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Cast out of Heaven, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his throne in Hell for Los Angeles. Emerging from the pages of THE SANDMAN, the former Lord of Hell is enjoying retirement as the proprietor of L.A.'s most elite piano bar when an assignment from the Creator Himself threatens to change all that. Collects THE SANDMAN PRESENTS: LUCIFER #1-3 and LUCIFER #1-13.


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Cast out of Heaven, Lucifer Morningstar has resigned his throne in Hell for Los Angeles. Emerging from the pages of THE SANDMAN, the former Lord of Hell is enjoying retirement as the proprietor of L.A.'s most elite piano bar when an assignment from the Creator Himself threatens to change all that. Collects THE SANDMAN PRESENTS: LUCIFER #1-3 and LUCIFER #1-13.

30 review for Lucifer, Book One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    You know how sometimes you’re standing around the water cooler at work and listening to a bunch of lawyers hash out the finer points of the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act), HMDA (Home Mortgage Disclosure Act), or TILA (Truth in Lending Act) and you’re just kind of nodding and smiling, a look of keen interest and sage understanding affixed to your face like the rictus grin of a corpse, even though you really only understand every seventh word they say (usually words like “the,” “and,” or “someti You know how sometimes you’re standing around the water cooler at work and listening to a bunch of lawyers hash out the finer points of the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act), HMDA (Home Mortgage Disclosure Act), or TILA (Truth in Lending Act) and you’re just kind of nodding and smiling, a look of keen interest and sage understanding affixed to your face like the rictus grin of a corpse, even though you really only understand every seventh word they say (usually words like “the,” “and,” or “sometimes”) and have only vaguest idea of where the conversation is going? That’s me when I’m reading Mike Carey’s work (sometimes). And Lucifer is no exception. This Sandman spinoff has a deep and intriguing mythology, but it requires some close reading and, if, like me, you aren’t well-versed in Sandman lore, a willingness to accept the fact that you’re not quite going to know exactly what’s going on. That said, it’s worth wading through—especially once Peter Gross joins the book as the regular penciler. Here’s the pitch: Lucifer has given up his throne in Hell and opened up a bar in Los Angeles. Without knowing more than that, I thought, “Hey, I smell sitcom!” Classic, fish-out-of-water hijinks layered with a literal devil-may-care attitude. Picture it: sweaty bar patrons fanning themselves to try to cool down. Enter Lucifer, Stage Left. “Hot enough for ya?” he asks slyly. Cue the laugh track. Turns out the book is NOTHING like that (both fortunately and unfortunately). There IS a sardonic humor underpinning the story, but it’s dark. Very dark. Like, homophobes sodomizing a guy with a broken beer bottle in dark alley dark. This is not light, fluffy pre-bed reading (as I discovered, reading it mostly right before bed). It’s heavy. Like lifting an elephant being ridden by an aircraft character. I had concerns as I waded through the first few issues that this was a twisted version of Highway to Heaven (showing my age referencing a Michael Landon show? Yup!)—a monthly morality tale with a dark twist. That’s all well and good, but not something I’d have been willing to commit to for dozens of issues. Fortunately, an intriguing (and funny) visit to “The House of Windowless Rooms” changed the tenor and tone of the story—not coincidentally, that’s the point where Gross took over as penciler and the storytelling as a whole got better. The Carey/Gross duo, also responsible for the excellent (if occasionally frustrating) The Unwritten, is unquestionably greater than the sum of its parts (not unlike peanut butter and chocolate), and the book really hits its stride over the second half (though still had some uneven moments). So, stick with it even if you don’t dig it right off the bat. I have high hopes for subsequent volumes. I just hope there are fewer backdoor beer bottle boffings.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The devil is a woman in a red dress. Or maybe a hot dude with a Brittish accent? A couple of my kids got into the Lucifer tv show. And while I wasn't as enthralled by it as they were, it did prompt me to check out the source material. As I suspected, Mike Carey's stuff isn't as campy as what's on television. However, if you're hoping to see Morningstar traipsing around solving crimes with a cute cop you'll be sorely disappointed. Although, several of the storylines do involve Lucifer traipsing arou The devil is a woman in a red dress. Or maybe a hot dude with a Brittish accent? A couple of my kids got into the Lucifer tv show. And while I wasn't as enthralled by it as they were, it did prompt me to check out the source material. As I suspected, Mike Carey's stuff isn't as campy as what's on television. However, if you're hoping to see Morningstar traipsing around solving crimes with a cute cop you'll be sorely disappointed. Although, several of the storylines do involve Lucifer traipsing around with females. So. There's that. Honestly, I don't know how I feel about this comic. Parts of it were cool, but once I closed the book (or e-book, in this case) I wasn't sure if I wanted to continue with the story. I had this overall feeling of quasi-boredom. Not fully bored, just...eeeeeeh. Anyway. I think I would have liked to have read Gaiman's original story, but (alas!) it wasn't included in this digital version. Woulda been nice...just sayin'. PS - The best thing to happen to this title was when the first artist left. Look at that hot mess of a panel up there. Christ. Looks like they hired me to draw that shit. At any rate, there is something interesting about the whole Devil runs a piano bar thing, so chances are I'm coming back for more of this at some point.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I'm finally getting around to reading Lucifer. I mean, I loved him in Sandman and I happened to have seen a few episodes of the tv show, but I needed to KNOW, you know? And it's a lot more wild than the tv show. By a lot. :) This first book takes on the first thirteen comics and it manages to be messed up, clever, disturbing, and a great premise for more. There isn't any PD stuff. :) There are new gods and angels, private hells, demiurge powers, ghosts, and an angelic battle to take out Lucifer r I'm finally getting around to reading Lucifer. I mean, I loved him in Sandman and I happened to have seen a few episodes of the tv show, but I needed to KNOW, you know? And it's a lot more wild than the tv show. By a lot. :) This first book takes on the first thirteen comics and it manages to be messed up, clever, disturbing, and a great premise for more. There isn't any PD stuff. :) There are new gods and angels, private hells, demiurge powers, ghosts, and an angelic battle to take out Lucifer right here on Earth. An all out affair. That fails. :) I'm hooked. It may not be the biggest and baddest comic out there, but it is definitely entertaining.