web site hit counter Sherlock Holmes: Misteri Yang Tak Terpecahkan (A Slight Trick of the Mind) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Sherlock Holmes: Misteri Yang Tak Terpecahkan (A Slight Trick of the Mind)

Availability: Ready to download

Long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle allowed him to retire to Sussex to take up beekeeping, there seems to be no end of enthusiasm for imagined versions of the life of Sherlock Holmes. There was Michael Chabon's The Final Solution in which "the old man," an 89-year-old beekeeper in Sussex is undoubtedly Holmes. Laurie King, a fine mystery writer, has appropriated Holmes and c Long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle allowed him to retire to Sussex to take up beekeeping, there seems to be no end of enthusiasm for imagined versions of the life of Sherlock Holmes. There was Michael Chabon's The Final Solution in which "the old man," an 89-year-old beekeeper in Sussex is undoubtedly Holmes. Laurie King, a fine mystery writer, has appropriated Holmes and created a romance between him and young Mary Russell which has lasted through several enjoyable books. And now, nonagenarian Holmes reappears, most appealingly, in Mitch Cullin's A Slight Trick of the Mind. He is frail and forgetful but still observant and capable of shining the bright light of his insight and brilliance on events both past and present. Cullin has carefully woven three stories together and managed it so neatly that no threads show--worthy of Holmes himself. The first is the story of Holmes's recent return from a trip to Japan, ostensibly in search of prickly ash, a bush that he believes contributes to healthy longevity, as does his beloved and trusted royal jelly. While there, he is met by his correspondent, Mr. Umezaki, who isn't as interested in prickly ash as in gleaning information from Holmes about his long-gone father. Supposedly, they met many years before, in London, and Holmes advised him not to return home. Of course, Holmes has no recollection of the meeting but finesses it nicely. It is 1947 when they visit Hiroshima, post-atomic bomb, and Holmes marvels at what he sees. He compares it, most poignantly, to the loss of the queen in a hive, "when no resources were available to raise a new one. Yet how could he explain the deeper illness of unexpressed desolation, that imprecise pall harbored en masse by ordinary Japanese?" That is what he tells Roger, the 14-year-old son of his housekeeper. Roger is the second thread of the novel. Holmes is introducing him to beekeeping and Roger proves an apt student. His hero-worship of Holmes and his need for a father form an integral part of Cullin's intention of "humanizing" the great Sherlock Holmes. The final thread is revealed in a journal that Holmes kept, in which he entered an encounter with a married woman, many years ago. He is infatuated with her, and hardly knows what to call it or what to make of his feelings. This is unfamiliar territory for the man who is rational above all else. The man we know at the end of the book makes the reader want another installment, showing a new Sherlock with a heart as well as a brain. (Amazon Review)


Compare

Long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle allowed him to retire to Sussex to take up beekeeping, there seems to be no end of enthusiasm for imagined versions of the life of Sherlock Holmes. There was Michael Chabon's The Final Solution in which "the old man," an 89-year-old beekeeper in Sussex is undoubtedly Holmes. Laurie King, a fine mystery writer, has appropriated Holmes and c Long after Sir Arthur Conan Doyle allowed him to retire to Sussex to take up beekeeping, there seems to be no end of enthusiasm for imagined versions of the life of Sherlock Holmes. There was Michael Chabon's The Final Solution in which "the old man," an 89-year-old beekeeper in Sussex is undoubtedly Holmes. Laurie King, a fine mystery writer, has appropriated Holmes and created a romance between him and young Mary Russell which has lasted through several enjoyable books. And now, nonagenarian Holmes reappears, most appealingly, in Mitch Cullin's A Slight Trick of the Mind. He is frail and forgetful but still observant and capable of shining the bright light of his insight and brilliance on events both past and present. Cullin has carefully woven three stories together and managed it so neatly that no threads show--worthy of Holmes himself. The first is the story of Holmes's recent return from a trip to Japan, ostensibly in search of prickly ash, a bush that he believes contributes to healthy longevity, as does his beloved and trusted royal jelly. While there, he is met by his correspondent, Mr. Umezaki, who isn't as interested in prickly ash as in gleaning information from Holmes about his long-gone father. Supposedly, they met many years before, in London, and Holmes advised him not to return home. Of course, Holmes has no recollection of the meeting but finesses it nicely. It is 1947 when they visit Hiroshima, post-atomic bomb, and Holmes marvels at what he sees. He compares it, most poignantly, to the loss of the queen in a hive, "when no resources were available to raise a new one. Yet how could he explain the deeper illness of unexpressed desolation, that imprecise pall harbored en masse by ordinary Japanese?" That is what he tells Roger, the 14-year-old son of his housekeeper. Roger is the second thread of the novel. Holmes is introducing him to beekeeping and Roger proves an apt student. His hero-worship of Holmes and his need for a father form an integral part of Cullin's intention of "humanizing" the great Sherlock Holmes. The final thread is revealed in a journal that Holmes kept, in which he entered an encounter with a married woman, many years ago. He is infatuated with her, and hardly knows what to call it or what to make of his feelings. This is unfamiliar territory for the man who is rational above all else. The man we know at the end of the book makes the reader want another installment, showing a new Sherlock with a heart as well as a brain. (Amazon Review)

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: Misteri Yang Tak Terpecahkan (A Slight Trick of the Mind)

  1. 4 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    In A SLIGHT TRICK OF THE MIND, we are treated to the premise that Sherlock Holmes was an actual living historical figure. The year is 1947 and the famous detective is 93. Holmes lives in a Sussex farm house and has spent decades in content isolation, tending to his gardens and his apiary. His housekeeper, Mrs. Munro, and her son Roger are his only companions, living in a cottage adjacent to the main house. At this advanced age, Holmes walks with two canes, but his mind is still quite sharp. Howe In A SLIGHT TRICK OF THE MIND, we are treated to the premise that Sherlock Holmes was an actual living historical figure. The year is 1947 and the famous detective is 93. Holmes lives in a Sussex farm house and has spent decades in content isolation, tending to his gardens and his apiary. His housekeeper, Mrs. Munro, and her son Roger are his only companions, living in a cottage adjacent to the main house. At this advanced age, Holmes walks with two canes, but his mind is still quite sharp. However, we also get a glimpse into Sherlock's lapses in memory, his visions, and his dreams of younger days. Author Mitch Cullin paints such a complete portrait of one of the most enduring characters in all of literature. And yet, I also appreciated Cullin's gaps and room for interpretations by the reader. After all, who can fully contemplate the gradual decline of a great mind and where that leads any of us in the end? A SLIGHT TRICK OF THE MIND was absolutely absorbing and wonderfully intriguing. SHERLOCK HOLMES: "Except, Holmes knew now, the boy had become a burden, a most painful burden. All the same, he told himself, whether it was Roger or anyone else, every life had a finish. And every one of the dead he had knelt beside had had a life. He set his sights on the stairs below, and while beginning his descent, he repeated the question he'd pondered to no avail since his youth. "What is the meaning of it? What object is served by this circle of misery? It must tend to some end, or else the universe is ruled by chance. But what end?" "Life is short, even in its longest days." ~John Mellencamp

