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On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of the bus and give up her seat to a white man. This refusal to give up her dignity sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, a yearlong struggle, and a major victory in the civil rights movement. Source notes, map, bibliography, index.


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On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to move to the back of the bus and give up her seat to a white man. This refusal to give up her dignity sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, a yearlong struggle, and a major victory in the civil rights movement. Source notes, map, bibliography, index.

30 review for Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julia Drescher

    While we have all most likely learned about the Montgomery Bus Boycott from a textbook while in grade school, this text represents the information in a very engaging manner. The information is factual, but unlike when I read most textbooks, I actually wanted to keep reading this. The text teaches about key figures during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, what they did and why they did it. The text goes into great detail about Jo Ann Robinson, Claudette Colvin, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr., a While we have all most likely learned about the Montgomery Bus Boycott from a textbook while in grade school, this text represents the information in a very engaging manner. The information is factual, but unlike when I read most textbooks, I actually wanted to keep reading this. The text teaches about key figures during the Montgomery Bus Boycott, what they did and why they did it. The text goes into great detail about Jo Ann Robinson, Claudette Colvin, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther King Jr., along with several other important individuals. The text includes quotes and details often omitted from textbooks and other sources. The fifth graders in my school are reading this text, and I think this is an appropriate age group for this text. The information is not too graphic for younger students, but it works well with our fifth grade curriculum so this seems like the best group of students to use this text. I could see using it with middle school students as well to support relevant research about the key individuals and the Montgomery Bus Boycott. There are photographs with captions used throughout the text. I liked that they were not on every page and were inserted where relevant, not just to fill space on the pages of the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Tags: Informational, Biography, African American History, paperback, picture book, Civil Rights Summary: Freedom Walkers is an informational chapter book, with a biography vibe to each chapter. Freedom Walkers tells the stories of the hardships that African Americans felt living in the south during Jim Crowe laws up until the end of segregation. The biography aspect of this book focuses on main leaders and people of importance during the civil rights era, such as Rosa Parks and Martin Luther Kin Tags: Informational, Biography, African American History, paperback, picture book, Civil Rights Summary: Freedom Walkers is an informational chapter book, with a biography vibe to each chapter. Freedom Walkers tells the stories of the hardships that African Americans felt living in the south during Jim Crowe laws up until the end of segregation. The biography aspect of this book focuses on main leaders and people of importance during the civil rights era, such as Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. It tells the stories of how segregation and racism affected everyone’s everyday life, especially African American people as well as “White” people who supported African Americans in their efforts during the civil rights movement. Freedom Walkers talks about what the African American community did to boycott the bus system in Montgomery Alabama. The community decided to boycott the bus system because of the unfair treatment of African Americans and because of the arrest due to African Americans not willing to give up their seat in the “African American” section because another white man got on the bus. They felt it was unfair because they had to pay the same amount to ride the bus however, usually got their seats taken away from them and if they refused they were arrested. The community also fought for their constitutional right that every man was created equal. Freedom Walkers is an inspirational book that tells everyone to fight for what they believe in. Responses: I have given this book a 3 star rating. I did this because while it is a historical book and talks about a very important part of American History, I found it personally to be sort of a harder read because I could not keep reading due to the fact that it’s a time in history were people were treated as less than people and no one enjoys thinking about that. However, I did find the book very factual and told great stories of what African American leaders and average people went through on a daily basis. Freedom Walkers is a book that could easily be used against the white population for their wrongs they have committed over the years. However, I noticed that this book did not have anything negative to say about the white population during the civil rights era it only told facts, and even explained that some white families tried to help African Americans and also supported them. Classroom Connections: This book could be connected to history class, you could use it to talk about how African Americans started to fight back against segregation and who were the majors players or leaders in that fight. You could also use it to do a project like tell a time line of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, or simply ask what the major factors in the end of segregation were. Text Complexity: Freedom Walkers has a Lexile of 1110, The guided reading for Freedom Walkers is a Z.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tahleen

    This is the story of the brave freedom fighters in Montgomery, Alabama that spearheaded the Civil Rights Movement in 1960s America. It starts even before Rosa Parks played her pivotal role by refusing to give up her seat to a white man. After a brief introduction giving readers context of what it meant to be black during the 1950s, Freedman then begins with a lesser-known figure in history, Jo Ann Robinson, a professor at the all-black university Alabama State who, after being kicked off a bus f This is the story of the brave freedom fighters in Montgomery, Alabama that spearheaded the Civil Rights Movement in 1960s America. It starts even before Rosa Parks played her pivotal role by refusing to give up her seat to a white man. After a brief introduction giving readers context of what it meant to be black during the 1950s, Freedman then begins with a lesser-known figure in history, Jo Ann Robinson, a professor at the all-black university Alabama State who, after being kicked off a bus for sitting too far toward the front, dedicated much of her time and life to changing the bus laws in the South. Throughout the book, Freedman continues to put the spotlight on forgotten and overlooked players that led to such a monumental shift in American history, along with well-recognized and essential names like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. Freedman leaves nothing out in this history--everything is detailed, and he does not shy away from including the horrific murders that occurred before and after the boycott. Written for middle-grade students, Freedman writes in such a way that is understandable for younger readers, yet is not degrading. He never talks down to his audience and assumes they know enough to understand what he's writing about. Here's a sample: "Rosa Parks had not expected to resist on that December evening. And she did not want to put her family at risk. But she was no longer willing to accept the indignities of bus segregation, a system that dehumanized all black people. 'I decided that I would have to know once and for all what rights I had as a human being and a citizen, even in Montgomery, Alabama' [she said]." Short paragraphs, often broken up by black-and-white photographs that help tell the story, make it easier for younger readers to stay focused, yet it's not so simple that it would bore them. Quotes and the aforementioned photographs are woven into the text, both of which enhance the telling and give a sense of realness to it that would have been lost otherwise; as a result, the reader is transported back in time. All in all, this is an inspiring chapter in American history that Freedman tells eloquently, simply, and brilliantly.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anna Parkinson

    Filled with important facts and plenty of amazing images, Freedom Walkers is a non-fiction novel that gives an in-depth account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955-56. The reader learns that way before Rosa Parks, there were many brave African Americans who were not afraid to stand up for their rights and question the many injustices and violations of civil rights in a country that promises life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This included girls as young as fifteen. A major lesson tha Filled with important facts and plenty of amazing images, Freedom Walkers is a non-fiction novel that gives an in-depth account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955-56. The reader learns that way before Rosa Parks, there were many brave African Americans who were not afraid to stand up for their rights and question the many injustices and violations of civil rights in a country that promises life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This included girls as young as fifteen. A major lesson that one can learn from reading this book is the power of unity. It teaches how fighting for something does not necessarily mean physical violence but how fighting can be done with a combination of knowledge, words, cleverness, courage, unity, persistence, dedication, and determination. As Rosa Parks states, there simply comes a time when people become tired of being tired. Not tired from a hard day's work but tired of being pushed around and oppressed. Tired of being treated as second-class citizens. Tired of having their civil rights violated. Many people seem to believe that slavery ended when Lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation on January 1, 1863, but fail to realize that other ways were created to keep African American's enslaved and oppressed for many years thereafter. There were Black Codes, Jim Crow Laws, and institutionalized racism (which still exists) just to name a few. This story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott gives readers the opportunity to examine only a fraction of the many struggles African Americans were,and continue to be, faced with. It does, however, represent the beginning of a movement--the civil rights movement led gracefully by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This is indeed a great read for young and even older readers--a book that can be read and taught any time of the year, not just in January or February.