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This was pretty good. I enjoyed the twists. This is Lucifer from the Sandman comics Neil Gaiman did. Lucifer walked out of hell and now owns a jazz club in LA. He gets pulled into some crazy stuff and God gives him a new mission. It is an interesting character development. It turns everything upside down. Let's just say it's entertaining and interesting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    The character of Lucifer initially appeared in the Sandman comic. During the events of that series, he abdicated being the Lord of Hell and went off to open a piano bar in LA. This series picks up from there. The first part of this volume "The Morningstar Option" was published as a stand alone story, but is the genesis of this volume. The rest of it concerns topics I absolutely love- cosmic level events. An entire universe at stake and another to be born. But, strangely enough, this is also a fam The character of Lucifer initially appeared in the Sandman comic. During the events of that series, he abdicated being the Lord of Hell and went off to open a piano bar in LA. This series picks up from there. The first part of this volume "The Morningstar Option" was published as a stand alone story, but is the genesis of this volume. The rest of it concerns topics I absolutely love- cosmic level events. An entire universe at stake and another to be born. But, strangely enough, this is also a family story. At the very top is God. An absentee father, he is merely a presence not an actual character. As the saying goes "When the parents are away..the kids will play." What a play it is. Heaven needs Lucifer to do a job for them (something they would rather not get involved in) and in return Lucifer gets a letter of passage. I won't spoil the rest of the story-and it's a great one. The artwork and the prose of the Morningstar Option are superb. It is a shame Scott Hampton didn't become the regular artist for the series. The rest of the book has Lucifer travelling to the Japanese pantheon's Hell and making a deal to get back his wings (which he gave up when he left Hell). This is great story about how he interacts with the "devils" of Japanese lore. It's worth reading so I won't say more. The final part has him working with a Nephalim (an angel-human hybrid) to open a gate to the void. Now why would he want to do this? Vol 2 has the answers, though the hints of what is to come are in the first volume. What can I say about this series? It's amazing. Lucifer is The Man. Classy, elegant, relatively polite and so powerful he doesn't even bother to use cheap displays of might. Just because he left Hell doesn't mean he is good. He just realized that the entire thing- Heaven, Hell, Earth, etc was all part of God's plan. That is simply unacceptable to the Morningstar. He decides it's time for him to change the rules and have his own Plan. Lucifer is the ultimate rebel. To the almighty Creator and his angelic minions who drone endless homilies, his is the middle finger thrust into the air. Not only did he challange the might of God, but he took a third of Heaven's host with him. He carved out a place all of his own or as he says: "There are no special places in Hell. Hell is a democracy". Once he tired of that-he left. That is why Lucifer is brilliant. He also points out that the whole Prince of Lies thing really is about Satan. His fall was due to the sin of PRIDE. Lucifer doesn't lie, he has NO need to. He tells you the terrible truth. The terrible truth is that most of humanity is his, has always been his and shall always be his. If the measure of "goodliness" is what is found in the Bible-then it is safe to say less than .01% of humanity is getting into Heaven. However, Hell is always open- 365 days a year end even on Christmas. Lucifer is not here to collect souls. His game is larger. If this universe is God's, then he too will create an universe where HE writes the rules. What could be more awesome? Great book. Great Story. Great Prose. Great Characters. Sadly- just decent to ok art (save for the superb Morningstar Option). Still the art is never bad enough to detract from the story and it does a decent enough job of conveying what is. Don't sweat that. This is abook to be read for the ideas and the wonderful prose.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    If you've read Sandman and are looking for more, this is a good place to start. It picks up with Lucifer running a nightclub in L.A. when he's asked to do a favor for heaven. I like that even though this spins out of Sandman Seasons of Mist, Carey quickly establishes his own mythology and characters. His Lucifer is cutthroat and conniving and yet, it's easy to think he's looking out for you. Like Sandman, Lucifer isn't always the star of each story, sometimes only playing a minor character. Scott If you've read Sandman and are looking for more, this is a good place to start. It picks up with Lucifer running a nightclub in L.A. when he's asked to do a favor for heaven. I like that even though this spins out of Sandman Seasons of Mist, Carey quickly establishes his own mythology and characters. His Lucifer is cutthroat and conniving and yet, it's easy to think he's looking out for you. Like Sandman, Lucifer isn't always the star of each story, sometimes only playing a minor character. Scott Hampton's art in the initial miniseries is fantastic. I love how he switches back and forth between sparse colored pencils and full paints. Todd Klein is known as the best letterer in the business. It's clear why in this story. Every character has his or her own font and way of speaking. Lettering is one of those things you typically only notice when it's bad. Here with the numerous nonhuman characters in the story, it really stands out. The House of Windowless Rooms This is where all the cool gods and foreign dimensions begin to come in that make this series so interesting. As we see here, underestimate Lucifer at your regret, even when he's at his most vulnerable. I love how manipulative Lucifer is. We also get to see what's behind Mazikeen's mask. Children and Monsters This is where Carey really begins to set up the story that will carry through the end of the series. Carey is excellent at planning ahead and building stories atop stories. It's what make this series so satisfying. The House of Windowless Rooms also gives us the art team that will carry through most of the rest of the series. Peter Gross and Ryan Kelly with Dean Ormston filling in between the bigger arcs. Mike Carey and Peter Gross establish a creative relationship that carries over the next 20 years to The Unwritten, The Highest House, and now The Dollhouse Family. This edition of Lucifer: Book One combines the first 2 volumes of the originally released collections.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cheese

