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50 Philosophy Classics: Thinking, Being, Acting, Seeing: Profound Insights and Powerful Thinking from Fifty Key Books

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For over 2000 years, philosophy has been our best guide to the experience of being human, and the true nature of reality. From Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Confucius, Cicero and Heraclitus in ancient times to 17th century rationalists Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza, from 20th-century greats Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Baudrillard and Simone de Beauvoir to contemporary thinkers M For over 2000 years, philosophy has been our best guide to the experience of being human, and the true nature of reality. From Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Confucius, Cicero and Heraclitus in ancient times to 17th century rationalists Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza, from 20th-century greats Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Baudrillard and Simone de Beauvoir to contemporary thinkers Michael Sandel, Peter Singer and Slavoj Zizek, 50 Philosophy Classics explores key writings that have shaped the discipline and had an impact on the real world. Philosophy can no longer be confined to academia, and 50 Philosophy Classics shows how powerful it can be as a tool for opening our minds and helping us think. Whether you are fascinated or daunted by the big questions of how to think, how to be, how to act and how to see, this is the perfect introduction to some of humanity's greatest minds and their landmark books.


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For over 2000 years, philosophy has been our best guide to the experience of being human, and the true nature of reality. From Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Confucius, Cicero and Heraclitus in ancient times to 17th century rationalists Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza, from 20th-century greats Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Baudrillard and Simone de Beauvoir to contemporary thinkers M For over 2000 years, philosophy has been our best guide to the experience of being human, and the true nature of reality. From Aristotle, Plato, Epicurus, Confucius, Cicero and Heraclitus in ancient times to 17th century rationalists Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza, from 20th-century greats Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Baudrillard and Simone de Beauvoir to contemporary thinkers Michael Sandel, Peter Singer and Slavoj Zizek, 50 Philosophy Classics explores key writings that have shaped the discipline and had an impact on the real world. Philosophy can no longer be confined to academia, and 50 Philosophy Classics shows how powerful it can be as a tool for opening our minds and helping us think. Whether you are fascinated or daunted by the big questions of how to think, how to be, how to act and how to see, this is the perfect introduction to some of humanity's greatest minds and their landmark books.

30 review for 50 Philosophy Classics: Thinking, Being, Acting, Seeing: Profound Insights and Powerful Thinking from Fifty Key Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim Krete

    I throughly enjoyed this book. The attempt to make philosophy accessible is refreshing and has opened up a renewed interest in it for me personally

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    *Goodreads First Reads advanced copy* The author did a wonderful job bringing these 50 philosophies to a level of explanation where everyone can understand them. He did so in a non-judgemental/non-favoritist way, allowing the reader to decide which makes sense to them and which sounds completely foolish. The way the author presented each philosophy, with a section listing other similar philosophies adds to the readers understanding. I definitely have a desire to check out some of these classics f *Goodreads First Reads advanced copy* The author did a wonderful job bringing these 50 philosophies to a level of explanation where everyone can understand them. He did so in a non-judgemental/non-favoritist way, allowing the reader to decide which makes sense to them and which sounds completely foolish. The way the author presented each philosophy, with a section listing other similar philosophies adds to the readers understanding. I definitely have a desire to check out some of these classics for myself now. I would recommend 50 Philosophy Classics to anyone interested in an introductory book on some of the most influential philosophies throughout history.

  3. 4 out of 5

    maria

    Summarises these 50 vital philosophical texts efficiently and with very accessible language, making complex ideas relatively easy to understand. I found it to be a great introduction to the field, and the succinct biographies a nice touch.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Don Mario

    It really keeps its promise of "insights" and "thinking". Very thought provoking, and good motivation for further reading. I think I'll get back to this book every some time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    The Conch

