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The Time Machine and The Invisible Man, by H. G. Wells, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissione The Time Machine and The Invisible Man, by H. G. Wells, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.   The Time Machine, H. G. Wells’s first novel, is a tale of Darwinian evolution taken to its extreme. Its hero, a young scientist, travels 800,000 years into the future and discovers a dying earth populated by two strange humanoid species: the brutal Morlocks and the gentle but nearly helpless Eloi. The Invisible Man mixes chilling terror, suspense, and acute psychological understanding into a tale of an equally adventurous scientist who discovers the formula for invisibility—a secret that drives him mad. Immensely popular during his lifetime, H. G. Wells, along with Jules Verne, is credited with inventing science fiction. This new volume offers two of Wells’s best-loved and most critically acclaimed “scientific romances.” In each, the author grounds his fantastical imagination in scientific fact and conjecture while lacing his narrative with vibrant action, not merely to tell a “ripping yarn,” but to offer a biting critique on the world around him. “The strength of Mr. Wells,” wrote Arnold Bennett, “lies in the fact that he is not only a scientist, but a most talented student of character, especially quaint character. He will not only ingeniously describe for you a scientific miracle, but he will set down that miracle in the midst of a country village, sketching with excellent humour the inn-landlady, the blacksmith, the chemist’s apprentice, the doctor, and all the other persons whom the miracle affects.”   Alfred Mac Adam teaches literature at Barnard College-Columbia University. He is a translator and art critic.


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The Time Machine and The Invisible Man, by H. G. Wells, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissione The Time Machine and The Invisible Man, by H. G. Wells, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.   The Time Machine, H. G. Wells’s first novel, is a tale of Darwinian evolution taken to its extreme. Its hero, a young scientist, travels 800,000 years into the future and discovers a dying earth populated by two strange humanoid species: the brutal Morlocks and the gentle but nearly helpless Eloi. The Invisible Man mixes chilling terror, suspense, and acute psychological understanding into a tale of an equally adventurous scientist who discovers the formula for invisibility—a secret that drives him mad. Immensely popular during his lifetime, H. G. Wells, along with Jules Verne, is credited with inventing science fiction. This new volume offers two of Wells’s best-loved and most critically acclaimed “scientific romances.” In each, the author grounds his fantastical imagination in scientific fact and conjecture while lacing his narrative with vibrant action, not merely to tell a “ripping yarn,” but to offer a biting critique on the world around him. “The strength of Mr. Wells,” wrote Arnold Bennett, “lies in the fact that he is not only a scientist, but a most talented student of character, especially quaint character. He will not only ingeniously describe for you a scientific miracle, but he will set down that miracle in the midst of a country village, sketching with excellent humour the inn-landlady, the blacksmith, the chemist’s apprentice, the doctor, and all the other persons whom the miracle affects.”   Alfred Mac Adam teaches literature at Barnard College-Columbia University. He is a translator and art critic.

59 review for The Time Machine/The Invisible Man

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cris

    ‘La máquina del tiempo’ es ciencia ficción en su estado más puro. Tras esta lectura se entiende a la perfección el título de padre del género que se ha otorgado a Wells de manera casi unánime. Un visionario que en su época se atreve a estirar los límites del tiempo, cuenta la crónica de sus aventuras en un futuro remoto a un grupo de invitados escépticos. El autor escoge, a pesar de su estilo narrativo vívido y tridimensional, hacernos llegar los hechos como una historia dentro de la historia. Es ‘La máquina del tiempo’ es ciencia ficción en su estado más puro. Tras esta lectura se entiende a la perfección el título de padre del género que se ha otorgado a Wells de manera casi unánime. Un visionario que en su época se atreve a estirar los límites del tiempo, cuenta la crónica de sus aventuras en un futuro remoto a un grupo de invitados escépticos. El autor escoge, a pesar de su estilo narrativo vívido y tridimensional, hacernos llegar los hechos como una historia dentro de la historia. Esta aparente distancia nos coloca en una postura particular: somos uno más de entre los asistentes a la reunión y tenemos ante nosotros la tarea de posicionarnos. Reseña completa y mi versión es la portada en https://sidumbledorefueralibrero.com/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Rubtsov

    As for “The Invisible Man,” Wells clearly improved as a writer over two years that had passed since “The Time Machine” was published: the story is smooth and gripping, with the first third of the book punctuated with episodes of slapstick comedy with typified country folk trying to penetrate into the mystery of the intruder. Peculiar and bitterly ironic it’s to note, however, how a man struggles to make himself noteworthy, “visible” to the hostile word first by turning INvisible and then resorti As for “The Invisible Man,” Wells clearly improved as a writer over two years that had passed since “The Time Machine” was published: the story is smooth and gripping, with the first third of the book punctuated with episodes of slapstick comedy with typified country folk trying to penetrate into the mystery of the intruder. Peculiar and bitterly ironic it’s to note, however, how a man struggles to make himself noteworthy, “visible” to the hostile word first by turning INvisible and then resorting to wanton violence and terrorism. Hardly anything has changed, it seems, since 1897. No wonder H.G. Wells wanted his epitaph to read “God damn you all: I told you so.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I wasn't expecting much from a time when fantasy and science fiction were not only in their infancy, but not acknowledged as being something for adults. However, having never read HG Wells in my entire life, I found him immensely entertainined. While the beginning of "The Time Machine" was a bit slow, I found the Darwinism (and the barely-hidden class commentary) of the future fascinating. However, I must say that I enjoyed "The Invisible Man" more than the time machine. Griffin is someone you c I wasn't expecting much from a time when fantasy and science fiction were not only in their infancy, but not acknowledged as being something for adults. However, having never read HG Wells in my entire life, I found him immensely entertainined. While the beginning of "The Time Machine" was a bit slow, I found the Darwinism (and the barely-hidden class commentary) of the future fascinating. However, I must say that I enjoyed "The Invisible Man" more than the time machine. Griffin is someone you can love to hate, and--according to some readers--may be a character alluding to terrorism. That in mind, I picked through "The Invisible Man" with a bit of interest; not because of the possible terrorism references, but because the Invisible Man was just...evil! After all, how do you protect yourself from something you can't see? Considering how tepid most science fiction has become in the age where Twilight and Harry Potter are considered the pinnacles of modern literature, looking back to the roots gives a reader something a bit more satisfying to read (and, of course, the lack of obvious self-insertion is much enjoyed).

