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For years, people have been asking Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel, the brash, outspoken, and fiercely loyal eldest brother in the Emanuel clan, the same question: What did your mom put in the cereal? Middle brother Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, erstwhile White House chief of staff, and one of the most colorful figures in American politics. Youngest brother Ari is a Hollywood supe For years, people have been asking Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel, the brash, outspoken, and fiercely loyal eldest brother in the Emanuel clan, the same question: What did your mom put in the cereal? Middle brother Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, erstwhile White House chief of staff, and one of the most colorful figures in American politics. Youngest brother Ari is a Hollywood super-agent, the real-life model for the character of Ari Gold on the hit series Entourage. And Zeke himself, whom the other brothers consider to be the smartest of them all, is one of the world’s leading bioethicists and oncologists, and a former special advisor for health policy in the Obama administration. How did one family of modest means produce three such high-achieving kids? Here, for the first time, Zke provides the answer. Set amid the tumult of Chicago in the 1960s and 1970s, Brothers Emanuel recounts the intertwined histories of these three rambunctious, hypercompetitive Jewish American boys, each with his own unique and compelling life story. But ultimately, this is the story of the entire Emanuel family: the tough, colorful Old World grandparents; a mischievous, loving father who immigrated to the United States with twenty-five dollars and who enthralled his boys with tales of his adventures in Israel’s war for independence; and a proud, politically engaged mother who took the boys with her to rallies and protests - including a civil rights march through the streets of Chicago led by Martin Luther King himself. Even as the Emanuels distinguished themselves as individuals, the bond of brotherhood that tied them together was never broken. Brothers Emanuel is a wry, rollicking, and often poignant narrative of how one American family succeeded in raising three extraordinary children.


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For years, people have been asking Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel, the brash, outspoken, and fiercely loyal eldest brother in the Emanuel clan, the same question: What did your mom put in the cereal? Middle brother Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, erstwhile White House chief of staff, and one of the most colorful figures in American politics. Youngest brother Ari is a Hollywood supe For years, people have been asking Ezekiel “Zeke” Emanuel, the brash, outspoken, and fiercely loyal eldest brother in the Emanuel clan, the same question: What did your mom put in the cereal? Middle brother Rahm is the mayor of Chicago, erstwhile White House chief of staff, and one of the most colorful figures in American politics. Youngest brother Ari is a Hollywood super-agent, the real-life model for the character of Ari Gold on the hit series Entourage. And Zeke himself, whom the other brothers consider to be the smartest of them all, is one of the world’s leading bioethicists and oncologists, and a former special advisor for health policy in the Obama administration. How did one family of modest means produce three such high-achieving kids? Here, for the first time, Zke provides the answer. Set amid the tumult of Chicago in the 1960s and 1970s, Brothers Emanuel recounts the intertwined histories of these three rambunctious, hypercompetitive Jewish American boys, each with his own unique and compelling life story. But ultimately, this is the story of the entire Emanuel family: the tough, colorful Old World grandparents; a mischievous, loving father who immigrated to the United States with twenty-five dollars and who enthralled his boys with tales of his adventures in Israel’s war for independence; and a proud, politically engaged mother who took the boys with her to rallies and protests - including a civil rights march through the streets of Chicago led by Martin Luther King himself. Even as the Emanuels distinguished themselves as individuals, the bond of brotherhood that tied them together was never broken. Brothers Emanuel is a wry, rollicking, and often poignant narrative of how one American family succeeded in raising three extraordinary children.

30 review for Brothers Emanuel: A Memoir of an American Family

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    One of three famous brothers, the author attempts to explain this abundance of success in a single family with this memoir. In all, it certainly wasn't anything mom "put in the cereal" but simply an early and constant emphasis on speaking one's mind, even to the extent of being pushy or aggressive, something Emanuel admits sometimes served as a double-edged sword. There are some interesting stories regarding his parents and their respective backgrounds, including emigrating from a burgeoning Isr One of three famous brothers, the author attempts to explain this abundance of success in a single family with this memoir. In all, it certainly wasn't anything mom "put in the cereal" but simply an early and constant emphasis on speaking one's mind, even to the extent of being pushy or aggressive, something Emanuel admits sometimes served as a double-edged sword. There are some interesting stories regarding his parents and their respective backgrounds, including emigrating from a burgeoning Israel and participating in civil rights activism, and a smattering of tales regarding Rahm's work on Clinton's first presidential campaign. Details regarding the author's health-care policies, or brother Rahm's tenure under Obama or his current position as mayor of a besieged Chicago, or brother Ari's illustrious Tinseltown career, are left out, presumably for their own books. The audio version is narrated by Emanuel, whose nasally voice recalls the nerdy Wesley in that film classic Midnight Madness, but it actually makes this illustrious man of medicine a bit more relatable and endearing, something he seemed to have struggled with while growing up due to his abrasive "Emanuel" manner.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shira Reiss

