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The man once named one of America’s ten “toughest” CEOs by Fortune magazine offers current and future leaders practical advice on how to make their companies and organizations more effective. Throughout his distinguished career—as a naval aviator, a U.S. Congressman, a top aide to four American presidents, a high-level diplomat, a CEO of two Fortune 500 companies, and the o The man once named one of America’s ten “toughest” CEOs by Fortune magazine offers current and future leaders practical advice on how to make their companies and organizations more effective. Throughout his distinguished career—as a naval aviator, a U.S. Congressman, a top aide to four American presidents, a high-level diplomat, a CEO of two Fortune 500 companies, and the only twice-serving Secretary of Defense in American history—Donald Rumsfeld has collected hundreds of pithy, compelling, and often humorous observations about leadership, business, and life. When President Gerald Ford ordered these aphorisms distributed to his White House staff in 1974, the collection became known as "Rumsfeld's Rules." First gathered as three-by-five cards in a shoebox and then typed up and circulated informally over the years, these eminently nonpartisan rules have amused and enlightened presidents, business executives, chiefs of staff, foreign officials, diplomats, and members of Congress.  They earned praise from the Wall Street Journal as "Required reading," and from the New York Times which said: "Rumsfeld's Rules can be profitably read in any organization…The best reading, though, are his sprightly tips on inoculating oneself against that dread White House disease, the inflated ego." Distilled from a career of unusual breadth and accomplishment, and organized under practical topics like hiring people, running a meeting, and dealing with the press, Rumsfeld's Rules can benefit people at every stage in their careers and in every walk of life, from aspiring politicos and industrialists to recent college graduates, teachers, and business leaders.


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The man once named one of America’s ten “toughest” CEOs by Fortune magazine offers current and future leaders practical advice on how to make their companies and organizations more effective. Throughout his distinguished career—as a naval aviator, a U.S. Congressman, a top aide to four American presidents, a high-level diplomat, a CEO of two Fortune 500 companies, and the o The man once named one of America’s ten “toughest” CEOs by Fortune magazine offers current and future leaders practical advice on how to make their companies and organizations more effective. Throughout his distinguished career—as a naval aviator, a U.S. Congressman, a top aide to four American presidents, a high-level diplomat, a CEO of two Fortune 500 companies, and the only twice-serving Secretary of Defense in American history—Donald Rumsfeld has collected hundreds of pithy, compelling, and often humorous observations about leadership, business, and life. When President Gerald Ford ordered these aphorisms distributed to his White House staff in 1974, the collection became known as "Rumsfeld's Rules." First gathered as three-by-five cards in a shoebox and then typed up and circulated informally over the years, these eminently nonpartisan rules have amused and enlightened presidents, business executives, chiefs of staff, foreign officials, diplomats, and members of Congress.  They earned praise from the Wall Street Journal as "Required reading," and from the New York Times which said: "Rumsfeld's Rules can be profitably read in any organization…The best reading, though, are his sprightly tips on inoculating oneself against that dread White House disease, the inflated ego." Distilled from a career of unusual breadth and accomplishment, and organized under practical topics like hiring people, running a meeting, and dealing with the press, Rumsfeld's Rules can benefit people at every stage in their careers and in every walk of life, from aspiring politicos and industrialists to recent college graduates, teachers, and business leaders.

30 review for Rumsfeld's Rules: Leadership Lessons in Business, Politics, War, and Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad Manske

    The US has benefited for many decades the wisdom and knowledge of Don Rumsfeld. Two weeks ago we hosted the former SecDef at National War College where he regaled students and faculty alike with stories of his time in government. This book, as he admits early, is a collection of pithy expressions and quotes he put in a box and then eventually compiled them into a book. It is a wonderful book of valuable lessons for any aspiring leader, in government or business. I thoroughly enjoyed the reaffirm The US has benefited for many decades the wisdom and knowledge of Don Rumsfeld. Two weeks ago we hosted the former SecDef at National War College where he regaled students and faculty alike with stories of his time in government. This book, as he admits early, is a collection of pithy expressions and quotes he put in a box and then eventually compiled them into a book. It is a wonderful book of valuable lessons for any aspiring leader, in government or business. I thoroughly enjoyed the reaffirmation of his perspective with an understanding that being a leader is a human endeavor and not always a popularity contest. I rarely give books a 5 here, but to me this one deserves it!

