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Yes! We Are Latinos: Poems and Prose About the Latino Experience

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Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino. Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino. Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each youth provide specific stories and circumstances for the reader to better understand the Latino people’s quest for identity. Each profile is followed by nonfiction prose that further clarifies the character’s background and history, touching upon important events in the history of the Latino American people, such as the Spanish Civil War, immigration to the US, and the internment of Latinos with Japanese ancestry during World War II. Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy’s informational yet heartwarming text provides a resource for young Latino readers to see themselves, while also encouraging non-Latino children to understand the breadth and depth of the contributions made by Latinos in the US. Caldecott Medalist David Diaz’s hand-cut illustrations are bold and striking, perfectly complementing the vibrant stories in the book. YES! WE ARE LATINOS stands alone in its presentation of the broad spectrum of Latino culture and will appeal to readers of fiction and nonfiction.


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Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino. Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse Juanita lives in New York and is Mexican. Felipe lives in Chicago and is Panamanian, Venezuelan, and black. Michiko lives in Los Angeles and is Peruvian and Japanese. Each of them is also Latino. Thirteen young Latinos and Latinas living in America are introduced in this book celebrating the rich diversity of the Latino and Latina experience in the United States. Free-verse fictional narratives from the perspective of each youth provide specific stories and circumstances for the reader to better understand the Latino people’s quest for identity. Each profile is followed by nonfiction prose that further clarifies the character’s background and history, touching upon important events in the history of the Latino American people, such as the Spanish Civil War, immigration to the US, and the internment of Latinos with Japanese ancestry during World War II. Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy’s informational yet heartwarming text provides a resource for young Latino readers to see themselves, while also encouraging non-Latino children to understand the breadth and depth of the contributions made by Latinos in the US. Caldecott Medalist David Diaz’s hand-cut illustrations are bold and striking, perfectly complementing the vibrant stories in the book. YES! WE ARE LATINOS stands alone in its presentation of the broad spectrum of Latino culture and will appeal to readers of fiction and nonfiction.

30 review for Yes! We Are Latinos: Poems and Prose About the Latino Experience

  1. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    This is an amazing compilation of poems and non-fiction text that demonstrates that there are so many varieties of Latino/a people living in the United States. I loved hearing from so many perspectives and hearing the histories of so many groups of people. This book is consistently labeled as teen and I guess I understand that because I don't imagine many of my students would sit down and read it all in one sitting . I do think though that upper grade teachers could use portions of the text to g This is an amazing compilation of poems and non-fiction text that demonstrates that there are so many varieties of Latino/a people living in the United States. I loved hearing from so many perspectives and hearing the histories of so many groups of people. This book is consistently labeled as teen and I guess I understand that because I don't imagine many of my students would sit down and read it all in one sitting . I do think though that upper grade teachers could use portions of the text to great effect for example when discussing immigration or history. I am going to get a copy for our elementary library. In one of the poems an older brother says, "it's okay if others ignore your history and your heritage. But it is a crime if you do...Never forget who you are." This book will help with both of those - keeping others from ignoring the history and also helping some to remember theirs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A great collection of character vignettes and brief essays about the diverse cultural heritage and historical roots of Latino Americans.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn Swanson

