web site hit counter A Soul Remembers Hiroshima - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Soul Remembers Hiroshima

Availability: Ready to download

Prior to contacting Dolores for a regression session, a 22-year-old American woman inexplicably became deeply traumatized and overwhelmed by a sudden rush of memories that had no rational explanation. The memories were triggered in the following settings. On an ordinary day as she walked into her living room, a program was playing on the television where survivors of the a Prior to contacting Dolores for a regression session, a 22-year-old American woman inexplicably became deeply traumatized and overwhelmed by a sudden rush of memories that had no rational explanation. The memories were triggered in the following settings. On an ordinary day as she walked into her living room, a program was playing on the television where survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima were being interviewed. There were no scenes of the bombing, simply the interviewer discussing the event with the guests. As she viewed the images of the survivors describing their experiences, without explanation, she suddenly began experienced scenes flashing through her mind of the actual bombing as it occurred in real time. As well as experiencing visual images of the event, additional senses were stimulated as she could also hear the screams of people and feel the deep pain of the experience. Intuitively, she knew she had been present when the event occurred. In the days and weeks that followed after watching the program, the horrific scenes of the explosion itself and the resulting aftermath continued to persistently flood her mind. She was able to push them to the back of her mind for a brief period of time so she could function in everyday life, however, this became too exhausting a process which provided no explanation to what was happening to her or why. At this point, she contacted Dolores and she sought her help via a session. This book is the story of how Dolores carefully traced these experiences back to her life as a Japanese man named Nogorigatu living in Hiroshima during WWII. It tells the story of what the Japanese people experienced during the war and is a side of history that has neither been fully explored nor written about. At the time, it was Dolores most challenging case because she was unsure of how the young lady would react to reliving dying in an atomic explosion. It had to be handled with extreme care. The resulting story cries out to our time, "Do not let this horror happen again!"


Compare

Prior to contacting Dolores for a regression session, a 22-year-old American woman inexplicably became deeply traumatized and overwhelmed by a sudden rush of memories that had no rational explanation. The memories were triggered in the following settings. On an ordinary day as she walked into her living room, a program was playing on the television where survivors of the a Prior to contacting Dolores for a regression session, a 22-year-old American woman inexplicably became deeply traumatized and overwhelmed by a sudden rush of memories that had no rational explanation. The memories were triggered in the following settings. On an ordinary day as she walked into her living room, a program was playing on the television where survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima were being interviewed. There were no scenes of the bombing, simply the interviewer discussing the event with the guests. As she viewed the images of the survivors describing their experiences, without explanation, she suddenly began experienced scenes flashing through her mind of the actual bombing as it occurred in real time. As well as experiencing visual images of the event, additional senses were stimulated as she could also hear the screams of people and feel the deep pain of the experience. Intuitively, she knew she had been present when the event occurred. In the days and weeks that followed after watching the program, the horrific scenes of the explosion itself and the resulting aftermath continued to persistently flood her mind. She was able to push them to the back of her mind for a brief period of time so she could function in everyday life, however, this became too exhausting a process which provided no explanation to what was happening to her or why. At this point, she contacted Dolores and she sought her help via a session. This book is the story of how Dolores carefully traced these experiences back to her life as a Japanese man named Nogorigatu living in Hiroshima during WWII. It tells the story of what the Japanese people experienced during the war and is a side of history that has neither been fully explored nor written about. At the time, it was Dolores most challenging case because she was unsure of how the young lady would react to reliving dying in an atomic explosion. It had to be handled with extreme care. The resulting story cries out to our time, "Do not let this horror happen again!"

30 review for A Soul Remembers Hiroshima

  1. 5 out of 5

    Iona Stewart

    This book differs from the other Cannon books I've read, as it doesn't mention extra-terrestrials! Therefore, the beginning of the book where the subject, a young girl called Katie, is regressed to common, banal lives seemed somewhat tame to me. But things soon changed. Katie was sure that she had lived a previous life in Japan during the second World War and experienced the dropping of the atom bomb on Hiroshima. Cannon accessed the life in question and got the man, Nogorigatu, to describe his l This book differs from the other Cannon books I've read, as it doesn't mention extra-terrestrials! Therefore, the beginning of the book where the subject, a young girl called Katie, is regressed to common, banal lives seemed somewhat tame to me. But things soon changed. Katie was sure that she had lived a previous life in Japan during the second World War and experienced the dropping of the atom bomb on Hiroshima. Cannon accessed the life in question and got the man, Nogorigatu, to describe his life, wedding, family and Japanese life and customs in general. She wanted to gradually approach the fateful day, August 6, 1945, since Katie had been extremely apprehensive about having to face and live through this memory. Nogorigatu proved to be a sensible, peace-loving man who made and decorated pots and sold them at the market. Eventually, the war begins and N starts to feel its effects on the town. The troops mistreat the people and steal their food. The population is on the brink of starvation. People, including N's daughters, are forced to work in factories. His sons are sent off to war, his wife dies. We get to know and care for this gentle Japanese man. The book becomes deeply moving. When the bomb is dropped, we experience this shocking event through N's consciousness as though we were there. A great flash, and rolling winds like fire. Screams. A giant cloud.Suddenly all the buildings simply vanish. The city disappears in a moment. There is nowhere to run for safety or shelter. People's skins and hair are burnt off. They become black like Negroes. Their lungs are burnt. This was a totally shocking experience, also for the reader. N takes about a week to die. Afterwards, Cannon conducts research to confirm what she has learnt through the regression. There had been no need to drop this horrific bomb - the Japanese government was in fact attempting to initiate surrender, since the people were dying of starvation and the country was falling apart. It had apparently been a sort of experiment on the part of the American government. No flyers were dropped warning the people to get out of town on the day in question, though some had been dropped on other towns to be bombed in the normal way. Truman who was President at the time thought it was acceptable to refrain from issuing any warning by way of revenge subsequent to the "sneak" attack on Pearl Harbour. (But it should be noted that it was the political leaders that made the decision to bomb Pearl Harbour, and it was thousands of ordinary men, women and children that got the atomic bomb thrown on top of them.) Like Cannon, I had never really thought about the suffering of the Japanese subsequent on the dropping of these atomic bombs. Now I have thought about this. The book is important precisely because it makes us realize what a gruesome decison it was to drop these bombs. How could we carry out these inhumane deeds? Everyone should read this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Donald LaPlante