  2. 4 out of 5

    James Wazorick

    This is a collection of bits of advice that Mr. Rumsfeld has been collecting for 60+ years. They come from many sources and are presented with brief explanations and examples of their application. The best part are the anecdotes from his career and other government, military and business leaders that illustrate the wisdom they embody and the perils of ignoring them. In Rumsfeld’s lexicon they might be “known knowns”, or perhaps “unknown knowns”, things we know but don’t realize that we do. It wo This is a collection of bits of advice that Mr. Rumsfeld has been collecting for 60+ years. They come from many sources and are presented with brief explanations and examples of their application. The best part are the anecdotes from his career and other government, military and business leaders that illustrate the wisdom they embody and the perils of ignoring them. In Rumsfeld’s lexicon they might be “known knowns”, or perhaps “unknown knowns”, things we know but don’t realize that we do. It would be unfortunate should some bypass this book because they disagree with his politics, because, while I didn’t encounter any blinding revelations, it is filled with sensible advice for all who would be leaders. Chapter 13, “The Case For Capitalism” should be required reading for liberal arts students; their professors certainly haven’t got a clue. Since it’s not a narrative it’s an easy read that you can dip into over time and is well worth it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Puddock8

    I enjoyed this. Lots of ideas and advice which really work in business and office life. It is also quite amusing and has interesting bits of history and insight to how government works, or doesn’t. He is a bit up himself, but had a remarkable career in government and large drugs companies. Rumsfeld is the man who, during a press briefing in 2002 about the absence of evidence linking the government of Iraq with the supply of weapons of mass destruction to terrorist groups, famously said...... “There I enjoyed this. Lots of ideas and advice which really work in business and office life. It is also quite amusing and has interesting bits of history and insight to how government works, or doesn’t. He is a bit up himself, but had a remarkable career in government and large drugs companies. Rumsfeld is the man who, during a press briefing in 2002 about the absence of evidence linking the government of Iraq with the supply of weapons of mass destruction to terrorist groups, famously said...... “There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Chock full of common sense, it’s a nice refresher “course” for senior level management – resulting, hopefully, with those folks passing the book and its messages down the line for the benefit of their younger staff. More interesting, though, are Rumsfeld’s reminisces of his dealings with various world leaders and how some of those experiences could be related – whether positively or negatively – to basic leadership principles. A good read. If he’s not there yet, Rumsfeld is quickly falling into Chock full of common sense, it’s a nice refresher “course” for senior level management – resulting, hopefully, with those folks passing the book and its messages down the line for the benefit of their younger staff. More interesting, though, are Rumsfeld’s reminisces of his dealings with various world leaders and how some of those experiences could be related – whether positively or negatively – to basic leadership principles. A good read. If he’s not there yet, Rumsfeld is quickly falling into the category of “senior statesman.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clara Roberts

    Over 8 decades of living Don Rumsfeld has accumulated leadership rules that are helpful to anyone in business, government or just in life. This is one of those books that just keeps giving wisdom to the reader. It is a book that I could refer to many, many times. I think I would have found this book helpful when I started my career many years ago. Most of his rules are common sense. When these rules are ideas from others he gives credit to the other person.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maciek Wiktorowski

