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Contém as histórias: 1.Star Wars Star Wars 2.Seis Contra a Galáxia Six Against the Galaxy 3.A Estrela da Morte! Death Star 4.Luta Contra Darth Vader In Battle with Darth Vader 5.Olhem, as Luas de Yavin! Lo, The Moons of Yavin 6.Será Este... o Último Episódio? Is This the Final Chapter? 7.Novos Planetas, Novos Perigos New Planets, New Perils 8.Os Oito Campeões de Aduba-3 Eight for Aduba-3 9 Contém as histórias: 1.Star Wars Star Wars 2.Seis Contra a Galáxia Six Against the Galaxy 3.A Estrela da Morte! Death Star 4.Luta Contra Darth Vader In Battle with Darth Vader 5.Olhem, as Luas de Yavin! Lo, The Moons of Yavin 6.Será Este... o Último Episódio? Is This the Final Chapter? 7.Novos Planetas, Novos Perigos New Planets, New Perils 8.Os Oito Campeões de Aduba-3 Eight for Aduba-3 9.Confronto Num Mundo Desolado! Showdown on a Wasteland World 10.O Colosso do Mundo Subterrâneo Behemoth from the World Below 11.Busca Estelar! Star Search A saga A Long Time Ago, publicada pela Marvel a partir de 1977, assinala o surgimento das personagens de Star Wars no mundo da banda desenhada. Esta série revive a emoção das aventuras galácticas originais e amplia-as com novas personagens e situações que nunca apareceram nos filmes, para deleite dos fãs da saga. Uma colecção imprescindível para os amantes de Star Wars e para os que ainda não conhecem o poder da Força. Este volume inclui os issues 1 a 11 originalmente publicados pela Marvel Comics.


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Contém as histórias: 1.Star Wars Star Wars 2.Seis Contra a Galáxia Six Against the Galaxy 3.A Estrela da Morte! Death Star 4.Luta Contra Darth Vader In Battle with Darth Vader 5.Olhem, as Luas de Yavin! Lo, The Moons of Yavin 6.Será Este... o Último Episódio? Is This the Final Chapter? 7.Novos Planetas, Novos Perigos New Planets, New Perils 8.Os Oito Campeões de Aduba-3 Eight for Aduba-3 9 Contém as histórias: 1.Star Wars Star Wars 2.Seis Contra a Galáxia Six Against the Galaxy 3.A Estrela da Morte! Death Star 4.Luta Contra Darth Vader In Battle with Darth Vader 5.Olhem, as Luas de Yavin! Lo, The Moons of Yavin 6.Será Este... o Último Episódio? Is This the Final Chapter? 7.Novos Planetas, Novos Perigos New Planets, New Perils 8.Os Oito Campeões de Aduba-3 Eight for Aduba-3 9.Confronto Num Mundo Desolado! Showdown on a Wasteland World 10.O Colosso do Mundo Subterrâneo Behemoth from the World Below 11.Busca Estelar! Star Search A saga A Long Time Ago, publicada pela Marvel a partir de 1977, assinala o surgimento das personagens de Star Wars no mundo da banda desenhada. Esta série revive a emoção das aventuras galácticas originais e amplia-as com novas personagens e situações que nunca apareceram nos filmes, para deleite dos fãs da saga. Uma colecção imprescindível para os amantes de Star Wars e para os que ainda não conhecem o poder da Força. Este volume inclui os issues 1 a 11 originalmente publicados pela Marvel Comics.

