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Adi Parva - Churning of the Ocean

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From the bestselling author of Kari comes a brilliant new interpretation of mythology. Combining stories from the Adi Parva which precede the main narrative of the Pandav-Kaurav war for succession.


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From the bestselling author of Kari comes a brilliant new interpretation of mythology. Combining stories from the Adi Parva which precede the main narrative of the Pandav-Kaurav war for succession.

30 review for Adi Parva - Churning of the Ocean

  1. 5 out of 5

    Santhosh Guru

    I love the art work of Amruta Patil. This book is full of gorgeous art work. I started reading this as I want to introduce Mahabharata to my son in the bedtime stories. I realised I didn’t know much of the work in detail. So this book is my way to get my journey started into this epic. Adi Parva sets a good context, introduces to the backstories of various characters of Mahabharata. Somehow I felt it was a slog to finish this book even though the art is stunning. I wish the story could have been I love the art work of Amruta Patil. This book is full of gorgeous art work. I started reading this as I want to introduce Mahabharata to my son in the bedtime stories. I realised I didn’t know much of the work in detail. So this book is my way to get my journey started into this epic. Adi Parva sets a good context, introduces to the backstories of various characters of Mahabharata. Somehow I felt it was a slog to finish this book even though the art is stunning. I wish the story could have been narrated better, but that is a minor quibble.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diptarup Ghosh Dastidar

    As a visual retelling of the myths leading up to the Mahabharata and two generations after that as a consequence of it, although it gets difficult at times to track the timelines correctly, it is a pleasurable read with amazing artwork.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abhijeet Rawle

    The story has some breaks in flow and tends to go on a tangent but the author brings it back. The visuals are stunning and clearly shows that a lot of thought and imagination has gone into it. I would recommend not breezing through this one - spend time and marvel at the thought put into each visual. There are other great works on mythology and the Mahabharata which go deep in interpretation. This book doesn't attempt to do that, or even pretends to do that - instead it wonderfully brings out an The story has some breaks in flow and tends to go on a tangent but the author brings it back. The visuals are stunning and clearly shows that a lot of thought and imagination has gone into it. I would recommend not breezing through this one - spend time and marvel at the thought put into each visual. There are other great works on mythology and the Mahabharata which go deep in interpretation. This book doesn't attempt to do that, or even pretends to do that - instead it wonderfully brings out an artist's creativity and imagination. Hope to see more such work from Amruta Patil!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ronil

    My review will actually be: 3.5 A good book with large and detailed images and drawings! It has chosen only one topic particularly about Mahabharata, so if someone starts to read the book with thought that it will give detailed insight of Mahabharata then one will get disappointed. The illustrations are sometimes very gorgeous and thought-provoking, while sometimes they are bit out of the context. So it makes one fill like the continuum is not maintained but on second thought it seems there are ma My review will actually be: 3.5 A good book with large and detailed images and drawings! It has chosen only one topic particularly about Mahabharata, so if someone starts to read the book with thought that it will give detailed insight of Mahabharata then one will get disappointed. The illustrations are sometimes very gorgeous and thought-provoking, while sometimes they are bit out of the context. So it makes one fill like the continuum is not maintained but on second thought it seems there are many points where there cannot be any related illustration possible for the topic author has chosen! Talking about the story line-up, it is quite detailed but not up to the mark or expectations. The narrative by story-teller is a good concept and can be used by other authors for a new experience and can be used as a great backdrop for stories. Overall, if you are interested in Indian Mythology and also want to experience something new by reading an illustrated story-telling it can be stepping stone for a new genre of books to be discovered by the reader.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak Hegde

    Probably 3.5 stars. This is the retelling of the origin of the world as per the Vedas and the precursor story of the Mahabharata till before the battle of Kurukshetra. So nothing new here if you have read books on it before. The only difference is the narrator is the celestial river Ganga in her earthly form as the Sutradhar (storyteller in Indian tradition). The artwork is brilliant with the collages and painted artwork. Amruta Patil brings out the essence of the tale and brings out a magic real Probably 3.5 stars. This is the retelling of the origin of the world as per the Vedas and the precursor story of the Mahabharata till before the battle of Kurukshetra. So nothing new here if you have read books on it before. The only difference is the narrator is the celestial river Ganga in her earthly form as the Sutradhar (storyteller in Indian tradition). The artwork is brilliant with the collages and painted artwork. Amruta Patil brings out the essence of the tale and brings out a magic realism in the retelling of the epic. There a bunch of easter eggs in references to the Egyptian Hieroglyphics (page 65), The Chinese folklore - the dragon with a serpentine tail (Page 91) and references to Hampi, Hyderabad and Mughal architecture towards the ending of the book. Quite an enjoyable read especially for the unusual mixed-media artwork.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Parmeet Kohli