    Donald Rumsfeld is one of the men that I kept watching in tv news for almost my whole life. Buying that book I was not especially interested in his achievements or career, but the idea of the book seduced me. This is an expanded version of so-called "Rumsfeld Rules" - the list of quotes, ideas, lessons that Mr. Rumsfeld was jotting down since he was a teenager and kept these notes in a shoe box. Later, when he served in White House he gave a collection of those quotes divided into a couple of se Donald Rumsfeld is one of the men that I kept watching in tv news for almost my whole life. Buying that book I was not especially interested in his achievements or career, but the idea of the book seduced me. This is an expanded version of so-called "Rumsfeld Rules" - the list of quotes, ideas, lessons that Mr. Rumsfeld was jotting down since he was a teenager and kept these notes in a shoe box. Later, when he served in White House he gave a collection of those quotes divided into a couple of sections to president Ford, and since then "Rumsfeld Rules" are handed in employees of the White House. I always shared the same mindset - it is better to learn from someone else's experience as this is the cheapest way of learning. I did not disappoint myself. What is more, I discovered how interesting person Rumsfeld was, an aviator in Navy, Congressman, Ambassador, Secretary of the Defense (the role that was known to me) and a CEO of a couple of top US companies (total surprise!). In the book, you will find pieces of advice on almost all aspects of leadership from hiring, communication to even, how to drive a meeting in a dictator-like manner. Although some of the Rumsfeld Rules are still valid, you can feel that some of them are old-school and in the remote work environment that is spreading are losing their meaning. Nevertheless, the vast majority is universal and will be universal, so you can give that book to your kids and later to grandkids so they can benefit out of it. There is no school like the old school and Mr. Rumsfeld is a headmaster.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Riordan

    Nothing new, nothing original. The book purports to be a collection of life lessons or rules that helped Rumsfeld through his personal and professional life. While it starts out in that vein, it then veers off into a memoir and then he tries to bring it back to being just a collection of rules near the end. If you’re looking for pearls of wisdom to make your life better/easier, “The Notebooks of Lazarus Long” by Robert Heinlein would be a better choice. One of Rumsfeld’s rules is “Never apologize Nothing new, nothing original. The book purports to be a collection of life lessons or rules that helped Rumsfeld through his personal and professional life. While it starts out in that vein, it then veers off into a memoir and then he tries to bring it back to being just a collection of rules near the end. If you’re looking for pearls of wisdom to make your life better/easier, “The Notebooks of Lazarus Long” by Robert Heinlein would be a better choice. One of Rumsfeld’s rules is “Never apologize”. He doesn’t explain how that is supposed to help you in life, but it is one of the few rules he actually follows. From the memoir portion of the book, it would seem that if he had followed his rules, the George W. Bush administration would have been less tumultuous. In the areas where history shows that Mr. Rumsfeld may have made a mistake, it is surprising the number of memos or marginal notes that he cites that shows that he suggested a different course, but was over-ruled by others. Not a book I would recommend. Is there any way to award negative stars?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    Superb! The best book on leadership I have ever read. Forget what you think of Donald Rumsfeld’s politcs or his role in the Iraq war. He is an outstanding public man whose experience has a lot to teach about courage, conviction, loyalty and determination in the face of adversity. His “rules” are bite-sized nuggets of advice related in a folksy manner. A great read for those in or aspiring to positions of leadership.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Brateman

    Loved it! It's part managerial training, part self-help, part historical. Rumsfeld is a smart guy, and has really put his intellect to its full uses in government and business. I should really get a copy of the original business rules and put them up on the wall at work! Or, just keep them tucked away in my not-so-secret drawer of treats and toys. Loved it! It's part managerial training, part self-help, part historical. Rumsfeld is a smart guy, and has really put his intellect to its full uses in government and business. I should really get a copy of the original business rules and put them up on the wall at work! Or, just keep them tucked away in my not-so-secret drawer of treats and toys.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pete Zilla

    An entertainingly string together string of rules, quotes, and vignettes from Rumfeld’s life. I only gave it three stars as I had a hard time restraining my cynicism as he articulated his leadership lessons with barely a nod towards his many failures. I would have better enjoyed his perspective if he had taken a more critical eye towards those events.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    This interesting book introduces the author's collection of quotes gathered over his lengthy career, and gives his personal historical context for each of them. I found myself sharing his content in several conversations. Good food for thought. This interesting book introduces the author's collection of quotes gathered over his lengthy career, and gives his personal historical context for each of them. I found myself sharing his content in several conversations. Good food for thought.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Lucas