  2. 4 out of 5

    Will Biby

    To start, this is not a mystery story. It is a character study of Holmes as a human not the figure/trope of Conan-Doyle. As an exploration into the inner monologue of an aging introspective celebrity, it's beautiful. I found it moving and incredibly sad...a slice of life, a peek behind the curtain. To start, this is not a mystery story. It is a character study of Holmes as a human not the figure/trope of Conan-Doyle. As an exploration into the inner monologue of an aging introspective celebrity, it's beautiful. I found it moving and incredibly sad...a slice of life, a peek behind the curtain.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I am truly at a loss as to how to describe this book. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle meets Akira Kurosawa is probably the best description. But even that really doesn't begin to touch it. In "A Slight Trick of the Mind", Sherlock Holmes is 93 and his memory is failing. The book doesn't so much have a plot as an obsession with death... and bees. The narrative flits between Sherlock Holmes at home in Sussex, his recent trip to post- WWII Japan, and events of 1902 involving a married woman that he is mildly i I am truly at a loss as to how to describe this book. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle meets Akira Kurosawa is probably the best description. But even that really doesn't begin to touch it. In "A Slight Trick of the Mind", Sherlock Holmes is 93 and his memory is failing. The book doesn't so much have a plot as an obsession with death... and bees. The narrative flits between Sherlock Holmes at home in Sussex, his recent trip to post- WWII Japan, and events of 1902 involving a married woman that he is mildly infatuated with. Only Sherlock Holmes stands out. The other characters are vapid and shadowy, and at times I found myself wondering if any of them were real, or if they were all just figments of a demented old man's imagination. There is no real mystery to be solved. The book is mostly just the meanderings of Holmes' mind in his twilight years. I shut the book when I had finished and thought "What the hell have I just read?" Pretty sure that's the first time I have come away from a novel completely bewildered. I do wonder how the hell they've managed to turn this novel into a script for the movie "Mr Holmes". There's nothing there to work with. It's all smoke and mirrors; mist and metaphors. I'm not sure I really want to find out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    AMEERA

    any book about Sherlock Holmes absolutely I'm gonna read it any book about Sherlock Holmes absolutely I'm gonna read it

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leah Lucci

    This book is set after WWII. Sherlock Holmes is in his 90s and suffering from Alzheimers and frailty. He lives with his maid, her young son, and his large collection of bees. When the story starts, he has just returned from his trip to Japan. There are three layers to this tale: 1) The present, in which Sherlock is back in England with his maid, her son, and the bees. 2) The recent past, in which Sherlock and his Japanese companion wander around Japan in search of "prickly ash," some sort of plan This book is set after WWII. Sherlock Holmes is in his 90s and suffering from Alzheimers and frailty. He lives with his maid, her young son, and his large collection of bees. When the story starts, he has just returned from his trip to Japan. There are three layers to this tale: 1) The present, in which Sherlock is back in England with his maid, her son, and the bees. 2) The recent past, in which Sherlock and his Japanese companion wander around Japan in search of "prickly ash," some sort of plant that allegedly increases longevity. 3) The distant past, in which Sherlock in his prime solves the mystery of where his client's wife goes during the day. The three mysteries (one per timeline) are introduced from furthest past to most current, and are addressed (I wouldn't necessarily say "resolved," in some cases) in reverse order, with the furthest past case closed last. Each story is tragic in its own way, and one actually got me watered up. It's a well-written, interesting tale, starring the fabulous Sherlock, who has humbled and mellowed in his old age. We finally get to see his point of view, and the toll his life has taken on him. Recommended for Sherlock fans. And if you aren't thrilled with it, don't worry; the book is short.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Michelle

    My first impression, upon finishing "A Slight Trick of the Mind," was "good heavens, that was terrible." I came to review the novel, fully prepared to give it a sound thrashing and a measly one star rating. While drafting my review, however, I realized that I made a mistake that colored my reading. I assumed that this Sherlock Holmes would be familiar to me. I've read all the stories, seen all the film and television adaptations. But this version of Holmes is not the detective I know - a brillia My first impression, upon finishing "A Slight Trick of the Mind," was "good heavens, that was terrible." I came to review the novel, fully prepared to give it a sound thrashing and a measly one star rating. While drafting my review, however, I realized that I made a mistake that colored my reading. I assumed that this Sherlock Holmes would be familiar to me. I've read all the stories, seen all the film and television adaptations. But this version of Holmes is not the detective I know - a brilliant man in his prime, solving mysteries and stunning us mere mortals with his flawless observation skills. This version of Holmes is well into his nineties, retired from crime-solving and the public eye. His mind is failing. The novel becomes more and more disjointed as it goes along - nothing feels right as the story progresses. The plot makes hardly any sense, and Holmes' characterization is strange and overly sentimental. I didn't like it - I still don't, but I think that's actually the intention. The story degrades in time with the degradation of Holmes' mind. It's not pleasant to read along as the once-luminous Sherlock Holmes succumbs to the mundane ailments of old age (hence the meager upgrade to two stars), but I think perhaps that was the writer's intention all along.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Franci

    #24 of 2021 I really really wanted to love this book and therefore give it a higher rating since Sherlock is a beloved literary favourite. But I couldn't. There were times when I struggled through, wishing I can just finish it. Some passages were lovely and almost beautiful in a certain sense. The writing is superb, definitely. All in all, I liked it enough for 3 reluctant stars. #24 of 2021 I really really wanted to love this book and therefore give it a higher rating since Sherlock is a beloved literary favourite. But I couldn't. There were times when I struggled through, wishing I can just finish it. Some passages were lovely and almost beautiful in a certain sense. The writing is superb, definitely. All in all, I liked it enough for 3 reluctant stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tinneal

    I read this book for two reasons: I greatly enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, and I heard that this story is going to be made into a movie starring Ian McKellen as Holmes. This story is mainly set 1947, in a cottage on the Southern slope of the Sussex Downs. There are two other stories also presented, that take place in the form of flashbacks - one set in post-WWII Japan, and one titled ‘The Glass Armonicist’, that took place when Holmes was still in his prime. Aside from ‘The Glass Armonicist’, th I read this book for two reasons: I greatly enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, and I heard that this story is going to be made into a movie starring Ian McKellen as Holmes. This story is mainly set 1947, in a cottage on the Southern slope of the Sussex Downs. There are two other stories also presented, that take place in the form of flashbacks - one set in post-WWII Japan, and one titled ‘The Glass Armonicist’, that took place when Holmes was still in his prime. Aside from ‘The Glass Armonicist’, these stories really don’t have much in the way of plot. The focus is on Holmes himself, who is ninety-three, retired, and living in a cottage in Sussex. He is kept company by his housekeeper and her 14-year old son Roger, who Holmes has taken on as a sort-of beekeeping apprentice. Holmes struggles with the emotions and grief brought on by the past. He is lonely, as Mrs Hudson, Watson and Mycroft have all passed away. He is also trying to come to terms with his failing mind and memory, as he struggles to remember and record the case of the ‘Glass Armonicist’. I found the story to be beautifully written. The writing itself made me feel as though I was in a fog as I read, which, combined with the switching back and forth between various memories and timelines, really added to the mood of Holmes current state of mind. I’m having trouble putting into words exactly how this book affected me, but it was certainly a very emotional experience, which involved at least two instances of tearing up. I am looking forward to seeing the screen adaptation!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Monnie