  5. 5 out of 5

    MissDziura

    2010 Caudill nominee, Freedom Walkers, is an excellent book that tells about the courage African-Americans in Montgomery, Alabama had to boycott the bus system as a means to non-violently protest for their civil rights. I think this book could be used in 5th grade classrooms and up as either an introduction to the Civil Rights movement, or just a resource for students to become educated about what happened during this tumultous time in our history. The chapters are divided into first-person acco 2010 Caudill nominee, Freedom Walkers, is an excellent book that tells about the courage African-Americans in Montgomery, Alabama had to boycott the bus system as a means to non-violently protest for their civil rights. I think this book could be used in 5th grade classrooms and up as either an introduction to the Civil Rights movement, or just a resource for students to become educated about what happened during this tumultous time in our history. The chapters are divided into first-person accounts and information in order for readers to really understand the enormoitiy of the situation. Since there never seems to be enough time to cover such an important part of history, I could see using the first chapter, one or two of the first person accounts and the last chapter as a classroom resource. It is important for students to understand that while the bus boycott paved the way for the Civil Rights movement to become a national issue, they also need to understand that problems still remained, and many lives were in danger. The last chapter covers the time immediately after the boycott ended, including the bombings of several Baptist churches, death threats, and Martin Luther King's monumental March on Washington, and his unfortunate assassination. Students should not be shielded from the bad side of history, and if used correctly this book can serve as a guide for students to know how important it is to stand for what you believe even if it means one's life. I think this is an important story for students to be aware of and Freedman has written a very good book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evan Hays

    I think if I could pick one book that all Americans should read right now, it would be this one. It speaks of the best of America--when Biblical principles are applied in a functioning democracy. It speaks of courageous love triumphing over terrible hate. We need this more than ever right now. And I would also choose this book because it is extremely well done. The format is very inviting, with simple language, excellent quotes interspersed, and lots of photographs. And for anyone who might thin I think if I could pick one book that all Americans should read right now, it would be this one. It speaks of the best of America--when Biblical principles are applied in a functioning democracy. It speaks of courageous love triumphing over terrible hate. We need this more than ever right now. And I would also choose this book because it is extremely well done. The format is very inviting, with simple language, excellent quotes interspersed, and lots of photographs. And for anyone who might think that this book is too "easy" or "simple", I would challenge you to try to write something like this. It's much harder than it might seem (having written many, many history papers myself). And actually the fact that it is so smoothly done is what makes it seem so easy. Writing anything concise is much harder than writing anything long. Too many Americans just don't know their own history, and we see that to our peril. The other reason this is so important is that people can be much more thoughtful about their beliefs when considering them in a historical scenario than a current one because current events tie so quickly to fear, but historical ones seem safer. But then, hopefully, parallels are made, and people can change their current beliefs and actions more easily. I hope that this book will be an excellent ending to the year for my 8th graders. I plan to read and own all of Freedman's books of this style in the future.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Taylor

    This is an informational book of the Mongomery Bus Boycott, the events that lead up to it, and the result of African American's standing up for their rights. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white man. This was the beginning of what started the boycott. Rosa Parks had E.D. Nixon and Martin Luther King, Jr. on her side when she went to court. The bus boycott nearly bankrupted the bus company. The boycott didn't come without threats. African Americans where harrassed and threa This is an informational book of the Mongomery Bus Boycott, the events that lead up to it, and the result of African American's standing up for their rights. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white man. This was the beginning of what started the boycott. Rosa Parks had E.D. Nixon and Martin Luther King, Jr. on her side when she went to court. The bus boycott nearly bankrupted the bus company. The boycott didn't come without threats. African Americans where harrassed and threatened, including Martin Luther King, Jr. This book is loaded with information about how the boycott was arranged. It has many pictures of events that happened and pictures of how the south looked at the time of the boycott. It shows pictures of "white only" signs to give the reader a look at what the towns looked like and what these signs of segregation looked like. This book is a great addition to learning about African American History. This website: http://lessonplanspage.com/sslaciblac... has a great idea for a research scavenger hunt in order to learn more about African American History. Some of the questions to be answered are Who is Dred Scott? and What is the undergroud railroad? This can be used in addition to a social studies lesson on African American History. Interest Level: Grades 6 - 8 Lexile Measure: 1110 Guided Reading: Z

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Westlund

    This was an excellent informational read that to me read more like a historical fiction story in that it was so compelling and unfolded in an intriguing manner. I did have background knowledge of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the role of Rosa Parks. However, there was so much more to the story that I didn't know. Though this book discussed in detail how Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King were involved, it also provided a lot of information and key points about other vital citizens involved i This was an excellent informational read that to me read more like a historical fiction story in that it was so compelling and unfolded in an intriguing manner. I did have background knowledge of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the role of Rosa Parks. However, there was so much more to the story that I didn't know. Though this book discussed in detail how Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King were involved, it also provided a lot of information and key points about other vital citizens involved in this fight for civil rights and basic human rights, such as E.D Nixon, a leader who founded the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP or Reverend Robert Graetz, a white pastor who supported the boycott. This text poignantly discusses the struggles, obstacles and triumphs of this time in history. The book also includes information that may be disturbing, but can't simply be omitted such as the tragic bombings that killed four black teenage girls. With appropriate scaffolding, I would recommend this book be used in a variety of classrooms and settings. All students should have awareness of this time in history and how it impacted life today. There are so many ways this book could be utilized- certain chapters could be presented or it could be used for research, writing and related projects.

  9. 4 out of 5

    pati

    Excellent primer for the young.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    A very readable introduction to the bus boycott, with a lot of photographs to add appeal and texture.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Giordano