  4. 5 out of 5

    ✨Sumi's Books✨

    It's always hard to write two books at once. The Time Machine though the concept was very interesting was a rather boring read. Perhaps it is the century in which it was written? I found it a little hard to get into. The Invisible Man was better but also a little difficult to get into due to language and grammar. Both very fascinating reads. I can see why HG Wells is one of the fathers of modern science fiction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karas Jim

    Two stories that undoubtedly deserve the title of "classic". Wells proves how far ahead of his age he actually was with the way he shapes his pessimistic, socialist outlook on the future of human existence into two narratives of extreme scientific thinking and moral inquiries. Fascinating to read, intriguing how he could so fully conceive such concepts in the late Victorian Age.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I reviewed The Time Machine separately. This review covers only The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells. While I enjoyed both stories, I preferred The Invisible Man. It was definitely a more exciting story and moved along at almost a breakneck pace. It follows a stranger who shows up at the small English town of Iping. He is masked with bandages, wears heavy clothing to cover his body and when he arrives at a local inn, demands and receives quarters and the private use of a lounge. He is brusque and rude I reviewed The Time Machine separately. This review covers only The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells. While I enjoyed both stories, I preferred The Invisible Man. It was definitely a more exciting story and moved along at almost a breakneck pace. It follows a stranger who shows up at the small English town of Iping. He is masked with bandages, wears heavy clothing to cover his body and when he arrives at a local inn, demands and receives quarters and the private use of a lounge. He is brusque and rude and demanding and upsets and intrigues the locals who contrive to find out more about him. His luggage arrives the next day and contains experimental equipment and scientific books. He hides in the lounge for days and avoids any efforts to discover more about him, even his name. Strange things begin to occur, such as a break in at the Vicarage, where the vicar and his wife see furniture moving about, strange voices and yet, no person. Money is stolen and back at the inn, there are further strange happenings. As things begin to escalate, the invisible man is 'revealed', so to speak and the town and people are upturned. It's all described very well and with, at times, slapstick humour and also full on action. The story moves along very brusquely with the action turning violent and quite scary. I won't describe anymore as I'd hate to ruin the ending. I'd never read this before and only recently seen part of the original movie, which is fairly faithful to the book. Well worth reading, a classic of the Science Fiction genre. (4 stars)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alfie Shuvro

    ভাল লেগেছে। অনেকদিন পর আবার পড়লাম ।

  8. 4 out of 5

    PhilomathicJ

    Obviously, Wells is a sci-fi legend, and rightfully so. His writing can be a bit clinical at times, but his imaginative prowess more than makes up for some stiff prose. While I was obviously familiar with both stories, I'd never actually read them, so many of the details were new to me. He spins an interesting yarn. The foot- and endnotes for this edition were a bit of a "highlight" for me, simply because they were generally absurdly unnecessary. First, the man responsible for them appears to be Obviously, Wells is a sci-fi legend, and rightfully so. His writing can be a bit clinical at times, but his imaginative prowess more than makes up for some stiff prose. While I was obviously familiar with both stories, I'd never actually read them, so many of the details were new to me. He spins an interesting yarn. The foot- and endnotes for this edition were a bit of a "highlight" for me, simply because they were generally absurdly unnecessary. First, the man responsible for them appears to be unaware that there are things called dictionaries, and many notes are simple definitions, many of words and phrases that aren't the least bit unusual, or are utterly understandable via context. Skimming through, he felt it necessary to explain "sleight-of-hand," "blind" (as in a window blind, which his footnote helpfully explains is a "shade," which, while not inaccurate, seems like a less precise definition), and "taters," a definition that'd help Gollum and just about no one else. His endnotes are much the same, often literally just repeating the information Wells had already given, and a couple of which actually seemed incorrect. There were, of course, helpful notes, most of them providing context that a modern reader would lack (as a foot- or endnote so often does). But the seemingly random subjects of his notes (occasionally even ignoring things that could have used an explanation) was a constant source of amusement. Are Barnes & Noble Classics for kids? That might explain some of it, but I'm not sure. Regardless, this was well worth the time I spent reading it. These are classics for a reason.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    For more than a century theses two works by acclaimed author H.G. Wells have been considered to be cornerstones of the science-fiction genre. However as this book points out , and as Wells' himself admitted' these are not science-fiction stories. Rather they are fantasies and horrors, more in the vein of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein than Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. These stories are about people and society, how we act and react to the world around us as it changes. The Time Machin For more than a century theses two works by acclaimed author H.G. Wells have been considered to be cornerstones of the science-fiction genre. However as this book points out , and as Wells' himself admitted' these are not science-fiction stories. Rather they are fantasies and horrors, more in the vein of Mary Shelly's Frankenstein than Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. These stories are about people and society, how we act and react to the world around us as it changes. The Time Machine focuses on what society could become in one fashion or another and The Invisible Man is a story of madness as an invisible man terrorizes a small town out of pettiness and selfish greed. Though these stories are more than a hundred years past us, they still have a resounding place in modern culture. The characters and their settings still apply, and the actions of people found throughout would still be of a similar character as it was when Wells first wrote them. These stories should be read as an example of actions and results, choices and consequences.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marco Rivera

    Maravillosas narraciones clásicas que uno debe tener como parte de su biblioteca de Ciencia Ficción. Como suele pasar con este género, ambas historias tratan, en trasfondos hasta cierto punto fantásticos, cuestiones que apelan a la naturaleza humana, como es el caso del futuro, la libertad absoluta y el egoísmo. Queda en uno disfrutarlas por su historia, o agregar un paseo por sus aristas más profundas.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    I received this book from Goodreads giveaway. The two books collected in this nicely bound volume are timeless. While the stories were original and “shocking” to contemporary readers, they are all too well known today. It was a pleasure to read the original stories that spawned many adaptations in movies and other sci-if novels.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elijah

    Absolutely mind blowing and mentally stimulating. H.G. Wells is a massive trendsetter for modern science fiction and I am ecstatic to have read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul Chance

    The scientist who is The Time Traveller in this brief novel constructs a time machine enabling him to travel into the remote future where, it is surmised, humans have developed into simpler beings, the Eloi, who live above ground, and the Morlocks, who live below ground. The assumption which The Time Traveller makes on discovering these two races is that the division arose from a split of the classes; the upper class or Eloi living above ground and the working classes reduced to living subterran The scientist who is The Time Traveller in this brief novel constructs a time machine enabling him to travel into the remote future where, it is surmised, humans have developed into simpler beings, the Eloi, who live above ground, and the Morlocks, who live below ground. The assumption which The Time Traveller makes on discovering these two races is that the division arose from a split of the classes; the upper class or Eloi living above ground and the working classes reduced to living subterranean existence. Blessed and privileged though the Eloi seem, the ease of their lifestyle leaves them ultimately as something of mental and physical 'vegetables' while, ironically, the underprivileged and underground Morlocks adapted so well to living in the dark that they could no longer live in the sunshine but could only make forays above ground to obtain by cannibalism the meat they needed. Nevertheless they survived and grew stronger while those who lived on their privilege could not. The theme may be said to throw into question the too easily held presupposition that societies which achieve a high standard of living are necessarily fulfilling the best of their nature and which may in any case, rather like empires and Roman Senators, crumble beneath their luxuriating and excess. Rather, we might survive the better and happier without the artificial niceties of privilege but instead by leading a simpler existence closer to nature. This is only one interpretation but the beauty of Wells' idea for The Time Machine is that, like a diamond, it reflects light from so many fresh angles and provokes a theatre of debate.