    Though not a fan of the administrations under which Rumsfeld served, I both enjoyed reading his anecdotes and perspective on management, leadership and collaboration. The rules are strong directives for efficient and effective use of time, talent, and resources.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sam Robb

    Thought provoking and informative Anyone interested in reflections on leadership in both public and private sectors accompanied by an insider’s account of several administrations would enjoy this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vsalogub

    A bit of history, a bit of politics and a few good thoughts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Waqar Ahmed

    Perhaps one of the best books I have read this year. Very interesting, very instructive full of crisp and clear advice by a man who has served in the white house multiple times

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jcr

    An inside look into the only person to serve as Secretary of Defense twice. Learn more about the man and see how it measures up to the persona reported by the press.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Vijayakumar

    Okay read Reads as short summary and defining Rumsfeldism. There are pockets of deep thoughts that readers / aspiring leaders can glean.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pete Guarnieri

    Get the audio book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    A nice little book packed with a lifetime of wisdoms. Good practical tool.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leandro Kaçaj

    Love the book and advices. Even though I don't agree with Many of his policies, his advices were very helpful. Love it. Love the book and advices. Even though I don't agree with Many of his policies, his advices were very helpful. Love it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Justin Fanelli

    Small government defense

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul,

    Rumsfeld and I differ on a lot of points, and this book is more than a little self-congratulatory, but there is still a lot to learn from Rumsfeld's wealth of experience. He listened to people and learned from them, and that is a gift that not many have. There are a lot of great quotes in here, both by him and by others. Here are a few of my favorites: If you can find something everyone agrees on, it’s wrong. —Representative Mo Udall (D-AZ) People are policy! Without the best people in place, the Rumsfeld and I differ on a lot of points, and this book is more than a little self-congratulatory, but there is still a lot to learn from Rumsfeld's wealth of experience. He listened to people and learned from them, and that is a gift that not many have. There are a lot of great quotes in here, both by him and by others. Here are a few of my favorites: If you can find something everyone agrees on, it’s wrong. —Representative Mo Udall (D-AZ) People are policy! Without the best people in place, the best ideas don’t matter. —DR. ED FEULNER Keep the boss’s options open. He is the one faced with the toughest decisions. The easier ones are generally made at lower levels. Don’t make his job harder by making decisions that could limit his flexibility. Agreement can always be reached by increasing the generality of the conclusion; when this is done, the form is generally preserved but only the illusion of policy is created. The default tendency in any bureaucracy, especially in government, is to substitute discussion for decision-making. The act of calling a meeting about a problem can in some cases be confused with actually doing something. People generally don’t walk out of such meetings feeling satisfied about what took place. If as the leader of an organization you call a meeting, make sure you have something to communicate or need to learn in a group setting. Have a goal. It’s helpful to circulate an agenda in advance. Begin the discussion by reminding attendees of the agenda and ticking off the things you’d like to cover in the time scheduled. When ending a meeting, make a practice of summarizing the salient points and takeaways, making sure that all participants know precisely what actions you intend to be taken and by whom. If there are specific tasks to be completed by you or others, the attendees all need to know it. Like many in positions of responsibility, I have learned from my own experience that bad personnel decisions can have exceedingly harmful results. When that occurs, as it undoubtedly will, your task, unpleasant as it may be, is to face up to your mistake and take steps to correct it—and fast. Do not wait. Errors, especially personnel errors, do not get better with time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Daly