    "Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott" by Russell Freedman is an award-winning, nonfiction chapter book intended for readers in grades four through nine. This book has won numerous awards, including recognition as a 2007 Honor Book for the National Council of English Teacher Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children, which is an award that recognizes “excellence in the writing of nonfiction for children” and looks at areas of accuracy, organization, design, "Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott" by Russell Freedman is an award-winning, nonfiction chapter book intended for readers in grades four through nine. This book has won numerous awards, including recognition as a 2007 Honor Book for the National Council of English Teacher Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children, which is an award that recognizes “excellence in the writing of nonfiction for children” and looks at areas of accuracy, organization, design, and style (www.ncte.org/awards). This text was also honored as the 2007 winner of the Carter G. Woodson Book Award, which recognizes “the most distinguished social science books appropriate for young readers that depict ethnicity in the United States” with sensitivity and accuracy (http://www.socialstudies.org/awards/w...). Russell Freedman is an award-winning author of many acclaimed texts. He graduated from the University of California and worked in journalism, a profession that led to him being well-researched and informed on many social issues. He has also traveled all over the world, gathering information and inspiration for his texts (www2.scholastic.com). In "Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott," Freedman chronicles the tumultuous and turbulent times during the Civil Rights Movement in Montgomery, Alabama, where people were walking for freedom, justice, and a true right to live freely. In "Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott," Freedman extensively creates authority by identifying and crediting experts consulted during his research process. Evidence of his research is found at the conclusion of this text in the Chapter Notes, Selected Bibliography, and Acknowledgements. In the Chapter Notes and Bibliography, Freedman credits many sources of his research, direct quotations, and unfolding of historical events. These credits include Rosa Parks’ "My Story," Jo Ann Robinson’s "The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It," and Martin Luther King, Junior’s "Stride Toward Freedom." Freedman also acknowledges his research and consultations with individuals from the Montgomery Convention and Visitors Bureau as well as from the Rosa Parks Library. Freedman’s research and investigation of the Montgomery bus boycott is well-documented, giving this text authority. As "School Library Journal’s" review states, “extensive chapter notes, an annotated selected bibliography, and a thorough index round out the exemplary presentation” (www.amazon.com). Along with authority, "Freedom Walkers" also demonstrates accuracy. Extensive research notes, as outlined above, combined with direct quotations and historic photographs with riveting captions, support a fact-filled story chronicling this famous historical event. Actual newspaper articles, jail documents and mug shots, as well a clear and detailed map of Montgomery during the time of the boycott, bolster and support the accuracy of this text. Theories and facts are clearly distinguished. Phrases like “after Till allegedly whistled at a white woman,” “eventually between 275 and 300 black-owned vehicles were transporting boycotters,” and “but, for the most part, his pleas were ignored” help distinguish theory from fact and strengthen the accuracy of this text. This text is appropriate for its intended age range of grades four through nine. It may even be accessible to younger readers if done as a read aloud. Information is effectively organized in this text, leading to an ease of reading and understanding for all ages of readers. It is sequentially and chronologically organized, describing, in detail, life in Montgomery before, during, and after the historic bus boycott. The beginning, middle, and end setup of this story keeps readers engaged and wanting to read more to find out if the fight is won. Freedman gives very candid and intricate, sometimes painful and difficult, details of the boycott, those which readers may not already know. He shows respect for the intended audience, the "School Library Journal" review states, “giving accounts of how much coordination and sacrifice went into conducting the Montgomery Bus Boycott–far more than students are likely to imagine from the usual popular and oversimplified versions offered in textbooks and on television” (www.amazon.com). In Freedom Walkers, Freedman is honest and open with the intended audience, giving the audience the stories and accounts of both regular and well-known crusaders fighting for freedom. The literary artistry within this text complements the historic story being told. Organized sequentially from the beginning of the boycott rumblings to the 381-day bus boycott to the Supreme Court’s ruling of bus segregation being unconstitutional, Freedman creatively integrates narrative text and memoirs with historic facts and details. This creates and puts a face onto history, truly connecting the people who created it and the reader who sees its effects. Strong metaphors are used throughout the text, such as “they were on fire for freedom,” “the act of being arrested had become a badge of honor,” and “kicked about by the brutal feet of oppression.” These help create a feeling, an idea, of what it was like to live and be during this turbulent time in history. The way Freedman asks questions to the reader, such as “would they be intimidated by fears of white retaliation?” and “could they persist with the car pool destroyed?” motivate and push the reader to read on to find the answer, to want to take action, to stand up, to become active in reading. The literary artistry of this text helps create an emotional and powerful experience in reading. The attractiveness of "Freedom Walkers" also commands emotions and power. The layout of riveting photographs and captions, as well as strong quotations and chapter titles, creates an enticed and engaged reader. The text size is not overwhelming and the chapters are short snippets of the timeline before, during, and after the boycott. As "Booklist’s" review states, “the photo-essay design is attractive and spacious. On every spread, readers will find beautifully reproduced black-and-white photos” (www.amazon.com). The faces of those who lived and walked during this historic boycott, from children to politicians to ministers to working women and men, adorn the pages of "Freedom Walkers" and entice the reader to find out more about these ordinary people who did something extraordinary. With the lives of Claudette Colvin, Jo Ann Robinson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and E. D. Nixon chronicled in this text, readers will want to read, do research, and dig deeper to find out more about these captivating figures. The creative integration of text and image creates an attractive and enticing text. "Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott" is a text that draws readers in, with excellence in writing and diversity, and reveals a story about a boycott that changed a nation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica LeBaron

    Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott (Bank Street College of Education Flora Stieglitz Straus Award Russell Freedman This chapter book details the Montgomery bus boycott that started in the 1950s. The book starts by explaining how African Americans were still very segregated at the time, and how the peaceful walks that occurred all came from something that started on a bus. Next, the book details the experience of JoAnne Robinson. JoAnne Robinson is an important person because Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott (Bank Street College of Education Flora Stieglitz Straus Award Russell Freedman This chapter book details the Montgomery bus boycott that started in the 1950s. The book starts by explaining how African Americans were still very segregated at the time, and how the peaceful walks that occurred all came from something that started on a bus. Next, the book details the experience of JoAnne Robinson. JoAnne Robinson is an important person because she was kicked off of a bus when she sat too near to the front (blacks were supposed to sit in the back), and then she went off and became the president of the Women’s Political Counsel and started advocating for black rights and the initial ideas of the bus boycott. The book also highlights Claudette Colvin, who was the first documented black person to refuse to move from a seat on the bus, even though she was technically sitting in the back of the bus where she was supposed to. She was arrested and found guilty of assault. E. D. Nixon, the founder of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, believed that Colvin was too weak to be the leader of the movement. Months later, another girl named Mary Louise Smith was arrested under the same circumstances, but Nixon felt the same way about her that he did with Colvin. On December 1st, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, and she was the perfect, strong candidate that Nixon was looking for. At the time, racial murders were very prominent and very horrifying, which made the boycott a bit daunting for black individuals. In order to spread the word, leaflets were printed telling black people not to ride the bus on December 5th, 1955 as a “protest of the arrest and trial” of Rosa Parks (Freedman, 35). This was when Martin Luther King Jr. came into the picture, which brought even more support for the movement because his speeches were so powerful. As the bus boycott went on, people were getting tired of walking everywhere instead of taking the bus, and other forms of transportation were wither not available or too expensive. In churches, people would try to boost each other up by naming people who were walking, and calling them “boycott heroes” (Freedman, 52). After a month of boycotts, the bus companies were going bankrupt and there was even more racial tension. Many people were arrested while helping with carpools that were available to boycotters. However, being arrested was regarded as a good thing to the boycotters, because it meant that they were being heard. MLKJ was found guilty in court of leading an illegal boycott, but eventually, Alabama declared segregation on busses unconstitutional, and things only went up from there in relation to legal equality. Unfortunately, once the boycott ended, there was a lot of racial violence because of people that were not happy with the desegregation. This book was entirely informational, with inset pictures from the time and events that were taking place, along with pictures of Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Claudette Colvin, and E. D. Nixon, as well as many others. It provides great information that a lot of kids definitely don’t usually learn in school. For example, the fact that Rosa Parks was not the first African American to refuse to give up her seat is not usually taught in schools. A lot of the violence, although it may be mentioned in classrooms, is not touched upon as well because of the extremity of it. This book made me think of research more than anything else, so some kids might get tired of it, while others may totally enjoy it. It really just depends on the person. However, I really enjoyed learning about the information that was provided. It really shows what African American communities went through during this time and how successful their efforts turned out to be.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Freedom Walkers Tags: Informational, black history month, Civil Rights, print form Summary Freedom Walkers is a very well written book for grade school students. It is a further look into the Montgomery bus boycott that took place in the 1950’s. Of course the author, Freedman, tells us about the well known participants in the civil rights movement such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks; but Freedman also presents not so well-known activist as well. He presents Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Freedom Walkers Tags: Informational, black history month, Civil Rights, print form Summary Freedom Walkers is a very well written book for grade school students. It is a further look into the Montgomery bus boycott that took place in the 1950’s. Of course the author, Freedman, tells us about the well known participants in the civil rights movement such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks; but Freedman also presents not so well-known activist as well. He presents Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Colvin, who I had never heard of before reading this book. Freedman explains why these characters and every boycotter were important to the civil right movement. In the beginning of the book there is a map of Montgomery, Alabama in 1955-1956. This gives students an idea of where the activists were walking to and how far they had to walk to get where they needed to go. Freedman discusses the Jim Crow laws and shows how unjust they were. The buses had been segregated and that no matter what the black people had to give up their seats for the whites. He tells how Rosa Parks didn’t want to give up her seat and how she was arrested. Also, Freedman discusses the hardships that boycotters faced, whether it was the KKK or the police. Although, he does not get too deep into the brutality that some blacks had faced, he still acknowledges that some activist gave their life for the cause. In the last chapters, Freedman discusses the resolution and the achievements of the civil rights movements. Response This book broadened my knowledge on the Montgomery bus boycott. I knew of Rosa Parks and her involvement in it, but hadn’t realized the others that played a major role in the boycott. I enjoyed learning about Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Colvin. I rate this book with 5 stars. It presents all six qualities needed for an outstanding book according to Temple, Martinez, and Yokota (TMY, 2010, p. 9). 1. Good books expand awareness. 2. Good books provide an enjoyable read that doesn’t overtly teach or moralize. 3. Good books tell the truth. 4. Good books embody quality. 5. Good books have integrity. 6. Good books show originality. Freedman expands awareness about what the boycotters had to endure for over a year when not taking the bus. The book also informs readers of not so popular people that were involved in making the movement a success. The integrity of the book is very helpful. The pictures throughout the book are enjoyable and add to the story that is being told. Classroom Connections I notice a few lesson plans that could be connected with this book. The first one is the map located on page xi. The students can take the map and figure out how far the walkers had to walk from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s house to E.D. Nixon’s house. This would give them better practice with maps and working with the scale. Also, for social studies the students can put together a timeline. This way they can better understand what happens first. This would, also, help visual learners learn the information in the book. Students could write a biography for the main characters in this book. This would give students a chance to practice their writing skills and research skills. Text Complexity: This book is a 1160 Lexile/GR level Z. Appropriate to read for grades 6 through 8. Grade equivalence of 8.6.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Guard

