what happened next. WARING: There is a cliffhanger ending. Followed with a brief sample of the next book in the series that cannot be published soon enough. Luke Daniels delivered this performance just as soundly as most of the rest that I have heard. Using his “trademarked” character voices. That all seem to always fit the story perfectly. For younger to older males. Female voices that are more believable than most speak. Full of strategic pauses and other unspoken traits of a truly skilled narrator. Going to file this under “Classic Daniels”. Audiobook was purchased for review by ABR.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    The Game takes on the good old "what if life on Earth as we know it were just a simulation" premise, in this version one where children from the age of 5 on live entire lifetimes in a virtual reality to allow them to gain valuable skills and life experience they can then apply to their real lifes when they grow up. The protagonist is Zack, a highly ranked player about to embark on his last game run and determined to finish in the top spot. In the outside world, a team has assembled to support hi The Game takes on the good old "what if life on Earth as we know it were just a simulation" premise, in this version one where children from the age of 5 on live entire lifetimes in a virtual reality to allow them to gain valuable skills and life experience they can then apply to their real lifes when they grow up. The protagonist is Zack, a highly ranked player about to embark on his last game run and determined to finish in the top spot. In the outside world, a team has assembled to support him, but it turns out that there's a lot more going on than initially meets the eye. Interesting premise with many promising sounding aspects, but the worldbuilding lacks development and somehow it all just ends up being one big, confusing, half-baked mess in which only about half of what we're told in massive info-dumps makes sense. The writing is all telling, no showing, and the characters are shallow and not particularly likable. By the time the whole thing turned into some exceedingly weird take on religion, I had long stopped caring about what was going on.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris K.

    When I began reading The Game by Terry Schott, I had no expectations. It was a free book that I found on iBooks and the description sounded good so I decided to read it. I enjoy reading books that have a fast pace and this was one of those books. The plot was very complex and kept me reading. I rated this The Game four stars because of all these reasons, and others, including a great setting and the incredible main idea of the book. What I did not enjoy about this book was the characters. They w When I began reading The Game by Terry Schott, I had no expectations. It was a free book that I found on iBooks and the description sounded good so I decided to read it. I enjoy reading books that have a fast pace and this was one of those books. The plot was very complex and kept me reading. I rated this The Game four stars because of all these reasons, and others, including a great setting and the incredible main idea of the book. What I did not enjoy about this book was the characters. They were not introduced well, and all of them were quite boring, but the great plot made up for where the characterization lacked. Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to everyone who has an interest science fiction, and anyone in high school and under because it is a simple book to read with an interesting storyline. I do not think an adult would like this due to the simplicity of the language. The Game by Terry Schott is an amazing book, and the best part about it was that it is free.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hegewald

    I thoroughly enjoyed "The Game" written by Terry Schott. This book is a science-fiction novel that takes place in the future. Reading this book allowed me to escape my life and enter into Zach's life and his experiences with the game. I gave this book a 4 out of 5 star rating because of its unique plot and the fact that the story was taking place in a very interesting futuristic society. I also enjoyed reading about adventures of all the different characters inside of the game. Terry Schott did I thoroughly enjoyed "The Game" written by Terry Schott. This book is a science-fiction novel that takes place in the future. Reading this book allowed me to escape my life and enter into Zach's life and his experiences with the game. I gave this book a 4 out of 5 star rating because of its unique plot and the fact that the story was taking place in a very interesting futuristic society. I also enjoyed reading about adventures of all the different characters inside of the game. Terry Schott did a wonderful job of characterizing his characters. I would recommend this book mainly to young adults because it would be easier to relate to the characters.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matt Durocher

    The Game is easily one of the more interesting books I've recently read. Although I haven't finished it yet, the plot is gripping and easy to understand, while not too simplistic. Terry Schott did an excellent job of switching between perspectives to keep things fresh and making the readers wonder what will happen to Zack and Alex. I would recommend this book to anyone to like adventure or science fiction. The Game is easily one of the more interesting books I've recently read. Although I haven't finished it yet, the plot is gripping and easy to understand, while not too simplistic. Terry Schott did an excellent job of switching between perspectives to keep things fresh and making the readers wonder what will happen to Zack and Alex. I would recommend this book to anyone to like adventure or science fiction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adam Smith