    I am excited to share the book "Yes! We Are Latinos: Poems And Prose About the Latino Experience" by Alma Flor Ada! This International Latino Book Award winner is a collection of memoir poems. It is told by different fictional voices and includes non-fictional facts about the history of Latinos. Each part of this book starts with a poem that begins with “My name is….” and “I am from….” statements and continues to describe the realization of the Latino culture and the desire to be Americans witho I am excited to share the book "Yes! We Are Latinos: Poems And Prose About the Latino Experience" by Alma Flor Ada! This International Latino Book Award winner is a collection of memoir poems. It is told by different fictional voices and includes non-fictional facts about the history of Latinos. Each part of this book starts with a poem that begins with “My name is….” and “I am from….” statements and continues to describe the realization of the Latino culture and the desire to be Americans without losing their identity. This book celebrates the essence of Latino history and culture. It is a very complex book, suitable for 4th -6th-grade students. The words on the poems are written in English and Spanish, so I suggest it is read out loud to students. However, students who are fluent in English and Spanish can read this book through guided reading. Also, I believe younger students 1st- 3rd grade can benefit from this book. For example, as a teacher, I can have class discussions about family customs and traditions. After I can encourage them to draw pictures, write stories or poems that will describe who they are. This book shows that Latinos do not have just one single story; their stories come from Spain, Central America, South America and the Caribbean islands. Latinos have a richly colorful and diverse culture! Their descendants are Africans, Asians, European Spaniards, Sephardic Jews, and indigenous people dated as far back as the pre-Colombian era. There are many things I like about this book, and one of them is that Ada gives Latinos a voice. Each narrator tells a story about his/her identity and how it was formed, whether it was through parents, grandparents, an aunt or uncle. Another reason I like this book so much is that this compilation of narratives clearly defines the Latino culture as being a large part of United States history. It is a treasure filled with 96 pages of information that will educate both Latinos and non-Latinos about the importance of cultural identity. My goal as a teacher is to create the cultural responsive classroom, and this book will fit perfectly in the class library to use as a read aloud, for discussions about cultural identity, the history of the Latino culture including immigration and their struggle for justice, and for learning about poetry. It is available in two languages, English and Spanish. Ada created a website for teachers who would like to use this book in the classroom. She shares a lot of activities for groups and individual learning, suggestions for teaching reading and questions for discussions to integrate into the lesson plan! Please go to http://yeswearelatinos.com/ for activities you can use in the classroom. If you would like to learn more about Alma Flor Ada you can go http://almaflorada.com or her like on Facebook at http://facebook.com/almaflorada.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kate Chambers