  14. 4 out of 5

    bup

    First, the Time Machine. I think it's considered important because this is where science fiction began to have IMPORTANT MESSAGES about society. I hate science fiction that has IMPORTANT MESSAGES. I do, nevertheless, thank H.G. Wells for writing this, without which we may not have had The Terminator series of movies nor Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Now on to The Invisible Man. Who authorized a book about an invisible man that doesn't even have one scene in a women's locker room? And it's no First, the Time Machine. I think it's considered important because this is where science fiction began to have IMPORTANT MESSAGES about society. I hate science fiction that has IMPORTANT MESSAGES. I do, nevertheless, thank H.G. Wells for writing this, without which we may not have had The Terminator series of movies nor Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Now on to The Invisible Man. Who authorized a book about an invisible man that doesn't even have one scene in a women's locker room? And it's not because it's all serious, either - Wells has lots of slapstick scenes with tripping and injuries that are supposed to be funny (but aren't). Also, it never occurred to anybody to keep plenty of flour about, for throwing when the invisible man was around? Yes, I'm responding on the wrong level - with pragmatic complaints about a philosophical thesis. But, really, I'm comfortable placing these with Frankenstein and Dracula - works that are more important for the cultural touchstones they left behind than for reading in their own right.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cassidy

    My biggest problem with these novels was that I wasn't able to get into the story for very long, and forget that I was reading. But, this could be due to the way I approached reading them. Both The Time Machine and The Invisible Man are very short novels. Personally, I enjoyed the Invisible Man a lot more, because I felt the characters had more substance and the story was more suspenseful. However, do not expect to "fall in love" with the characters from The Time Machine. I found that very hard, My biggest problem with these novels was that I wasn't able to get into the story for very long, and forget that I was reading. But, this could be due to the way I approached reading them. Both The Time Machine and The Invisible Man are very short novels. Personally, I enjoyed the Invisible Man a lot more, because I felt the characters had more substance and the story was more suspenseful. However, do not expect to "fall in love" with the characters from The Time Machine. I found that very hard, and almost impossible if it were not for Weena. I rated The Time Machine 3 stars, for its creativity and social commentary. The point Wells made between the Eloi (upper class) and Morlocks (working class) was very interesting. Although I had more fun reading The Invisible Man, I rated that also a 3 because I am very familiar with the "mad with power" theme.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Really enjoyed The Time Machine. Even though it was all told by the Time Traveler instead of happening in real time, I found it interesting and loved the concepts of the future of humanity. I felt a lot of sympathy for the Time Traveler and his plight and liked how the story came full circle. If it was just this story, I would have given it four stars. I did not enjoy the Invisible Man nearly as much. I ended up skimming a lot of it later on. The beginning was better than the ending, especially w Really enjoyed The Time Machine. Even though it was all told by the Time Traveler instead of happening in real time, I found it interesting and loved the concepts of the future of humanity. I felt a lot of sympathy for the Time Traveler and his plight and liked how the story came full circle. If it was just this story, I would have given it four stars. I did not enjoy the Invisible Man nearly as much. I ended up skimming a lot of it later on. The beginning was better than the ending, especially when the Invisible Man went on for pages about his experiments and such. This would be a two star story for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary Harris

    I gave this book 3 stars because it was hard to get into. It did not immediately grasp my attention as did some of the other books I read such as "Stolen." The way it was written reminded somewhat of Shakespeare. The premise of the book was interesting though it was about a man trying to convince his friends about this time machine he had invented. He was interested in how the future man would be. His talk of time travel was very interesting and almost created another world in which the reader c I gave this book 3 stars because it was hard to get into. It did not immediately grasp my attention as did some of the other books I read such as "Stolen." The way it was written reminded somewhat of Shakespeare. The premise of the book was interesting though it was about a man trying to convince his friends about this time machine he had invented. He was interested in how the future man would be. His talk of time travel was very interesting and almost created another world in which the reader could look forward to. It was not a bad story, however, it was not my favorite. This was my choice for a classic book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beck