    Unless it's about James Bond, my husband and I rarely go to a movie. But when I learned of the recently released Mr. Holmes starring wonderful actor Ian McKellen, I put it on my must-see list immediately. Not long afterward, I discovered this book, which is the basis for the movie - and in my rarely broken rule of book before movie, I got my hands on a copy. Now that I've finished with it, I'm doubly determined to see the movie and Mr. McKellen's performance - what a plum role this must be! Thou Unless it's about James Bond, my husband and I rarely go to a movie. But when I learned of the recently released Mr. Holmes starring wonderful actor Ian McKellen, I put it on my must-see list immediately. Not long afterward, I discovered this book, which is the basis for the movie - and in my rarely broken rule of book before movie, I got my hands on a copy. Now that I've finished with it, I'm doubly determined to see the movie and Mr. McKellen's performance - what a plum role this must be! Though relatively short at 272 pages, this isn't a book to be read quickly; there are simply too many details that would be missed by skimming. It begins in 1947 as Sherlock Holmes, now 93, is living at a farmhouse in Sussex, England, keeping bees and and claiming to "no longer crave" the bustle of London or Baker Street. He hasn't been in contact with his partner, Dr. John Watson, for a few years, and (as he does with most people), he keeps an emotional distance from his housekeeper, Mrs. Munro (played by Laura Linney in the movie). His does, however, take pleasure - more than he likes to admit - in teaching her son, Roger, to work with the bees. In his journal writings, Holmes takes pains to dispel what he believes to be myths about himself (largely conceived, he says, in Watson's writings of their adventures). Never, he insists, did he really wear a deerstalker, nor did he ever smoke a big pipe or call his partner by anything except his first name ("...he was John, simply John"). Holmes recalls various cases and events from other times, trying hard to recall the details and pertinent facts (his greatest fear, he says, is the forgetfulness that has accompanied the aging process). The chapters skip around in time a bit, and it's a little hard to discern whether Holmes's musings are fact or fiction, real or dream - intentional, I'm guessing, so readers can share the character's uncertainty. In fact, almost from the beginning, I felt dogged by a feeling of sadness as Holmes struggles with the realization that his once-brilliant mind has lost some of its luster. Excellent book, with or without the movie.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruthie Jones

    A Slight Trick of the Mind is a slow, delicate story that offers a plausible glimpse into the twilight years of one of fiction's greatest detectives. This book is neither a fast mover nor filled with unceasing action. With that said, this story has many interesting elements. There are actually three stories going on here: a present story, a memory, and a written account of a past investigation. All three stories are intertwined and bittersweet. The unassuming homage to a famous work of fiction by A Slight Trick of the Mind is a slow, delicate story that offers a plausible glimpse into the twilight years of one of fiction's greatest detectives. This book is neither a fast mover nor filled with unceasing action. With that said, this story has many interesting elements. There are actually three stories going on here: a present story, a memory, and a written account of a past investigation. All three stories are intertwined and bittersweet. The unassuming homage to a famous work of fiction by a famous Russian author is unexpected and, I hope, intentional. Will anyone else notice, or am I simply being fanciful? This is the only clue I will give. This story is enjoyable, melancholy, and thought provoking. Ah! the honeybees. They make up a society of hard workers and givers. We can all learn from their diligence and steadfastness. Their lives are purposeful and honey sweet, just as ours should be. Hats off to you Mitch Cullin. You have given me a unique view of Holmes that makes me love him even more. *** "Actually, it is amazing how much can be learned about people from the books they own."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles Prepolec

    I've had this sitting on the shelf since its release in 2005, but decided I'd best read it before the film opens. It's a beautifully written, ultimately sad and reflective piece of work that attempts to breathe a certain degree of depth into the character of a rather elderly Sherlock Holmes dealing with age and memory loss. It's certainly a very 'original' take on Holmes, fairly engaging, which is down to the lovely writing style more than the story, but on completion I found myself wondering ab I've had this sitting on the shelf since its release in 2005, but decided I'd best read it before the film opens. It's a beautifully written, ultimately sad and reflective piece of work that attempts to breathe a certain degree of depth into the character of a rather elderly Sherlock Holmes dealing with age and memory loss. It's certainly a very 'original' take on Holmes, fairly engaging, which is down to the lovely writing style more than the story, but on completion I found myself wondering about the point of it all. As a study of aging, loneliness, isolation and and memory loss, it's fascinating, but as a Holmes tale, well, I don't think I really 'get' why Holmes was needed as the protagonist. If the goal was to show the hidden side of Holmes, the human side, laced with all the attached foibles and intricacies of human relationships, I guess it achieves that, but I was still left wondering 'To what end?' In any event, it was a fine read, just to my mind, a vaguely pointless one. Can't begin to imagine how this work will translate to the screen. Guess I'll find out soon...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mansel