    I discovered this book while looking through the poetry options on MackinVia (where it is available as an e-book) and I fell in love right away. A large population of the students at my school are Hispanic/Latino and I think this book could be a good way to help them celebrate their culture- or to bring up discussion of common issues. It also may be that they don't relate to anything in this book, and that's okay. I think it is so important to offer many representations of different cultures to I discovered this book while looking through the poetry options on MackinVia (where it is available as an e-book) and I fell in love right away. A large population of the students at my school are Hispanic/Latino and I think this book could be a good way to help them celebrate their culture- or to bring up discussion of common issues. It also may be that they don't relate to anything in this book, and that's okay. I think it is so important to offer many representations of different cultures to help our students figure out who they are and to develop well-rounded opinions about the world. This book begins with a practical and simple explanation, "What Makes Someone a Latino?" This is an important discussion to have with students. It also clarifies that the book offers only a sample of what it is like to be Latino, which is also important to talk about with your students. The rest of the book is full of profiles of different Latinos, told in verse. Each profile is prefaced by a short informational piece explaining the background related to the poem (indigenous roots, Latino immigration, Cuba and the United States, etc.). One way I would use this in the classroom is to have students draw inferences about the narrator based on the poem. For example, in one of the poems, a father says to the son, "You don't want to break your back every day, like I do." I would have students infer what that means about the father's work, what jobs he may have, and what he hopes for his son. Overall, this book has a very practical application to encourage discussion of diverse cultures told through beautiful verse.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book is a combination of fictional vignettes and non fiction descriptions of the many diverse Latino groups in the United States. The fictional sections are actually narrative poems about children/students living in different parts of the country with different heritages. The emphasis is on adapting to a new way of life and also retaining their native culture, language and customs. Depicted are the difficulties of coping with intolerant or ignorant people. The non fiction sections explore t This book is a combination of fictional vignettes and non fiction descriptions of the many diverse Latino groups in the United States. The fictional sections are actually narrative poems about children/students living in different parts of the country with different heritages. The emphasis is on adapting to a new way of life and also retaining their native culture, language and customs. Depicted are the difficulties of coping with intolerant or ignorant people. The non fiction sections explore the history of each group and the contributions to art or music or literature or science that people of that culture have made. Written by well respected and award winning authors; Alma Flora Ada and F. Isabel Campoy, the book is well researched . Block print illustrations are by David Diaz . They are an excellent addition to the narrative sections. This book will be a welcome addition to school libraries on all levels as a resource and as an excellent way to educate students on the diverse backgrounds their fellow Latina/Latino classmates bring to a classroom. A great resource for teachers wanting to assign Latino/Hispanic figures for multicultural reports or a study of the various countries that make up Latin America.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The voices of thirteen Latino/as can be heard proudly claiming their heritage and telling their unique stories in the 12 narrative poems in this book. The authors alternate the fictionalized accounts of individuals such as Jose Miguel whose name means everything to him and Lili and Michiko whose Latino heritages are mixed with Chinese and Japanese, respectively, with nonfiction sections highlighting the history, culture, triumphs and challenges of those they represent. By the time readers reach The voices of thirteen Latino/as can be heard proudly claiming their heritage and telling their unique stories in the 12 narrative poems in this book. The authors alternate the fictionalized accounts of individuals such as Jose Miguel whose name means everything to him and Lili and Michiko whose Latino heritages are mixed with Chinese and Japanese, respectively, with nonfiction sections highlighting the history, culture, triumphs and challenges of those they represent. By the time readers reach the conclusion of this ground-breaking and enlightening book, they will have a much broader understanding of what it means to be Latino/a as well as just how complicated it may be. The illustrator's trademark hand-cut illustrations have been colored through Adobe Photoshop and lend a handsome appearance to this important, engaging, and empowering book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    TED 8650 Children's Literature Text to World: This book is about children from countries all over the world and living all over the United States, yet they are all Latino/Latina. They share their stories, and there is also a nonfiction piece that follows each story. Discussion Questions: 1. List four countries that the children in the book are from. 2. How would you characterize the children in the book? 3. What questions would you ask in an interview with a Latino/Latina person? 4. Pick two children TED 8650 Children's Literature Text to World: This book is about children from countries all over the world and living all over the United States, yet they are all Latino/Latina. They share their stories, and there is also a nonfiction piece that follows each story. Discussion Questions: 1. List four countries that the children in the book are from. 2. How would you characterize the children in the book? 3. What questions would you ask in an interview with a Latino/Latina person? 4. Pick two children from the story. How are they alike? How are they different? 5. What is your favorite poem in the book? Why? 6. Write a poem about yourself and a time in your life, like the children in the story. (2013, June 17). Publishers Weekly. http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...#

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This is a beautiful book. I reviewed it on Amazon and will find my review. Suffice it to say that it is wonderful for students and people who live all over the United States to understand what it means to be Latino -- it means many different things. It can mean you are from Puerto Rico, or you are Japanese and Peruvian and your parents only speak Spanish, or you are from Miami and your parents were born in Cuba, or so much more. The illustrations by David Diaz are beautiful. Please buy it for yo This is a beautiful book. I reviewed it on Amazon and will find my review. Suffice it to say that it is wonderful for students and people who live all over the United States to understand what it means to be Latino -- it means many different things. It can mean you are from Puerto Rico, or you are Japanese and Peruvian and your parents only speak Spanish, or you are from Miami and your parents were born in Cuba, or so much more. The illustrations by David Diaz are beautiful. Please buy it for your school library.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    How to compress the experiences of 12 different Latinos or Latinas in the United States in order to show both the variety and the richness of the cultures in brief poetry and prose sounds like a challenge to accomplish, yet these two authors have managed that very well indeed. This book chronicles the stories of twelve different immigrants who live in the U.S., all with important heritages to consider, including varied and interesting backgrounds along with the stereotypes that are often faced i How to compress the experiences of 12 different Latinos or Latinas in the United States in order to show both the variety and the richness of the cultures in brief poetry and prose sounds like a challenge to accomplish, yet these two authors have managed that very well indeed. This book chronicles the stories of twelve different immigrants who live in the U.S., all with important heritages to consider, including varied and interesting backgrounds along with the stereotypes that are often faced in their daily lives. The poems are written in first person, with a second part showing background history of the person’s culture. Included are those from Mexico, El Salvador, Cuba and Nicaragua, Guatamalan Chinese, Japanese from Peru, and seven others. There is an introduction explaining what makes someone Latino, and additional information at the end. Poems, poignant in the frustration of having to explain misconceptions often, but remaining proud of the personal cultural heritage, show much feeling in the few pages of each one. Here are a few memorable lines: “”If you would let us call you/Joe or Mike,/It would let you blend in.” “Abu Amaya gets animated,/and there is the same sadness/in both,/the same outrage/in both,/and in both the same pain/for a dream that was destroyed.” Illustrations by David Diaz (Smoky Nights) are silhouettes, showing one scene from each story poem, including beautiful detail. This is a poetry anthology every middle and high school should own, hopefully more than one copy!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Kelly