    I liked the Time Machine well enough, but had a really hard time with The Invisible Man. It was such an unsettling feeling. I'll probably end up liking it more later on, but right now the average of the two is 2 stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    In this as in other older books, edition is important. This is the 1984 printing of the Signet Classic edition 'with an introduction by John Calvin Batchelor'. I'm of two minds about whether to recommend reading the introduction. Its primary function seems to be to annoy readers of Wells' works by introducing all sorts of arguments about Wells as a person, implying (and sometimes stating outright) that Wells was quarrelsome, inconsistent, and sometimes downright immoral). Most of this is not the In this as in other older books, edition is important. This is the 1984 printing of the Signet Classic edition 'with an introduction by John Calvin Batchelor'. I'm of two minds about whether to recommend reading the introduction. Its primary function seems to be to annoy readers of Wells' works by introducing all sorts of arguments about Wells as a person, implying (and sometimes stating outright) that Wells was quarrelsome, inconsistent, and sometimes downright immoral). Most of this is not the business of the reader, and if Wells had still been alive when this edition was published, there's considerable evidence he'd have sued Batchelor, on the grounds that what was written was either unprovable (and thus libelous), or none of the public's business, and thus an invasion of his privacy. There's one exception, however: I think most people tend to assume that Wells was well-educated, and he wasn't. Furthermore, he was apparently pretty defensive about this fact. This may help explain why, in several of his stories, Wells refuses to explain scientific and technical points. It's not just that he gave wrong answers to questions nobody knew the answers to at the time. It's also that he didn't know enough to give right answers that WERE already known. More on this later. If you're planning to skip the Introduction, I'd advise at least reading the capsule biography on the frontispiece. This at least gives useful information about when the two enclosed stories were first published (1895 and 1897, respectively). THE TIME MACHINE There's a prevailing tendency to describe all English literature before 1900 as 'Victorian'. This is an understandable form of shorthand, since Victoria was around a record-breaking amount of time (though Elizabeth II, if she can make it past 2015, bodes fair to break that record), and a lot of English literature was written in that period. In this case, it's also literally true: 1895 is in the late Victorian Era, in the period known as "the Gay 90's". This will stand as an explanation for why Wells knew nothing about Mendelian genetics. Precious few people did at the time. Although Mendel's publications began shortly after the printing of Origin of Species (1859), they didn't become widely known until well after Darwin's 1882 death (they were widely published in 1901). Darwin himself was somewhat agnostic about the mechanisms of inheritance, and did believe (if warily) in the inheritance of acquired characteristics. On the other hand, if Wells was planning to apply Darwinian principles in a book, he really had no excuse for not knowing what those principles WERE. Darwin's works have mostly remained in print since they were first published (it's a little difficult at present to get current editions, but older ones are still available, pretty generally). And they're easy to read: Darwin was a good writer. There was no need to turn to Huxley's versions, especially since Huxley often modified Darwin's theories without comment when he disagreed. For one thing, Darwin was a convinced gradualist. He wouldn't have accepted an argument that any substantial genetic change could have become established after a (geologically) short interval like 800,000 years and change. He would have argued that no major genetic variation had happened among humans since their first separation from an isolated population of hominids (Homo erectus, but he wouldn't have known that part), whenever that happened (still not clear). Indeed, it's now known that even the most maximally morphologically divergent humans differ by no more than one hundredth of 1% from ANY other humans). For another thing, Darwin was aware that natural selection is not necessarily a directional process. There's no particular reason to believe in trends of any sort (progressive, regressive, or whatever) UNLESS other processes are active. Darwin tended to try to add fudge factors, because he was a meliorist--he did believe in progress. But they're not a necessary part of his own theoretical framework, and he added them because he was uncomfortable with a nondirectional variation. The first time I read The Time Machine, I was in my teens, and I remember being most concerned about the water. The industrial processes used by the Morlocks are not clear, but they almost certainly involve leakage of toxic materials; mutagenic, teratogenic, carcinogenic, you name it. And all known water cycles involve a subterranean passage of water at some point. How was the water prevented from becoming so toxic that even the few viable organisms became sterile? This rereading raised additional issues. For one, I simply can't believe in any sort of change that resulted in the elimination of ALL fungi and bacteria. There have been bacteria since the origin of life on Earth, and they still comprise the majority of living things. How COULD two (or maybe three) of the five kingdoms of life just be completely eliminated, in 800,000 years, or in 800 million? This falls under the heading of literally incredible. Furthermore, while the majority of bacteria are completely irrelevant to other life, some are crucial to survival processes (digestion, oxygen production, etc). And without fungi, bacteria, earthworms,etc to decompose the bodies of dead creatures, how could the essential minerals, etc be returned to the life cycle of plants and animals? The Time Traveler describes many familiar plants, most of which depend on those recycled nutrients. And what about insects? And other pollinators, seed dispersers, and insectivores? Without all these, the whole system crashes. The surviving plant and animal communities are piecemeal. It's not surprising, for example, if equines had all gone extinct. Most species of equines are dependent on human cultivation and protection. But what about cervines (deer and their ilk?). Those are currently flourishing in the most improbable places, such as hedgerows and the verges and central vegetation on highways. What has become of them, in this improbably near future? It's perhaps not surprising that a British author is so insular. In the whole period (not much above a week, but still...) he's in this future time, he doesn't get more than about a day's pedestrian travel away from his landing point (if he'd thought the matter through more thoroughly, he might've put a bike rack on the thing. And thrown in a picnic basket, just in case. And a first aid kit, maybe?). He does, at one point, come near the seashore (moved in more toward London by erosion), but doesn't consider marine assets until later. But if the terrestrial flora and fauna were so affected, what ABOUT the marine systems? And come to that, if, in the present day, coral reefs in the Caribbean are deleteriously affected by dust from the Sahara, it's not likely that even the most insular society won't be affected by impacts from 'the Continent'. Or Iceland, for that matter. What's happened to Icelandic glaciers if average temperatures in Britain have heated enough to make outdoor life comfortable year 'round? Then there's the question of exactly what the Morlocks do to supply the Elois' 'wants'. What ARE those 'wants'? Food is easily acquired. Sleeping rooms probably don't need much maintenance. Water seems to be plentiful. Unexpectedly, the Eloi don't even seem to want any games to play with. All they do is dance, swim, and make love. Weena doesn't even understand the utility of pockets, because she and her companions don't have any property to carry--though you'd think they'd pick up things like pretty rocks as well as flowers. And as for clothing, they wear lightweight clothing (?why wear any?), which could easily be made durable, comfortable, and easily cleaned. After a certain amount is made in suitable sizes, what need for more? The 'Time Traveler' is careful to disavow any knowledge of 'drains'...but the reason he gives is not very good. There aren't a lot of possible variations for plumbing, after all. But if the society HAD come up with vastly superior plumbing, the best improvement is mechanisms to keep it functional--so what is there for the Morlocks to do? Keep the service robots in repair? And the price they charge is simply unreasonable. Eloi may not be very wary except on dark nights, but they're still about as large as the Morlocks (who are also small). Wouldn't it be easier for the Morlocks to do some night fishing? There is clearly life left in the ocean, and even if all the plankton (krill and the like) were gone (and life in the ocean probably wouldn't persist if they were), fishing is a lot easier than hunting down intelligent beings, who might sell their lives dear. I doubt, by the way, the premise that having no conflict (and no drudgery) in people's lives would mean that they wouldn't develop their intellects. In reality, I would say it was the reverse: that people who dull their talents with drudgery and exhaustion are the least likely to develop intellectually, all other things being equal. From babyhood, most humans learn for the fun of it, after all. And their investigative edge, too often, is blunted by the imposed need to get serious (read obsessive) about it all. If, having heard the Time Traveler's story, he had asked me for advice, I would have suggested taking tools to fortify the museum he spent far too little time in, and to study there until he got a pretty good idea what happened. And then to try to find other museums, and maybe even some surviving libraries. And THEN to go back to an earlier time, bearing evidence of how things were trending, and set up a school, in an attempt to head off what is coming. The penultimate scenes in an (unidentified) far future time are untenable. Granting that, with time, the Earth would likely become tide-locked to the sun (really, it would probably happen with the Moon, first. The Moon is already tide-locked to the Earth; in time it would probably become reciprocal), it'd almost certainly be too MUCH time. In about 4.5 billion years, the Earth will be inside the sun. How? The sun will run short on hydrogen for fusion. Because it's no longer producing enough energy to counteract gravity, it will begin to shrink...until the heavier elements get close enough together to begin fusing. Then it will begin to expand again (slowly, because it's too small for there to be enough fusion reactions for an explosion). By the time it reaches maximum size, its photosphere will be beyond the orbit of Mars. Then after it runs out of fuel to produce iron (iron is the first element on the periodic table that produces less energy from fusion than it uses up in fusing--heavier elements are produced only in supernovae), it will begin to collapse again. But until it's shrunk quite a bit, the Earth, the Moon, and the inner planets will still be inside the sun. And all this would almost certainly be before the Earth could become tide-locked to the Sun. Afterwards, when the sun has become a neutron star, it might happen--but even if there were again oceans on the Earth by that time, it's unlikely they'd contain crustaceans: because probably life would have to get started again, and it's not likely that multicellular life would develop again. Details, details! But details count. THE INVISIBLE MAN It's said that Wells only realized after he had written the book that the Invisible Man would be blind--because the retina was no longer opaque to visible light. But there are a lot more technical problems than that. For example, it's the colored agents in blood (haemoglobin, particularly) that carry oxygen. If the haemoglobin lost its color, could it carry oxygen to the cells? But the technical problems, while interesting, are not the primary interest in this book. Griffin could easily have resolved some of them, by creating (as he proved he could) invisible clothing. The social problems, however, might be intractable. Griffin expects that invisibility will give him power. In fact, he finds that it brings him only troubles. He gains little or nothing, but he's often in danger (of freezing, if nothing else). And people finally chase him down and murder him, without negotiation or quarter. And the reason given for this ruthless behavior on the part of the visible is patently false, or at least unprovable. Note that the only person who ever TALKED to Griffin about his problems is the person who set him up to be killed. He CLAIMS to be accurately representing Griffin's story--but there's no way to question a dead man. So we're left with a situation where the only evidence we have about the man is people who have various sorts of grudges against him, or who stood to profit from his death (the homeless man Griffin drafts into his service has every intention of robbing him. If he didn't intend to make away with Griffin's property, why not just ditch it somewhere safe, and tell him where it is)? There's no evidence at all that Griffin meant to undertake a 'reign of terror'. Even if he thought of it at some point, he would have rapidly realized it was impossible, since he still had to get away from people to remain at large. And at one point there is a coordinated effort to deny him food and sleep, though he's evidently had a serious shortage of both for weeks. Furthermore, the description of the man's life BEFORE he developed his 'invisibility' technique is too easily dismissed. Born an albino, he has almost certainly led a life of pain and illness. Without any pigment in his skin, he was at terribly high danger of skin cancers (and there's no evidence that the process rendered him transparent in the UV range--so he's at even greater risk if he daren't wear clothes). Skin cancer, after all, is what killed Snowflake the White Gorilla. Furthermore, he must have lived a lifetime of pain, and not just from perennial sunburns. He must have been severely and chronically photophobic. And there's no evidence that he was able to arrange a nocturnal schedule. I would be surprised, really, if he hadn't had those 'smoked glasses' LONG before he ever experimented with invisibility. Then there's the question of irritability. Even if the one person who actually interviewed him hadn't accused him of extreme irritability (probably exaggerating for propaganda purposes), I wouldn't be surprised if someone in chronic, low-level pain did have a tendency to be irritable. The only escape would be in a darkened room. But in a society where people were considered to have no right to privacy, keeping in a darkened room might be hard to manage. I have to say that I never stopped feeling wincing pity for the man. Even when he did kill a man (in what sounds to me to be a fair fight against a man who assaulted him), I wasn't prepared to accept the sickening scene in which he's beaten to death by what amounts to a lynch mob. I don't consider the 'villagers with pitchforks' revelation a spoiler, by the way, because it's repeatedly telegraphed. I found this book a horror novel, in that it revealed the revolting cruelty of 'ordinary people' when faced with anything out of the ordinary.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    This is the first of H.G. Wells’ work that I’ve read, and it was fascinating. I was mainly intrigued by the idea that these two short stories were written in the late 1890s. The ideas, I imagine, were unheard of at the time of publication, and while I found the writing itself merely adequate, writing about time travel and invisibility around the turn of the 20th century is such a novel (pun intended) idea to me. The Time Machine (a fast read, clocking in at only 94 pages) was definitively the be This is the first of H.G. Wells’ work that I’ve read, and it was fascinating. I was mainly intrigued by the idea that these two short stories were written in the late 1890s. The ideas, I imagine, were unheard of at the time of publication, and while I found the writing itself merely adequate, writing about time travel and invisibility around the turn of the 20th century is such a novel (pun intended) idea to me. The Time Machine (a fast read, clocking in at only 94 pages) was definitively the better story. Once the inventor began describing his adventure, it got interesting - rather than traveling into the “near” future (as I anticipated he would), he went to the year 802,701. At this point, life as he knew it had shifted dramatically. He interacts with the two races (the peaceful Eloi and the sewer-dwelling Morlocks) in his struggle to return to his own time. To me, the most enjoyable aspect of this book was how it stood the test of time. Rather than attempt to describe how the world would be in 200 years (what would be considered modern-day for a reader like me), Wells created a completely possible world eight hundred thousand years in the future. One of my favorite quotes from The Time Machine: Our agriculture and horticulture destroy a weed just here and there and cultivate perhaps a score or so of wholesome plants, leaving the greater number to fight out a balance as they can. We improve our favorite plants and animals - and how few they are - gradually by selective breeding; now a new and better peach, now a seedless grape, now a sweeter and larger flower, now a more convenient breed of cattle. We improve them gradually, because our ideals are vague and tentative, and our knowledge is very limited; because Nature, too, is shy and slow in our clumsy hands. Some day all this will be better organized, and still better. That is the drift of the current in spite of the eddies. The Invisible Man was tedious. To say the least. Quick summary (spoilers): a weird looking dude shows up in a town outside London, tries to do science in a private room but the townspeople get suspicious of him, and eventually realize he’s invisible. He’s really mean. There’s a big confrontation and he runs away. He then gets a ‘tramp’ to sneak him back into his room for his science journals. Before too long, the tramp gets scared of the invisible man and tries to run away, causing the invisible man to get angry because the tramp has his journals and some of his money. The invisible man then finds an old science schoolmate’s house and recounts the whole story of his transition to invisibility. During his retelling, we find out he’s actually a really really really horrible person, and he wants to start a reign of terror where he kills people because he’s invisible, so basically why not kill people. His friend, who isn’t actually his friend, tries to turn him in to the police, but the invisible man escapes and basically the entire town locks down to capture him, and when they do, he is killed in the process and turns back to the albino he started as. It ends ambigiously with the tramp reading over the books, thinking about what he would do if he were invisible. I found very little value in the book, but I thought this quote was pretty good: “And being but two and twenty and full of enthusiasm, I said, ‘I will devote my life to this. This is worth while.’ You know what fools we are at two and twenty?” “Fools then or fools now,” said Kemp. “As though knowing could be any satisfaction to a man!” Overall, Time Machine good, Invisible Man bad. All of it was fascinating when taken in context of the time it was written.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hi