    Theologian and philosopher Thomas Aquinas wrote in On the Heavens: “the study of philosophy has as its purpose to know not what people have thought, but rather the truth about the way things are.” I saw the series of 50 books of author Tom Butler at airport. The attractive point of the 50 series is that it is act like capsule containing 50 globules of knowledge and on swallowing one more access of knowledge will open. As the name suggests, this book summarizes thoughts of fifty major western and Theologian and philosopher Thomas Aquinas wrote in On the Heavens: “the study of philosophy has as its purpose to know not what people have thought, but rather the truth about the way things are.” I saw the series of 50 books of author Tom Butler at airport. The attractive point of the 50 series is that it is act like capsule containing 50 globules of knowledge and on swallowing one more access of knowledge will open. As the name suggests, this book summarizes thoughts of fifty major western and Greek philosophers. However, except Confucius, no other occidental philosophers are given place. The reader will find him/herself floating in the river of thoughts from ancient philosophers Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Epicurus, Heraclitus etc. to modern Daniel Kahneman, Chomsky, Peter Singer, Taleb and Slavoj Zizek.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    A average of 6 pages dedicated to each Philosopher makes for easy reading, especially if you are not familiar with them. The first theme of "Discover life's meaning" was enough to draw me to this book. I was not disappointed either. I like the format of 50 different stories, where I can read a chapter, put the book down and return to it some weeks later, and start another story. Liken it to a short story book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena Golden

    Solid 5* for the content. The book is a wonderful introduction to the major philosophical works and certainly got me more interested in reading more, especially as far as modern philosophers are concerned. However, I was not convinced by the alphabetic order right from the start and only got progressively more annoyed it as I was reading. I decided to read the chapters in chronological order so first I had to come up with it (I'm attaching a list at the bottom of this review for those of you who Solid 5* for the content. The book is a wonderful introduction to the major philosophical works and certainly got me more interested in reading more, especially as far as modern philosophers are concerned. However, I was not convinced by the alphabetic order right from the start and only got progressively more annoyed it as I was reading. I decided to read the chapters in chronological order so first I had to come up with it (I'm attaching a list at the bottom of this review for those of you who want to do the same). That in itself was an annoying task but then having to always consult my list after every chapter and synchronising progress across my reading devices was a pain each and every time. And that jumping was made even more annoying by the fact that I found it easier to associate ideas with philosophers' names but the chapters are named after particular books which further contributed to the nuisance. It also meant I was not able to easily go back to refresh my memory which, again, was annoying because by far most of the references are chronologically anaphoric so would have made no sense to me had I decided to read the book in the order that it is presented in. In any case, here is the chronological order: The number in brackets refers to chapter number 1. (21) Heraclitus - Fragments - 6th century BC (mistakenly written AD in the book) 2. (12) Confucius - Analects - 5th century BC 3. (38) Plato - The Republic - 4th century BC 4. (2) Aristotle - Nicomachean Ethics - 4th century BC 5. (15) Epicurus - Letters - 3rd century BC 6. (11) Cicero - On Duties - 44 BC 7. (31) Niccolò Machiavelli - The Prince (1513) 8. (34) Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580) 9. (13) René Descartes - Meditations on First Philosophy (1641) 10. (37) Blaise Pascal - Pensées (1660) 11. (47) Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677) 12. (30) John Locke - Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1689) 13. (29) Gottfried Leibniz - Theodicy (1710) 14. (22) David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748) 15. (41) Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762) 16. (25) Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781) 17. (7) Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) 18. (19) G.W.F. Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) 19. (45) Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818) 20. (26) Søren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843) 21. (33) John Stuart Mill - On Liberty (1859) 22. (14) Ralph Waldo Emerson - Fate (1860) 23. (36) Friedrich Nietzche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886) 24. (8) Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1907) 25. (23) William James - Pragmatism (1907) 26. (20) Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927) 27. (42) Bertrand Russel - The Conquest of Happiness (1930) 28. (39) Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934) 29. (3) A.J. Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936) 30. (44) Jean-Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943) 31. (6) Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1949) 32. (49) Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953) 33. (1) Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958) 34. (28) Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) 35. (16) Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966) 36. (32) Marshall McLuhan - The Medium Is the Massage (1967) 37. (35) Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970) 38. (40) John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971) 39. (27) Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972) 40. (9) David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980) 41. (5) Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981) 42. (10) Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002) 43. (17) Henry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005) 44. (48) Nassim Nicholas Taleb - The Black Swan (2007) 45. (46) Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009) 46. (43) Michael Sandel - Justice (2009) 47. (50) Slavoj Žižek - Living in the End Times (2010) 48. (4) Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011) 49. (24) Daniel Kahneman - Thinking, Fast and Slow (2011) 50. (18) Sam Harris - Free Will (2012)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashik Uzzaman