    I wanted to enjoy this book more than I did, as it had a nice, communal development story (uploaded to Facebook in parts for friends) and had themes I like exploring. In the end, I finished it just to squeeze out the ideas that the author had, as there were so many it ended up incoherent with little focus. The Game is a pre-adult virtual reality life system designed to educate the children of Tygon. The Game is E. A. R. T. H. The idea is that the children come out of this system having lived full I wanted to enjoy this book more than I did, as it had a nice, communal development story (uploaded to Facebook in parts for friends) and had themes I like exploring. In the end, I finished it just to squeeze out the ideas that the author had, as there were so many it ended up incoherent with little focus. The Game is a pre-adult virtual reality life system designed to educate the children of Tygon. The Game is E. A. R. T. H. The idea is that the children come out of this system having lived full lives, and can then take that experience into their real life. Sounds good. Except that you have to earn credits to be a part of the game (from having a ‘good game’), after your initial free runs. (Children play multiple times during their ‘childhood’). Logical inconsistency #1: the Tygon rulers therefore don’t actually care that much about maxing out a child’s potential. Logical inconsistency #2: kids that fail end up in labour camps. Where are the parents? Who are the parents? The Game has been around for 30 years – where is the supposed societal enlightenment that would come about from the communal wisdom of a generation? These aren’t answered. They are compounded by the idea that The Game is viewed for pleasure by the adults – the very same adults who have been through the process themselves in order to become ‘better adults’. It’s masochistic, and given the dwindling popularity of Big Brother type shows in our reality: unrealistic. There’s also no explanation as to how The Game is viewed, as an entire lifetime inside The Game can take around 7 weeks in real-time (assuming someone ‘lives’ to be 70). It’s stated that recording and rewatching an event in The Game is impossible. There are ‘big’ events that happen in-game that in reality, for someone watching, would flash by in an instant. It makes no sense. It also makes no sense that so much time and dedication is placed by ‘Patrons’ – people on Tygon who ‘sponsor’ single individuals (out of millions/billions) with the goal of trying to influence the outcome of in-game activities, when they cannot communicate directly in-game, and events would happen so fast that it would be impossible, in reality, to react quick enough even if they could. Despite massive holes such as these, there were some good ideas, such as the explanations for Angels and Demons, and religion as a whole. The idea that the Pyramids and other ancient structures were BETA testers. It had some innovation, but all this was just not enough to paper the cracks. Add to this one-dimensional characters and an unrealistic, narcissistic MC; and a writing style that lacks variety, ‘style’, ambition – that does nothing but ‘tell’ instead of ‘show’ – and you get your two-stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fabi

    I am racking my brain trying to figure out how to rate this book. I listened to the Audible version narrated by Luke Daniels which isn't an option in the book editions in GR. -boo- It is 5 star narration. Very, very good. It's an interesting plot. It's premise is that Earth is a virtual reality game created to teach kids about life. It replaces regular schools. On Earth we are all avatars for the kids playing the game while they are in suspended animation for weeks at a time while taking their tur I am racking my brain trying to figure out how to rate this book. I listened to the Audible version narrated by Luke Daniels which isn't an option in the book editions in GR. -boo- It is 5 star narration. Very, very good. It's an interesting plot. It's premise is that Earth is a virtual reality game created to teach kids about life. It replaces regular schools. On Earth we are all avatars for the kids playing the game while they are in suspended animation for weeks at a time while taking their turn playing. A week in their real life is about a decade in the Earth game so they get to experience an entire lifetime each time they play. They win and lose game credits while playing which turn into real life wealth (or lack of) when they become too old to play anymore. Their entire society has become financially dependent on this VR game. It really is my kind of crazy. :-) The only thing that bugged me was the underlying religious theme. Still, overall, the plot is an easy 4 stars. My main hangup is in the delivery of the plot. It is written in 3rd person POV, which tends to distance me from the characters. On top of that, we are dealing with characters living on two different worlds so we get shuffled back and forth between the two. Then there are the 'snippets' that happen quite often to give us information or clarify the action for us. They are blurbs from books, newscast recordings, historical records, etc. As necessary as they were to explain and move the plot along, they honestly wore me out. I always prefer being in the middle of the action as opposed to being informed of it. I can't give the writing anything more than a generous 3 stars. I can average all this out to a four star, but it would only apply to the Audible version which is not even listed in GR. So, I've decided to leave the rating blank and let you make up your own mind.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Simaz

    The Game is a weird offspring of the book The Hunger Games and the movie The Truman Show. Zack, the main character, is a world renowned “Player” of the game which is very similar to the Hunger Games except that it’s a simulation of life. While in the game you basically live someone else’s life, but players can buy “power ups” before entering to help them last longer. The duration and fruitfulness of your life gives you points that put you on places on the ranking in the real world. Zack, in his The Game is a weird offspring of the book The Hunger Games and the movie The Truman Show. Zack, the main character, is a world renowned “Player” of the game which is very similar to the Hunger Games except that it’s a simulation of life. While in the game you basically live someone else’s life, but players can buy “power ups” before entering to help them last longer. The duration and fruitfulness of your life gives you points that put you on places on the ranking in the real world. Zack, in his passed life, went up a lot of rankings and ended up rank two. But in his next run of the game, things get a little more interesting. The entire story was very slow but all around amusing. The characters were well thought out and each one had their own sense of voice. The romance in the story was enticing and kept you on the edge, but the story was very predictable and ended exactly how you would think. The originality was not there and just felt like a combination of a ton of other stories. In other words, it was the most basic sci-fi story you could think of. It appeals to almost every sci-fi reader because it has every aspect of a sci-fi book, which makes the book very unoriginal. If you like sci-fi at all, then this book will appeal to you for the soul reason that I’ve already explained.

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