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Window to the Future: The Golden Age of Television Marketing and Advertising

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When television sets were still a luxurious novelty, manufacturers had to sell the new technological wonders by emphasizing their most glamorous, comforting, and appealing attributes. Window to the Future is a nostalgic, humorously prescient look at the ads and graphics that introduced TV to a consumer public who would make it a fixture in the home within a few short years When television sets were still a luxurious novelty, manufacturers had to sell the new technological wonders by emphasizing their most glamorous, comforting, and appealing attributes. Window to the Future is a nostalgic, humorously prescient look at the ads and graphics that introduced TV to a consumer public who would make it a fixture in the home within a few short years. From fanciful visions in early radio magazines to the lifestyle ads in the heyday of the "talking picture box," Window to the Future brims with images that projected idealized scenarios of the television as a treasured addition to the household. Celebrities who would come to dominate the medium (Walt Disney and Ronald Reagan not least) endorsed the latest Westinghouses and Zeniths, while illustrations of dapper men and elegant women hosting cocktail hour in front of their new black-and-white console projected the party trend of the future. More than 150 print advertisements, magazine covers, and catalog images show the evolution of our complex relationship with this ubiquitous domestic appliance and a pixellated trip down memory lane of television's youthful innocence.


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When television sets were still a luxurious novelty, manufacturers had to sell the new technological wonders by emphasizing their most glamorous, comforting, and appealing attributes. Window to the Future is a nostalgic, humorously prescient look at the ads and graphics that introduced TV to a consumer public who would make it a fixture in the home within a few short years When television sets were still a luxurious novelty, manufacturers had to sell the new technological wonders by emphasizing their most glamorous, comforting, and appealing attributes. Window to the Future is a nostalgic, humorously prescient look at the ads and graphics that introduced TV to a consumer public who would make it a fixture in the home within a few short years. From fanciful visions in early radio magazines to the lifestyle ads in the heyday of the "talking picture box," Window to the Future brims with images that projected idealized scenarios of the television as a treasured addition to the household. Celebrities who would come to dominate the medium (Walt Disney and Ronald Reagan not least) endorsed the latest Westinghouses and Zeniths, while illustrations of dapper men and elegant women hosting cocktail hour in front of their new black-and-white console projected the party trend of the future. More than 150 print advertisements, magazine covers, and catalog images show the evolution of our complex relationship with this ubiquitous domestic appliance and a pixellated trip down memory lane of television's youthful innocence.

29 review for Window to the Future: The Golden Age of Television Marketing and Advertising

  1. 4 out of 5

    Loyd

    A good collection of ads from the early days of TV. Not much on text or history, but the images are fascinating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dave Clayton

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Δnd

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adrià

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bill Bryant

  12. 4 out of 5

    Darcy Jansen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Phillip

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hunter

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mulva

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rae

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Gardner

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian Behm

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniela Brain

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maurizio Lippiello

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Kirksey

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Duncan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob Linegar

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kloe Wu

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