    So a Mahabharata fixation made me pick Adi Parva - Churning of the Ocean by Amruta Patil. My first graphic novel and I wasn't sure what to expect. What an outstanding read it turned out to be! Up there with Mrityunjaya for me as an alternate narration of the epic. Her paintings are beyond words and so is the narrative. Her prose never fails to match her stunning artwork and sets a wonderful pace to the tale. Patil uses the age old Indian tradition of a "sutradhar" to weave her web of stories and So a Mahabharata fixation made me pick Adi Parva - Churning of the Ocean by Amruta Patil. My first graphic novel and I wasn't sure what to expect. What an outstanding read it turned out to be! Up there with Mrityunjaya for me as an alternate narration of the epic. Her paintings are beyond words and so is the narrative. Her prose never fails to match her stunning artwork and sets a wonderful pace to the tale. Patil uses the age old Indian tradition of a "sutradhar" to weave her web of stories and connect with the contemporary reader. Gandhari and Kunti's depiction in particular is spectacular. It truly is akin to watching a movie and reading a book at the same time. Read up!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abhinav Agarwal

    A spectacular graphic retelling of the Mahabharata. This first in a trilogy will leave you spellbound Adi Parva, by ("via") Amruta Patil is a standout addition to the retellings of the epic, for several reasons. This lavishly produced high quality edition is a marvelous work, for several reasons. This is a graphic book, with the emphasis being more on the drawings than on the text. Each page has at most a two-three lines of text, which leaves you with a full page of charcoal or color illustration A spectacular graphic retelling of the Mahabharata. This first in a trilogy will leave you spellbound Adi Parva, by ("via") Amruta Patil is a standout addition to the retellings of the epic, for several reasons. This lavishly produced high quality edition is a marvelous work, for several reasons. This is a graphic book, with the emphasis being more on the drawings than on the text. Each page has at most a two-three lines of text, which leaves you with a full page of charcoal or color illustrations to gaze at.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vaidehi

    A stunning new take on traditional Indian myths and legends as well as the oral tradition. The author is able to add incredible depth to these oft-told stories and her original illustrations allow an incredibly interesting perspective to the tales - an absolute must-read!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nirav

    Such beautiful book. Spellbound. Loved it. Must read for all. Can't wait to read Sauptik. Those paintings have made me a fan of her work! Such beautiful book. Spellbound. Loved it. Must read for all. Can't wait to read Sauptik. Those paintings have made me a fan of her work!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Em*bedded-in-books*

    An awesome work of art and profound knowledge. This book is only for those who have a good background knowledge of Hindu mythogy and lore.. the stories are just presented as glimpses from the Mahabharatha with more stress upon the beautiful artwork and philosophical nuggets I enjoyed it thoroughly. One rant is that the font was very difficult to read , being small and in cursive writing. Couldn't read at a stretch. I am not done with the book ..will be concentrating on one painting at a time.. My An awesome work of art and profound knowledge. This book is only for those who have a good background knowledge of Hindu mythogy and lore.. the stories are just presented as glimpses from the Mahabharatha with more stress upon the beautiful artwork and philosophical nuggets I enjoyed it thoroughly. One rant is that the font was very difficult to read , being small and in cursive writing. Couldn't read at a stretch. I am not done with the book ..will be concentrating on one painting at a time.. My first read was hurried so as to know what comes next... Am awesome piece of work ..wonder how much time it took to complete. Had started this as part of my snake and ladders challenge where I got the prompt doe "graphic novels"

