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And, you fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. (Ephesians 6:4) In this passage, Paul requires Christian fathers to provide their children with a "paideia of the Lord." To the ancient world, the boundaries of paideia were much wider than the boundaries of what we understand as education. Far more is involve And, you fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. (Ephesians 6:4) In this passage, Paul requires Christian fathers to provide their children with a "paideia of the Lord." To the ancient world, the boundaries of paideia were much wider than the boundaries of what we understand as education. Far more is involved in paideia than taking the kids to church, having an occasional time of devotions in the home, or even providing the kids with a Christian curriculum. In the ancient world, the paideia was all-encompassing and involved nothing les than the enculturation of the future citizen. He was enculturated when he was instructed in the classroom, but the process was also occurring when he walked along the streets of his city to and from school. The idea of paideia was central to the ancient classical mind, and Paul's instruction here consequently had profound ramifications.


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And, you fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. (Ephesians 6:4) In this passage, Paul requires Christian fathers to provide their children with a "paideia of the Lord." To the ancient world, the boundaries of paideia were much wider than the boundaries of what we understand as education. Far more is involve And, you fathers, provoke not your children to wrath: but bring them up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. (Ephesians 6:4) In this passage, Paul requires Christian fathers to provide their children with a "paideia of the Lord." To the ancient world, the boundaries of paideia were much wider than the boundaries of what we understand as education. Far more is involved in paideia than taking the kids to church, having an occasional time of devotions in the home, or even providing the kids with a Christian curriculum. In the ancient world, the paideia was all-encompassing and involved nothing les than the enculturation of the future citizen. He was enculturated when he was instructed in the classroom, but the process was also occurring when he walked along the streets of his city to and from school. The idea of paideia was central to the ancient classical mind, and Paul's instruction here consequently had profound ramifications.

30 review for Paideia of God: & Other Essays on Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Parkison

    Incredibly insightful. It is flat out shocking that Wilson wrote this in the 90s. This little book drips with prophetic prescience, and inspires a bit more confidence to divorce from worldliness in all its forms—especially its educational forms.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Brogdon

    I really liked the beginning chapters but ended up speeding through the later ones

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    This was a really good collection of essays on an interesting array of issues in the realm of Christian education. Doulas Wilson, in his usual somewhat snarky style, provides a thoughtful Biblical analysis in the chapters as follows: 1. The Paideia of God A foundational essay concerning the Biblical mandate and understanding of Christian education. 2. Teaching Disadilities: Why Johnny Doesn't Learn Much Anymore An assessment of what constitutes learning disabilities and who is really responsible for This was a really good collection of essays on an interesting array of issues in the realm of Christian education. Doulas Wilson, in his usual somewhat snarky style, provides a thoughtful Biblical analysis in the chapters as follows: 1. The Paideia of God A foundational essay concerning the Biblical mandate and understanding of Christian education. 2. Teaching Disadilities: Why Johnny Doesn't Learn Much Anymore An assessment of what constitutes learning disabilities and who is really responsible for them. 3. A Brief Statement Against Vouchers A clear presentation of why a school voucher system ultimately will fail. 4. The Biblical Meaning of School Clothes A great picture of teaching "the true, the good, and the beautiful," an assessment of how "the beautiful" somehow got left out of the picture in most of evangelicalism, and a defense of the distinctions even the Bible makes when it comes to clothing. 5. Does Classical Mean Reformed? An honest answer to the question of why the classical Christian schools that are popping up for the most part seem to be Reformed in their theology. 6. The Great Logic Fraud By far the most complicated chapter; but also one of the most profitable. Here logic is defended as tool to be used, but not as the end of all standards by which to measure. This essay also explores the nature of language and how it is learned. Truly, a very insightful essay. (But I'll have to read it again and again to understand all that was said.) 7. A Brief for Greyfriars Hall A refreshing approach (and I would say alternative approach) to a seminary level education. Very thoughtful, and Biblically minded. 8. Why Evangelical Colleges Aren't A short critique concerning the failure of most "Christian" colleges to actually be Christian in their thinking, teaching, and overall mission. 9. Classical Learning and the Christian College A defense of epistemologically conscious Christian learning and for understanding and using the Bible as the only infallible guide in the education process. I really enjoyed the whole book and will surely reference it frequently as I think more through these issues.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Huff