    2nd read - Absolutely brilliant. BEtter the second time round as I caught on to more of what i missed the first time round. I love what Carey has done here. It's solid. The artwork is very good and consistent but it's the unique and interesting characters that make this such a good story. At some points throughout the story you see Lucifer as the hero, but you are quickly reminded why he is not. He is just the protagonist. Lucifer has played out intricate plots to defeat everyone and everything t 2nd read - Absolutely brilliant. BEtter the second time round as I caught on to more of what i missed the first time round. I love what Carey has done here. It's solid. The artwork is very good and consistent but it's the unique and interesting characters that make this such a good story. At some points throughout the story you see Lucifer as the hero, but you are quickly reminded why he is not. He is just the protagonist. Lucifer has played out intricate plots to defeat everyone and everything to get the upper hand and make his plans a reality. Fantastic. You can tell this is going to be a slugger with a huge end game in site. I'm excited to be on the band wagon to see where this leads.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sikata

    I read Sandman and loved it. Lucifer is a spin off of the series. Since am not a major comic book junkie, I am not one to decide on the art and prints. The question is - have you seen the TV show 'Lucifer'? Well, if you have and - a) Loved it - then do read this comic too because it's completely different from the show so far. b) Hated it - well read it! It's DIFFERENT! 😁 The comics is dark (well it's Vertigo after all) and I loved it. Supernatural + dark = The show is like candy land compared to I read Sandman and loved it. Lucifer is a spin off of the series. Since am not a major comic book junkie, I am not one to decide on the art and prints. The question is - have you seen the TV show 'Lucifer'? Well, if you have and - a) Loved it - then do read this comic too because it's completely different from the show so far. b) Hated it - well read it! It's DIFFERENT! 😁 The comics is dark (well it's Vertigo after all) and I loved it. Supernatural + dark = The show is like candy land compared to the comics. Lucifer in the comic is cold, calculative, ruthless and committed in his hatred for heaven. He doesn't interfere unless it doesn't serve any purpose. Mazikeen is loyal and badass. Similar to the show but more cold and ruthless. She knows what she wants and isn't afraid to seek it. Amenadiel on the other hand is completely different too. Completely different from the show. He's decisive, relentless and no "Lucy" calling crap in this comics. Nah uh. A MUST READ if you love fantasy, supernatural, blood and gore and not to mention a self obsessed, cold and daunting character.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I will admit that I know of this character and the series for some time having read the Sandman series long ago - I just didnt know enough about it seems. And yes just so I make things clear I have followed the TV series (and will carrying on doing so now its been saved) however the series is NOTHING like this book in fact apart from names there appears to be very little in connection and the storyline - well no spoilers but lets say things have gone in a totally different direction. Well what o I will admit that I know of this character and the series for some time having read the Sandman series long ago - I just didnt know enough about it seems. And yes just so I make things clear I have followed the TV series (and will carrying on doing so now its been saved) however the series is NOTHING like this book in fact apart from names there appears to be very little in connection and the storyline - well no spoilers but lets say things have gone in a totally different direction. Well what of the book - this is the first in what appears to be a series of 5 books which have collected the original comics together (there is a 52 universe storyline along with a second series which I am not really sure about apart from the title) So what of the books - well it certainly has a lot of action in it that the series and the story portrays Lucifer in a different way which to be honest is quite refreshing although after nearly 400 pages I feel as I do not really understand his motivations (where as the TV show you found that out after 45 minutes) now is that a bad thing I say no as it means there is still so much more to discover. The only concern I have is that when will I pick up the next book as there are so many things screaming for my attention - no seriously the series has a lot of the intrigue and feel of Neil Gaiman however make no mistake this is hmm Mike Carey someone who's work I am now taking a renewed interest in (am sure I have a signed book of his somewhere), So a lot to learn still and explore, never a bad thing if you ask me. Just check those preconceptions at the door!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sagar

    Throughout the story, Lucifer Morningstar reminded me of John Constantine(of whatever I have seen and read). I want to read more of Lucifer to know who is more dark and astute.