    I picked up this book after going to see a lecture Don Rumsfeld gave at the Atlanta History Center this past November. I was always a fan of the Don Rumsfeld press conferences but hearing him talk about leadership in government especially his experiences in the executive branch for four Presidents were what lead me to pick up this book. The idea of Rumsfeld Rules was simple starting when he was young and encouraged by his school teacher mother he started writing down various phrases and snippets I picked up this book after going to see a lecture Don Rumsfeld gave at the Atlanta History Center this past November. I was always a fan of the Don Rumsfeld press conferences but hearing him talk about leadership in government especially his experiences in the executive branch for four Presidents were what lead me to pick up this book. The idea of Rumsfeld Rules was simple starting when he was young and encouraged by his school teacher mother he started writing down various phrases and snippets of advice and keep them in a shoe box. I actually have done the same thing since high school and now keep a moleskin that has some of my favorites on the front cover and I’m always adding new ones as well. As time went by and Donald Rumsfeld became Gerald Ford’s Chief of Staff the President asked for a copy of the maxims he had collected on management in government. Rumsfeld had them typed up and labeled the document Rumsfeld’s Rules. Overall I think there is a lot in this book to walk away with especially since I work for a Government Agency that has a high profile at time. Rumsfeld’s wisdom at times is clouded by his baggage but it does not mean some of his points lack merit. Here are some of the Rules that I think are applicable to my experience and have been written down in my moleskin… •Learn from those who have been there. •Whatever your position, reach out to those who know more than you do, and have been around longer than you have. Find those people and listen carefully. •“Disagreement is not disloyalty.” –Curtis E. Sahakian •Some leaders don’t end meetings when it’s clear they’ve become a waste of time. Instead they sit there and let the meeting experience a slow, painful death of its own. •Large bureaucracies can be masterful at creating an insular and self-serving culture in which people reinforce each other and become captive to what becomes conventional wisdom. •Never say “the White House wants.” Building can’t want. •Remember you are not all that important. Your responsibilities are. •Your best question is often ‘Why’.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Nelson

    This is a nice book to use as a reference or even quick thumb through for little anecdotes on leadership. Don't get hung up on politics or what you may think of Rumsfeld personally. It's difficult to discount his experience from serving in Congress, an Ambassador to NATO, Chief of Staff to President Ford, and Secretary of Defense on two different occasions. He's quick to point out mistakes and miscalculations from his career, but with all of that experience it's hard to discount some nuggets of This is a nice book to use as a reference or even quick thumb through for little anecdotes on leadership. Don't get hung up on politics or what you may think of Rumsfeld personally. It's difficult to discount his experience from serving in Congress, an Ambassador to NATO, Chief of Staff to President Ford, and Secretary of Defense on two different occasions. He's quick to point out mistakes and miscalculations from his career, but with all of that experience it's hard to discount some nuggets of wisdom that are valuable and applicable to leadership. Particularly helpful are the rules on how to run a meeting something sorely needed in today's business world. The appendix has the full list of "rules" which includes quotes, thoughts, observations, and axioms. I found the book to be measured, concise, and accessible. Very practical and common sense approach. It's worth a review even if you just choose to read the list of "rules."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    As indicated by the book's title, "Rumsfeld's Rules: Leadership Lessons in Business, Politics, War, and Life" contains Rumsfeld's life-long collection of observations about leadership, business and life. He takes credit for few of these observations, but instead credits the originators of these proven thoughts, rules, and observations which have served him well, and which can serve others just as well. Originally collected in a shoe box by Rumsfeld, they were typed and distributed to President F As indicated by the book's title, "Rumsfeld's Rules: Leadership Lessons in Business, Politics, War, and Life" contains Rumsfeld's life-long collection of observations about leadership, business and life. He takes credit for few of these observations, but instead credits the originators of these proven thoughts, rules, and observations which have served him well, and which can serve others just as well. Originally collected in a shoe box by Rumsfeld, they were typed and distributed to President Ford's inner circle when Rumsfeld was Chief of Staff. The topics cover a variety of subjects, from leadership to running a meeting to simple rules of life, and include numerous Rumsfeld anecdotes about each. Rumsfeld held positions of leadership in politics, military, and business, and has always been considered to be an extremely successful individual. These little rules apparently served him well though his life, and there are nuggets for success for all readers.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam Rabiner