    Summary: In Montgomery, Alabama around the 1950's, segregation of whites and blacks was required under the Jim Crow Laws "separate but equal." Due to a white supremacy standpoint, blacks were forced to sit at the back of the bus, and if more whites boarded, they were forced to give up their seats. In some cases, the bus drivers would make the black passengers pay their bus fare and then walk around to get on through the back of the bus, so they did not pass the white passengers. It was not uncomm Summary: In Montgomery, Alabama around the 1950's, segregation of whites and blacks was required under the Jim Crow Laws "separate but equal." Due to a white supremacy standpoint, blacks were forced to sit at the back of the bus, and if more whites boarded, they were forced to give up their seats. In some cases, the bus drivers would make the black passengers pay their bus fare and then walk around to get on through the back of the bus, so they did not pass the white passengers. It was not uncommon for the bus drivers to drive away without them boarding. The black people of Montgomery were constantly walked over and mistreated on the public buses and throughout the rest of the community. Though there were a few instances that black passengers refused to give up their seats, Rosa Park's case ignited the Montgomery bus boycott. With the help of Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and many others, thousands of blacks joined together to nonviolently protest the injustices at hand by walking and finding their own means of transportation. The public bus transportation finds itself at the brink of bankruptcy, but those fighting for freedom through the boycott also face many challenges. On top of the Ku Klux Klan's determination to scare or discourage the blacks from continuing their protest, arrests are taken place, as well as court rulings that disable most of their transportation means (except for walking.) Response: EDCI 311 Connections: This is a piece of outstanding children's literature, deserving a 5/5 star rating. Showing integrity, honesty, quality, originality, and expanding awareness without overly teaching, this book meets all 6 qualifications for outstanding children's literature according to our text book (TMY, 2010, p.9). Personal Connections: I cannot imagine myself standing up to authority, like when Rosa Parks kindly refused to offer up her seat after approached by police officers. It takes courage to stand up for your beliefs, especially against authority. I loved that their cries were heard through their peaceful footsteps and nonviolence. I admire those protesting, because it takes even more strength to resist fighting back, especially the way their adversaries were treating them. Classroom Connections: This clearly would connect to a history lesson on the Jim Crow Laws and segregation, along with constitutional rights each individual has in America. It is important for the students to understand why we have been granted this freedom we share today, and to honor those who fought for our freedom of speech, desegregation, and rights to vote (etc.). A good visual for this lesson would be a timeline with important people, dates, and events that occured which ultimately lead to change. Text Complexity: (Found at www.scholastic.com/bookwizard) Lexile Level: 1110 L Guided Reading Level: Z Grade Level: 6th-11th Based on the lexile level, I think that this would be appropriate to introduce to 6th graders but expect 9th graders to read independently. 9th graders lexile levels typically range from 855 L to 1165L, with 1010 L falling directly in the center. I think that most 9th graders should be able to tackle this book without a problem. *lexile ranges found from www.lexile.com

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Plucinski

    Summary A time in history that changed the way we lived then to the way we live now. The Montgomery Bus Boycott changed the way we saw and treat people now. In the 1950’s segregation of whites and blacks was a major issue that many were trying to tackle. Black individuals had to attend separate schools, stores, their own drinking fountains, and when riding the bus they had to sit in the back and if a white individual got on and there were no seats the black individual had to give their seats up. Summary A time in history that changed the way we lived then to the way we live now. The Montgomery Bus Boycott changed the way we saw and treat people now. In the 1950’s segregation of whites and blacks was a major issue that many were trying to tackle. Black individuals had to attend separate schools, stores, their own drinking fountains, and when riding the bus they had to sit in the back and if a white individual got on and there were no seats the black individual had to give their seats up. This went on for years with no change, until a young man of Martin Luther King Jr., decided to help with the movement of civil rights for African Americans. Some individuals even decided to fight for what was right and not give up their seats on the buses which actually caused a fuss between other individuals in the towns and cities. One of these individuals name was Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat to a white individual because she knew she was following the rules of being in the black section of the bus. After all of the commotion, a boycott occurred that stated that all African American individuals who used a bus would/should walk or find other ways of transportation to get to and from where they are going. This boycott lasted over a year of fighting for what is right. In that year many were imprisoned, injured, killed, and the bus company even was facing bankruptcy. A hard fight was fought to achieve success and fairness between races. Response I gave this book 5 stars. The historical information that is in this book really helped me realize what many individuals had to face in their lifetime, to get us to equal rights today. In my eyes, I believe that this book achieved and had all 6 of the qualifications for an outstanding children’s literature (TMY, 2012, pg.9). Until this book I really had not even thought, heard of or wanted to read about this even in history. I was wrong because this time in history is extremely interesting and it is start of the life we live today with civil rights and racial segregation. It’s a book that shows individuals standing up in what they believe in, strength, love and fight, and the determination to have their voices all heard; while not fighting back. Classroom Connection While reading this book, you could have the classroom act out certain events that occurred during the Civil Rights movement. Children tend to learn better doing than just hearing. Another one could be learning, discussing, understanding and memorizing the speech “I have a Dream” by ML; which is one of the most memorable speeches in history to this date. Children could also do a little history on the Civil rights movement and find special and important people during that time period. Text Complexity This book has a lexile of 1110L and reading level of Z. Children can independently read this book from the grades of 6th grade to 12th grade. Now you could teach the children in 4th and 5th grade but I believe that the book might have to be read to the children so they could get a better understanding of what occurring in that time period of history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mandie Hill