30 review for Comics Star Wars: Clássicos 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    A New Hope has always been one of my favourite Star Wars films, most likely because it was my very first glimpse at something that would eventually develop into an epic. Luke Skywalker’s story is where it all began, and I really did enjoy seeing it in this form. The artist has rendered the planetary systems, the deserts of Tatooine and the oppressive nature of the Death Star perfectly. The environments look great, but there are a few issues with the characters. So, I have mixed feelings about it A New Hope has always been one of my favourite Star Wars films, most likely because it was my very first glimpse at something that would eventually develop into an epic. Luke Skywalker’s story is where it all began, and I really did enjoy seeing it in this form. The artist has rendered the planetary systems, the deserts of Tatooine and the oppressive nature of the Death Star perfectly. The environments look great, but there are a few issues with the characters. So, I have mixed feelings about its overall quality. The artwork: • Characters 2/5* • Environments and effects 4/5 *It must be noted that the cover art image is a modern rendering, and is in no ways a reflection of the illustrations in here that were done in the 70s. Here's what actually Luke looks like: Here's a cool looking explosion: Luke comes across in the necessary degrees of naïve; he acts young, though in some of the images he actually looks older than Han Solo. I’ve had a peak at the second instalment (The Empire Strikes Back Comic) and his rendering is much more appropriate. He actually looks like Mark Hamill rather than some random square jawed dude who needs a good night’s sleep. So his appearance, at odds with the on screen version, is just an issue with this first instalment. I’m glad it improved, but it does make the series feel a little inconsistent. It’s a double edged sword really. The space battles are where the illustrator’s skill comes into play. The colouring is spot on, and the explosive effects are quite impressive. Visually speaking, they were the best aspect of the graphic novel. The fight between Ben Kenobi and Vader was also quite good. Kenobi’s death was incredibly dramatic even in this form. The story- 4/5 I’m glad to say that this edition lacked any originality. It is basically an exact copy of the events in the movie. This is a good thing, of course. There isn’t a single plot deviation or major inconsistency that I detected. It’s all very true to its origins. It needed to be. Kenobi has always been the Skywalker’s protector. Firstly, at his master’s behest, he rescues the young Anakin and trains him in the ways of the force. Secondly, he looks after Anakin’s son from a distance, and insures the heir to the Jedi survives. He is Luke’s silent guardian; his shield against the Empire. He is the true hero of this story. Sometimes I just feel like the man deserves a little bit more recognition. He gave his life to the Skywalker’s. He was a wise and powerful Jedi, one that even mastered death. Few Jedi can say the same. Obi-Wan becomes one with the force and escaped being struck down, does this not make him one of the greatest Jedi of all time? Luke was lucky to have him as a master regardless of how brief the experience was. I think this comes across superbly in this form. He’s a great character. Overall, this is a fairly good adaption. There is room for improvement but, like I said, the artwork is better in the next edition, which I will also be reviewing at some point soon. The story makes this what it is; it’s like a breakdown of all the important scenes in the film. It captures both the humour and urgency of the situations. The character dynamic are there in full force along with appropriate personalities. It’s like a pleasant reminder of the movie, that I now have an overbearing urge to watch. I think that’s a good thing, don’t you? Star Wars Original Trilogy Graphic Novels 1. A New Hope- A fair three stars 2. The Empire Strikes Back- An improved 3.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jim Ef

    A nice way to remember the facts that took place in a far far away galaxy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jelena

    This is one of the few cases (known to me) where the film came before everything else. So maybe this comic has had it easy or easier in a way: It had its plot, pacing and characters already set. And as a reader you know fully what to expect. But still, as visual as they both may be, those are two different media, with different dynamics and focusing of different aspects. The film and the comic aren’t identical. They couldn’t and shouldn’t be. And yes, some things differed from what I had come to This is one of the few cases (known to me) where the film came before everything else. So maybe this comic has had it easy or easier in a way: It had its plot, pacing and characters already set. And as a reader you know fully what to expect. But still, as visual as they both may be, those are two different media, with different dynamics and focusing of different aspects. The film and the comic aren’t identical. They couldn’t and shouldn’t be. And yes, some things differed from what I had come to know and love in the film or from what I had imagined for myself. Of those different approaches, some irked me. Like Chewie being an aggressive beast rather than a badass but gentle giant. Or Han, who is far less rough around the edges but with his heart in the right place, and far more an outright jackass. Or Luke looking like Prince Adam. (Don’t get me wrong, I love Prince Adam, that was my favourite cartoon as a child. But a He-Man Skywalker is a bit weird.) While I’m at it: The Völsunga/Sigmund/Signy vibe between Luke and Leia was disturbingly gross. Though technically we’re not supposed to know that yet. Also, I missed John Williams’ brilliant score. Which is easily overcome by humming the according themes to oneself while reading. On the other hand, C-3PO was considerably less annoying than usually. But that might just as well be me getting old(er) and going all soft and gooey. But the primary issue, the only real issue here, is that this is a remastered edition of the seventies comic. And that’s what rubbed me. It’s just… too remastered. Too postery, too glossy, to shiny, too bright. Seriously, the beam of a regular light bulb in my living room hit a panel once and almost blinded me. That taught me to read more by natural daylight. But here’s the thing: This is Star Wars and it is the Holy Trinity. And there will never ever be a time when, at seeing the words “In a galaxy far, far away…”, I won’t be transferred back into my eight-year-old, goggle-eyed self, all transfixed and mesmerised. (Seriously, we all know that a parsec is a distance unit, and if you’re going all logical and purist and looking for implausibilities, then kindly fuck off, go make you own space opera with black-jack and hookers, and leave Star Wars, and everything else, for that matter, alone.) Whatever may have bugged me, it never lasted long. This adaptations isn’t good, it’s actually great. And everything else is forgiven. For me, Star Wars has always been highly visual. The novels and novelisations just never really sat with me; I think the galaxy far away loses more than it gains in the process. And this comic is probably the best thing you could have done to the source material when transferring it and giving it a new shape, but without leading it too far from its essence. Like the Force, this comic is in balance between being a good adaptation, true to the original, and being a good genre comic in itself, equally true to the standards of its own form. And hey, here Chewie does get his very deserved medal!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ruel