  11. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    I honestly can’t think of anything clever for the beginning of this review. It’s surprising since I can normally come up with a sorta dark humored thing to say when reviewing stuff like this but here... nothing... (sigh) What’s it about? So many think that Lucifer, the devil himself, walks around on Earth in some way. In this book he’s the owner of a club in LA who ends up finding people to go on strange adventures with so, pretty much if The Doctor had a club and was Satan. Pros: The story is cool. I honestly can’t think of anything clever for the beginning of this review. It’s surprising since I can normally come up with a sorta dark humored thing to say when reviewing stuff like this but here... nothing... (sigh) What’s it about? So many think that Lucifer, the devil himself, walks around on Earth in some way. In this book he’s the owner of a club in LA who ends up finding people to go on strange adventures with so, pretty much if The Doctor had a club and was Satan. Pros: The story is cool. I like weird sci-fi adventures and I think most fans of these sorts of stories will enjoy this one, especially if they like supernatural themes. The art is cool and suits the story well. The characters are interesting in their own unique ways, both protagonists and antagonists. The horror elements of this book are very well done. There’s some good, exciting action scenes. This book is very suspenseful. This story is weird as hell (pun intended) and it’s done in a way that the reader does have a WTF reaction the entire time but the story still makes sense, I really enjoy those kind of books. Cons: This book tries a bit too hard to be artsy at times. There is some unnecessary monologuing. I don’t mind it if it progresses the story or has some sort of cool element to it but in this book it USUALLY doesn’t. This book has some various scenes that show female character’s boobs for no fucking reason other than... they’re boobs. It wasn’t all over the place or anything and I don’t even mind sexual content/nudity but here it has nothing to do with the story so it felt like it was there for no reason other than “sex sells”. Overall: This is a good book and I will be adding book 2 to my reading list but it’s not a masterpiece IMO. The way I feel about this book is the same way I feel about Gaiman’s Sandman (which is fitting since this is a spin-off), I enjoy it very much and would recommend it, however there are a few flaws I can’t help but notice (Lucifer and Sandman actually share many of those flaws). I think I like this one a bit more than Sandman though so yeah, I’d recommend giving this a shot! Oh and, to any other metalheads looking into reading this: listen to Ghost, Slayer and Venom while reading this, it enhances the experience a bit I’d say! 4/5

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tamahome

    Good writing. If you liked Sandman or Neil Gaiman, it's a spinoff from that, so it's a no-brainer for you. I'm not really a fan of the "intentionally sloppy" school of art, but I liked it well enough. There are 3 or 4 different artists. Much more sophisticated than your typical cinematic marvel or dc comic. I'll probably check out something else by this writer, like Hellblazer (Constantine), The Unwritten, or The Girl With All The Gifts. Soon to be a tv series. I'm not sure I like the sound of a Good writing. If you liked Sandman or Neil Gaiman, it's a spinoff from that, so it's a no-brainer for you. I'm not really a fan of the "intentionally sloppy" school of art, but I liked it well enough. There are 3 or 4 different artists. Much more sophisticated than your typical cinematic marvel or dc comic. I'll probably check out something else by this writer, like Hellblazer (Constantine), The Unwritten, or The Girl With All The Gifts. Soon to be a tv series. I'm not sure I like the sound of a "campy tv version".

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eilonwy

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this. I've been meaning to read Lucifer for quite a while, since I loved Mike Carey's later series, The Unwritten. And since that was pretty dark and violent, I wasn't entirely surprised by how dark this turned out to be. But whoa, it is very dark. But it was also just as creative and intriguing as I expected it to be, and with awesome continuing threads through the story arc -- I had to keep flipping back to previous installments, because virtually every detail I wasn't sure what to expect from this. I've been meaning to read Lucifer for quite a while, since I loved Mike Carey's later series, The Unwritten. And since that was pretty dark and violent, I wasn't entirely surprised by how dark this turned out to be. But whoa, it is very dark. But it was also just as creative and intriguing as I expected it to be, and with awesome continuing threads through the story arc -- I had to keep flipping back to previous installments, because virtually every detail turned out to be important later. I really admire that storytelling technique. This is not for the faint-of-heart (which I would normally consider myself), and a lot of the story is rooted in deep and terrible sadness. And yet I enjoyed this enough that I promptly put the next volume on hold and will be reading it soon. Hopefully it will stay on that edge of tolerably dark for me, without passing over to unbearable. (Note: I've never seen the TV series, but from what I Googled up about it, it seems quite different from the books. So maybe someday I'll watch it as its own entity.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    3.5 stars The problem with Lucifer is Mike Carey. He is nowhere near as good a writer as Neil Gaiman. It feels like Carey tries to tell a very complex and huge story, but he is talking very fast and he leaves out important chunks of the story, only to later remember that and say "by the way, yeah, that also happened then, I guess". This volume just doesn't feel like it's going anywhere, at least not until the last couple of issues. The story flows too slow and focuses too much on seemingly unimpo 3.5 stars The problem with Lucifer is Mike Carey. He is nowhere near as good a writer as Neil Gaiman. It feels like Carey tries to tell a very complex and huge story, but he is talking very fast and he leaves out important chunks of the story, only to later remember that and say "by the way, yeah, that also happened then, I guess". This volume just doesn't feel like it's going anywhere, at least not until the last couple of issues. The story flows too slow and focuses too much on seemingly unimportant parts, while not giving enough attention to the good bits. Still, by the end of the last arc I found myself actually enjoining the book, more or less. So maybe it does get better in later volumes. What I really enjoyed in this book, though, is the artwork. A lot of different artists contributed to this big volume, and every single page looks great. The colours are gorgeous. And I really like the quality of paper, it is kinda chalky and pretty thick, and it does the artwork justice. So yeah, at least this book is really nice to look at. Anyway, I probably will give the next volume a read in a while, but so far, I am not very happy with this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alatea