    Freedom Walkers discusses the Montgomery bus boycott that occurred during the civil rights movements. The book starts out discussing a college professor named Jo Ann Robinson in 1949 who was forced and threatened to get off a Montgomery city bus by a white bus driver for sitting in the white-only section of the bus. Regardless if there were no white people present on the bus, black people were not allowed to sit there. As a member of the Women’s Political Council (WPC), she elected president the Freedom Walkers discusses the Montgomery bus boycott that occurred during the civil rights movements. The book starts out discussing a college professor named Jo Ann Robinson in 1949 who was forced and threatened to get off a Montgomery city bus by a white bus driver for sitting in the white-only section of the bus. Regardless if there were no white people present on the bus, black people were not allowed to sit there. As a member of the Women’s Political Council (WPC), she elected president the following year with the topic of bus segregation being the top issue she get handled. Although minor changes were asked to be made such as more bus stops in black neighborhoods and for the bus drivers to be more courteous, nothing serious really happened. That is until 1954 when the Supreme Court declared school segregation to be unconditional as Ms. Robinson wrote to the mayor of Montgomery demanding for conditions on the city buses to be improved. The famous citywide boycott began to be put into effect as members of the WPC started organizing it. Even though segregation was the law, forcing black people to give up seats in their area was an unstated practice from the bus company. In December of 1955, Rosa Parks was arrested after refusing to give up her seat in the black section of the bus to a white passenger. After being bailed out of jail, the WPC decided to write a protest letter and hold a one-day bus boycott. The boycott ended up being a success on the day of Ms. Parks’ trial. After being found guilty and fined $14, Martin Luther King Jr. and other black leaders formed the Montgomery Improvement Association where Mr. King was elected as president. Each of the protests were covered by the national press and money began to come in from outside sources. As the demands with bus company lawyers and city officials continued to be rejected, the protests continued to heighten. When the bus company announced to the public that it was close to bankruptcy in January of 1956, the city police began harassing and arresting for minor offenses including Martin Luther King Jr. This only inspired the boycotts to continue. In June of that same year a federal court declared bus segregation to be unconstitutional in the state of Alabama. In December, the bus integration order was put into effect and Martin Luther King Jr. was the first black man to ride on the day Montgomery bus segregation was put to an end. The rest of the book describes the lives of Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Jo Ann Robinson after the boycott including Martin Luther King’s assassination. This book did a terrific job at providing accurate facts and descriptions of everything that occurred during this time of the Montgomery bus boycotts. This would be a great book to use in classroom teaching as it help teach students about America’s history and the different forms of prejudice and racial discrimination that occurred and eventually overcome. Lessons can be taught and assignments can be made on different events that took place during the civil rights movement as well as research projects on key figures during this time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kyla C.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Freedom Walkers is a historical account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Written in a biography format, each chapter is dedicated to an individual who helped fuel the movement. First giving the reader background knowledge in the introduction about the history. Chapter after chapter new characters are introduced, Jo Ann Robinson, Claudette Colvin, and Rosa Parks. Then those who helped criminalize segregation. African Americans of Montgomery walked to and from work and school, everyday for over a ye Freedom Walkers is a historical account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Written in a biography format, each chapter is dedicated to an individual who helped fuel the movement. First giving the reader background knowledge in the introduction about the history. Chapter after chapter new characters are introduced, Jo Ann Robinson, Claudette Colvin, and Rosa Parks. Then those who helped criminalize segregation. African Americans of Montgomery walked to and from work and school, everyday for over a year. Unknown to them at the time, the Montgomery Bus Boycott would set off the United States Civil Rights Movement. Helping pass legislation prohibiting segregation in the state and across the south the Montgomery Bus Boycott was one of the world’s most publicized events in US history. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Being a huge history buff Freedom Walkers sparked my interest instantly. The Civil Rights Movement is one of the most fascinating topics in history. I knew about Rosa Parks and the role she played during the Montgomery Bus Boycott however I was unaware of the other woman before her. Not because I was naive to the fact that many people were treated badly but because she, Rosa, received most of the publicity. It was interesting to find out that there was a short documentary film called Claudette Who? Frankly, I think it’s ridiculous that many important people are left out of the history books. Claudette played a smaller roll but she fought furiously and deserves the credit she received in Freedom Walkers. I enjoyed the black and white photos within the text. It was nice putting a face to a name. The most shocking photo was on page 92. It was of a young man being attacked by a German shepherd. Other than the young man who was undoubtedly scared and hurt the only person who seemed as shocked as he was was an elderly woman in the background. The photo of Emmett Till was particularly sad because he had a promising future ahead of him. It’s disgustingly awful what his perpetrators did to him, worse, is that they got away with it and bragged about it. Martin Luther King, Jr. strongly believed that “we must meet hate with love” (p.66). Students may write a poem that extends the meaning of this quote to their daily lives and how to treat others. Classroom Connections Link: http://www.holidayhouse.com/docs/Free... This may be a good lesson in resolving social media and classroom bullying. Also it allows students to look within to find the right words about how they should be treated. Students may share their work to the class. By sharing their work they can make connections and comparisons. I bet they’ll find that most wish to be treated the same. According to Lexile.com and Scholastic.com, Freedom Walkers, range of text complexity is… Lexile: 1110L Interest Level: 6-8 Grade Level Equivalent: 6.8 DRA: 70 Guided Reading Level: Z

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tony Montez

    Summary This book was made to inform its readers on the Montgomery Bus Boycott. It begins with the old days where all busses were segregated and blacks were forced to sit in the back of the bus while whites got to sit in the front. There were also often occasions where all of the white seats were taken, so when more whites got on the bus, blacks were forced to give up their seats even if they were on the black side of the bus. This started causing problems and when women like Jo Ann Robinson and Summary This book was made to inform its readers on the Montgomery Bus Boycott. It begins with the old days where all busses were segregated and blacks were forced to sit in the back of the bus while whites got to sit in the front. There were also often occasions where all of the white seats were taken, so when more whites got on the bus, blacks were forced to give up their seats even if they were on the black side of the bus. This started causing problems and when women like Jo Ann Robinson and Claudette Colvin refused to move, this got the african community to begin standing up and making a push to end segregation. The lawyer was looking for a good case to begin the fight to end segregation and when Rosa Parks boarded the bus on December 1, 1955, this gave them the case they were looking for. The african community decided to boycott the buses until they got what they wanted, and because the african american community was the busses biggest clients, the boycott was working. Black all over began to walk everywhere and eventually led to organized carpools. The black community stuck together and boycotted the buss for over a year. Martin Luther King Jr. began his role in civil rights beginning with the bus boycott. This book covers his role and shows how he grew into the iconic symbol we all know him as today through the year of the boycott and eventually leading to his death on April 4, 1968. Reflection i rate this book 5 stars. Initially this would never be the type of book I would pick up on my own and choose to read, however I am glad that I did. it was a very informative book and I learned a lot about what the people had to go through to get what they deserve. To me this was a very inspiring story. To see they go through all the hardships they went through and to still remain un-violent was truly inspiring. I think this would be the perfect book for younger generations to read, because they are growing up in segregated worlds, and this book will not only show them what the world used to be like, but also teach them about working together and that you can achieve anything if you have the heart to work at it. I think that students can learn a great deal from reading a book like this. Classroom Connection I think with a book like this, I would have the children do a research report. For an older grade I would like them to pick either a person or an event related to the civil rights movement and research on it and write a report. I think doing something like this, then the children can expand their knowledge on the civil rights movement and learn a lot of new interesting facts. Above all that I would hope reading this and then the reports would show the children to appreciate the lives they were born into now and to enjoy everything they have in life. Text Complexity Lexile Measure 1110, Guided Reading Level Z, Grade Equivalence 8.6, Interest Level 6-8