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tushar Gandhe

    I often think backstory of Mahabharat is not given its due credit. Amruta Patil in Adi Parva starts right from beginning of the world and connects some of the countless stories in a thread like a really good Sutradhar (the threadbearer). In auther's note she says "At the end of every story is the nub of a new beginning. The snakes versus birds rivalry in the Adi Parva is no careless latter-day addition to Mahabharatan lore; it is a fitting metaphor for the mortal rivalries that will come to pass I often think backstory of Mahabharat is not given its due credit. Amruta Patil in Adi Parva starts right from beginning of the world and connects some of the countless stories in a thread like a really good Sutradhar (the threadbearer). In auther's note she says "At the end of every story is the nub of a new beginning. The snakes versus birds rivalry in the Adi Parva is no careless latter-day addition to Mahabharatan lore; it is a fitting metaphor for the mortal rivalries that will come to pass later in the tale." I cannot agree more. I really liked the format of visual retelling. The pictures are so nice and apt. Overall the book is really worth a read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Divya Pal Singh

    Any retelling of this eternal epic is bound to be interesting. This graphic version is no exception. Frankly, I found the illustrations dense and rather abstract - as if clouded by the mists of time. However, my artist wife considers them brilliant, and I've valued her judgment in all things aesthetic. What I found fascinating was the script - was it hand crafted or printed? Finally, my 5 star rating shows my appreciation. Have also got the sequel "Sauptik" and am champing at the bit to start on Any retelling of this eternal epic is bound to be interesting. This graphic version is no exception. Frankly, I found the illustrations dense and rather abstract - as if clouded by the mists of time. However, my artist wife considers them brilliant, and I've valued her judgment in all things aesthetic. What I found fascinating was the script - was it hand crafted or printed? Finally, my 5 star rating shows my appreciation. Have also got the sequel "Sauptik" and am champing at the bit to start on it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Swathi

    Illustrations were good. Characters were refreshingly simple unlike how gods, kings, queens and demons are portrayed in other visual medium. The stories in this book lacked cohesiveness. Introduction of a character seems rushed. E.g. I did not know about Janmejaya before this and dint come out of the book knowing a lot about him. I felt like there was a deliberate emphasis on Woman's Beauty, selflessness, strength and the same was downplayed for male characters. Illustrations were good. Characters were refreshingly simple unlike how gods, kings, queens and demons are portrayed in other visual medium. The stories in this book lacked cohesiveness. Introduction of a character seems rushed. E.g. I did not know about Janmejaya before this and dint come out of the book knowing a lot about him. I felt like there was a deliberate emphasis on Woman's Beauty, selflessness, strength and the same was downplayed for male characters.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nanta

    Late to the party here, but this was so beautiful! With the central conceit of a suthradhar, I love how the book is structured and all the metaphors of weaves and wefts that Amruta Patil introduces. The tales are as old as stories themselves and there is some creative liberty with the stories or at least they were different from the versions I had read before. But as Amruta herself puts it so eloquently - tales must be tilled like the land so they can breathe, the only thing you owe allegiance t Late to the party here, but this was so beautiful! With the central conceit of a suthradhar, I love how the book is structured and all the metaphors of weaves and wefts that Amruta Patil introduces. The tales are as old as stories themselves and there is some creative liberty with the stories or at least they were different from the versions I had read before. But as Amruta herself puts it so eloquently - tales must be tilled like the land so they can breathe, the only thing you owe allegiance to is the essence. The illustrations are stunning and very unique. The snark asides and lively audience provide a nice relief and counterpoint. Some of our most repeated stories, told in a new and lovely style!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sneha Sahay

    Took my time with this one. Very beautifully illustrated. The stories are also very insightful. Magnificent!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Megha Sharma

    For once that a took interest in mythology and did not end up pulling my hair or yawning. Give it a shot, I say.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jahnabi

    Spellbinding, engrossing work! Amruta Patil’s retelling of the Mahabharata’s first book deserves to be read and seen. She’s as talented a writer as an artist.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tejas

    Adi Parva is almost there. The art is exquisite but towards the end it took a direction that was unexpected and didn't work for me. But each frame is masterful. Adi Parva is almost there. The art is exquisite but towards the end it took a direction that was unexpected and didn't work for me. But each frame is masterful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sumit Shetty

    The artwork is brilliant

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dani Scott

    A complex tapestry of Hindu stories with beautiful mixed media pages.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bala Variyam

    Beautifully illustrated and expertly weaved yarns of stories

  22. 5 out of 5

    Purva Khandelwal

    Another fantastic story book!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    KhepiAri