    If we remember Rumsfeld at all, former Secretary of Defense under George W. Bush, it's as the guy who gave a press conference and spoke of the known knowns, the known unknowns, and the unknown unknowns. Well it turns out the man has spent a life-time collecting words of wisdom of this type and he's collected these here on this new primer on leadership and career development. You don't have to be a Republican or a conservative to benefit from his advice, culled from a life-time spent in both the If we remember Rumsfeld at all, former Secretary of Defense under George W. Bush, it's as the guy who gave a press conference and spoke of the known knowns, the known unknowns, and the unknown unknowns. Well it turns out the man has spent a life-time collecting words of wisdom of this type and he's collected these here on this new primer on leadership and career development. You don't have to be a Republican or a conservative to benefit from his advice, culled from a life-time spent in both the public and private sectors. He has many good and worthwhile pointers and it's not to say that the book contains a lot of wisdom and practical tips. The book is largely apolitical, however, he reserves most of his policy praise for Republican presidents and his chapter on the virtues of capitalism struck me a bit polemical.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jared

    Great book with a lot of pithy wisdom from the guy who's done it all. Rumsfeld has to rank as one of the most effective people on the planet. His wit and piercing insights are entertaining. I think Shark Tank would do well to have him guest star occasionally. A note however on the book's format: I listened to it as an audiobook. The benefit of this is that the reader is Rumsfeld himself, so you get the intonations as the author intended. The downside is that this book was not necessarily written Great book with a lot of pithy wisdom from the guy who's done it all. Rumsfeld has to rank as one of the most effective people on the planet. His wit and piercing insights are entertaining. I think Shark Tank would do well to have him guest star occasionally. A note however on the book's format: I listened to it as an audiobook. The benefit of this is that the reader is Rumsfeld himself, so you get the intonations as the author intended. The downside is that this book was not necessarily written to be read cover to cover. There isn't much of a story line. I think the best use of the book is as a reference manual, with each chapter being on a different subject. If I hadn't already read Rumsfeld's memoir, Known and Unknown, I wouldn't have been as engaged with this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Roskelley

    Having really enjoyed Rumsfeld's Known and Unknown: A Memoir, I wanted to see how aptly he described each of his (and others' he incorporated) rules into daily life. He applies rules in carrying out responsibilities in different positions throughout his career, from aviation pilot to U.S. Congressman, to business leadership positions, and Secretary of Defense under two administrations. This small book would be a valuable addition to the working library of those starting careers in order to help Having really enjoyed Rumsfeld's Known and Unknown: A Memoir, I wanted to see how aptly he described each of his (and others' he incorporated) rules into daily life. He applies rules in carrying out responsibilities in different positions throughout his career, from aviation pilot to U.S. Congressman, to business leadership positions, and Secretary of Defense under two administrations. This small book would be a valuable addition to the working library of those starting careers in order to help prevent making some of the serious mistakes that so many of us have experienced.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eric van Dalen

    It's like sitting down with your grand father and letting him counsel you...only Mr. Rumsfeld is obviously very experienced in politics and business. So it's a real treat to read or listen to. It contains many great quotes such as - while 1/3 of the world is sleeping the other 2/3 is up to something. Or there are 3 types of people in the world 1. those that make things happen 2. those that watch things happen & 3. those that wonder what happened. So many more. Great insider wisdom. I need to lis It's like sitting down with your grand father and letting him counsel you...only Mr. Rumsfeld is obviously very experienced in politics and business. So it's a real treat to read or listen to. It contains many great quotes such as - while 1/3 of the world is sleeping the other 2/3 is up to something. Or there are 3 types of people in the world 1. those that make things happen 2. those that watch things happen & 3. those that wonder what happened. So many more. Great insider wisdom. I need to listen to it about every 5 yrs.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben Chapman

    I liked this book a lot, & glad I had the privilege of meeting Donald Rumsfeld, when he was on tour speaking about and signing it. I didn't, however, care for the many military references he uses in the book. Not that I'm against it, but I, & others, who are not too familiar with a few of his references when he his comparing things, are left unsure on what he is writing about. The last few chapters, especially the chapter on Capitalism, were my favorite. I liked this book a lot, & glad I had the privilege of meeting Donald Rumsfeld, when he was on tour speaking about and signing it. I didn't, however, care for the many military references he uses in the book. Not that I'm against it, but I, & others, who are not too familiar with a few of his references when he his comparing things, are left unsure on what he is writing about. The last few chapters, especially the chapter on Capitalism, were my favorite.

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