  19. 5 out of 5

    Taneka

    Jim Crow laws in the South dictated the lives of blacks and whites, segregating them in all public facilities. On public buses blacks had to sit in the back and give up their seats to White passengers when the front seats were taken. After the arrest of Rosa Parks for not giving up her seat, Blacks began a boycott campaign to demand that the city of Montgomery provide better treatment of Black passengers. Blacks walked and carpooled for 381 days. They boycotted stores and the bus system. Legal a Jim Crow laws in the South dictated the lives of blacks and whites, segregating them in all public facilities. On public buses blacks had to sit in the back and give up their seats to White passengers when the front seats were taken. After the arrest of Rosa Parks for not giving up her seat, Blacks began a boycott campaign to demand that the city of Montgomery provide better treatment of Black passengers. Blacks walked and carpooled for 381 days. They boycotted stores and the bus system. Legal action was taken and the Supreme Court ruled that desegregation on the bus system was unconstitutional. The city of Montgomery desegregated the buses on December 21, 1956. This story highlights the events before, during and after the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama. I like learning information that has never been mentioned before. It was a treat to be introduced to people that participated in this historical event. I was a little shocked while reading some information. I did not know that Martin Luther King, Jr. was reluctant to lead the boycott campaign. From the readings, it seems like they caught him by surprise and he didn't realize what had happened until later. He was new to town and the events were moving really fast. I was also surprised to see that Rosa Parks was not the first woman to stand up to the drivers. Two teenagers, Claudette Colvin (15) and Mary Louise Smith (18) both were arrested prior to Parks. Young people were the first to exercise their rights and challenge the system. I was also amazed at how much organizing went into this event, especially since they did not plan for it. Another interesting thing was that they did not initially want to integrate the buses; they just wanted better treatment as passengers. This book is really a gem. The text is written in a straightforward style. The events are presented in chronological order, making it easy to follow. Readers will want to pursue the subject further. There are key figures of the Montgomery Bus Boycott that are not widely known. Two of the figures are teenagers and may pique the interest of younger readers due to their closeness in age. The book breaks the stereotype of the boycotters as trouble makers. Their tactic was nonviolent with a few angry moments that were brief, such as after the bombing of Martin Luther King, Jr. home while his wife and children were at home. It also portrays all Blacks, not just the maids and porters that sacrificed and gave of themselves for the movement. There are lawyers, college professors and Black businesses that participated or donated to the boycott. The most relevant and significant facts are being presented. There is a list of bibliographical resources listed and photographs of the events as they occurred are presented throughout the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Henna Patel

    Summary/Annotation: Freedom Walkers is a very informative book that talks about how African Americans boycotted against the unfair bus system that was happening in Montgomery, Alabama. There are different chapters that talk about famous African American who spoke up against the racial segregation that was happening at that time. Some of these famous people included Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. They walked the journey together for freedom because they couldn't take the unfair way societ Summary/Annotation: Freedom Walkers is a very informative book that talks about how African Americans boycotted against the unfair bus system that was happening in Montgomery, Alabama. There are different chapters that talk about famous African American who spoke up against the racial segregation that was happening at that time. Some of these famous people included Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. They walked the journey together for freedom because they couldn't take the unfair way society was treating them. They knew it was wrong and they had to do something about it. Response: As I was reading this book I was reminded of all the times I had learned about the Montgomery bus boycott throughout my school years. This was one of the important times in history that every student should be aware of. I remember how schools focused very much on the racial segregation throughout history. It's important that everyone learns to accept people for who they are and not judge them by the color of their skin. I think students need to be informed of all the hardships people went through fighting for their equal rights. I loved the pictures that were added to this book which were actual images of the time period. It helped me visualize how it really looked back then. Images of the important people through history helped me see their personalities. I really enjoyed reading this book because it refreshed my history and knowledge about the racial segregation. Classroom Connections: This book definitely has many uses for students within the classroom. This is a wonderful book to use as a language arts lesson as well as a great history lesson. The text is complex so I feel that this book can be introduced to students in fifth grade and higher. Students would be able to read this book and learn about the important people during the Civil Rights Movement. This book can be used as a way to teach them about what happened. I would also use this book to add to a lesson taught using the required textbooks. I think that students would be very engaged in the events that occurred through this book because the images provided can help the students visualize what happened. Through teachingbooks.net I also found a wonderful link that helps provide suggestions on what to discuss along with how to meet the common core standard with this text. I find this link very useful http://www.holidayhouse.com/docs/Free... Text Complexity: According to lexile.com the measure is 1110L. This book is appropriate for students between the ages 11 and 12 possibly higher. I think it's perfect for grades 5-7. It would be a good read aloud for third grade and higher and students should be reading this book independently by seventh grade. This book can be incorporated in many different lessons which would be very informative for the students.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenni Kemling

    Summary Freedom Walkers is a moving nonfiction book that explains in detail the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama from 1965-1966. It is not told from the point of view of any character but is told on third person narration. The central characters of the book are not fictional, but people who really lived through this time period. Such people were Martin Luther King JR., Rosa Parks, and Jo Ann Robinson. The story has a linear time line that starts with some of the first revolts against segregat Summary Freedom Walkers is a moving nonfiction book that explains in detail the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama from 1965-1966. It is not told from the point of view of any character but is told on third person narration. The central characters of the book are not fictional, but people who really lived through this time period. Such people were Martin Luther King JR., Rosa Parks, and Jo Ann Robinson. The story has a linear time line that starts with some of the first revolts against segregation. Each of the centralized real life characters tell what has happened to them in linear order to the timeline starting with Jo Ann. Each person then builds on top of one another to lead to the plots climax. This books themes of equality grow strong leading to the book from start to finish and leading to the abolishment of segregation. Response "We must fight hate with love.". This quote from the book said by Martin Luther King JR is my favorite in the book and almost any book i have. It is a very true statement that should be the standard for everybody on the planet and should especially be taught to children. It is a good line to use for bullying. If someone is mean to you you should not use hate to solve the problem, but love because sometimes that is all it takes to turn someone else's mind set around. This line moves me. This whole story moves me. It makes me more aware for the struggle for equality. It boggles my mind why there are still people who segregate and are racist. I would recommend they read this book and try to put themselves in the shoes of the effected people. It makes me want to do something, to spread awareness. Classroom Connection I would read this book during black history to spread awareness. I would have students find people who helped during the boycott or who were effected by it and have them research them and write a research paper. This will enhance students skills of finding integral good and justifiable works. It will also be able to enhance their writing skills and their knowledge of black history. Text Complexity This book has a lexile of 1100. It can be read aloud grades 6-8. It can be read independently by students sixth month of eighth grade. It has a guided reading level of Z.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Long