    I was leaning toward rating this less than four stars when I remembered that it was STAR WARS. This is a collected volume of the original Marvel comics from that magical year of 1977 when something from a galaxy far, far away took over Planet Earth. My dad bought me the oversized version of these comics and I wore them out after repeated readings. As a child I remember thinking that the characters didn't really look like the actors from the movie. Even Chewbacca didn't look like the infamous Wal I was leaning toward rating this less than four stars when I remembered that it was STAR WARS. This is a collected volume of the original Marvel comics from that magical year of 1977 when something from a galaxy far, far away took over Planet Earth. My dad bought me the oversized version of these comics and I wore them out after repeated readings. As a child I remember thinking that the characters didn't really look like the actors from the movie. Even Chewbacca didn't look like the infamous Walking Carpet; he was more Sasquatch than Wookie. This remains true in this newly colored and remastered version, but I do like the new colors since they seem to make everything "pop" more. Or maybe it's just been so long since I read this six-issue series that I forgot about the artwork. In either case, it's still a blast following the adventures of Luke and the gang, even if the, um, intimate moments between him and Princess Leia seem even creepier now. Since the artists at the time didn't know the big secret about the siblings, their choice of artwork was more, um, romantic. Let's move on, shall we? There are several deleted scenes in the comics, including one of Jabba the Hutt in which he looks vastly different than the version that appeared in the third movie. There's also a scene that explains the friendship between Luke and Biggs while they're on Tatooine. Overall, this was a great way for me to get hyped for The Force Awakens. Not that I needed any more reasons, but still.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    The artwork inside is so '70s that I am actually digging it. The artwork inside is so '70s that I am actually digging it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ned Leffingwell

    This is a reprinting of the original Marvel comic adaptation of Star Wars: A New Hope. The reprint looks great. They did recolor the entire story using a modern method. I have mixed feelings about the recoloring. If I had never seen the original comics I would say that they did a fantastic job. However, the art now has a 21st century comic look to it. It has lost some of the 70's comic charm. I remember that the original cover to issue one showed Darth Vader's helmet with a green hue. Also, the This is a reprinting of the original Marvel comic adaptation of Star Wars: A New Hope. The reprint looks great. They did recolor the entire story using a modern method. I have mixed feelings about the recoloring. If I had never seen the original comics I would say that they did a fantastic job. However, the art now has a 21st century comic look to it. It has lost some of the 70's comic charm. I remember that the original cover to issue one showed Darth Vader's helmet with a green hue. Also, the original colors had a bright psychedelic feel to them. I would recommend this. It is interesting to see the adaptation of the film. We are treated to an early appearance of Jabba the Hutt (who looks nothing like he does in Return of the Jedi), scenes with Luke's friend Biggs, and some other treats that differ from the film. Otherwise it is a bronze age adaptation of the film that does the job well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Yankovich

    A very cool hardcover remastering and reprinting of the first six issues of Marvel's 1970s and 1980s ongoing Star Wars series, adapting Episode IV. This book features some excellent recoloring that brings a beautiful modern flair to the 1977 artwork. These issues also feature some interesting aspects of the movie that were cut for one reason or another: we see Luke on Tattooine witnessing a space battle and a very different Jabba the Hutt to name a few. Also included is a covers and artwork gall A very cool hardcover remastering and reprinting of the first six issues of Marvel's 1970s and 1980s ongoing Star Wars series, adapting Episode IV. This book features some excellent recoloring that brings a beautiful modern flair to the 1977 artwork. These issues also feature some interesting aspects of the movie that were cut for one reason or another: we see Luke on Tattooine witnessing a space battle and a very different Jabba the Hutt to name a few. Also included is a covers and artwork gallery. This book is great for collectors and new fans alike.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Han shoots. I'd say Han shoots first, but that would imply there's a second shot. Five stars. This is a reprint of the original comic adaptation of the films. Colors have been retouched. Good stuff. Han shoots. I'd say Han shoots first, but that would imply there's a second shot. Five stars. This is a reprint of the original comic adaptation of the films. Colors have been retouched. Good stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie Bettina