    I wanted to like this book but it was difficult to force myself through it. Like so many others, I truly love Sherlock Holmes and have for almost my entire life. The current show with Cumberbatch has been so enjoyable because it's respectful & of great quality. This book, on the other hand, portrays him as practically a non-human who can't exist out of his hive. That's just too much for me to accept. I wanted to like this book but it was difficult to force myself through it. Like so many others, I truly love Sherlock Holmes and have for almost my entire life. The current show with Cumberbatch has been so enjoyable because it's respectful & of great quality. This book, on the other hand, portrays him as practically a non-human who can't exist out of his hive. That's just too much for me to accept.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    I just knew I would like this book and would have to read it before I saw the movie. It was a bit deeper than I expected but that was a pleasant gift. I love it when a book makes a connection with me and makes me think. Mich Cullin's take on Sherlock has done that. Have you ever met someone or gotten to know them and wish that you had known them in their early life...They are so interesting and inspiring! Well, we all knew Sherlock Holmes when he was a young man. He has been created into many dif I just knew I would like this book and would have to read it before I saw the movie. It was a bit deeper than I expected but that was a pleasant gift. I love it when a book makes a connection with me and makes me think. Mich Cullin's take on Sherlock has done that. Have you ever met someone or gotten to know them and wish that you had known them in their early life...They are so interesting and inspiring! Well, we all knew Sherlock Holmes when he was a young man. He has been created into many different images but basically we've seen him "develop". And now some writers are imagining Sherlock in his retirement and senior years. Collin allows him to still be the same awkward, observant, strange loner. No one ever really changes and so Holmes observations about his present state are especially fun to know about. I really like the way Mich Cullin allows Sherlock to present his inner feellings and thoughts about changes that he notices in his physical and mental abilities. This Holmes is working on his third volume of 'The Whole Art of Detection' but can't seem to make any progress, "...this latest endeavor was hamptered by an inability to concentrate fully: He would sit down and promply fall asleep, pen in hand; he would sit down and find himself staring out the window instead, sometimes for waht seemed hours..." Oh, yes! It happens to the brightest and best of us. "Holmes believed he was capable of incorrectly revising past events, especially if the reality of those events were beyond his grasp. But, he wondered, what was revised and what was true?And what was known for certain anymore? More importantly, what exactly had been forgotten? He couldn't say." I am so glad that someone else feels this way! Mitch Cullin has studied life and created a couple of characters that are trying to figure things out. Holmes says, "Over time, I have realized my mind no longer operates in such a fluid manner. The change has been by degrees, but I sense it fully now......Now I retain only that which is necessary. The minor details aren't essential - what appears in my mind these days are rudimentary impressions, not all the frivolous surroundings. And for that I'm grateful." Mr. Umezaki peers into his sake glass and asks Homes. "So what is the truth? How do you arrive at it? How do you unravel the meaning of something that doesn't wish to be known?" But Homes was quiet, seemingly lost in thought, sorting through the vast index of his memory. Soon Mr. Umezaki felt certain Holmes was retrieving an invaluable amount of information "when almost imperceptibly, a faint snoring could then be heard. " Holmes is perplexed when his mind can't grasp its own ruminations. He admits "somethimes things occur beyond our own understanding and the unjust reality is that these events- being so illogical to us, devoid of whatever reason we might attach to them - are exactly what they are and, regrettably, nothing else." Cullin created a very wise detective who has made some conclusions based on his own experiences. I hope I will not be disappointed by the movie.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    What do I want to say about this book? Well, a number of different things, really. I have a lot to say, yet my mind won't wrap around how exactly to say them, how to express the minutiae details that impacted and drove the plot in subtle ways. There are four different plots in this. First, the relationship between an old man and a young boy. Second, a remembrance of a trip to Japan and of the man who took him around. Third, a case he had taken years ago that made a lasting impact on him. And, four What do I want to say about this book? Well, a number of different things, really. I have a lot to say, yet my mind won't wrap around how exactly to say them, how to express the minutiae details that impacted and drove the plot in subtle ways. There are four different plots in this. First, the relationship between an old man and a young boy. Second, a remembrance of a trip to Japan and of the man who took him around. Third, a case he had taken years ago that made a lasting impact on him. And, fourth, is a spoiler so I will mark it as such. (view spoiler)[An old man ruminating on the death of a young boy who he had come to care for. (hide spoiler)] Yet, all of these plots come together as a cohesive, rambling gaze into an old man's life as he looks back on it and tries to decide if the life he led was a good one. "What have you ever known about loving anyone?" John, dead. Mrs. Hudson, dead. Mycroft, dead. Everyone, dead. It is a crutch that one day, most everyone, will come to. Your friends are dying off and you feel the acute sense that you too will die at any moment. It's a very depressing subject matter to tackle, yet one most will face at some point in their life. Holmes, alone and the last man standing to keep tide. Never had I felt such an incomprehensible emptiness within myself, and just then, as my body moved from the bench, did I begin to understand how utterly alone I was in the world. He forgets what he was doing, where he was going, conversations he had only a short while ago. He is an old man and his age is showing in body and mind. A depressing story to read, every single story line. Why would someone make this into a movie?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Charles Berman

    In outline it sounds almost like a joke, or something deliberately bizarre: a ninety-three-year-old Sherlock Holmes travels to Japan. Instead, this is a very sad, wistful novel that examines at many angles and with emotional complexity the loneliness and alienation of Holmes' life and the guards he has constructed to keep himself from being consumed by them. Mitch Cullin's prose is excellent and the novel is quietly structured quite exquisitely, with three storyline unraveling very comfortably n In outline it sounds almost like a joke, or something deliberately bizarre: a ninety-three-year-old Sherlock Holmes travels to Japan. Instead, this is a very sad, wistful novel that examines at many angles and with emotional complexity the loneliness and alienation of Holmes' life and the guards he has constructed to keep himself from being consumed by them. Mitch Cullin's prose is excellent and the novel is quietly structured quite exquisitely, with three storyline unraveling very comfortably next to one another, and in such a way that events in one show Holmes' growth in another. The Holmes of this book is a very rounded and complicated character -- and one that it's easy to imagine could have been the man transformed by Watson into the Holmes we know. On the Sherlock Holmes myth associated with Victorian mysteries, Mitch Cullin has hung a reflective, often melancholy but also philosphic little novel of meaning and missed opportunities in our lives.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mahlon

    A great premise, poorly written and executed. The transitions between the three cases were clunky, and the cases themselves were uninteresting. The movie Mr. Holmes is much better.