    Did you ever wonder if Rosa Parks was really the first to refuse to give up her seat on the bus that day? How did the Montgomery Boycott become so successful in improving the civil rights of African Americans in the south? In this informational book, we are walked chronological through what some may see as a spur of the moment event that would go down in history and give others the courage to stand up for what was right. In addition to a narrative about the events leading up to and through the M Did you ever wonder if Rosa Parks was really the first to refuse to give up her seat on the bus that day? How did the Montgomery Boycott become so successful in improving the civil rights of African Americans in the south? In this informational book, we are walked chronological through what some may see as a spur of the moment event that would go down in history and give others the courage to stand up for what was right. In addition to a narrative about the events leading up to and through the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the author, Russell Freedman, has selected moving photographs from the time period that enhance the message of the text. Freedman explains in detail the events many do not realize took place prior to Rosa Parks. She was of course not the first to ever refuse to give up her seat to a white person, and she wasn't any more tired than any other day she had got off of work. She was just tired of the treatment and had made a promise to herself that she would never comply again. She was even on a women's council for civil rights and had been active in the movement before. Also, there was another woman that refused to give up her seat prior to Rosa and was willing to fight the charges. Unfortunately, the leaders of the civil rights movement in that area did not feel she fit the part to be able to take on the publicity and win. Freedman continues the book by explained the boycott in great deal. He describes the well planned effort that was made to bring the public transportation to its knees and the lengths they went to in order to make that happen. People walked miles to work, others offered to taxi people for free, an extension carpool system was organized and implemented to ensure those that were willing to give up the buses still could live and work effectively. Many times the city tried to bargain with the leaders, but the held strong no matter what the city did to try and make their lives worse. In this story of bravery, strength, community and commitment, we truly start to understand what had to take place to make the story of the bus boycott so infamous and successful.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Austin Finley

    Im not really a fan of non-fiction books and never really have been. I like books with action and adventure and non-fiction books don't really have that unless its a war book or something in that genre. This book was decent but very intriguing. The authors purpose of this book was to really tell the story of the segregation and the ways it changed most people ways lives in that day of age. They wanted the readers such as me to visualize what went on during that time period and how the African Am Im not really a fan of non-fiction books and never really have been. I like books with action and adventure and non-fiction books don't really have that unless its a war book or something in that genre. This book was decent but very intriguing. The authors purpose of this book was to really tell the story of the segregation and the ways it changed most people ways lives in that day of age. They wanted the readers such as me to visualize what went on during that time period and how the African Americans felt. This book is overall about segregation and stories told of cases that African Americans were treated poorly and discriminated. The authors theme of this book is, no matter what color you are, no matter how you look, no matter how big or small you are, you should never be looked down upon and discriminated just because a color of your skin. This theme is a good fit for this book because this book tells the stories of discriminated people who were looked down upon and treated down upon because of there color and difference. My opinion is that this book really tells the stories of hurt people and its a good one too because it shows people how others should be treated. This book was written to describe what happened back then and what it felt like to actually be there. This book was written to explain a specific time so the book was description. In this book you really feel like your are there first hand and you can imagine what is actually going on at the time. While reading this book I could really feel and imagine what was going on at the time and could kind of sense how it felt to be there. Im not a big fan of non-fiction but mostly enjoyed this book for the most part. I liked how the book was very descriptive and vivid and you could sense what was going on. What I disliked about this book was that Im not a big fan of this topic I read so I wasn't fully committed to this book until I got further on in the book. I wouldn't really change anything about this book and its not really similar to anything I've read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ciara Alamillo

    Summary Freedom Walker is a book of the different stories of the different civil right leaders. Some issues that this book talks about is how the bus boycott started the different steps people took to try and solve the issue of segregation on the buses, how racism and segregation can affect people’s lives and how it wasn’t fair. This book describes how Rosa Park was sitting in the “Black” assigned area on the bus and when the “white” assigned area was filled up the African Americans had to give u Summary Freedom Walker is a book of the different stories of the different civil right leaders. Some issues that this book talks about is how the bus boycott started the different steps people took to try and solve the issue of segregation on the buses, how racism and segregation can affect people’s lives and how it wasn’t fair. This book describes how Rosa Park was sitting in the “Black” assigned area on the bus and when the “white” assigned area was filled up the African Americans had to give up their seat to let the white people sit down. When she refused to get up, she was arrested. This case was a great one to challenge the Jim Crow laws because to the African Americans these were unconstitutional. So when all the civil rights leaders got together they thought of a plan to get what they deserved, to be treated like everyone else. Response This is a great book to share with students because it shows are history. Even though this was a bad part of our history, it still needs to be reviewed and taught. This could be a great way to show students that we learn from our mistakes even if they are really bad ones. This book deserves 5 starts because it actually shows you the words of all the people highlighted in the book. Some of the people that you probably didn’t even know were part of this movement. Another great thing about the book is that it gives pictures of all the people and objects which makes it more real for the reader. Classroom Connection Obviously, you could connect this book to a history lesson on the civil rights movement. By watching movies on this topic or even reading more stories about this topic would bring the lesson more real for the students. You can also bring up that the use of non-violent protesting can actually work and not everything that you want has to be fought in an aggressive way. Text Complexity This book is a 1110 Lexile/GR level is Z.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Smith

    This book is about the historical event of the bus boycott. We all learned about this when we were in elementary school but we were never really told the story the way this book tells it. There are so many unknown facts in this book that we believe to be true. For example Rosa Parks was not the first woman to refuse to give up her seat, Claudette Colvin was. This book teaches you so many things that after this book I found myself rattling off random facts to everyone! It really tells the behind This book is about the historical event of the bus boycott. We all learned about this when we were in elementary school but we were never really told the story the way this book tells it. There are so many unknown facts in this book that we believe to be true. For example Rosa Parks was not the first woman to refuse to give up her seat, Claudette Colvin was. This book teaches you so many things that after this book I found myself rattling off random facts to everyone! It really tells the behind the scenes story that we were either too young to hear or just did not want to know. As I was reading I was actually getting more and more upset about what happened so long ago. I read this book thinking that I wouldn’t learn anything new but as always books surprise me. I gave this book 5 stars because it was so unexpectedly good. I never thought I would actually learn anything new from this book or that this book would evoke such emotion from me. I love history and thought that I knew most of the stories from the bus boycott but I was so wrong! There were so many untold stories in the book along with the pictures. The stories in this book alone will make anyone upset, yes I’ll admit some even made me cry. It is just so upsetting to think that anyone can actually do that to an actual human being. After paying for the bus it’s bad enough you have to get off and go through the back door, but having the bus driver drive away before you can get on after you paid is just wrong. The classroom connection for this book would obviously be a history lesson. I would have the students put on a skit like they were on the actual bus. We would then hold a trial and they would decide if they should actually go to jail or not for not giving up their seats. This will show the students how crazy the situation was back then that people were being beaten and thrown in jail just because they refused to move seats. Lexile 1110L, Grade level: 3-5, Guided Reading: Z, DRA: 70-80