    I finished the audiobook today and overall liked it. I didn't like the fact that the philosophers were presented in the order of their last name. I think it would be very appropriate to order them in terms of their birth or death time to have a sequence how various ideas in philosophy developed over time. Another thing I am not clear is what was the criteria to pick the below 50 philosophers. For example, how come Averroes (Ibn Rush) and his theory of the unit of the intellect did not get a plac I finished the audiobook today and overall liked it. I didn't like the fact that the philosophers were presented in the order of their last name. I think it would be very appropriate to order them in terms of their birth or death time to have a sequence how various ideas in philosophy developed over time. Another thing I am not clear is what was the criteria to pick the below 50 philosophers. For example, how come Averroes (Ibn Rush) and his theory of the unit of the intellect did not get a place in this list? Despite that, I think this book is a great start for people who are thinking to get familiar with the history of philosophy. Below is the list of books covered in 50 Philosophy Classics. 1. Hannah Arendt - The Human Condition (1958) 2. Aristotle Nicomachean - Ethics (4th century BC) 3. AJ Ayer - Language, Truth and Logic (1936) 4. Julian Baggini - The Ego Trick (2011) 5. Jean Baudrillard - Simulacra and Simulation (1981) 6. Simone de Beauvoir - The Second Sex (1952) 7. Jeremy Bentham - Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789) 8. Henri Bergson - Creative Evolution (1911) 9. David Bohm - Wholeness and the Implicate Order (1980) 10. Noam Chomsky - Understanding Power (2002) 11. Cicero - On Duties (44 BC) 12. Confucius - Analects (5th century BC) 13. Rene Descartes - Meditations (1641) 14. Ralph Waldo - Emerson Fate (1860) 15. Epicurus - Letters (3rd century BC) 16. Michel Foucault - The Order of Things (1966) 17. Harry Frankfurt - On Bullshit (2005) 18. Sam Harris - Free Will (2012) 19. GWF Hegel - Phenomenology of Spirit (1803) 20. Martin Heidegger - Being and Time (1927) 21. Heraclitus - Fragments (6th century) 22. David Hume - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748) 23. William James - Pragmatism (1904) 24. Daniel Kahneman - Thinking: Fast and Slow (2011) 25. Immanuel Kant - Critique of Pure Reason (1781) 26. Søren Kierkegaard - Fear and Trembling (1843) 27. Saul Kripke - Naming and Necessity (1972) 28. Thomas Kuhn - The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962) 29. Gottfried Wilhelm - Leibniz Theodicy (1710) 30. John Locke - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) 31. Marshall McLuhan - The Medium is the Massage (1967) 32. Niccolo Machiavelli - The Prince (1532) 33. John Stuart - Mill On Liberty (1859) 34. Michel de Montaigne - Essays (1580) 35. Iris Murdoch - The Sovereignty of Good (1970) 36. Friedrich Nietzsche - Beyond Good and Evil (1886) 37. Blaise Pascal - Pensees (1670) 38. Plato - The Republic (4th century BC) 39. Karl Popper - The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934) 40. John Rawls - A Theory of Justice (1971) 41. Jean-Jacques Rousseau - The Social Contract (1762) 42. Bertrand Russell - The Conquest of Happiness (1920) 43. Michael Sandel - Justice (2009) 44. Jean Paul Sartre - Being and Nothingness (1943) 45. Arthur Schopenhauer - The World as Will and Representation (1818) 46. Peter Singer - The Life You Can Save (2009) 47. Baruch Spinoza - Ethics (1677) 48. Nassim Nicholas Taleb - The Black Swan (2007) 49. Ludwig Wittgenstein - Philosophical Investigations (1953) 50. Slavoj Zizek - Living In The End Times (2010)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandru

    Excellent selection of philosophers and a neutral presentation of various issues tackled by the selected 50. I really appreciated the modern philosopher's analysis, because the classics are already known to me. Another good point is the inclusion of various philosophers with opposable opinions on various issues. A worthy read for sure, even though often people do not like books that have in the title 100 or 50 of the best minds and so on... My favourite parts that left a deep impact are as follo Excellent selection of philosophers and a neutral presentation of various issues tackled by the selected 50. I really appreciated the modern philosopher's analysis, because the classics are already known to me. Another good point is the inclusion of various philosophers with opposable opinions on various issues. A worthy read for sure, even though often people do not like books that have in the title 100 or 50 of the best minds and so on... My favourite parts that left a deep impact are as follows: the scepticism of A.J. Ayer; the myths of human dignity and character and the influence of situational factors of Julian Baggini; the modern era of plenty of information and lack of meaningful data described by Jean Baudrillard; Henri Bergson's optimism, a new light on Epicurus and his human hedonism, which is different from the modern definition of hedonism (being more of a Stoic it was intersting to see a new insight on hedonism); Michel Foucault relatvism; Harry Frankfurt on bulshiting in this century; Sam Harris on the illusion of free will; Williams James pragmatism; Daniel Kahneman on the importance of psychology in the finding of truth; Nassim Nicholas Taleb on the wanted "mediocristan" vs the real "extremistan"; and finally Zizek and his criticism of the capitalism with the human face and the charity as the price for consumaristic sins. Do not get me wrong all 50 chapters of the book are worth reading, especially for those that are beginners in philosophy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    william ellison