    filled with poetic stories and facts, this book is entertaining and informative. The factual text is filled with gems of info, but for the most part is not overwhelming. Santiago - Dominican I really wanted to read more! I felt like he was a real kid, and I was caught myself about to Google him to see if he ever made that hospital he wanted... Jose Miguel - Cuban & Nicaraguan I LOVED this one. The boy in this story does not want to be called Joe or Mike to blend in, he wants people to just accept hi filled with poetic stories and facts, this book is entertaining and informative. The factual text is filled with gems of info, but for the most part is not overwhelming. Santiago - Dominican I really wanted to read more! I felt like he was a real kid, and I was caught myself about to Google him to see if he ever made that hospital he wanted... Jose Miguel - Cuban & Nicaraguan I LOVED this one. The boy in this story does not want to be called Joe or Mike to blend in, he wants people to just accept his name. This is a pet peeve of mine. If people can say Tchaikovsky without wrinkling their nose in confusion, they can say Babatunde or Jose Miguel the same way. And the love of the grandfather to grandson (and vice versa) bleeds off the page! love it The factual text made me angry. There was more hardcore, easy to understand information explaining the U.S. / Cuban relationship in those 2 pages than I got in my entire schooling career. Felipe - Panamanian, Venezuelan, Black his love for Angelita was beautiful and i wanted to see his art work! Lili - Guatemalan, Chinese & Michiko - Peruvian, Japanese Although I really like the characters, I thought the prose here was the weakest of what I read. It felt more like the intro to a young elementary school book about two best friends. There is nothing wrong with that, either, but it didnt pull me with the rhythm of the words the way the rest did. Minimal black and white artwork, book recommended for middle school and up.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Sanders

    "Yes! We are Lationos" mixes poetry and history. It has a poem and then a section on Latino history that helps to explain the poem. I feel it would have been better to have the history first. I am an adult and I was confused by some of the poems until after I read the history. The first poem starts with a girls' mother talking to her in Spanish. Later her NY teacher greets her in Spanish, but the girl thinks to herself "I understand she believes she is speaking my home language--trying to make m "Yes! We are Lationos" mixes poetry and history. It has a poem and then a section on Latino history that helps to explain the poem. I feel it would have been better to have the history first. I am an adult and I was confused by some of the poems until after I read the history. The first poem starts with a girls' mother talking to her in Spanish. Later her NY teacher greets her in Spanish, but the girl thinks to herself "I understand she believes she is speaking my home language--trying to make me feel good, showing me that she has made the effort to learn a little Spanish." What is her "home language" if not the one her mother uses at home? We learn she also speaks Mixtec (a South American Native language). I felt like her attitude toward the teacher was condescending. This was not the only poem that gave "attitude" from a child. In a later poem, a grown up is recommending to a boy that he Americanize his name to fit in better. The boy tells the grown up he was named for Don Miguel de Cervantes and Miguel Hernandez and to Google them to see who they are and why he won't Americanize his name--big attitude. He was actually named for his grandfather. I am not sure why the child cannot be proud of being named for his grandfather and refuse to alter his name for that reason. I feel that the point of some of these poems is that white people can't understand the Latino culture. Those types of white people are not picking up this book to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Yes! We are Latinos written by, Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy Reflection: For this reflection, I picked the chapter about Latin’s indigenous roots. This reminded me that it relates to social studies, so a lot of this information you could relate it in your social studies lessons. Rationale: I chose this book because it is set up as a short chapter book with pictures. This would be a good book to read aloud when learning about different cultures. The teacher could pick what chapters to read. T Yes! We are Latinos written by, Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy Reflection: For this reflection, I picked the chapter about Latin’s indigenous roots. This reminded me that it relates to social studies, so a lot of this information you could relate it in your social studies lessons. Rationale: I chose this book because it is set up as a short chapter book with pictures. This would be a good book to read aloud when learning about different cultures. The teacher could pick what chapters to read. This book is culturally specific because it talks about the Latin community. Bloom’s Taxonomy Questions: a. Name two things that reflect the Latino community that you learned. b. Summarize the story, page, or paragraph that you just read. c. How would you classify the Latino community? d. What was the most exciting part of the story and why? e. What chapter did you like best and why? f. Role play the story or chapter with a group of 4.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Grover