    A bit bummed about the boring looking Jabba the Hutt (but I just found out that he actually didn't appear until Return of the Jedi in the original theatrical releases), and the comic format made the fighting scenes very chaotic! However, nothing can spoil the pure magic known as A New Hope (well, originally just Star Wars, but you get the point)! A bit bummed about the boring looking Jabba the Hutt (but I just found out that he actually didn't appear until Return of the Jedi in the original theatrical releases), and the comic format made the fighting scenes very chaotic! However, nothing can spoil the pure magic known as A New Hope (well, originally just Star Wars, but you get the point)!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kamillah

    Is it "lightsaber," or "lightsabre"? I never had to think about it until just now, seeing it in writing. This is the reissued, remastered, and freshly colored hardcover collecting the original six issues first published in 1977 prior to the release of the film. (Sidenote: I don't think a pre-release of essentially the ENTIRE story of a hotly anticipated film would ever be released like this way again. Hello, spoiler alert!) Funny that even then, the covers screamed "The greatest space-fantasy fi Is it "lightsaber," or "lightsabre"? I never had to think about it until just now, seeing it in writing. This is the reissued, remastered, and freshly colored hardcover collecting the original six issues first published in 1977 prior to the release of the film. (Sidenote: I don't think a pre-release of essentially the ENTIRE story of a hotly anticipated film would ever be released like this way again. Hello, spoiler alert!) Funny that even then, the covers screamed "The greatest space-fantasy film of all!" I picked this up because I wanted to catch up on the original film, but I don't have a copy of it so I thought it would be neat to read the comic adaptation. In the interest of full disclosure, I actually didn't remember what happens in the story because I was really young when I first saw the movies and never really watched them again, so while the characters and ideas were familiar, the story was like new again. I'll have to see how the comic and the film fit together. To be totally honest, it sometimes read as a 2-star book, with the wordy narration and copious exclamation points that seem to be common in older comics, but this is likely a challenge of viewing an older comic through contemporary eyes. The dialogue really kept an adventurous and fun tone in the face of cosmic domination, and each character's personalities comes across very clearly, except maybe for Chewbacca, but then again his characterization must lose some edge when you're reading his language as opposed to hearing it! I loved that Princess Leia played a role in her own rescue, wielding her own blasters--I wasn't very optimistic about how she'd be depicted in a '70's comic...but in the end I was pleasantly surprised and satisfied. The action and emotional tension noticeably picks up in the last issue (#6), which depicts the one final space pilot dogfight with gravity, humor, and excitement at the right moments. So yes, I enjoyed it. As a special re-release, this collection offers little that adds to the experience--there's a new introduction meant to share a bit about how Marvel came to publish a comic adaptation prior to the film release, but it's surprisingly pretty boring. The original cover art (original inks, plus the colored versions) are reprinted at the end of the collection if you enjoy examining covers through the years. The remastered and newly colored pages are the real boon here--the vibrant colors jump off the page in a more three dimensional way that's more pleasing to the modern eye, yet the book still retains the original "throwback" look of the original artwork. The lightsabres (I'm going with the spelling in the comic!) glow in a way I doubt they glowed in the original newsprint.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    It's difficult to say whether it's something to do with the pacing and style of story, or just the plain horrible artwork that's a cross between a 2001-Kubrick style lightshow fantasia and someone vomiting uncontrollably over the page. Either way, this comic adaptation of Lucas' classic movie falls somewhat short, to the extent that I'm struggling to offer even the most ardent Star Wars fan a good reason to pick this up and spend time with it. I suppose the fact that it's the first Star Wars com It's difficult to say whether it's something to do with the pacing and style of story, or just the plain horrible artwork that's a cross between a 2001-Kubrick style lightshow fantasia and someone vomiting uncontrollably over the page. Either way, this comic adaptation of Lucas' classic movie falls somewhat short, to the extent that I'm struggling to offer even the most ardent Star Wars fan a good reason to pick this up and spend time with it. I suppose the fact that it's the first Star Wars comic and an important piece of Star Wars history. But then again, there's a lot of early Star Wars paraphernalia that helped market the phenomenen at the time that it's just best to forget nowadays ... the 1978 TV Holiday Special springs to mind. What I'm saying is that I'm even struggling to motivate myself to write a review for a book that was just a mediocre adaptation of a decent script. Where the visuals fall so flat, the dialogue fails to ring out and the story doesn't take on any weight, meaning or purpose. It's interesting, I guess, to compare the failure of this to the the success of the movie which achieves so much more with the same plot and dialogue. (there are slight alterations to the plot here - extra scenes with Biggs and a non-slug like Jabba, but you can hear these and more in the much better Star Wars Radio adaptation from a similar period)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Todd Bauerle