    Book wasn't bad, and the story itself was quite interesting, but there was something missing. When it's recommended by Gaiman, I expect more... :/

  16. 4 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    Imagine a person : highly articulate, well informed on almost every topic, fiercely intelligent and capable of deal making under the most pressing of scenarios. No, he is not a diplomat and neither is he a human being and in fact I am not entirely certain if I can refer to this person as a ‘he’. The person in question is an angel and the name is Lucifer Morningstar. We know him as the Devil. That’s right : no fire and brimstone, no cloven hooves, no horns and forky tail and none of the theatrics Imagine a person : highly articulate, well informed on almost every topic, fiercely intelligent and capable of deal making under the most pressing of scenarios. No, he is not a diplomat and neither is he a human being and in fact I am not entirely certain if I can refer to this person as a ‘he’. The person in question is an angel and the name is Lucifer Morningstar. We know him as the Devil. That’s right : no fire and brimstone, no cloven hooves, no horns and forky tail and none of the theatrics that the role asks for in popular mythology. Lucifer is introduced as more of a has-been for he has resigned his role as the lord of Hell (utter boredom with the monotony) and now runs a piano bar on earth. He is still not someone to be trifled with for all the things that made him formidable once still lurk under the surface. This collection is a series of short stories in which Lucifer travels all over Earth and his former dominion to find resolution for multiple crises. There is a whiff of nostalgia when he remarks approaching the gates of hell : Home again, home again. Jiggety jig. There arrives a missive to Lucifer from the throne high above the clouds with a pass attached that wants to recruit him for a particular job. With nothing better on his list of appointments, he accepts and is then hurled headlong into an adventure filled with ancient gods, clairvoyant teenagers, his former minions and all powerful shamans. I liked Morningstar for his poetic turn of phrase even when it is about describing absolutely terrifying things : Understand me. Whatever lived there then lives there still, though your kind abandoned this place half a million years ago. There are forests of black oaks, a hundred feet tall, standing invisible in the dark. There are creatures…predators..that have not eaten in geological ages. You have forgotten the voiceless, but they have not forgotten you. They want you to come home. Want the feel of your fear and your worship. But while the darkness is a home for them, for you it was only a womb. Lucifer does not come across as a hero or a villain but he has his own agendas to fulfil. His next move is to a version of the Japanese hell where he goes in search of his wings and which he reclaims even while he is in mortal form (utterly powerless and without defences). This is where Lucifer becomes a personification of hard, cold intellect and it suits the character the most. He is dismissive of wasteful excess and also of trivial conversation and is guilty as charged of being a ‘devilishly’ charming and manipulative bugger. The last sequence of stories ‘Children and monsters’ is a prolonged confrontation between the hosts of heaven and Lucifer. But then he trumps them all with a move which is in itself a classic. Mike Carey does not make the character either good or evil but all head. There might be machinations that Lucifer is planning to set in motion but none of those are revealed in detail here. I did happen to see a couple of episodes of the TV series and the Lucifer of the book does not have any resemblance to the beefcake in the series ! The book is far more interesting (isn’t it so almost always ? ). Recommended. All stories are lies. But good stories are lies made from light and fire. And they lift our hearts out of the dust, and out of the grave. When the Devil wants you to do something, he doesn’t lie at all. He tells you the exact, literal truth. And he lets you find your own way to Hell.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    To view all my reviews visit http://dancinginth3dark.blogspot.com My feelings after reading this graphic novel? Meh. I do not know about you but I am in love with this brand new show on Fox called Lucifer. Oh yes you do! I love the actor who plays Lucifer and it's been months since I haven't read the comics and I decided that I should read it to figure out what is the general plot for the television show. I am afraid to announced that the show is completely different from the comics and I am still To view all my reviews visit http://dancinginth3dark.blogspot.com My feelings after reading this graphic novel? Meh. I do not know about you but I am in love with this brand new show on Fox called Lucifer. Oh yes you do! I love the actor who plays Lucifer and it's been months since I haven't read the comics and I decided that I should read it to figure out what is the general plot for the television show. I am afraid to announced that the show is completely different from the comics and I am still curious if that makes the fandom quite divided or makes these two universes separate for both parties to enjoy. The only thing that the show and the comic have in common is Satan has quit ruling Hell and is residing in Los Angeles, California. Lucifer is living the luxurious life among humans with his own club/restaurant called Lux when an angel messenger from God appears seeking Lucifers help. Apparently there is this evil spirit lurking in the shadows that helps provide wishes for mortals and with each wish granting this evil spirit gets superior in force. Heaven cannot get in the mix with Earth so they