    Another excellent book from Wilson. Though the collection as a whole did not focus on the idea of paideia proper as much as I expected, I was quite pleased by a number of his essays, particular those on learning disabilities, classical Christian education, and, interestingly, the importance of school clothes. Not a slammer, but certainly a triple.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    I struggle to articulate my thoughts on many of Doug Wilson's materials (whether books, blog posts, or lectures), and I am similarly torn as I try to respond to The Paideia of God. He has many good things to say that are worth considering, some positions that I disagree with but can understand and respect how he got there, and some assertions that I would argue are flat out wrong, needlessly provocative, and diminish his credibility. This book was predominantly the former, but there was enough o I struggle to articulate my thoughts on many of Doug Wilson's materials (whether books, blog posts, or lectures), and I am similarly torn as I try to respond to The Paideia of God. He has many good things to say that are worth considering, some positions that I disagree with but can understand and respect how he got there, and some assertions that I would argue are flat out wrong, needlessly provocative, and diminish his credibility. This book was predominantly the former, but there was enough of the latter that I am not sure he has a place in my education library.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Finfrock

    Wasn't what I was expecting. There were parts that I particularly enjoyed and others not so much. But there was a lot of interesting thoughts in here about the way the education system is broken, and how there is a degradation of seeking excellence in our schools. There's also an awesome little Church History lesson in there, which is awesome. Wasn't what I was expecting. There were parts that I particularly enjoyed and others not so much. But there was a lot of interesting thoughts in here about the way the education system is broken, and how there is a degradation of seeking excellence in our schools. There's also an awesome little Church History lesson in there, which is awesome.

  7. 5 out of 5

    TJ Ross

    A collection of essays ranging from Christian education to school clothing. Similiar to his book "Excused Absence" but covering a wider variety of topics. A collection of essays ranging from Christian education to school clothing. Similiar to his book "Excused Absence" but covering a wider variety of topics.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Douthit

    I enjoyed this, although Wilson often over states his point. Mini things I disagree with, but the book was challenging and interesting as far as encountering a different viewpoint.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tony Lee Ross Jr.

    A compilation of essays regarding Christian education. The topics were always changing, so sometimes the book was hard to follow.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Seth Mcdevitt

    If you plan on going to seminary, or sending your children to college, this book will benefit you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A foresighting of things to come, published in the previous century.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett Sims

    Ok, so I want to start out by saying I don't want to discount what Douglas Wilson has done for education and that I basically wouldn't have a job if not for the movement he has done so much to advance. HOWEVER. I was pretty unimpressed with a lot of this book. I have decided my feelings on Wilson are pretty similar to my feelings on Ayn Rand: I really like a lot of his ideas, he just takes them too far. I also feel like he likes pushing the envelope; that's not necessarily a bad thing. I just alwa Ok, so I want to start out by saying I don't want to discount what Douglas Wilson has done for education and that I basically wouldn't have a job if not for the movement he has done so much to advance. HOWEVER. I was pretty unimpressed with a lot of this book. I have decided my feelings on Wilson are pretty similar to my feelings on Ayn Rand: I really like a lot of his ideas, he just takes them too far. I also feel like he likes pushing the envelope; that's not necessarily a bad thing. I just always get the feeling he's not happy unless he offends someone. Some of the essays in this book were spot-on. His critiques of the state of American education are much appreciated. I was planning on giving this my top-of-the-bell-curve three star rating: not amazing, but enjoyable. There was one particular essay though that had so many factual errors I immediately lowered my mental rating. The essay dealt with science and math. He makes it clear that he is not a scientist or a mathematician, however I feel like in that case you must be extra careful about what you are saying. Relativity does not postulate five dimensions and colors of light do not mix the same way as colors of pigment. So I thought that was sloppy. If you are in classical education (or interested in it), you should probably read this book. There are a lot of valuable insights in it. He just happened to hit on one of my pet peeves...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Josiah Richardson