    I have read these issues before...most notably in the Dark Horse, two-issue collection from the 90's. But here, the art is presented in a new, remastered color...which breathes new life into the comic. Bound in a nice hard cover presentation, this is a fine bookshelf edition. It also includes a digital edition to read with your Marvel online account. If you are hesitating, don't...this is a confident buy. I have read these issues before...most notably in the Dark Horse, two-issue collection from the 90's. But here, the art is presented in a new, remastered color...which breathes new life into the comic. Bound in a nice hard cover presentation, this is a fine bookshelf edition. It also includes a digital edition to read with your Marvel online account. If you are hesitating, don't...this is a confident buy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    What I really liked in this adaptation was that Marvel got the script from George Lucas himself before the movie was released. The artists did a good job. They stick closely to to the original lines, so as a Star Wars fan I easily could visualize the movie images. Back in 1977 any fan could enjoy Star Wars again reading this adaptation. The rough sketching of the images aren't always my taste as I'm used to a more detailed and precize coloring of comics as is normal in Europe. What I really liked in this adaptation was that Marvel got the script from George Lucas himself before the movie was released. The artists did a good job. They stick closely to to the original lines, so as a Star Wars fan I easily could visualize the movie images. Back in 1977 any fan could enjoy Star Wars again reading this adaptation. The rough sketching of the images aren't always my taste as I'm used to a more detailed and precize coloring of comics as is normal in Europe.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ian Reay

    Absolutely beautiful edition of the original Marvel adaptation. Brand new colouring techniques give life to the artwork like never before! The back of the book contains some sketch covers of the original issues,plus covers of previously collected editions.Perfect!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    fun revisit.....newly re-colored.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kelly K

    This was a collection of the original Star Wars: A New Hope comics by Marvel in 1977. It was great to read the originals that were started shortly after the movie came out.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    good enough to get you ready for the movie.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    I enjoyed it. IT has some slightly different lines from the movie so I can see where Lucas might have gone in future episodes.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jaimie

    Even though the comic adaptation of George Lucas’ Star Wars by Marvel contains a few factual flaws (Red Five, and what’s with Jabba the Hutt?) and the illustrated characters rarely look like Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford, it was still quite delightful to revisit the space epic in comic book form. Most of the flaws I can write off as being due to them writing the story before the finalized film was released, but it was a bit weird to see so much exposition within the panels. Most Even though the comic adaptation of George Lucas’ Star Wars by Marvel contains a few factual flaws (Red Five, and what’s with Jabba the Hutt?) and the illustrated characters rarely look like Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford, it was still quite delightful to revisit the space epic in comic book form. Most of the flaws I can write off as being due to them writing the story before the finalized film was released, but it was a bit weird to see so much exposition within the panels. Most modern comics rely on strong dialogue and visuals to get the story across to readers, but during this period Marvel writers seemed to add a lot of omniscient narrative in addition to these staples - not always necessarily in fact. The majority of the panels adequately depicted the story (with much of the artwork being surprisingly good for non-coloured or shaded work) and the dialogue was generally taken right out of the film, so a lot of their added content in the form of characters’ inner thoughts (which didn’t appear in the film obviously) or in a formalized narration came off as being slightly overkill and in some cases downright forced. All that aside, considering that comic adaptations of films or novels often aren’t successful (even now), Marvel made a pretty strong representation of the Star Wars story!