    'The thread twirls and brings us to a queen of this land, whose story closely mirrors Shakuntala's. Like Shakuntala, she was born of a king and an apsara. Like Shakuntala by the Malini, she was a motherless baby left by the river Yamuna. She too was taken in by a foster father, without any mother-figure in the picture. Unlike Shakuntala, though, this queen was a fierce boulder- not victim- of fate. With her, the childlike innocence of Krita Yug started slowly giving way to the gritter Treta and 'The thread twirls and brings us to a queen of this land, whose story closely mirrors Shakuntala's. Like Shakuntala, she was born of a king and an apsara. Like Shakuntala by the Malini, she was a motherless baby left by the river Yamuna. She too was taken in by a foster father, without any mother-figure in the picture. Unlike Shakuntala, though, this queen was a fierce boulder- not victim- of fate. With her, the childlike innocence of Krita Yug started slowly giving way to the gritter Treta and Dwapar' We see the Epic Mahabharata as the story of Five Brothers' quest to gain the rightful and those five imbeciles were husband to one fiery woman. We see the Kauravs as the evil and Pandavs as ethical. Yet Amruta Patil traces the whole lineage of our myths to the abstract, metaphorical, very primal rivalries between the children of Kadru and Vinata - the reptiles vs the aviators. I am no expert in art, but calling this book a #graphicnovel is not enough! There is flowing platter of mix media, styles and observations. Garuda is being drawn like Horus picked from a Hieroglyph. Vishnu is indeed androgynous and Ganga the Saturadhar painted in black and white invokes the ancient tradition of oral storytelling with a pinch of sarcasm. Patil retells the myths from the beginning among many beginnings, she keeps the overlapping of stories deliberate and the questioning audience mere mortals to witty Narrator. Best part was when Brahma, Vishnu and Shiv call it a tie on who is the creator of multiverse!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Somya

    So this is an illustrated version of Chapter/Book/Parva 1 of the Mahabharata. As it says "It extends the reach of Mahabharata in either direction". That it does! I was not thrilled initially but warmed up to it gradually. Not bad. The illustrations are good. Some stories from Hindu mythology that I did not know. All in all, good. But borrow it from the library, if you can. So this is an illustrated version of Chapter/Book/Parva 1 of the Mahabharata. As it says "It extends the reach of Mahabharata in either direction". That it does! I was not thrilled initially but warmed up to it gradually. Not bad. The illustrations are good. Some stories from Hindu mythology that I did not know. All in all, good. But borrow it from the library, if you can.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Beautiful, enthralling, and eloquent, I knew, from reading Kari, that Amruta Patil is worth reading, but this is on a completely different level. Taking on the first part of the Mahabharata is extremely ambitious, and Patil is up to the challenge.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Saptarshi Ghosh

    Adi Parva, by Amruta Patil, is the 1st book of the Mahabharata duology to be followed by Sauptik: Blood and Flowers.It is primarily a graphic novel with brilliant artworks throughout. The story does not mention of Ugrasrava Sauti narrating the tale to the assembled rishis at the Naimisha Forest and is replaced by Ganga and later Ashwathama ( in the 2nd book) as the storyteller.Introducing Ganga as our sutradhaar for the story, narrating the tale to the gathered crowd of men and women, the author Adi Parva, by Amruta Patil, is the 1st book of the Mahabharata duology to be followed by Sauptik: Blood and Flowers.It is primarily a graphic novel with brilliant artworks throughout. The story does not mention of Ugrasrava Sauti narrating the tale to the assembled rishis at the Naimisha Forest and is replaced by Ganga and later Ashwathama ( in the 2nd book) as the storyteller.Introducing Ganga as our sutradhaar for the story, narrating the tale to the gathered crowd of men and women, the author cum painter has attempted to illustrate and emphasize on the practice of these epics being orally transmitted from generations to generations, altering the tale by bit over time. Although it is a brilliant piece of artwork, some parts of the story might feel out of context or irrelevant to the flow, making it partly difficult to understand.Apart from this few sections, mostly keeping true to the stories, the author has been lucid in her style of writing.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rohit