    This is the first Wilson book I've read that I wasn't thrilled about. Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good material in here and it is a valuable resource for any intro into educational reform. But the formatting of the writing really discounted the writing itself. Hard to follow, random topics every other page, random book critiques and a random defense of the doctrines of grace. Again, good material, just a complete lack of flow. "Why Evangelical Churches aren't" was by far the best chapt This is the first Wilson book I've read that I wasn't thrilled about. Don't get me wrong, there is a lot of good material in here and it is a valuable resource for any intro into educational reform. But the formatting of the writing really discounted the writing itself. Hard to follow, random topics every other page, random book critiques and a random defense of the doctrines of grace. Again, good material, just a complete lack of flow. "Why Evangelical Churches aren't" was by far the best chapter and it was quite fascinating to see the insite of Wilson on these topics almost 20 years before they are ubiquitously seen in the church today.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

    The first full-length book on education by Wilson I've read. I caught an interview he did about a year ago talking about the Classical Education movement, and I am sold on it now. If one is at all interested in the Classical Methods or educational reform, that one needs to read this book. I also must now read his others on education. In due time of course. And in closing, the essay on the importance of school clothing was surprisingly informative and interesting. The first full-length book on education by Wilson I've read. I caught an interview he did about a year ago talking about the Classical Education movement, and I am sold on it now. If one is at all interested in the Classical Methods or educational reform, that one needs to read this book. I also must now read his others on education. In due time of course. And in closing, the essay on the importance of school clothing was surprisingly informative and interesting.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James

    This was my second read through and don't remember when I read it first but it was just as good the second time and I definitely picked up more this time around. A must read for any parent or educator! This was my second read through and don't remember when I read it first but it was just as good the second time and I definitely picked up more this time around. A must read for any parent or educator!

  16. 4 out of 5

    James

    A Christian education is not merely one that teaches how to pass the tests while having a 30 minute chapel session squeezed into the day. This book presents a whole educational stage as the world into which you immerse your kids. Prime reading for Christian parents of school-aged young'ns. A Christian education is not merely one that teaches how to pass the tests while having a 30 minute chapel session squeezed into the day. This book presents a whole educational stage as the world into which you immerse your kids. Prime reading for Christian parents of school-aged young'ns.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sean Higgins

    One of Wilson's earlier books about enculturating our students with love for Christ and also with love of learning about what Christ created. As usual, filled with hope and the need to get back to work. One of Wilson's earlier books about enculturating our students with love for Christ and also with love of learning about what Christ created. As usual, filled with hope and the need to get back to work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Guy Moody

    Excellent treatise on education and life. Much was covered that I did not expect (such as a brief defense of reformed theology). I highly recommend this one to any parent interested in a Christian education, or indeed, preserving (reforming) a Christian culture.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Great book. A good way to kick off prep for deciding how to educate my kids. "The Great Logic Fraud" was worth the price of admission all by itself. Great book. A good way to kick off prep for deciding how to educate my kids. "The Great Logic Fraud" was worth the price of admission all by itself.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Great

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is a collection of essays concerning Christian education. It is not as strong as "Repairing the Ruins" or "Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning" in my opinion, but is still very good. This is a collection of essays concerning Christian education. It is not as strong as "Repairing the Ruins" or "Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning" in my opinion, but is still very good.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Troy Martin

    Very Good. Interesting miscellany of educational concerns from unifroms to voutchers to learning disabilities.

  23. 4 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    It's always good to read a book that explains to me exactly why I root for classical Christian education. It's always good to read a book that explains to me exactly why I root for classical Christian education.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    A good reminder for those of us in the Classical Christian "revolution"--education is more than facts; it is enculturation at every level. A good reminder for those of us in the Classical Christian "revolution"--education is more than facts; it is enculturation at every level.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Ripple

    Great book, very insightful and provocative.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abrahamus

    Very, very good stuff here on Christian eduction—as an integral biblical concept and as a practically and pervasively applied theology.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rick Davis

    Good essays on education.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Comis

    Another good one by Wilson on Christian education.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Great collection of essays on classical Christian education.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sean McGowan

    Great.

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