  20. 4 out of 5

    brian d rogers

    Chaykin is a classic no doubt. A lot like Frank Miller, his style can be somewhat flat at times. You can feel some designs had maybe not been finalized when the original work was done back on the 70s. I noticed this especially on the tie fighter pilots. The special edition colors made the covers look amazing, but on some pages I found myself saying that modern colors would render the image more clear so I don't think modernizing the colors was a knock out " all the time" and not always successfu Chaykin is a classic no doubt. A lot like Frank Miller, his style can be somewhat flat at times. You can feel some designs had maybe not been finalized when the original work was done back on the 70s. I noticed this especially on the tie fighter pilots. The special edition colors made the covers look amazing, but on some pages I found myself saying that modern colors would render the image more clear so I don't think modernizing the colors was a knock out " all the time" and not always successful. A very true adaption over all minus the occasional over the top campy dialogue. Charming book though and worth the read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3470690.html in the days before home video, let alone DVDs, we were able to relive the cinema experience only by getting the comic book, by two Marvel luminaries, Roy Thomas and Howard Chaykin. Of course it's not a match for the big screen (or even small screen, these days), but it's a faithful and enjoyable adaptation with a couple of wrinkles - notably an early scene with Luke and his friend Biggs, which was cut from the film, survives here. https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3470690.html in the days before home video, let alone DVDs, we were able to relive the cinema experience only by getting the comic book, by two Marvel luminaries, Roy Thomas and Howard Chaykin. Of course it's not a match for the big screen (or even small screen, these days), but it's a faithful and enjoyable adaptation with a couple of wrinkles - notably an early scene with Luke and his friend Biggs, which was cut from the film, survives here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This is the reprinted edition of the original comic adaptation of Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope. I actually own a few of the issues but hadn't read them (I'm not sure I own #1 so I hadn't bothered with the others). The artwork was pretty off-putting at first - which is mostly just a product of the time it was made and what comic artwork looked like in general. It grew on me, though, and good grief - by the end of the comic I was just as sucked into the story as I get with the movie. It is fas This is the reprinted edition of the original comic adaptation of Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope. I actually own a few of the issues but hadn't read them (I'm not sure I own #1 so I hadn't bothered with the others). The artwork was pretty off-putting at first - which is mostly just a product of the time it was made and what comic artwork looked like in general. It grew on me, though, and good grief - by the end of the comic I was just as sucked into the story as I get with the movie. It is fascinating tracing how some little details got changed. I really can't believe they put the comic out before the movie actually hit theaters. There are some names or story details that are different because the comic was based on a slightly earlier version of the script. I love these little tidbits - like you're seeing a bit of history forming. I'd definitely read more of the original Marvel comics. I think they've all been reprinted so it should be easy to find.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle de R

    As far as Star Wars comics go, this wasn't my favourite. I prefer the art style of the Prequel adaptations and Darth Vader comics, and there were many discrepancies between this and the film - probably the biggest being Jabba the Hutt. However, this did come out around the time of the movie and is definitely a throwback to the good ol' 70s. As far as Star Wars comics go, this wasn't my favourite. I prefer the art style of the Prequel adaptations and Darth Vader comics, and there were many discrepancies between this and the film - probably the biggest being Jabba the Hutt. However, this did come out around the time of the movie and is definitely a throwback to the good ol' 70s.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Ann

    This graphic novel had a lot more of the storyline than the previous one that I read!! The graphics were awesome but the pages felt really weird. I think they were just too glossy but that’s just me being weird on the material!! I really enjoyed the story and felt like it did a really great job including the whole story Ive seen on screen a handful of times.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sean Chick

    When I came to review this comic, it had 666 ratings. I hate to break that up, but here I am... This is not a good adaptation, at least by 2020 standards. The panels are crowded and never "breath" so to speak. The art is mostly poor, with some bad coloration. Luke sometimes looks like He-Man. What dialogue is added is pretty cheesy even by Star Wars standards. The last line is "What the future holds for these six daring souls, only time and the space-winds know. But, for today...for now...they ar When I came to review this comic, it had 666 ratings. I hate to break that up, but here I am... This is not a good adaptation, at least by 2020 standards. The panels are crowded and never "breath" so to speak. The art is mostly poor, with some bad coloration. Luke sometimes looks like He-Man. What dialogue is added is pretty cheesy even by Star Wars standards. The last line is "What the future holds for these six daring souls, only time and the space-winds know. But, for today...for now...they are content." Not exactly stirring stuff. Still, a few things are actually better here, such as Biggs and the light-saber duel. The Death Star attack is undoubtedly the best adapted section.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ViNo

    As good as the movie. too much dialogue for a comic though!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Byrd

    I loved this book, I'm a big fan of the star wars series, and I hope to buy the next book. I loved this book, I'm a big fan of the star wars series, and I hope to buy the next book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Dolan

    A classic science fiction

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenna ( Chicken Mama )

    Nothing else is better to read then the journey of Luke, Leia, chewie and Han.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This artwork is almost comical in how bad it is. This is based off the original script so some aspects are way off from the story we know. A big old yikes from me on this one.

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