    Food for thought The author's take on history of philosophy includes many familiar names ancient and modern and a few one may come across, alluded to or quoted, but may not know much about. I'm not sure just how enlightening Tom Butler Bowden s commentary is, though I applaud his range and clarity; it's just that after a while reading continuously they all merge into a general philosophy which hovers between idealist and materialist, does not require God but promotes similar behavioural habits to Food for thought The author's take on history of philosophy includes many familiar names ancient and modern and a few one may come across, alluded to or quoted, but may not know much about. I'm not sure just how enlightening Tom Butler Bowden s commentary is, though I applaud his range and clarity; it's just that after a while reading continuously they all merge into a general philosophy which hovers between idealist and materialist, does not require God but promotes similar behavioural habits to major religion s. It is nonetheless quietly inspiring , prompting one to look deeper into the field of philosophy,and some particular thinkers: for instance I bought the Essential David Bohm, amazed he'd escaped much likeminded attention in recent times. The appended list of 50 more classics is a pointer to many more edge-of-focus writers/thinkers. Maybe he'll do a follow-up to add to his list of "50 Classics" .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daline Ly

    As a young amateur entering the world of philosophy, I can't stress enough how much this book have helped me wrap my head around, some of the most complex ideas and put it in four pages so eloquently. The world of philosophy can be overwhelming as one is bombarded with many philosophers: where do i even begin? what is my philosophy? who should I know? Although Bowdon tried to summarize each philosopher's idea in a "nutshell" there are times when i wish it could be further elaborated due to its c As a young amateur entering the world of philosophy, I can't stress enough how much this book have helped me wrap my head around, some of the most complex ideas and put it in four pages so eloquently. The world of philosophy can be overwhelming as one is bombarded with many philosophers: where do i even begin? what is my philosophy? who should I know? Although Bowdon tried to summarize each philosopher's idea in a "nutshell" there are times when i wish it could be further elaborated due to its complexity, nonetheless his writing and explanation makes philosophy accessible for anyone as long as he/she has an interest in this field. Because of how dense the content of this book is, I have spent months reading this book, and there are times when my brain feel completely drained after (definitely worth it though).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Moira McPartlin

    I am starting to take baby steps into the world of philosophy, but a look at the philosophy shelves in my local bookshop bamboozle me. There is so many different strands, and they all seem to disagree with each other. I found this book in my local library and it saved me. The author has chosen 50 wide ranging books of philosophical works and explains in very accessible language what the books and authors are about. Each chapter begins with some quotes, there is an 'In a nutshell' sentences and a I am starting to take baby steps into the world of philosophy, but a look at the philosophy shelves in my local bookshop bamboozle me. There is so many different strands, and they all seem to disagree with each other. I found this book in my local library and it saved me. The author has chosen 50 wide ranging books of philosophical works and explains in very accessible language what the books and authors are about. Each chapter begins with some quotes, there is an 'In a nutshell' sentences and also an 'In a similar vein' list to allow you to group the works into their strands. At the end he lisys a further 50 works for consideration. So I now have 100 philosophy books to add to my toppling 'to be read' pile.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marielle Anne Ignacio

    Great read for someone new to philosophy. I like being able to see each philosopher's ideas in a brief but comprehensive summary. Apart from that, it is also really helpful that a short biography of the philosopher is attached in the last part of every chapter since it helps put into context how that person was able to come up with certain ideas. I love how philosophy always asks us to remain curious and to always question our most fundamental beliefs. Everything is related, and themes on happin Great read for someone new to philosophy. I like being able to see each philosopher's ideas in a brief but comprehensive summary. Apart from that, it is also really helpful that a short biography of the philosopher is attached in the last part of every chapter since it helps put into context how that person was able to come up with certain ideas. I love how philosophy always asks us to remain curious and to always question our most fundamental beliefs. Everything is related, and themes on happiness, free will, purpose, justice, and responsibility are timeless and relevant to every individual looking to find some semblance of meaning in this life. Thanks Tom Butler-Bowdon for putting this together. Because of you, my reading list on philosophy has expanded into a long list.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kanske Svartfors