    Liked it. This is an important book and the stories it shares are the kind of diversity our students need to see to either relate to or learn something new. My one drawback - giving it 4 stars instead of 5 - is it REALLY needed a different format/layout. Some color would have really helped out. For being published in 2013, I am shocked. If I were to purchase (and jury's still out on that), I would really push it to my teachers, especially Spanish & English classes, to use as a mentor text, or se Liked it. This is an important book and the stories it shares are the kind of diversity our students need to see to either relate to or learn something new. My one drawback - giving it 4 stars instead of 5 - is it REALLY needed a different format/layout. Some color would have really helped out. For being published in 2013, I am shocked. If I were to purchase (and jury's still out on that), I would really push it to my teachers, especially Spanish & English classes, to use as a mentor text, or select one or two for class study. I really don't see it flying off a display - even I was bored with the lack of ambience/atmosphere in this book. Underwhelmed and sad - because this book needs to be read - it's just a missed opportunity for the content it shares. Jury's out on purchasing for my MS library.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Penny Peck

    The brief short story essays in this book are so well done, one might wish they are a little longer and meatier. In this celebration of Latino-American culture, the essays are first person, coming from various characters representing different areas: Puerto Rican-American, Cuba-American, etc. Some are done in free verse, some in prose, but all briefly describe how that person 'sees' being American and being Latino/Hispanic. Each fictional piece is followed by a factual essay on how that group or The brief short story essays in this book are so well done, one might wish they are a little longer and meatier. In this celebration of Latino-American culture, the essays are first person, coming from various characters representing different areas: Puerto Rican-American, Cuba-American, etc. Some are done in free verse, some in prose, but all briefly describe how that person 'sees' being American and being Latino/Hispanic. Each fictional piece is followed by a factual essay on how that group originally came to the U.S. Backmatter is also helpful, with suggested reading, index, and other information. Diaz's black woodcut prints add interest and lend a tone of "gravitas" to this book, which is sure to be useful to teachers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Erin Sterling

    I love how this book explores what it means to be "Latino/a" through verse identity poems followed by 1-2 pages of history about that aspect of Latin-American culture. Some of the information I hadn't even known very well, so I loved the somewhat easy access to a more complex topic. Each poem starts with "I am NAME (Jose Miguel, Susana, etc.), I am from COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (or my grandparents are from...), and ends with I am Latino/a. Really well done and great for elementary through middle school I love how this book explores what it means to be "Latino/a" through verse identity poems followed by 1-2 pages of history about that aspect of Latin-American culture. Some of the information I hadn't even known very well, so I loved the somewhat easy access to a more complex topic. Each poem starts with "I am NAME (Jose Miguel, Susana, etc.), I am from COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (or my grandparents are from...), and ends with I am Latino/a. Really well done and great for elementary through middle school, and would even be great for high school as a jump-off.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donna Merritt