    The Time Machine - 2/5 With The Time Machine, I think the biggest issue was the narration. The majority of the story is the Time Traveller’s narration of what he experienced, and it really only jumped from one point to the next. The word count was filled up primarily with the Time Traveller’s theories regarding society, and it may have simply been the notes this version contained, but there were very heavy political undertones and criticisms regarding class distinctions that I feel might have aff The Time Machine - 2/5 With The Time Machine, I think the biggest issue was the narration. The majority of the story is the Time Traveller’s narration of what he experienced, and it really only jumped from one point to the next. The word count was filled up primarily with the Time Traveller’s theories regarding society, and it may have simply been the notes this version contained, but there were very heavy political undertones and criticisms regarding class distinctions that I feel might have affected how I’d viewed many of the themes in the story and made me think of the future-world a little shallow and contrived in spite of extremely creative and thoughtful depictions. The Time Traveller himself I did not feel was very likeable. He was a cliche, arrogant scientist whose motive was only to gain more knowledge (as all cliche arrogant scientists tend to wish for). He didn’t care about how his actions affected others, which is something I found very insufferable as he continuously preached about humanity but lacked any empathy for whatever creatures he felt were beneath him. There was nothing particularly redeemable or interesting about him. The main focus of this story was the journey to the future, but with the lack of a engaging or likeable narrator, the journey is wasted. The Invisible Man - 2.5/5 I started off enjoying the Invisible Man- it was a mysterious character, with a very engaging set up to the story, but a little after the half way mark, it began to fall apart. The concept of the Invisible Man himself was very interesting, and there were so many directions it could have gone, but had instead ended up with a very messy explanation and half-thought out plot. I think the main issue for me was Invisible Man’s development; it was abrupt and there was no gradual progression from a secluded, mysterious, and desperate character in a strange situation to an outright maniac. There as never the “falling into madness” because, as the story seemed to explain, he had always been terrible. His motivations for every action that led him up to that point of the story made no sense, by which I mean that despite learning about his past, there never seemed to be any motivation for him at all. He was conducting experiments and behaving the way he did because he was a scientist and he was invisible and that was what the plot needed. The fate of the Invisible Man was anticlimactic, and there was still some lack of clarity when it came to the epilogue. Neither The Time Machine nor The Invisible Man were so bad that I couldn’t stand to finish them, or so terrible that I have a burning rage against them. I can see why both these stories are regarded as classics and how so many enjoy them, but to me both the stories were just very flat and disappointing. I think most of this stems from the fact that I felt like the narratives were too focused on the concept of the stories themselves rather than telling the actual story. Both were highly fixed on the their singular stories, moving from one point to the next in regards to the plot, and it felt very forced and restrictive.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Chen