need the devil to do Gods work. Lucifer does not have an issue with accomplishing this task in exchange for a letter of indulgence from God. At first it seems such a silly wish nonetheless God grants him the letter. Knowing Satan, he has calculated everything and follows the necessary precautions to achieve his plans and to void detection. By having this letter, Satan is able to open a portal that enters a realm outside of creation meaning with the right set of skills and power he can create a whole universe and become God. I was disappointed with this series mainly because it's nothing like the television show. I believe if the show never existed I would have enjoyed this graphic novel but the other issue that lies in this series is organization. Lucifer plans are not revealed to us at first and it is through the course of the story that we see his plans unfolding as we meet different characters who will become important by the end of this first volume. There is nothing wrong introducing countless different characters in a series but the writers lack the skills of how to properly introduce this characters and not interrupt the flow of story arc. What would catch me off guard would be that 100 pages would go by and everything is about Lucifer and his plans then out of nowhere come the next page and you meet a random girl who can talk to ghosts. It would take about another 50 pages to see Lucifer again and his connection to the girl. In all honesty I believe the writers could have done a better job at connecting the dots with these characters and their ties to Lucifer and hopefully in this next volume the story gets polished. I want to continue this series because I have faith in Neil Gaiman but I am not in any hurry to read the next volume. Hopefully we can see the qualities that we love in the tv show reflected onto the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    A graphic novel series starring Lucifer, the former lord of Hell who abdicated? It shouldn't have worked, but it really does. It's a little brother to Sandman; never gaining as much acclaim, but really pretty close in quality (it's actually more approachable than Sandman, and more cohesive, which are both pluses and minuses). The first volume introduces this incarnation of Lucifer in his current role, as well as several of the other characters that populate his world. And they're fascinating and A graphic novel series starring Lucifer, the former lord of Hell who abdicated? It shouldn't have worked, but it really does. It's a little brother to Sandman; never gaining as much acclaim, but really pretty close in quality (it's actually more approachable than Sandman, and more cohesive, which are both pluses and minuses). The first volume introduces this incarnation of Lucifer in his current role, as well as several of the other characters that populate his world. And they're fascinating and disturbing. Mike Carey has gone on to the Unwritten, which is of similarly wonderful quality. This is where he started his long form work, and he started with a bang. If you can get over the main character, you'll find an amazing work of comics. It helps to have read Sandman (and if you haven't, you really should), but it isn't required. This can stand on its own, even while it exists in Sandman's shadow.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    It seems that almost anything related to Gaiman's Sandman universe is going to be excellent, but Carey's Lucifer is a very different kind. The stories of Lucifer don't even feature him very much, only having him plot and plan in the background (mostly) whilst others do his dirty work for him, only to sweep in at the end and reveal his perfectly concocted schemes and 'save' the day. This is expertly plotted stuff that all builds on itself but has each story stand alone too, which makes it even more It seems that almost anything related to Gaiman's Sandman universe is going to be excellent, but Carey's Lucifer is a very different kind. The stories of Lucifer don't even feature him very much, only having him plot and plan in the background (mostly) whilst others do his dirty work for him, only to sweep in at the end and reveal his perfectly concocted schemes and 'save' the day. This is expertly plotted stuff that all builds on itself but has each story stand alone too, which makes it even more enjoyable as things from past arcs reappear and play vital roles going forward in the larger narrative. It's all very clever stuff, being both unpredictable and surprising - I'm quite sad that the next volume isn't out for a long time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Based on my experience with The Unwritten and now this collection, I'd guess that Cary books tend to be slow starters. It took quite awhile for Unwritten to really connect, but when it did, it really did. One of the best-written comics I've ever read. After 13 issues of Lucifer, I'm still not quite there. I like it all well enough, but there's still something a bit off-putting about the whole affair. Lucifer himself is a hard character to warm up to. And the stories themselves read like warmed-o Based on my experience with The Unwritten and now this collection, I'd guess that Cary books tend to be slow starters. It took quite awhile for Unwritten to really connect, but when it did, it really did. One of the best-written comics I've ever read. After 13 issues of Lucifer, I'm still not quite there. I like it all well enough, but there's still something a bit off-putting about the whole affair. Lucifer himself is a hard character to warm up to. And the stories themselves read like warmed-over Neil Gaiman. I've got Book 2 all ready to go, but might have to take a break with some lighter weight fare before I come back to this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Sumper