    My recently re-discovered love for Indian mythology, thanks in no small measure to Mrs. Divakurani's 'The Palace of Illusions', guided me to purchase this book when a group on FB announced that a book by the name of 'Adi Parva' was available at a discount. The name piqued my interest, the theme appealed to me, and after ascertaining that the reviews were mostly positive, I decided to take the plunge. The books deals with a handful of ancillary tales surrounding the main story of Mahabharat. These My recently re-discovered love for Indian mythology, thanks in no small measure to Mrs. Divakurani's 'The Palace of Illusions', guided me to purchase this book when a group on FB announced that a book by the name of 'Adi Parva' was available at a discount. The name piqued my interest, the theme appealed to me, and after ascertaining that the reviews were mostly positive, I decided to take the plunge. The books deals with a handful of ancillary tales surrounding the main story of Mahabharat. These are narrated by a lady, who is the human embodiment of Ganga, to a small gathering of village folks. The book itself is presented in the form of a comic book, the exception being that the quantity of text accompanying each panel is quite small. Even the sketches seem to be drawn using as few lines as possible. Indeed, minimalism is a theme which pervades the book in its entirety. I was familiar with most of the anecdotes presented in the book, but I enjoyed the way the author chose to represent them here. This is (hopefully) the first of the 18 'Parva's. And I am eagerly looking forwards to the next one now.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Varsha Dinesh

    I think overall 3.5 Some of Amruta Patil's prose is absolutely jaw-droppingly beautiful, and the format is very well suited to this kind of storytelling. I adore the story-within-a-story narrative, and the paintings are gorgeous. I do wish there was a little more depth to each story told within the network of stories. This reads like a collection of very condensed nuggets from the Mahabharata rather than an in-depth look at any particular narrative thread: I do wish Patil had focused on something I think overall 3.5 Some of Amruta Patil's prose is absolutely jaw-droppingly beautiful, and the format is very well suited to this kind of storytelling. I adore the story-within-a-story narrative, and the paintings are gorgeous. I do wish there was a little more depth to each story told within the network of stories. This reads like a collection of very condensed nuggets from the Mahabharata rather than an in-depth look at any particular narrative thread: I do wish Patil had focused on something particular, wholly and deeply, rather than touch upon several different tales and leave the details that enhance it out of her narrative. As it is, there is something just slightly deliberately esoteric about this graphic novel that jars with me, not exoticism per se but a sort of mysticism that alludes to an (odd and not entirely true) idea that Hindu mythology is oh, so incomprehensible in its deep philosophy. Although I will give her that the imagery and the colored pages are absolutely gorgeous.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Suhit

    Amazing graphic interpretation of unknown parts of Mahabharata. The creativity/imaginations put in most of art work is in different mediums charcoal acrylic etc and its really beautiful. This book doesn't talk about the great fight or the great conversation between Arjun and Krishna. The stories are mostly before that. The storytelling using Ganga as a sutradhar brings up a connection to the modern world. Even the dialogues seem anachronistic but delivers the message with a contemporary connect. Amazing graphic interpretation of unknown parts of Mahabharata. The creativity/imaginations put in most of art work is in different mediums charcoal acrylic etc and its really beautiful. This book doesn't talk about the great fight or the great conversation between Arjun and Krishna. The stories are mostly before that. The storytelling using Ganga as a sutradhar brings up a connection to the modern world. Even the dialogues seem anachronistic but delivers the message with a contemporary connect. I liked the ideas how interpretations of devas and asuras were provided as ideas of different moral standards. Overall the book was really enjoyable. The print and page quality is brilliant. 3.5 years of art work goes into the book. Respects for the hard work.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aseem Kaul

    Amruta Patil's Adi Parva features some exquisite art work, and the idea of using Ganga as a sutradhaar, recounting stories to a justifiably skeptical audience is truly inspired; so it's a shame that the story it tells is not more engrossing. A few bright touches aside (I loved the section on Gandhari) Patil does little more than rehash the old myths, in a way that will neither endear them to those unfamiliar with Indian mythology, nor excite those who are. If anything, Adi Parva makes these old Amruta Patil's Adi Parva features some exquisite art work, and the idea of using Ganga as a sutradhaar, recounting stories to a justifiably skeptical audience is truly inspired; so it's a shame that the story it tells is not more engrossing. A few bright touches aside (I loved the section on Gandhari) Patil does little more than rehash the old myths, in a way that will neither endear them to those unfamiliar with Indian mythology, nor excite those who are. If anything, Adi Parva makes these old stories seem both inchoate and childishly silly, which though not entirely unfair is at least somewhat unnecessary.

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