  17. 5 out of 5

    cypt

    Wow. I was not prepared to be swept away by this book. Yet after talks about the upcoming movie starring Ian McKellen, I decided to give it a try, still expecting nothing more than some Dumbledore-ish TED talks. At the very best, that is. (Worst case scenarios I’d made up involved someone like my late grandfather singing “I Did It My Way”, esp. after rumours that the new movie will address Holmes’s personal life, children, grandchildren, and other fai...achievements, that is.) Boy, was I prepare Wow. I was not prepared to be swept away by this book. Yet after talks about the upcoming movie starring Ian McKellen, I decided to give it a try, still expecting nothing more than some Dumbledore-ish TED talks. At the very best, that is. (Worst case scenarios I’d made up involved someone like my late grandfather singing “I Did It My Way”, esp. after rumours that the new movie will address Holmes’s personal life, children, grandchildren, and other fai...achievements, that is.) Boy, was I prepared to scorn this book. As much as I scorned Holmes Hunts Paedophiles, or Holmes’s Young Wife Is Even Better Detective series, or Shameless Guy Ritchie Rip-Off TV series, or Watson Won't Kiss Sherlock TV series. How short-sighted of me. Like many other reviewers, I too am fascinated by Sherlock Holmes. By the pure literary beauty this character emits, by the precision, the almost divine order that governs his literary universe. By the beauty that some of his movie and TV versions manage to approach. And like many, many other Holmes-enthusiasts, I am from time to time haunted by wistful need to get into his world, to actually encounter this mysterious figure capable of righting all wrongs and misfortunes in life. This is in fact what good fanfiction does to you. It allows access to the alternate universe you have come to love. And it is way too easy to become hooked on the stuff. Sadly though, really good fanfiction is not that easy to come by. But oh, this book. Did I get high on this book. What I loved about it is its being a detective story without any actual crime-solving. The biggest mystery here is search for Holmes’s character. It presents us with Sherlock Holmes that never was– yet who is closer to any one of us than the “real one” (read: JeremyBrettRathboneCumberbatch). It shows you the person that Sherlock Holmes could have been, in a way better than any other pastiche, verbal or visual, ever did. (Well, any that I know of.) It is one of the best pieces of fanfiction I’ve ever read, as it cannot stand alone apart from the SH universe, and yet somehow manages to extend it. Somehow I feel like I’ve always known such a book was waiting for me. It’s as if Virginia Woolf sat down “to write about death, only with life breaking in as usual”: Still, the waves broke, the cliffs loomed high, the breeze carried the smell of salt water, and the storm’s aftermath tempered the summer’s warmth. Proceeding down the trail, the desire to be a part of the original, natural order stirred inside him, the wish to escape the trappings of people and the meaningless clamor that heralded its self-importance; this need was set in him, surpassing everything he treasured or believed was true (his many writings and theories, his observations on a vast number of things). And what did it matter if, eventually, everything was to be lost, vanquished, or if there existed no ultimate reason, or pattern, or logic to all which was done on the earth? For she was not there, and yet I remained. Never had I felt such incomprehensible emptiness within myself, and just then, as my body moved from the bench, did I begin to understand how utterly alone I was in the world. So with dusk’s fast approach, I would take nothing away from the garden, except that impossible vacancy, that absence inside which still had the weight of another person–a gap which formed the contour of a singular, curious woman who never once beheld my true self. 1. Storytelling Many of the literary SH follow-ups have tried to copycat the narrative trick of the original stories: the voice of limited knowledge, the point-of-view of an accomplice who is just a bit more clueless than us readers, so that we are free to join him in awe and praise. Some say that Watson’s perspective is exactly why SH himself is as enticing figure as he, undoubtedly, is. Yet modern watsons sadly tend to lack either selfless admiration, or the lovable cluelessness, or simply the gift of “fictionalising the truth”, to simulate the pleasure that the original ACD stories provide. Mitch Cullin, though, has given us a Holmes devoid of any other (loving, loyal) presence besides. And is this a sight. Most of the story is told in the third person, and there you are, Holmes, all thoughts on display but too scattered to put in that swift, aphoristic way that once came so easily: If only it were that easy, he thought. If only every problem was guaranteed a solution. Then the perplexity that signified periods when his mind couldn’t grasp its own ruminations cast its shadow over him, but he managed to articulate himself as best as he could, solemnly saying, “It seems–or rather–it’s that sometimes–sometimes things occur beyond our own understanding, my dear, and the unjust reality is that these events–being so illogical to us, devoid of whatever reason we might attach to them–are exactly what they are and, regrettably, nothing else–and I believe–I truly believe that that is the hardest notion for any of us to live with.” Some parts of the book are told in the first person, by Holmes himself, and they are just what one can expect remembering “Adventure of the Lion’s Mane”: long worded and slow, though significantly less self-satisfied. No, I had finally concluded, she was never mad or ill, nor was she despairing to the point of insanity. She had, for reasons unknown, simply extracted herself from the human equation and ceased to be; doing so, perhaps, as some contrary means of survival. And even now I wonder if creation is both too beautiful and too horrible for a handful of perceptive souls, and if the realisation of this opposing duality can offer them few options but to take leave of their own accord. Beyond that, I can give no other explanation which may strike closer to the truth of the matter. Still, it has never been a conclusion I have wanted to live comfortably with. This Holmes does not deduce– or infer, for that matter. But this is Holmes seeing and observing life that is around him, and he is every bit as we always suspected him to be– slightly less articulate, much less agile and much quieter, but every bit as introspective and troubled. And yet even more immune to such petty things as emotions, excitement, fear, even regret, than we could have imagined. Here it is, the great mystery of the Holmes’s mind, the one that we always tried to catch a glimpse of among John Watson’s “clever detail and hyperbole”. I still admire the JW version of Holmes, I even miss him as I would miss a distant relative, an offstandish but fascinating acquaintance who is long gone. Yet for Cullin’s Holmes, I feel genuine affection. 2. Plot While a fantastic character study, this book will disappoint those looking for good old crime-solving. In the near 300 pages we have exactly zero of it. What we do have, is 3 plotlines with some mock-crime: 1) Story-within-a-story, in which Holmes describes an old case of a disappearing woman, which however turns out to be anything but, 2) Story of a 93-year-old old Holmes musing on life and doing some beekeeping, aided by his current housekeeper and her 14-year-old son Roger, 3) Memories of a very recent journey to Japan to see some Mr. Umezaki, with whose father Holmes ostensibly had business back in 1903. This plotline contains the sole mystery in the book, which is not a crime but Holmes trying to figure out how to create a story (“like Dr. Watson working out the plot of a story, he reasoned–the mixing of what was and what never had been into a single, undeniable creation”). All of those storylines end up (view spoiler)[with death (hide spoiler)] , which leaves you lost and bewildered. It contradicts much of what the original stories used to champion- reason, order, and life. This is a different world with a different Holmes, extracted by Cullin from the “always eighteen ninety-five” and actually crossing borders of (fictional) time and space. But I have digressed. (view spoiler)[Holmes has not married, and has no children nor grandchildren. He has burnt the remaining journals of John Watson. And everyone else has died (Mrs. Hudson, Watson, even Mycroft) (hide spoiler)] .

  18. 4 out of 5

    Renita D'Silva

    A wonderfully imagined, brilliant tale

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gerhard

    I tracked this down when I read that Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) was going to film it with Sir Ian McKellen in the lead role. There are startling similarities between the two projects: Again, we have a curmudgeonly old man in his dotage, presided over by an irascible housekeeper, with a pretty blue-eyed teenage boy flitting about. This is one of the more intriguing aspects of Mitch Cullin’s book, as he paints a very delicate picture of the affection (love?) that Sherlock Holmes has for Roger, I tracked this down when I read that Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters) was going to film it with Sir Ian McKellen in the lead role. There are startling similarities between the two projects: Again, we have a curmudgeonly old man in his dotage, presided over by an irascible housekeeper, with a pretty blue-eyed teenage boy flitting about. This is one of the more intriguing aspects of Mitch Cullin’s book, as he paints a very delicate picture of the affection (love?) that Sherlock Holmes has for Roger, the housekeeper’s son, whom he introduces to the science and wonder of beekeeping – with tragic results. In one of the narrative strands, Holmes pays a visit to Mr Umezaki and Mr Hensuiro in Kobe, a discreet gay Japanese couple. Mr Umezaki, in fact, comments on Holmes’s cohabitation with another bachelor – Watson, of course – to which Holmes drily replies: “It was purely platonic.” And then there is Holmes’s extraordinary chance meeting with the enigmatic Mrs Keller, while in disguise – a meeting that haunts him to the end of his days. The cover of the version I read has a soft-focus portrait of the traditional profile of Holmes, with the hat and pipe. Cullin’s Holmes is quick to point out early on that these were merely marketing gimmicks, while his own detective prowess was much exaggerated (by Watson, no less). The book finds him alone in a cottage in Sussex, presiding over his apiary and a fading store of memories, contemplating the meaning of existence. If this sounds grim, fear not. This is an extraordinary book, elegiac and melancholic, but uplifting in its own way. What I particularly liked is how Cullin places Holmes in a historical context, at the beginning of “this uncertain age of atomic alchemy”. His visit to Japan and the ruins of Hiroshima, in particular, exposes him to the full irrationality of man, and the barbarity of so-called civilisation. What role can reason and truth play in a world such as this? Holmes remarks: “I have dipped my toes into two centuries and now my race is run.” There is so much bubbling beneath the surface of this short, delicate novel. It is understated and quietly mannered to the point where it could prove perplexing to many readers, especially as Cullin provides no irrefutable answers to the many issues he touches upon. As is to be expected, there is not really any sense of an ending either, just a genteel segue into the fading darkness of regret and memory. Hopefully when it does it get filmed, it will help to dispel the abominations that were the Richard Downey Jr. / Jude Law movie versions.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katy Noyes