    I've read quite a few books of this kind that try to convey the ideas of philosophers in a nutshell, and I have to say that this book does it perfectly. The author balances the amount of information on any given philosopher very well: not too little, not too much. Also, the author has the ability to explain complex ideas extremely well. A lot of times books like this are very frustrating, mostly because they try to morally judge the philosophers they are talking about. Also, most of them are just I've read quite a few books of this kind that try to convey the ideas of philosophers in a nutshell, and I have to say that this book does it perfectly. The author balances the amount of information on any given philosopher very well: not too little, not too much. Also, the author has the ability to explain complex ideas extremely well. A lot of times books like this are very frustrating, mostly because they try to morally judge the philosophers they are talking about. Also, most of them are just too academic. This book is perfect for the purpose it was made for! 6/5 (because it actually succeeds in doing what it set out to do)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sophy H

    This is a good little "guide to philosophy" if you will, something to dip in and out of depending on your mood and preferences. Butler-Bowden pretty much gives an A-Z of philosophers, and summarizes their main school of thought, their background and the pivotal points of their "teachings". The selection of philosophers is diverse and inclusive of many different schools and directions. Probably not a book to plough through from start to finish; rather peruse at your philosophical leisure then wit This is a good little "guide to philosophy" if you will, something to dip in and out of depending on your mood and preferences. Butler-Bowden pretty much gives an A-Z of philosophers, and summarizes their main school of thought, their background and the pivotal points of their "teachings". The selection of philosophers is diverse and inclusive of many different schools and directions. Probably not a book to plough through from start to finish; rather peruse at your philosophical leisure then with the extended reading lists and bibliographies provided of philosophers mentioned, pick your fave and read on!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carol Chen

    Philosophy can be a daunting subject to get into. One misstep, such as directly reading Hegel, can throw you into the abyss of never wanting to touch philosophy ever again. Therefore, this book is both ambitious and comforting in that it reduces the great works of philosophy into understandable quotes and summaries. However, that reductive quality also means that you don't get the whole picture, and without the whole picture, it is harder to make these philosophical ideas stick in your head. Tre Philosophy can be a daunting subject to get into. One misstep, such as directly reading Hegel, can throw you into the abyss of never wanting to touch philosophy ever again. Therefore, this book is both ambitious and comforting in that it reduces the great works of philosophy into understandable quotes and summaries. However, that reductive quality also means that you don't get the whole picture, and without the whole picture, it is harder to make these philosophical ideas stick in your head. Treating it as a catalogue (like Bloom's Western Canon) of titles, where you choose which ones to read further, is the best approach to this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zhi Yan Jin

    Great read, great introduction to established as well as more recent thinkers and pieces. Pros: Extensive coverage of recent pieces, from Nassim Taleb, to Zizek, to Sam Harris Concise and impactful summaries One-word summary and quote on the first page on each work/author are great Cons: A ton of typos, which could totally have been avoidable Would have liked to have seen more Middle Eastern/Eastern thinkers. Especially since the author and a lot of his favourite works make references to Buddhis Great read, great introduction to established as well as more recent thinkers and pieces. Pros: Extensive coverage of recent pieces, from Nassim Taleb, to Zizek, to Sam Harris Concise and impactful summaries One-word summary and quote on the first page on each work/author are great Cons: A ton of typos, which could totally have been avoidable Would have liked to have seen more Middle Eastern/Eastern thinkers. Especially since the author and a lot of his favourite works make references to Buddhist and Hindu thought.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Seth Lewis

    A really good way to pick up on all the philosophy classes your education system failed to provide. A good variety of thought, some wacky ideas, a few that really hit the nail on the head. Obviously depending on the reader. A couple of that was so deep you had to just stare at the page whilst you tried to navigate through space and time to come to some remote understanding of what they were on about. All in all a great exploration of thought throughout the history of humankind, just enough to sc A really good way to pick up on all the philosophy classes your education system failed to provide. A good variety of thought, some wacky ideas, a few that really hit the nail on the head. Obviously depending on the reader. A couple of that was so deep you had to just stare at the page whilst you tried to navigate through space and time to come to some remote understanding of what they were on about. All in all a great exploration of thought throughout the history of humankind, just enough to scratch the surface.