    Fascinating, and intriguing. The story is one that touched me to the core. I was very shaken by it. It felt like I was right there with them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Phip Rix

    Amazing journey. Another winner in her life. I am on a delores cannon journey. Amazing journey. Has changed my life and outlook on life. This book is a good edition to that journey. I am travelling in the proper timeline. Her life story is seventeen books long. I thank her wherever she is for her life, and her legacy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Craig Carsley

    This book is an exploration into the horror of experiencing the total devastation of atomic warfare from the perspective of a man who died as a result. The recanting of this man’s experience is heartbreaking and sobering. As hard as it is to stomach, we should all make an effort to be aware of our capacity for destruction.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Willi

    Regression Interestingly sad & horrific.I was shocked & amazed by this documentary of sorts!It made me stop & ponder life in general.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mitch Hoover

    As someone who performs past life regression’s I thought this book was wonderful! Very detailed in the questions asked to the subject. A must-read if you’re interested in past life regression.

  7. 5 out of 5

    L'aura

    Accessed through past life regression, a poignant story told from the viewpoint of an elderly and peaceful Japanese man, who had no understanding of the politics of war. He tells the heartwrenching account of how he lost everything he had; his whole family, his house and agricultural fields, his city Hiroshima as it was effectively devastated in an instant, by the A-bomb in 1945 and ultimately, how he lost his own life nine agonizing days later. What truly pulled my heartstrings was when he inte Accessed through past life regression, a poignant story told from the viewpoint of an elderly and peaceful Japanese man, who had no understanding of the politics of war. He tells the heartwrenching account of how he lost everything he had; his whole family, his house and agricultural fields, his city Hiroshima as it was effectively devastated in an instant, by the A-bomb in 1945 and ultimately, how he lost his own life nine agonizing days later. What truly pulled my heartstrings was when he interrupted the hypnotist with "WHY?" with so much emotion and so much pain. He could not comprehend how a human being could even think of inflicting so much horror upon another human being, much less carry it out. Seeing this tragedy play out from this simple man's perspective, it is so obvious that the few people in power are the ones that are capable of causing so much damage, not the masses of humaninity who just want to live a peaceful existence with their families. This book truly moved me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    My Pseudonym

    Dolores Cannon is great; however, I thought this was a little less intriguing than her typical works. She used a good chunk of the book to explain the subject's relatively normal and uneventful past lives before their incarnation at Hiroshima. This provided nothing constructive to the title of the book except to increase the page count. The event of the atomic bomb going off is harrowing, however, the actual death experience is explained in a very brief section at the very end. This may have bee Dolores Cannon is great; however, I thought this was a little less intriguing than her typical works. She used a good chunk of the book to explain the subject's relatively normal and uneventful past lives before their incarnation at Hiroshima. This provided nothing constructive to the title of the book except to increase the page count. The event of the atomic bomb going off is harrowing, however, the actual death experience is explained in a very brief section at the very end. This may have been a distinctive moment for a hypnotherapist, however, on paper, it doesn't seem to translate as strongly as it should.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Claudette

    I loved it. I found it so enthralling, one of those books that you can't put down. Having lived in Japan, studied Japanology and been to Hiroshima & the Peace Museum - I could relate to what the person was describing under hypnosis. She was very accurate describing their customs, tradition and culture. What these poor people suffered during the atomic bomb, they were the innocent victims. I hope that history never repeats itself. I loved it. I found it so enthralling, one of those books that you can't put down. Having lived in Japan, studied Japanology and been to Hiroshima & the Peace Museum - I could relate to what the person was describing under hypnosis. She was very accurate describing their customs, tradition and culture. What these poor people suffered during the atomic bomb, they were the innocent victims. I hope that history never repeats itself.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    This book may be good for someone who has less exposure to Dolores' work. It focuses on one client and their findings of a man's life in Hiroshima. The actual bombing makes up very little of the book, and doesn't go as in depth as I would have liked. This book may be good for someone who has less exposure to Dolores' work. It focuses on one client and their findings of a man's life in Hiroshima. The actual bombing makes up very little of the book, and doesn't go as in depth as I would have liked.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mayra Cruz Ortega

    I've read Dolores Cannon's books before and this one is no disappointment. Quite an interesting topic if you're open minded. I've read Dolores Cannon's books before and this one is no disappointment. Quite an interesting topic if you're open minded.

  12. 5 out of 5

    GERALD J ARDOIN JR

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Schneide

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karissa Wolf

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bert

  18. 5 out of 5

    D.D.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mattea Go

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brad Brune

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heleri

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hieu

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christel

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.P. McDonald

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  26. 5 out of 5

    joe zvirblis

  27. 4 out of 5

    Millard Weaver

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jason Cassidy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Koslov

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.