    The Time Machine “Ages ago . . . [m]an had thrust his brother man out of the ease and the sunshine. And now that brother was coming back—changed!” (60). H.G. Wells’ science fiction novella, The Time Machine, is a tour de force that is both awe-inspiring (“great and splendid architecture . . . more massive than any buildings of our own time . . . built of glimmer and mist" (21)), and, perhaps even more importantly, morally provocative (“[t]he rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the The Time Machine “Ages ago . . . [m]an had thrust his brother man out of the ease and the sunshine. And now that brother was coming back—changed!” (60). H.G. Wells’ science fiction novella, The Time Machine, is a tour de force that is both awe-inspiring (“great and splendid architecture . . . more massive than any buildings of our own time . . . built of glimmer and mist" (21)), and, perhaps even more importantly, morally provocative (“[t]he rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work . . . in that perfect world” (81)). Technically structured as a frame narrative, Wells’ short story begins and ends through the eyes of the narrator, Hillyer, listening to the adventures of the traveler; what falls between is the traveler’s extended monologue, spanning over ninety pages. In the novel, an unnamed scientist invents a time machine and travels 802,701 years into the future to find that the human species has divergently evolved into two different species: the terricolous, diurnal, “feebl[y] prett[y]” Eloi and the subterranean, nocturnal, “mere[ly] mechanical[-minded]” Morlocks, both of whom lack intelligence—because “there is no change and no need of change” (81) in their society—and strength—because “[u]nder the new conditions of perfect comfort and security, that restless energy, that with [modern humans] is strength, would become weakness” (34). After exploring the serene landscape for a day—speckled by “splendid buildings, endlessly varied in material and style . . . clustering thickets of evergreens . . . blossom-laden trees and tree-ferns . . . water [that] shone like silver . . . [and] blue undulating hills” (41)—the traveler discovers that his time machine has gone missing; he suspects that some creature has hidden it within a nearby statue he calls the White Sphinx. He soon befriends an Eloi named Weena; together, they traverse to the Palace of Green Porcelain to find a tool to break inside the statue. Gradually, he becomes aware of the nighttime horrors of the Morlocks, who devour the Eloi for sustenance; he protects himself and Weena during their journey with the light and heat of some matches. However, upon returning to the White Sphinx, he finds that the statue is already open. He steps inside and promptly escapes that world. After “liv[ing] eight days” (18) in that time period, he travels further into the future, discovering a dying, red sun and a beach populated by giant crabs and “intensely green vegetation” (84). Narrowly escaping death by a giant crab, he travels thirty million years into the future, “drawn on by the mystery of the earth’s fate” (86), a mystery that will only be resolved if you read this book. One of the most profound, yet pessimistic, themes in this masterpiece is that all matter will ultimately return to its “ground state”: the condition of activity demanding the lowest possible amount of energy. The traveler “grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide” (80), meaning that, eventually, humans will lose all interest in advancing technology and society, instead “settl[ing] down into perfect harmony with [nature]” (34), as displayed by the Elois. Even the “artistic impetus would[,] at last[,] die away” and “fade in the end into a contented inactivity” (35). On a cosmic scale, the sun itself will continue to “grow larger and duller in the westward sky” before fading out altogether, like a burnt candle, and “the life of the old earth [will] ebb away” (86), along with all memories of our past achievements and impressions. ----------------------------------------------- The Invisible Man Anyone who believes that invisibility is a fantastic superpower has clearly not yet read H.G. Wells’ renowned chilling, twentieth-century science fiction classic, The Invisible Man. It’s not. It is true that invisibility comes with many advantages: “[W]hatever the consequences might be [of The Invisible Man’s actions], was nothing . . . [he] had merely to fling aside [his] garments and vanish” (225). However, upon celebrating his newfound immunity by “treating [him]self” to a “sumptuous feast,” he realized that “[he] could not eat unless [he] exposed [his] invisible face” (225). Clearly, while “invisibility made it possible to get” anything one wanted, “it made it impossible to enjoy [those things] when they are got” (225). Set in the quiet village of Iping, the story opens “one wintry day . . . [during] a biting wind and a driving snow” (101) with a peculiar, equally cold character, Griffin, staying at the Coach and Horses inn. “[W]rapped up from head to foot” (101), he garners the suspicion of the innkeepers and the villagers, who soon accuse him of robbery. Stripping off his clothes (consequently revealing his invisibility), he flees from the village to Port Stowe, where he forces a homeless figure named Marvel to carry his plundered goods. After Marvel escapes from his captivity in a riveting bar fight, The Invisible Man goes to Burdock and finds Kemp, a college friend. However, Kemp betrays Griffin by alerting the authorities to his presence. And when the authorities arrive . . . well, you’ll have to read the book to discover what becomes of Griffin (and Kemp). Set in 19th-century England, the author uses a semi-Romantic writing style with emphasis on individuality and liberalism: "[The Invisible Man] beheld, unclouded by doubt, a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a man—the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks [he] saw none [yet]" (195). Further, despite the incorporation of science in a semi-Naturalistic style, he celebrates rural life, fabricating les paysages of small countryside towns in England. One theme present is that opportunity leads to selfishness, which is affirmed by all of history, from Napoleon’s reign to the American belief in manifest destiny. With his invisibility, Griffin “had been quietly and dexterously making off . . . in handfuls and rouleaux” (170). But it is not just wealth that Griffin seeks to achieve: “[I] must now establish a Reign of Terror . . . [I must] terrify and dominate [Burdock] . . . all who disobey [my] orders [I] must kill, and kill all who would defend them” (229). Another profound and dominant theme in the novella is that humans naturally oppose differences. Even before gaining his invisible powers (burdens), he had been different from most people, as a scientist “white with the whiteness of albinism” (253). Instead of opening more gateways, his invisibility has only further ostracized him from society, isolating him from the accepted norm. Griffin laments to Kemp the lugubrious state of his isolation: “Alone—it is wonderful how little a man can do alone! To rob a little, to hurt a little, and there is the end" (228). Alors, should you ever have the opportunity to select a superpower, pick flying instead. Much cooler.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isabell