    3.5 stars The idea intrigued me - a fictional character returned to in old age. We've had Young Sherlock Holmes, a Disney mouse version, a modern BBC-adaptation Sherlock, and now we see the great man as a failing old man. Saying that, he's still got it... But just not all of the time. This tells several stories at once (which didn't work brilliantly well for me on audiobook, though I loved the narrator), of the required 'how did they do that?' case, his home life as an old man and a little mystery 3.5 stars The idea intrigued me - a fictional character returned to in old age. We've had Young Sherlock Holmes, a Disney mouse version, a modern BBC-adaptation Sherlock, and now we see the great man as a failing old man. Saying that, he's still got it... But just not all of the time. This tells several stories at once (which didn't work brilliantly well for me on audiobook, though I loved the narrator), of the required 'how did they do that?' case, his home life as an old man and a little mystery there with his bees, a storyline about a Japanese man Holmes may or may not have met with decades before, and the one I was interested in - the story of an old man, dealing with the fame of his younger incarnation and trying to come to terms with aging and seeing those around him dying. This I found very moving and sad, as all the names we know from Holmes stories are no longer with him, how he is a relic and a piece of history already for autograph-hunters in a new era. I would have liked the book to focus on this to the exclusion of the other elements, which I didn't find particularly interesting to listen to. A new genre I think I like though, fictional heroes in old age. Some excellent insights and thought has gone into Sherlock's later life and how his friends aged around him. But one I wouldn't reecommend on audiobook, I think it would be easier to follow on paper/e-book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marvin

    This is, in a way, a homage to the Sherlock Holmes books the way Tilting at Windmills was an homage to Don Quixote. But this one goes further beyond the character's original portrayal while still remaining recognizably the same one. Holmes is, in 1947, 92 years old, caring for his bees, as he is cared for by his housekeeper & admired by her son, who has, almost against Holmes's will, become something of a beekeeping apprentice for whom Holmes has come to care deeply. Holmes has also recently ret This is, in a way, a homage to the Sherlock Holmes books the way Tilting at Windmills was an homage to Don Quixote. But this one goes further beyond the character's original portrayal while still remaining recognizably the same one. Holmes is, in 1947, 92 years old, caring for his bees, as he is cared for by his housekeeper & admired by her son, who has, almost against Holmes's will, become something of a beekeeping apprentice for whom Holmes has come to care deeply. Holmes has also recently returned from a visit to a correspondent in Japan and sees there the devastation caused by the war. He is repeatedly asked to answer why deeply troubling things happen & to come to grips with the realization that the meaning of human tragedy is much more elusive, much more difficult to solve than the mystery solving that made him famous. I'm sure this book was asking me as a reader to make far more connections than I was able to make, but I never felt that it was pretentious or that my failure as a reader diminished my appreciation for the author's ability to plumb the depths of a human soul who by his nature tended to resist such probing questions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    blushenka

    This book is well-written and will undoubtedly appeal to some people. It hasn't anything to do with Sherlock Holmes, though, so don't let that 'trick' you into reading it. There is no mystery, no actual plot and even if towards the end the ideas which the author wants to convey fall into some sort of place, still - any character could have been at the centre of this book - like, an original character, maybe? Holmes is used out of his element in this book, which is of course to his disadvantage, This book is well-written and will undoubtedly appeal to some people. It hasn't anything to do with Sherlock Holmes, though, so don't let that 'trick' you into reading it. There is no mystery, no actual plot and even if towards the end the ideas which the author wants to convey fall into some sort of place, still - any character could have been at the centre of this book - like, an original character, maybe? Holmes is used out of his element in this book, which is of course to his disadvantage, and clearly the author's intention. Overall impression: Meh. 2/5.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura Tolomei

    Nostalgic and sad: I'm a Sherlock Holmes fan, and this book did him justice in a well written manner I found fascinating and enthralling. And that's the best praise I can write considering how misrepresented this popular character has been of late. Nostalgic and sad: I'm a Sherlock Holmes fan, and this book did him justice in a well written manner I found fascinating and enthralling. And that's the best praise I can write considering how misrepresented this popular character has been of late.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Mr. Holmes is aging, but he does it in his own words, not those of Watson's. This is actually three mysteries rolled into one novel: a past, recent past and present conundrum. Mr. Holmes is aging, but he does it in his own words, not those of Watson's. This is actually three mysteries rolled into one novel: a past, recent past and present conundrum.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    One of the few times when the movie is better than the book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    3.5 stars Quite a good book, witnessing Sherlock Holmes as you never seen him before.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    I was rather disappointed by the book - I'd seen the movie with ian mckellen and liked it very much, but the book lacks some rythm - I was rather disappointed by the book - I'd seen the movie with ian mckellen and liked it very much, but the book lacks some rythm -