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maxzine Rossler

    Freedom Walkers is an informational book about the Montgomery Bus Boycott that takes you back in time to one of the most memorable times in history. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was the beginning of African Americans fighting for their rights and standing up to stop the separation of races on buses. This book adds interesting photos to help guide the reader to the main points of history and who was involved. People were separated by race from the moment they were born to the moment they were buried Freedom Walkers is an informational book about the Montgomery Bus Boycott that takes you back in time to one of the most memorable times in history. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was the beginning of African Americans fighting for their rights and standing up to stop the separation of races on buses. This book adds interesting photos to help guide the reader to the main points of history and who was involved. People were separated by race from the moment they were born to the moment they were buried in segregated cemeteries. This book shares information that is not commonly taught in schools. This book goes into detail about who was really the first person to take a stand about seating on the bus. This book speaks about very important people in the history of desegregation, and the heroes that got us to where we are today. This book really tested my knowledge on the Montgomery Bus Boycott. Before reading this book I thought that Rosa Parks was the first person to stand up for anything. This could just be lack of education growing up or it could be because we focus solely on Rosa Parks that we forget about others involved. This book made me realize that there is so much more to know about the boycott then just Rosa Parks. This book would be a really good book to read together as a class. As a teacher I would assign readings as homework and then have class discussions about the reading. This will open up opinions of the students and they will have the opportunity to share their thoughts and feelings on the topic. At the end I would have them do some type of project with different activities that they will be able to choose from to further test their knowledge on the boycott, using the book as a reference. This book had a lexile score of 1110L which means that this would be a good read aloud for third grade and up, and kids should be reading this book independently by middle of seventh grade.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Freedom Walkers: The story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott is about the year long struggle that started in 1955 as part of the Civil Rights Movement. The book is about the Montgomery Bus Boycott that helped end segregation of public transportation. The book starts with an excerpt about JoAnn Robinson and her experience on a public bus. Claudete Colvin, fifteen at the time, refused to give up her seat on a crowded bus and was arrested. Later she was found guilty of assault in a juvenile court. A fe Freedom Walkers: The story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott is about the year long struggle that started in 1955 as part of the Civil Rights Movement. The book is about the Montgomery Bus Boycott that helped end segregation of public transportation. The book starts with an excerpt about JoAnn Robinson and her experience on a public bus. Claudete Colvin, fifteen at the time, refused to give up her seat on a crowded bus and was arrested. Later she was found guilty of assault in a juvenile court. A few months later Mary Louise Smith refused to give up her seat just as Colvin had. On December 1, 1955 Rosa Parks boarded a bus. Parks refused to give up her seat and was sent to jail. E.D. Nixon asked Parks if she would be willing to fight the charges against her. Parks decision to fight started the boycott. On the morning of December 5, Martin Luther King Jr. looked out his window and saw that the bus was empty, the boycott had started. Park’s trial to ten minutes and she was found guilty. Fred Gray, Park’s attorney, appealed. This was the first step in challenging bus segregation in federal court. A giant carpool system was put in to motion so no one would have to catch a bus. In January the bus company announced that it was close to bankruptcy. Soon the leaders of the boycott were being targeted, with Robinson’s car being burned by acid. Park’s case was thrown out of court on a technicality. City officials asked the state court for an injunction banning car pools. It went to the Supreme Court and 381 days after the boycott began Montgomery desegregated its buses as part of the new law. It was not until years later that the Jim Crow laws were disbanded that the Civil Rights Movement came to an end. It took the work of many people to make the boycott a success with each person making sacrifices for the greater good.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jamaica

    Blacks had to sit in the back of the bus and sometimes even give up their seats to a white passenger. Inequality is an understatement of how the people in this described in this book went through. Leadership and faith gets this group of people through a gruesome 13 months of finding alternate ways to work. People knew their personally and family safety was at risk but the boycott was long overdue. It was time to show the world that they were wanted reasonable revisions to the busing policy. Mr. Blacks had to sit in the back of the bus and sometimes even give up their seats to a white passenger. Inequality is an understatement of how the people in this described in this book went through. Leadership and faith gets this group of people through a gruesome 13 months of finding alternate ways to work. People knew their personally and family safety was at risk but the boycott was long overdue. It was time to show the world that they were wanted reasonable revisions to the busing policy. Mr. King, E.D. Nixon and Rosa Parks are only a few of the historical figures mentioned in this book. Their role in the movement is mapped out in an easy to read and enjoyable format. History can be boring at times but when I read this I enjoyed it and I think kids would be interested in this topic. The book emphasizes the organization of the people who lead the boycott. It also emphasized the diligence of those who were harassed. I think the book would create role models for young readers and that is why I liked this book. It wasn’t just facts or narration of one person; it showed every one’s role and the importance of it. Teamwork. This is a topic elementary teachers focus on the most. For my class I could use it to facilitate a research project. For research they could find other events in the civil rights movement, find a newspaper clip or other books about the bus boycott, or focus on one person who participated and explain the importance of what they did. I would also like to use it in a project. For the project I would put the students into groups and make them write a plan on how they would organize a boycott. As I said, the book emphasized the organization it took to pull it off. Each group would have to create their own plans and present them to the class. This book is 1160L and GR level Z . Students in the 8th grade would be interested in this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Coral Bachen

    Opening with a map of Montgomery, Alabama, 1955-1956, Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott makes some of the most significant moments of the Civil Rights Movement accessible to young readers. My personal favorite part of this book is the photography. I have never seen some of these photos, though I have learned about Bus Boycott in the past. I found that to be refreshing. I also liked the format of the book as a whole; giving each important figure from the Boycotts his/her ow Opening with a map of Montgomery, Alabama, 1955-1956, Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott makes some of the most significant moments of the Civil Rights Movement accessible to young readers. My personal favorite part of this book is the photography. I have never seen some of these photos, though I have learned about Bus Boycott in the past. I found that to be refreshing. I also liked the format of the book as a whole; giving each important figure from the Boycotts his/her own chapter and putting everything together like a story instead of the hard facts Social Studies textbooks present. This makes learning more engaging and I appreciated that. As a reader, I felt connected to the people involved with the Boycotts. Parts of this book get emotionally and put this era into perspective for someone (like me) who has never experienced such harsh segregation. I found the quotes from the heroes to make their stories come alive; I got a greater understanding reading from their points of view than I would have if Freedman hadn’t written the way he did here. As a teacher, I would use this in conjunction with a Social Studies class, in middle school grades. I can see myself teaching this in a Jigsaw activity (each group of students is assigned a particular person/section from the book to become “experts” and teach the rest of the class). Additionally, if there weren’t enough time to do full-fledged curriculum for this book, I would take the photographs and have students investigate the emotions they can interpret. This is absolutely a good bridge into teaching Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech as well as other Civil Rights literature.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Myhiah

    -Audience: Intermediate -Genre: Historical Fiction Discussion Questions: REMEMBER: Who were the main characters? -The main characters in this book were Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks. UNDERSTAND: What was the main idea? -The main idea was to share the story of the Montgomery boycott in Alabama. To share what blacks were going through in that time period and what they had to do in order to gain equality. APPLYING: Think of a situation that occurred in the story and explain what you would ha -Audience: Intermediate -Genre: Historical Fiction Discussion Questions: REMEMBER: Who were the main characters? -The main characters in this book were Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks. UNDERSTAND: What was the main idea? -The main idea was to share the story of the Montgomery boycott in Alabama. To share what blacks were going through in that time period and what they had to do in order to gain equality. APPLYING: Think of a situation that occurred in the story and explain what you would have done? -If I was in Rosa Parks shoes, I would have done what she did on the bus too. I don’t think that I would have had the ability and strength like she did to take the case to a higher court knowing what some of the consequences could have been for her and her family members. ANALYZING: What was the most exciting part? -The most excited part of this story was when the Supreme Court ruled that Alabama’s bus segregation laws were unconstitutional. This is what they had been fighting for, for 13 months! EVALUATING: Would you recommend this book to other readers? Why or why not? -I would definitely recommend this book to other readers. This book talks not only about the Montgomery boycott in Alabama, but it gives great information on what was going on during that time period with segregation. This book tells an important story that all Americans should know and they tell the story in a way that keeps readers wanting to read! CREATING: How could you improve on how the book was written? -To improve this book and make it more appealing to readers like me, I would have made the book a bit lengthier. This would include a few more pictures and more detail about different activities that occurred in the story.

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