    The Time Machine: 3/5 Stars I thought this was interesting considering it was the first time travel book written by man. The contrast between the future human species was interesting and expertly depicted the cynicism the author had regarding humanity's future. I can't say I disagree with his right now. That being said, the way the story was told (as a long, personal narrative) was strange and brought took me out of the story at times. The narrator was not the person telling the story, he was simpl The Time Machine: 3/5 Stars I thought this was interesting considering it was the first time travel book written by man. The contrast between the future human species was interesting and expertly depicted the cynicism the author had regarding humanity's future. I can't say I disagree with his right now. That being said, the way the story was told (as a long, personal narrative) was strange and brought took me out of the story at times. The narrator was not the person telling the story, he was simply relating the story of another person to the reader. I think the story of the time travel itself would have been more effective told strictly in the first person. In the end, I understand why Wells chose to have a narrator (the ending was actually my favorite part of the story; I loved the slightly ambiguous ending) who did not travel through time personally. The Invisible Man: 2/5 Stars Nope. Nope. Nope. Nope. I thought I was going to like this when I first started reading it. I enjoyed the suspense of the story, seeing the characters question the town's guest, and the curiosity surrounding the Invisible Man's experiments. However, once the story shifted towards the Invisible Man's journey and direct interactions with the world I started disliking the story. While the Invisible Man was purposely written as an unlikable character (how could readers be expected to like a selfish, violent, manipulative egomaniac?) I still thought there should have been something redeeming about him. Maybe the experiments should have originally been for humanity's good or the Invisible Man could have been shown to have a friend/lover who hurt him and pushed him to despise humanity. As it was, the Invisible Man had a personal vendetta against humanity for no reason other than his outrageous rage. I could not empathize with him and I did not care about him.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Qasim

    The time machine & The Invisible Man They are two Sc-Fi classics novels by the Famous writer H.G.Wells, my first read to this writer was when I was at intermediate school. Back then we read the summary of 'war of the worlds'. To be honest i wasn't really a big fan of Sc-fi but I wanted to make some changes to my read list and I was the right about that. In this review i will talk a little about these two stories : The time machine this story takes place in man who his name remain unknown but they The time machine & The Invisible Man They are two Sc-Fi classics novels by the Famous writer H.G.Wells, my first read to this writer was when I was at intermediate school. Back then we read the summary of 'war of the worlds'. To be honest i wasn't really a big fan of Sc-fi but I wanted to make some changes to my read list and I was the right about that. In this review i will talk a little about these two stories : The time machine this story takes place in man who his name remain unknown but they keep calling him the time traveler, he built a time machine that made him travels through time and sees the world after and before thousands years, but when he was in the future, something blocked him to make his own way back to his time and he stacks in the far future . Wells shows us how he imagines the world after thousands years, how the life, languages even animals and fruits are different from now days but the strange thing is that the world turns into a Dystopia , but even in a places like this ... maybe you can find what we call ' Love ' The story telling was good and you can fell the realty in it, and we have to mention that the novel was written before Albert einstein discovered the theory of relativity by ten years , as Wells was a Scientist in way or another as well as writer The Invisible Man This novel takes place in a life of a man who became Invisible because of accident happened in his life, because of that he had to survive even if that meant he has to rob or maybe kill and thats make us ask is it a bless to be invisible or it is an Indignation? after reading this story maybe we can answer in different ways ... Wells described the invisible man's thinking and how it's changed and became more Dangerous after living out of people’s sights both stories are great and worth to read my rate 3.8

  25. 4 out of 5

    Johann

    We were at Barnes & Noble this week and I saw this book available for $4.95, which I thought was a pretty good deal, considering it contained two stories in one. I was familiar with the basic premise of The Time Machine, being a fan of the 1960 film. There are a few differences in the original story, but the basic outline was the same. What the movie lacks, in a way, is the political subtext and the potential dangers of “progress” in a Socialist economy. The Invisible Man was largely new to me, o We were at Barnes & Noble this week and I saw this book available for $4.95, which I thought was a pretty good deal, considering it contained two stories in one. I was familiar with the basic premise of The Time Machine, being a fan of the 1960 film. There are a few differences in the original story, but the basic outline was the same. What the movie lacks, in a way, is the political subtext and the potential dangers of “progress” in a Socialist economy. The Invisible Man was largely new to me, other than a few warped film previews or fancied tales. The actual story is far more dismal. The writing, however, is gripping and exciting—it felt like watching a movie you couldn’t move from until it was over. Perhaps because it was new to me, I far preferred this story to The Time Machine. I want to watch the 1933 film adaptation, but I’m afraid I’ll be disappointed. I definitely don’t want to see the new 2020 movie. The story tells of the dangers of science altering nature. The Man eventually becomes a monster, considers himself higher than man, almost a god, and feels that natural laws/rules of society no longer apply to him and the tale details the eventual fallout of his decisions and experiments. Once just a pathetic and lonely human being, the story does a much better job than I ever could of describing how he morphs from there into something almost inhuman—at least in his mind (even though the only difference between him and any other person is the fact that you can’t see him). Perhaps the one critique would be what one contemporary reviewer noted, and that is that there is a lack of depth in H. G. Wells’ characters. That is what keeps John Steinbeck paramount amongst authors, in my mind.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Cam