  19. 4 out of 5

    PuriP

    Great synthesis of the most famous philosophers, presenting some of their cardinal ideas. The only aspect that I did not enjoy about this book is the inclusion of too many contemporary personalities, who in my opinion are not nearly as valuable for the field of philosophy as their predecessors, whose contributions shaped society as we know it. Maybe some of those philosophers of our time will become "classic" in the future, but I felt that they have been included in this book to early, their ide Great synthesis of the most famous philosophers, presenting some of their cardinal ideas. The only aspect that I did not enjoy about this book is the inclusion of too many contemporary personalities, who in my opinion are not nearly as valuable for the field of philosophy as their predecessors, whose contributions shaped society as we know it. Maybe some of those philosophers of our time will become "classic" in the future, but I felt that they have been included in this book to early, their ideas not being completely assimilated into this field yet.

  20. 5 out of 5

    The Book Grocer

    Purchase 50 Philosophy Classics here for just $12! This is a fantastic book for anyone who is interested in learning some philosophy but is not quite sure where to start. With his concise summaries of both classical and modern philosophical texts, Tom Butler-Bowdon has taken content that is normally quite difficult to wrap your head around and unpacked it in a way that is accessible and easy to follow. Leea - The Book Grocer Purchase 50 Philosophy Classics here for just $12! This is a fantastic book for anyone who is interested in learning some philosophy but is not quite sure where to start. With his concise summaries of both classical and modern philosophical texts, Tom Butler-Bowdon has taken content that is normally quite difficult to wrap your head around and unpacked it in a way that is accessible and easy to follow. Leea - The Book Grocer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    Great surface level look at some of the major philosophical works. Leaves something to be desired in terms of eastern philosophies, and the author definitely injects his own interpretation into the summaries, but it's a great starting place if you want to quickly grab the main points from a bunch of works all at once. As someone looking to get a basic foundation and work on my own personal philosophy, this was a fantastic intro to cherry-pick from.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Liddement

    This is a great book for someone like me who doesn't know a lot about the great philosophers and i have learned a lot. This book covers the great Greek philosopher,Plato to modern thinkers Noam Chomsky. This would make a good book to have in upper schools and colleges for anyone studying philosophy as it is bite size segments and makes you want to go and further research.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zlati

    I enjoyed this book so much. Concise and to the point concepts from some of the brightest minds in the field. The only thing I wished for was diversity- too much western, not enough world philosophy. For example, no Russian or African thought, very little Eastern and Middle Eastern thought. Nonetheless lovely and efficiently structured read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Dolan

    To someone new to the subject, this is an approachable summary of the thinking of some famous philosophers, several of whom, I was unfamiliar with. Excerpts of each book are followed by some helpful paraphrasing and an appreciated short biography of each author. Almost half of the books covered are now on my "to read" list.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    This is a great overview of some of the major western philosophers from the past 2500 years. I wasn't familiar with all the names but every chapter held my interest. It also struck me for the first time while going through this list how few female philosophers there have been throughout history.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    Thoroughly eurocentric, even in the chapter on Confucius. Still, smoothly written and read, and with a slant toward more contemporary thinkers makes a good supplement to surveys that focus on classical classics.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Coffee & books

    A nice compendium of philosophers. I think some could have been skipped, and introduced others, more well known. But, even so, it was a nice book to read. I've made a list of a few philosophers I want to read after reading this book, so it was helpful. For me it was a 4.5/5 stars. I wish the philosophers would have been classified chronologically and not by name. http://www.coffeeandbooks.co.uk/50-ph... A nice compendium of philosophers. I think some could have been skipped, and introduced others, more well known. But, even so, it was a nice book to read. I've made a list of a few philosophers I want to read after reading this book, so it was helpful. For me it was a 4.5/5 stars. I wish the philosophers would have been classified chronologically and not by name. http://www.coffeeandbooks.co.uk/50-ph...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason S Liptow

    Great beginners book into the top philosophers in history. Easy to read and understand.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nick Richards

    Excellent breakdown of the most prevalent philosophical ideas in history. Would not recommend reading end to end though.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dkettmann

    (Audiobook version) Wonderful survey of where philosophy stands. Very accessible and informative. Highly recommended.

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