    I allways shied away from this because of multiple reasons, first how do you follow up on neil gaimans magnum opus that is sandman and the birthplace of this version of the character? I am convinced not even gaiman would know the answer to that. Still I was curious enough that I would give it a chance one day... but the TV-Show they made out of this, convinced me otherwise yet again. It wasn't till my fiance bought me the first tpb that I would actually start reading it. (thanks) And color me surp I allways shied away from this because of multiple reasons, first how do you follow up on neil gaimans magnum opus that is sandman and the birthplace of this version of the character? I am convinced not even gaiman would know the answer to that. Still I was curious enough that I would give it a chance one day... but the TV-Show they made out of this, convinced me otherwise yet again. It wasn't till my fiance bought me the first tpb that I would actually start reading it. (thanks) And color me surprised it is good... like actually good and that in a similar vein of what we are used to from the character lucifer. Not only did I actually feel like visiting old places and characters without feeling odd, it also had me hooked from the first pages. I only got two points I have to critique, the art change in the beginning and the overall story lacked the depth of what I expected. But considering this was written by Mike Carey and this being my first time reading anything of him, I have to give him credit. Very recommendable especially if you are a fan of the sandman universe. 4.5 stars out of 5.0 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I’m tempted to give this five stars, it came close. When I started this out, I was only banking on maybe three stars. So what happened? Basically everything was a little jarring and piecemeal at first. I wasn’t sure where it was all going and couldn’t figure out what Lucifer’s goal was. Then I realized the angels had no clue what lucifer was doing either, so at least I wasn’t alone. Each story in this built off the piece before it until it’s revealed what lucifer is trying to accomplish. By the end I’m tempted to give this five stars, it came close. When I started this out, I was only banking on maybe three stars. So what happened? Basically everything was a little jarring and piecemeal at first. I wasn’t sure where it was all going and couldn’t figure out what Lucifer’s goal was. Then I realized the angels had no clue what lucifer was doing either, so at least I wasn’t alone. Each story in this built off the piece before it until it’s revealed what lucifer is trying to accomplish. By the end of this first book everything started clicking into place and I’m very intrigued at the possibilities going forward. The only issues I had here were that some of these magical based Vertigo titles have confusing “rules.” They may have logic in something, but it’s not always as clear of spelled out (Books of Magic post-Gaiman was very confusing for instance). I know what Superman or Batman can do. Not so clear what mythology they’re pulling from or if they just made a rule out of thin air. But lucifer seemed to make more sense than others under the Vertigo banner at least. Going to read on for sure.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Ideiosepius

    Why did I wait for so long to read this beauty? Mike Carey does great work in general, with his offbeat take on reality and his ability to (apparently) effortlessly invoke the mythic value of stories. In this compilation, he tells the story of Lucifer, the Lucifer that Neil Gaiman gave us in the Sandman. The one that got bored with ruling Hell, quit and now runs a nightspot in LA where he plays the piano. In this story Heaven offers him a contract, for which, if fulfilled, he can name his own pric Why did I wait for so long to read this beauty? Mike Carey does great work in general, with his offbeat take on reality and his ability to (apparently) effortlessly invoke the mythic value of stories. In this compilation, he tells the story of Lucifer, the Lucifer that Neil Gaiman gave us in the Sandman. The one that got bored with ruling Hell, quit and now runs a nightspot in LA where he plays the piano. In this story Heaven offers him a contract, for which, if fulfilled, he can name his own price and so begins a series of stories that wander through realities, hells and other alternative dimensions. The cast of characters is wide and fascinating, several will be familiar to Sandman readers, and many take completely different forms. There are a number of different artists who have worked on this series of comics. While all the artwork was good (loved what they did with the Tarot people) I especially loved the artwork in the first, Scott Hampton has a glorious, deft way of making people look like watercolour paintings that I love and coupled with the dynamic, often vivid backgrounds it is extraordinarily effective. Great story, satisfying ending.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Jones

    I'm not really sure why I never read this when it was first published, because I was reading other similar comics at that time; and I'm not really sure why I didn't realize right away that the TV show, "Lucifer," was based on the comic series, "Lucifer." But ... I didn't, and I didn't, and now I have. And let me say right up front: wow the TV show is really nothing like the comic books!!! The biggest change for me what that Amenadiel was completely different and he 100% hates Lucifer - on the TV I'm not really sure why I never read this when it was first published, because I was reading other similar comics at that time; and I'm not really sure why I didn't realize right away that the TV show, "Lucifer," was based on the comic series, "Lucifer." But ... I didn't, and I didn't, and now I have. And let me say right up front: wow the TV show is really nothing like the comic books!!! The biggest change for me what that Amenadiel was completely different and he 100% hates Lucifer - on the TV show, they have a sort of love-hate-sibling relationship, which can add a nice depth to the story. Also, there is no cop, no psychiatrist, and no weekly murder mystery in the comic. And, of course, Mazikeen looks different, but she acts pretty much the same so that's just a superficial change. The comic books are very "comic-book-y," by which I mean that they are full of alternate planes, paranormal creatures, violence, beauty and ugliness, end of the world plans, and just general mind-blowingly batshit crazy plots. (For example, Lucifer, the former lord of Hell, takes a trip through the Void, which doesn't follow any of our physical rules, to another completely unrelated Hell ruled by a different master, who is so old she has become a stone statue - he does this because she has his wings.) If you have read and enjoyed other paranormalesque titles, like Hellblazer or Sandman, and you haven't read this one yet, stop waiting and read it! One thing that stays the same in both comic and TV show: Lucifer is suave, sexy, and a master manipulator. This was my first e-comic, and maybe I went a little bit nuts being able to take pretty screen shots of the pretty pages. I hope these images display correctly here. Lucifer spends some time reminiscing about the good ole' days, before humans arrived and mucked everything up: Lucifer explains a few things to a not-quite-human woman who had no idea she's more than human (I have to say, I enjoyed this artwork more than the later issues from Gross - my library loan has ended so I can't go back and check which artist this is) There are cameos from well-known "Sandman" characters (I won't ruin the surprise and tell you who shows up), and fun little shout-outs hidden in the background art for the avid comics reader (for just one example on this page, "Empire Lanes" was an early comic series from Peter Gross): There are PLENTY of badasses in this book. I liked this line from Jill Presto: "So here's my best offer: you get up on your feet now, or else you're going to die lying down." And finally, just a glimpse of the gorgeous, winged Lucifer (no, he's not naked ALL the time):