    Book Review: The Time Machine(83 pages) What is time? Is it the recording of the present and past and the peeking into the future? Is it the aging process of all things? Is it relative to space? Is it changeable or in a constant mold? Can you move about it and through it? These questions come to mind while either A) reading The Time Machine by H.G. Wells or B) having a deep, frustrating moment, pondering things beyond my own understanding. That is part of the reason The Time Machine was such a gr Book Review: The Time Machine(83 pages) What is time? Is it the recording of the present and past and the peeking into the future? Is it the aging process of all things? Is it relative to space? Is it changeable or in a constant mold? Can you move about it and through it? These questions come to mind while either A) reading The Time Machine by H.G. Wells or B) having a deep, frustrating moment, pondering things beyond my own understanding. That is part of the reason The Time Machine was such a great read, different from most books I have found. There were two themes uncovered in this book, in my opinion. The first was to believe in yourself, even when people may not think you can achieve your goals. This first occurred to me when the time traveller was meeting in his study with friends, discussing his miniature model. They kindly joked and remarked on 'the absurdity' of his intentions, but he went along with his plan anyways. The second was curiosity. The saying "curiosity killed the cat" popped into my mind several times as I read. Chapter after chapter was filled with close calls and risks based on the fact that the time traveller was eager to see what lay around the corner. A scientist is supposed to be a skeptical and have a curious mind; I'm positive you could associate the main character as a scientist (based on his character traits). As I read, I realized the main character is never named; he is just referred to as "the time traveler". Multiple maids, servants, friends, and acquaintances are named, but he is not. I found that strange, but it added mystery to the story, and it mad The Time Machine more interesting to me personally. I think the time traveler can be described as naive, curious, adventuresome, athletic, and humorous. The traits naive and curious can be found any time he sits on the time machine and maneuvers its levers. Adventuresome doesn't describe the time traveler; adventuresome IS the time traveler. The moment he steps off the seat of the machine and into the year 802,701 A.D. he is an adventurer, like it or not. I also call him athletic, because at one point in the story, he runs, on his account, about 2 miles in no more than 10 minutes to escape the coming of darkness. His character is also humorous, because he always is turning his misfortune into a joke about himself, especially when he comes home a wreck and his friends want to know why--he tells them they must wait for him to eat and have a cigar. I probably admire this last trait the most about the time traveller. The story takes place in England in the mid-1800s. Some things that also went along with the setting was the descriptions of houses as cottage-like and clothing as 'evening' and 'day dress'. Another thing affected by either the setting of the story or the time the story was written was the dialect. This book wasn't written in a very modern form (by that I mean with modern slang or speech). It made me feel I was in a different world, and that was BEFORE he traveled into the far future. Those descriptions were of scenarios that I had trouble imagining myself in. A place with all rustic ruins and no technology? If that's what the future holds, I don't want to travel very far into it. In The Time Machine, the time traveler "travels" through time. That's pretty predictable because of the tittle, but what is unpredictable is the order of events as they take place. The story begins in the home of the traveller; his friends/colleagues are over and they are all thoughtfully discussing the concept of time. He tells them that with time, the fourth dimension, people should be able to move around it like they do the other three. His friends only ponder it with him long enough to cross if off their list of possibilities. The next week, he invites them back for dinner, only when they arrive, the time traveler cannot be found. A few moments pass before the time traveler finally stumbles in his front door, looking like he spent a week on Survivor (the game show). His guests are in suspense as he puts off the explanation for his condition until after dinner. When they are all settled in his lounge, the time traveler tells the small group of men gathered of the creation of a time machine, hand built and home tested. He tells them of his first trip into the future, the amazing sights he saw, and the two very different species that solely inhabit the future earth. He also projects the thought that people can evolve or change and loose the very thing that separates human beings from plain animals. His story may come to an end, and his guests may go home, but is his adventure really over? The author, H.G. Wells, has a distinct writing style to me; I haven't seen many books like it, but that's because The Time Machine was first published in 1895. The language used is older English than most people are used to hearing, but it essentially will cause the reader to slow down and be more thorough in how they read. I reread parts many times if I didn't feel like I understood the descriptions or dialect. What I could understand and what I enjoyed, was the writer's beautiful way of putting things that were pretty plain. Once, where the author could have said "As I went faster, night and day went by one after the other" he says "As I put on pace, night followed day like the flapping of a black wing". It makes me forget I'm reading a novel and not a poem; his writing as a piece of art. The Time Machine was not only thought provoking, mysterious, or artistic, it was also deep. The way he compares the futures inhabitants to animals really made me think about the human race and what makes people unique. That in itself can blow people's minds, and H.G. Wells had to throw in a concept as deep as time travel right in on top of it all. W-O-W. One reflection I had was that if time and the surrounding earth could change that much, would people really change that greatly? Would our minds evolve first, or our physical bodies? Have we evolved very much over the past thousands of years? I could go on forever with questions, as I'm sure any person could after reading The Time Machine. This book is for the scientific thinker or the adventurer; I don't recommend its reading if you don't want to think, ponder, or become curious, just like the time traveler.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    These are two very different stories joined together to form a rich anthology that showcases Wells' sci-fi writing chops. The Time Traveller's tale was a brilliantly plotted social commentary on the possible fate of our binary political and economic world. This was an original take on a subject that transports readers into time unimaginable, which grants Wells the ability to mold his tale in a way that cannot be combatted nor critiqued. It's easy to see why The Time Traveller became a classic, pa These are two very different stories joined together to form a rich anthology that showcases Wells' sci-fi writing chops. The Time Traveller's tale was a brilliantly plotted social commentary on the possible fate of our binary political and economic world. This was an original take on a subject that transports readers into time unimaginable, which grants Wells the ability to mold his tale in a way that cannot be combatted nor critiqued. It's easy to see why The Time Traveller became a classic, paving the way for future generations of sci-fi story tellers. The Invisible Man is an intense and suspenseful tale, about a mad scientist whose morals and motives are both ambiguous and yet forthright, which makes it all the more chilling and uneasy. This novel is another sci-fi classic that keeps you at the edge of your seat, wanting to know more about the mysterious Invisible Man, and yet despising his antagonistic ways. This character is someone you hate to love and love to hate. You don't know whether to feel bad for him or to feel as if he deserves his fate. This tension with our main character is what makes this story so brilliant- all other characters are just vehicles to get the reader to the end (as they are also treated as vehicles to Griffin's- rather cruel- end). Excellently unfolded, and a tale unlike any other, this is one for the ages.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sabina Schmitz

    I got a taste of Wells after reading “A slip under the microscope”. Excited to find this book, consisting of two stories, I dove in. You sense the passion for science in all of his books. In “The Time Machine”, the protagonist does the unthinkable and travels through time. In “The Invisible Man”, the protagonist makes himself invisible by conquering the concept of light. Time and light are both mysteries of the universe and thus Wells proceeds to theorise them in both of his novels. His writing is I got a taste of Wells after reading “A slip under the microscope”. Excited to find this book, consisting of two stories, I dove in. You sense the passion for science in all of his books. In “The Time Machine”, the protagonist does the unthinkable and travels through time. In “The Invisible Man”, the protagonist makes himself invisible by conquering the concept of light. Time and light are both mysteries of the universe and thus Wells proceeds to theorise them in both of his novels. His writing is very realistic, so realistic that you may believe that the stories are taken from true accounts. I enjoyed how he continuously brings you in conflict with the mysteries hidden in the depth of his stories. You’re not quite sure why you’re sympathising with the enemy. A true founding father of science fiction, and a very smart one indeed

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Both classic books. The Invisible Man was, ultimately, the more exciting read, as the Time Machine suffers from having the character who's supposed to be in danger telling the entire story after the fact. The ending is satisfying, but The Invisible Man is more intriguing from start to finish. All of that said, this edition of the book has an issue. It has both footnotes and end notes. The end notes are helpful for putting everything in the social and political contexts of Wells's time. But the fo Both classic books. The Invisible Man was, ultimately, the more exciting read, as the Time Machine suffers from having the character who's supposed to be in danger telling the entire story after the fact. The ending is satisfying, but The Invisible Man is more intriguing from start to finish. All of that said, this edition of the book has an issue. It has both footnotes and end notes. The end notes are helpful for putting everything in the social and political contexts of Wells's time. But the footnotes are, frankly, distracting. They are effectively there to let the reader understand colloquial terms of the time, but they are inconsistent about what they translate, and any reader that can understand things from context will be better off without looking at them. That aside, though, it was convenient to have both books in one volume together, so that was definitely a plus!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cathleen

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  32. 5 out of 5

    John

  33. 5 out of 5

    Sergey

  34. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tiffanie

  36. 4 out of 5

    Preston Constantine

    I was expecting more from The Time Machine. I liked it, but I was left wanting to know more. I did like, however, the use of Darwin's theory of evolution.

  37. 5 out of 5

    Malex

  38. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

  39. 4 out of 5

    Rainey

  40. 5 out of 5

    Ted

  41. 4 out of 5

    Raghu

  42. 5 out of 5

    Raghavan

  43. 4 out of 5

    Patience

  44. 4 out of 5

    Megan K

  45. 4 out of 5

    Celine

  46. 5 out of 5

    Saturnina

  47. 4 out of 5

    Cassa

  48. 4 out of 5

    Halaloyea

  49. 5 out of 5

    Wagz

  50. 5 out of 5

    Kingrhythm

  51. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  52. 5 out of 5

    andy

  53. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Daniel

  54. 4 out of 5

    Barb

  55. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  56. 4 out of 5

    Raheem

  57. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  58. 4 out of 5

    Brit

  59. 4 out of 5

    William

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