  28. 5 out of 5

    Δx Δp ≥ ½ ħ

    How many roads most a man walk down Before you call him a man ? How many seas must a white dove sail Before she sleeps in the sand ? Yes, how many times must the cannon balls fly Before they're forever banned ? The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind The answer is blowin' in the wind. Yes, how many years can a mountain exist Before it's washed to the sea ? Yes, how many years can some people exist Before they're allowed to be free ? Yes, how many times can a man turn his head Pretending he just doesn't s How many roads most a man walk down Before you call him a man ? How many seas must a white dove sail Before she sleeps in the sand ? Yes, how many times must the cannon balls fly Before they're forever banned ? The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind The answer is blowin' in the wind. Yes, how many years can a mountain exist Before it's washed to the sea ? Yes, how many years can some people exist Before they're allowed to be free ? Yes, how many times can a man turn his head Pretending he just doesn't see ? The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind The answer is blowin' in the wind. Yes, how many times must a man look up Before he can see the sky ? Yes, how many ears must one man have Before he can hear people cry ? Yes, how many deaths will it take till he knows That too many people have died ? The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind The answer is blowin' in the wind. The Bolwin' In The Wind by Bob Dylan ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Setidaknya ada dua pelajaran berharga bagi para penulis yang akan membuat cerita fiksi untuk jangan pernah menulis cerita terlalu bagus! Pelajaran berharga tersebut setidaknya pernah dialami dua penulis kondang, JK Rowling dan Arthur Conan Doyle. Ketika dua penulis tersebut membuat cerita terlalu bagus terutama melalui tingkah para tokoh rekaannya, ajaibnya, nama tokoh jauh lebih terkenal daripada nama si pengarang sendiri. (Berapa banyak orang yang tau kepanjangan JK pada nama Rowling, bagaimana sislsilah keluarganya? bandingkan dengan si HP yang para pembaca setianya tau hingga detail terkecilnya). Ketika suatu tokoh telah lahir dalam cerita yang hebat, maka para pembaca setianya akan memujanya dengan sedemikian rupa dan berharap agar nasib tokoh pujaannya sesuai harapannya tanpa memperdulikan apa yang ada di benak si pengarang. Setidaknya hal seperti itulah yang menimpa kedua penulis besar tersebut. Pertama, JKR. Ketika HP mencapai puncak kejayaannya, dimana rekor-rekor penjualan bertumbangan dalam semalam saja (yang oleh pengarang lain perlu ratusan tahun), HP telah memiliki fans setia yang "akan mengorbankan" apapun agar nasib HP "bahagia". Bahkan JKR mengaku stress bagaimana mengakhiri kisah HP agar sesuai dengan harapan para fansnya namun juga sesuai dengan ide dia pada mulanya. Selain itu, bayang-bayang HP akan terus menghantui karir kepenulisan JKR selanjutnya. Bagaimana jika karya2 JKR tidak sehebat HP? Mungkin JKR seharusnya tidak perlu serisau itu, toh dengan berhenti menulis pun, dia akan tetap sangat kaya. Tapi, bukan itu kan tujuan seorang penulis? Tapi bagaimanapun, bayang2 HP akan terus menghantui dan menjadi beban bagi karya-karya dia selanjutnya. Di sisi lain, ending yang menggantung pada HP seri ke 7, membuat jutaan pembaca yang tak puas akan menuntut kelanjutan cerita HP, meski dengan tegas dia tidak akan melanjutkan kisah HP. Mungkin kelanjutan HP tidak akan ada selama beberapa dekade mendatang (kecuali JKR berubah pikiran), tetapi, saia yakin, pada abad-abad mendatang (dimana copy rights tidak terlalu dipermasalahkan), sekuel2 HP akan terus bermunculan. Apalagi mengingat tokoh HP masih hidup di akhir kisah (maap ini spoiler paling berbahaya bagi buku HP ke 7) :D FYI, pada tahun-tahun demam HP, di dunia maya beredar cerita HP versi "bajakan" yang tidak ditulis oleh JKR. Puncaknya, saat seluruh dunia tercurah untuk menantikan akhir kisah HP pada seri ke-7, sebelum versi asli terbit, di internet (dan diterbitkan hardcopy-nya di China), beredar kisah akhir HP. Begitu banyak versinya. Salah satu judulnya adalah Harry Potter and The Sons of Revenge yang berusaha "membocorkan" akhir kisah sang legenda Hogwarts tersebut. Btw, saat ini, di toko-toko buku telah beredar buku fantasi anak yang dengan jelas "meniru" buku HP, berserial pula, kalau tidak salah judulnya "Harry dan ...". Terlihat jelas kan kalo buku itu meniru konsep HP dimana selain berserial, judul2nya pun biasanya berembel-embel "HP dan..." Namun, nasib yang lebih tragis dialami oleh Doyle. Meski kisah Holmes telah melambungkan nama Doyle sebagai salah satu pengarang paling terkenal sepanjang masa, namun kepopuleran tersebut harus dibayar mahal. Holmes telah menyihir jutaan pembaca bahkan telah menjadi ikon budaya. sesuatu yang tak pernah dia duga sebelumnya. Ajaibnya, nama Holmes bahkan jauh lebih populer daripada nama Doyle sendiri. Bahkan yang tragis adalah jutaan orang malah percaya kalau tokoh SH adalah sosok yang nyata! lebih tragis lagi, banyak orang yakin kalau Doyle, sang pengarang, justru merupakan "orang suruhan" SH untuk menulis kisah-kisahnya. Tentu saja Doyle menjadi "cemburu". Dalam "kecemburuannya" tersebut, dia melakukan "pembalasan" dengan cara mematikan karakter Holmes dalam kasus The Final Problem dimana sang pahlawan menemui ajalnya setelah bertarung dengan raja penjahat Prof. Moriarty dalam duel maut di air terjun Reichenbach yang legendaris. Namun, semua itu seolah menjadi awal petaka bagi Doyle. Begitu populer dan dicintainya Holmes, sehingga para penggemarnya malah mendesak Doyle untuk menghidupkan kembali Sang Pahlawan. Karena desakan yang semakin hebat, dengan berat hati dan dilanda dilema, akhirnya Holmes kembali dihidupkan dalam kisah "The Return of SH". Dan seolah tak mau mengulangi kesalahannya kembali, untuk mengakhiri kisah Holmes, alih-alih mematikan sang tokoh (lagi), Doyle malah mengasingkan Holmes ke pedesaan terpencil dalam buku His Last Bow. Namun, jutrsu ini malah termasuk kesalahan fatal Doyle yang lainnya. Kisah si SH yang "tidak mati" dan "terus berlanjut" kemudian dimanfaatkan para penulis lain untuk membuat sekuel-sekuel kelanjutan SH. Tercatat (sesuai pengamatan saia, cmiiw), sudah ada 3 novel yang sudah diterjemahkan ke dalam bahasa Indonesia yang merupakan sekuel SH dari penulis selain Doyle. Ada yang berjudul "SH dan Sekretaris Itali" (Gramedia), "SH dan Laskar Jalanan Baker Street" (Qanita), dan buku ini, "SH : Misteri yang Tak Terpecahkan" (Voilla Book) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Entah mengapa, saat sedang merasa kesepian, lagu "blowin' in the wind"-nya Bob Dylan terus menerus berkelindan di kepala saia. Pun saat membaca buku ini. Membaca Buku "SH : Misteri yang Tak Terpecahkan", saia teringat pada film "Watchmen" (2009) dimana para superhero pun mengalami masa tua. Tokoh yang dulunya begitu dipuja, akhirnya bisa renta dan mengalami hal paling manusiawi dan paling mengerikan, kesepian dan keterasingan. Berbeda dengan dua buku SH non-Doyle lainnya, kisah SH dalam buku ini menampilkan sosok SH yang renta. Sang Pahlawan itu telah berusia seabad. Untuk menghindari kejaran wartawan dan para penggemar, SH (menurut buku ini) mengasingkan diri ke desa terpencil di daerah Sussex. Dalam masa-masa "pengasingan" yang damai itulah, kisah ini bergulir. Menurut buku ini, SH masih hidup pada tahun 2001. Dia telah melewati berbagai peristiwa besar dunia. Sebenarnya ini yang menjadi kunci ketertarikan awal saia pada buku ini. Bayangkan, Sang Legenda itu hidup pada masa kita! Seolah melihat Einstein di depan rumah! Namun, usia panjang tersebut seolah menjadi kutukan baginya. Bayangkan, para kerabat dan sahabatnya telah meninggalkan dia lebih dr setengah abad yang lampau. Mycroft, bahkan sahabat sehidup-sematinya, Dr. Watson telah meninggal jauh-jauh hari. Namun, dalam ketersendiriannya itu, Holmes melakukan "kesalahan" yang bisa "membunuh" para pahlawan terhebat sekalipun, dia tetap melajang. Alhasil, lebih dari setengah abad dia diteror kesunyian yang mencekam. Meski telah menolak kasus, bagaimanapun kerasnya bujukan para klien, namun, dalam buku ini ada tiga "kasus" yang semakin membuat Sang Pahlawan merana. Di sinilah kepiawaian Mitch Cullin bermain. Dengan pekanya, Cullin berhasil menyentuh sisi paling sensitif dari seorang pahlawan yang "normalnya", dengan banyaknya penggemar seharusnya tidak kesepian, namun mengalami kesunyian batin yang mencekam. Hasilnya, berupa sebuah kisah yang senyap, menghanyutkan, dan akhirnya mengharukan... Sebenarnya SH adalah salah satu bacaan favorit saia, itu sebabnya segala sesuatu yang ada tulisan SH-nya saia baca. Tapi pas membaca buku ini, entah mengapa "kehadiran" SH hanya berupa tempelan saja... Pertama, hal-hal yang "berbau" SH di buku ini nyaris gak ada. Jangan mengharapkan bakal bertemu dengan kantor Baker Street 221B atau Watson, dll yang telah menjadi "image" seorang Holmes. Hanya Holmes sendiri... artinya, kalo begitu, seharusnya, jika tokoh utama dalam buku ini diganti bukan oleh Holmes, ceritanya bakal sama saja... kedua, di buku ini dicerikanan kalo SH menemukan seorang sosok wanita yang dia cintai "bahkan diklaim cinta sejati". tapi, wanita tersebut bukanlah Irene Adler seperti dalam kisah (di buku Doyle) A Scandal in Bohemia, padahal semua fans SH tahu, dialah wanita pujaan Holmes. ketiga, SH disini ditampilkan sbg SH yang pikun, cepat lupa (maklum dah seabad), namun beberapa kenangan (sedih) masih dia ingat. Ringkasnya, SH-nya dah tua banget lah. Tetapi SH yang ini masih bugar. padahal menurut Doyle, SH adalah pengemar berat minuman, cerutu dan kokain. Apa mungkin bagi pecandu ketiga tsb bisa hidup bertahan lama? (kemungkinan itu selalu saja ada sih, tapi... gimana yah... :P) SH disini juga ditampilin sebagai sosok yang kadang tealten alias rapi. Misal dia menyusun sendok makanan secara simetris dan melipat kertas dengan sempurna... Ini membuat saia seolah melihat seorang Poirot daripada seorang Holmes T_T Hal-hal semacam inilah yang membuat saia seolah melihat Holmes yang lain. Okelah, usia tua ga apa-apa, tapi masa ciri khas Holmesnya juga berubah? perannya di buku ini lebih cocok digantikan Poirot atau malah detektif yang baru sama sekali :P keempat, dan ini yang membuat bintangnya cuma 3 adalah, Judul buku ini, "SH : Misteri yang Tak Terpecahkan" (judul aslinya A Slight Trick of the Mind) benar-benar "menyesatkan"... percaya atau tidak, di buku ini sama sekali tidak ada misterinya! boro-boro tak tak terpecahkan, "ada" pun tidak T_T Kalaupun ada 3 kasus, itu berupa kasus yang terjadi puluhan tahun lampau dan "sudah terselesaikan" bahkan satu kasus malah berupa kasus xxxxxx (kena sensor XD). Dan yang tambah bikin keki adalah, kasus-kasus yang disajikan adalah kasus-kasus "sederhana" dan "mudah ditebak" (percayalah, Anda tak akan mengalamai kesulitan berarti dalam menebaknya!). Makanya saia berpikir kalo nama Holmes cuma dijadikan sebagai "pajangan" saja :P Tapi terlepas dari itu semua, memang, novel ini lebih menekankan pada konflik psikologis. Rasa kesepian karena ditingalkan para kerabat dan yang terkasih, membuat Holmes nyaris tak berdaya. Membaca novel ini, kita akan melarut dalam suasana sendu dan hening yang terus membayangi Holmes... Jika Holmes yang hebat saja bisa sedemikian merana, bagaimana jika kita yang mengalaminya? Untuk itu mungkin kita bisa memahami mengapa banyak orang yang putus asa bahkan bunuh diri saat mereka merasa terasing dan terabaikan... Sisi rasionalitas Holmes yang kuatlah yang mungkin mencegahnya bertindak serupa... Overall, lebih tepat disebut roman darpada novel misteri. NB : Dilema penulis dalam menciptakan tokoh yang hebat sepertinya hampir melanda semua pengarang terkenal lainnya. Doyle dan Rowling hanya sedikit dari para "korban" tersebut. Namun, karena tak banyak cerita yang mampu menyihir ratusan juta penggemar bahkan menjadi ikon budaya, sepertinya hal itu tak terlalu menjadi masalah. Ada penulis lain yang nyaris mengalami hal serupa. Agatha Christie telah menjadi penulis tersukses dunia melalui karakter Hercule Poirot-nya. Namun, alih-alih merasa tertekan dg karakter ciptaannya, Christie secara "kejam" mengakhiri riwayat tokoh pahlawannya melalui novel terakhir Poirot, Curtain. Melalui ending yang membuat merinding, Christie telah menutup kisah sang jagoan secara tragis, bahkan ironis. Namun itu sekaligus merupakan cara yang jenius untuk menutup pintu kesempatan bagi para penulis lain yang ingin membuat sekuel Poirot :) cmiiw