    This book explores the history of Latinos in our country and around the world. Interspersed between pages of facts are poems that children (and adults) can relate to. With our current immigration crisis combined with the underrepresentation of the Latino population in literature, this is a wise book to add to any collection. From the book: "My father says illegal / is a dirty word. / All human beings / are made legal / by God / when they are born. This book explores the history of Latinos in our country and around the world. Interspersed between pages of facts are poems that children (and adults) can relate to. With our current immigration crisis combined with the underrepresentation of the Latino population in literature, this is a wise book to add to any collection. From the book: "My father says illegal / is a dirty word. / All human beings / are made legal / by God / when they are born.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

    This helped me to see all the diffferent cultures that make up theLatino population of this country. I love the David Diaz woodcuts and the combination of short fiction and informational text. If nothing else it will help students find out about other cultures. Sometimes dry, butbetter tgan a text book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Skye Bryant

    Alma Flor Ada had done it. Reading through the thirteen powerful poems and their accompanying material was a pure joy. All my bilingual friends please check this out. There are poems about Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, El Salvador, Dominican, Venezuela, Peru, Columbia, Ecuador that Celeberation the subsystem and richness of being Latinos and Latinas.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Josette

    Just read the 1st section with my ten-year-old, and we loved it. I ended up reading the rest of it after he went to bed. Each section is two parts: Poetry from the perspective of a Latino kid and prose exploring the history and culture of that child's origin. Beautifully written and organized. Highly recommend. Just read the 1st section with my ten-year-old, and we loved it. I ended up reading the rest of it after he went to bed. Each section is two parts: Poetry from the perspective of a Latino kid and prose exploring the history and culture of that child's origin. Beautifully written and organized. Highly recommend.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Georgie

    This book was so meaningful and informative. Very truthful, eye-opening, and powerful. There is a poem representative of personal experience for people from many different Latino countries. Then there is a historical summary about each country represented. An easy read, but lots of food for thought. Loved it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Fictional narrative vignettes tell powerful stories of a variety of Latino/a individuals and the challenges and triumphs they face throughout the world. Included throughout are informative nonfiction pieces that highlight history and culture of various Latino peoples.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katt Hansen

    I enjoyed the poetry best. The sections between poems were full of details but sometimes took a political slant that you want to be aware of if you're using this book to teach children about the Latin American culture. I come away from this book wanting to write my own poetry. :) I enjoyed the poetry best. The sections between poems were full of details but sometimes took a political slant that you want to be aware of if you're using this book to teach children about the Latin American culture. I come away from this book wanting to write my own poetry. :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angelita

    This book is a great book for children, because it explains diversity so well. It also includes tales about family and school and how they may shape a child's view on diversity. Also, the obstacles they face when being different can seem so hard. This book is a great book for children, because it explains diversity so well. It also includes tales about family and school and how they may shape a child's view on diversity. Also, the obstacles they face when being different can seem so hard.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Noelle

    (A 2015 Big Read companion title.) The mix of poetry and essays from a wide variety of Latino/a perspectives focuses on the wide variety of ethnicities and cultural experiences that fall under the umbrella of "Latino." It was a fun read. (A 2015 Big Read companion title.) The mix of poetry and essays from a wide variety of Latino/a perspectives focuses on the wide variety of ethnicities and cultural experiences that fall under the umbrella of "Latino." It was a fun read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Loved this book of poetry!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    One Sentence Review: A great premise marred solely by some minor inaccuracies spotted throughout the text.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    A mixture of information and poetry that describes the diversity within the "Latino" community. An important book for every middle grade and up classroom. A mixture of information and poetry that describes the diversity within the "Latino" community. An important book for every middle grade and up classroom.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen Gibson

    Very informative and an easy read. Titlewave.com has predicted 2014 award winners and this is one of them. I'm trying to read as many as possible before the winners are announced. Very informative and an easy read. Titlewave.com has predicted 2014 award winners and this is one of them. I'm trying to read as many as possible before the winners are announced.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael Okoniewski

    It was very interesting

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ally Doerman

    DNF

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