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Benavidez

    Going back and rereading these graphic novels (well rereading Sandman which led to Lucifer, while simultaneously reading Hellblazer and Private Eye) I'm beginning to realize why these had just a great effect on me. First off, the art is always great, but the fact that the art tends to add emphasis on certain things, helps to give the air of the story, and just create a world that words alone cannot do. But it's the fact that there is no dependency on the art. It's the story that pulls it all to Going back and rereading these graphic novels (well rereading Sandman which led to Lucifer, while simultaneously reading Hellblazer and Private Eye) I'm beginning to realize why these had just a great effect on me. First off, the art is always great, but the fact that the art tends to add emphasis on certain things, helps to give the air of the story, and just create a world that words alone cannot do. But it's the fact that there is no dependency on the art. It's the story that pulls it all to life, the story and in turn the characters. And that's what Lucifer is. A spin-off of the character Neil Gaiman created in Sandman, this is very much like but not like Sandman. Sandman was about the characters, to me at least. The characters and their motives pulled the story to life, and moved the plot. In Lucifer, the characters are very much the pinpoint of the story, and yet they're not. The characters all play out like chess pieces, some knowing they're chess pieces ready to be played, or others refusing to acknowledge it, or too arrogant to. However, where Morpheus was the pinnacle of the stories, here it's Lucifer (derr). And I love it. You get everyone's story, everyone's personality, except Lucifer's. Despite being the title character, he's left to the side, as that force that is calculating but never gives away what he's calculating, not even to the writer. And he's ALWAYS calculating. The story starts off that way. He has a plan and sets it into full effect, and from there things roll forward. There is no break from the main story line, although we get a few side things going on, they all lead back to the same thing, and Lucifer in his ever cunning ways, has seen it coming. It's really brilliant, especially as a reread with all this knowing of what's to come. As far as the art goes, it's great. This volume has three different styles, the first style, then the two that trade off every issue/chapter. The first style is pretty good, but doesn't add or take away from the story. The next two however, for some reason, help the flow more. Maybe because they stay throughout the series, I had a chance to get used to it? Where as the first style was done before I could get a feeling for it? I'm not sure. But it's not off putting. So yeah, it's a great beginning, very linear, brilliant, and yet always guessing where the hell this is going next

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    As a Christian, I sometimes questioned whether I should feel uncomfortable reading a series in which the devil is the protagonist. However, I was comforted by the fact that he is not portrayed as a good person, and that this is more of a riff on Milton's Lucifer than it is about the character of Satan from the Bible. Also as the series progresses and its cosmology and theology become weirder and weirder, the comparisons with Christianity become less and less relevant. With that dealt with, I love As a Christian, I sometimes questioned whether I should feel uncomfortable reading a series in which the devil is the protagonist. However, I was comforted by the fact that he is not portrayed as a good person, and that this is more of a riff on Milton's Lucifer than it is about the character of Satan from the Bible. Also as the series progresses and its cosmology and theology become weirder and weirder, the comparisons with Christianity become less and less relevant. With that dealt with, I loved this series. Unlike all the other attempts to make spin offs of The Sandman, this one works beautifully. It's weird and epic and entertaining and disturbing, but all in a way that is very Mike Carey not merely an imitation of Neil Gaiman. The premise of the series, based on a plot point in The Sandman, Vol. 4: Season of Mists, is that Lucifer has retired from his duty as ruler of hell and has moved to Los Angeles where he opened a piano bar. However, his retirement is soon interrupted when an angel is sent by God to hire him for a secret mission. That's the first arc. The book expands from there in huge and bizarre ways that I can't even hint at without spoiling things. Along the way weird and wonderful characters are introduced, such as Gaudium, the fallen cherubim, and Elaine, a little girl that can see dead people (and who just might be one of the most important people in the universe). While it drags a bit in the middle, it's worth reading through. This is Mike Carey, also known as M.R. Carey, at his very best.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I fell in love with Lucifer through the television series, so seeing the comic representations of the characters was a bit jarring for me. Once I got over the fact Amenadiel was white and Lucifer was a blond, though, I sank into the story and became entranced. I adored this book and will be picking up #2 very soon.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    69th book read in 2014. Number 130 out of 412 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YK_OS... 69th book read in 2014. Number 130 out of 412 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YK_OS...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Koen Claeys

    Dark & heavy reading material that gets weighed down by its own mythology. The story gets better halfway, when Peter Gross picks up the pencilling duties. Dark & heavy reading material that gets weighed down by its own mythology. The story gets better halfway, when Peter Gross picks up the pencilling duties.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Wow! Thats some damned impressive world building and story telling!

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