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    It is the story of how an elderly detective sought to attain a kind of ration of honey besides "royal jelly" in hopes of regaining a life of confidentiality of an unfinished biographical intellect of a younger woman who repudiated living in harsh conditions. Around the time he was recounting the task of for endeavor: the quest for japanese honey bees abstract called Prickly Ash. He had encountered a relationship with his housekeeper's son whose name was Roger, and taught he how to adapt to an ap It is the story of how an elderly detective sought to attain a kind of ration of honey besides "royal jelly" in hopes of regaining a life of confidentiality of an unfinished biographical intellect of a younger woman who repudiated living in harsh conditions. Around the time he was recounting the task of for endeavor: the quest for japanese honey bees abstract called Prickly Ash. He had encountered a relationship with his housekeeper's son whose name was Roger, and taught he how to adapt to an apiary that held many honey bees in the outskirts of his country. The renowned detective realizes that this youngster is greatly into his thoughts in the writing of a dear friend and trust to help Holmes retrieve the content of her apprehension... This story's moral is one to consider if you are a reader of resilience and peer influence regarding friendship and infliction.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Gross

    I like old bee-keeping Sherlock Homes. I first read about him in Michael Chabon's The Final Solution, which I enjoyed greatly. Then recently we watched the movie Mr. Holmes and I enjoyed that and saw it was a book so I was excited to read it. Unfortunately I got it on audiobook, which I listen to while getting my walking in, and this was the type of book I wish I could have paid more attention to and had in print. I loved the settings of the English countryside and post war Japan, the interesting I like old bee-keeping Sherlock Homes. I first read about him in Michael Chabon's The Final Solution, which I enjoyed greatly. Then recently we watched the movie Mr. Holmes and I enjoyed that and saw it was a book so I was excited to read it. Unfortunately I got it on audiobook, which I listen to while getting my walking in, and this was the type of book I wish I could have paid more attention to and had in print. I loved the settings of the English countryside and post war Japan, the interesting, detailed descriptions, and the interwoven stories that came off a little disjointed in the movie. It tackles deep issues of aging and loss and the meaning of life and empathy, all while telling interesting and vivid stories. I really enjoyed this this book and will have to get an actual copy of it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.