    This is a story mainly about 3 brothers and their family in the 1950’s growing up in Chicago. The story captured the era of the Viet Nam War, MLK & Civil Rights, growing up as Jews in America, the exodus to suburbia, the role and expectation of mothers who mainly focused on “being a housewife” and even on the young state of Israel. Written intelligently by one of the brothers in an open, honest and direct manner, this memoir is a delightful read that I recommend. I loved it and was sad at the en This is a story mainly about 3 brothers and their family in the 1950’s growing up in Chicago. The story captured the era of the Viet Nam War, MLK & Civil Rights, growing up as Jews in America, the exodus to suburbia, the role and expectation of mothers who mainly focused on “being a housewife” and even on the young state of Israel. Written intelligently by one of the brothers in an open, honest and direct manner, this memoir is a delightful read that I recommend. I loved it and was sad at the end for I wanted more. As a baby boomer who is the same age as the author, I admired the values; social conscience, education and love that was instilled.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mukeary

    This was a curious memoir by one of the three brothers Emanuel, the more famous being Rahm, the current mayor of Chicago. Curious because the author's deep love for and devotion to his two younger brothers comes through loud and clear as does his loyalty to and affection for his parents. These deeply held feelings are a curious paradox juxtaposed with his description of his parents' marriage and their mother's withdrawls into icy anger. This was a curious memoir by one of the three brothers Emanuel, the more famous being Rahm, the current mayor of Chicago. Curious because the author's deep love for and devotion to his two younger brothers comes through loud and clear as does his loyalty to and affection for his parents. These deeply held feelings are a curious paradox juxtaposed with his description of his parents' marriage and their mother's withdrawls into icy anger.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    Lightweight memoir by a seemingly arrogant man from an obnoxious family. Just my opinion. Read by the author who acknowledges his annoying voice. Not a pleasant listen. Not a pleasant picture of the three Emanuel brothers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    نسترنّگار

    I came upon this title when I was reading about Rahm Emmanuel, the former mayor of Chicago and noticed that his brother has had a distinguished career in medicine but I was a bit disappointed by his self-congratulatory and obnoxious tone throughout the book. I did enjoy the parts about his childhood, though.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan Bazzett-Griffith

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. If this hadn't been a giveaway book, i would probably have rated it only two stars, but decided to give it three because I could find no faults with the writing or story itself; I just could not immerse myself in this memoir at all. I found the author and his family history surprisingly uninteresting, considering as adults they have all become exceptional professionals. I also put the book down for a time because after reading a passage around pages I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. If this hadn't been a giveaway book, i would probably have rated it only two stars, but decided to give it three because I could find no faults with the writing or story itself; I just could not immerse myself in this memoir at all. I found the author and his family history surprisingly uninteresting, considering as adults they have all become exceptional professionals. I also put the book down for a time because after reading a passage around pages 35-40 about the author's father, I found myself rather irritated by both the "character"/person of the Emanuel patriarch, and his son's lackadaisical amusement when he describes how his father (and his father's friends) basically molested a young woman whom they tricked into thinking they could make her breasts larger by massaging moisturizer into them-- with their own hands, of course. I literally had to put the book away after that because that anecdote was thrown in with no apology or recognition that it was such a foul and objectifying offense. Once I finally picked the book back up, I tried to read it objectively. Zeke Emanuel is a solid writer, and the memoir was well-written, if long-winded at times. I had trouble connecting to their family, other than their mother, whom I often felt somewhat sorry for when reading his descriptions of her desire for a career and her life surrounded by boys and men who were all somewhat chauvinistic (following their father's example), but usually not so blatantly so as in that previous anecdote mentioned. I could tell that their family was close, that the brothers' bond was exceptional, and that their parents loved them very much, so in that way, the memoir was successful. Overall, though, I found the author/narrator rather arrogant and condescending, which made the book less than pleasant to read in parts. He does seem to acknowledge some of these character flaws in the later chapters and claims he has worked to mellow them, and for the sake of his wife and children, I hope that is true.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mom2nine

    I have studied how children learn for decades and this type of book is normally of interest. The only reason that I kept reading is because I received the book through the goodreads contest and wanted to give a fair review. After the first 30 pages of repeatedly reading about how demanding and difficult his mom's world was with two and then three little boys; then how many sacrifices she made to feed and clothe her children on limited (a doctor's) wages. Ah yes, the liberal mantra that bad food I have studied how children learn for decades and this type of book is normally of interest. The only reason that I kept reading is because I received the book through the goodreads contest and wanted to give a fair review. After the first 30 pages of repeatedly reading about how demanding and difficult his mom's world was with two and then three little boys; then how many sacrifices she made to feed and clothe her children on limited (a doctor's) wages. Ah yes, the liberal mantra that bad food is cheaper than healthy food, not so from my decades of experience feeding many. Sorry, but as a mom to nine, with six boys, I couldn't take it very seriously, either the massive exuberance of three boys or the massive food to feed three children. His stories about his parents made them seem arrogant, always in the right, never trust authority. Interesting, considering they would all become that authority. Condi Rice's tribute to her parents, including their place in the race wars was far better written and even handed. Emanuel believes that his father "depended on his considerable charm and humor to get him out of jams." Also, that he passed on to his boys his disregard for social formalities and niceties. It is good that the boys have such respect for their father, but I missed it, as he didn't seem likeable to me. Their "aggressive, free-form style of relating might strike an outsider as obnoxious", possibly would also be how they "won" many debates, as most people want the profanity and aggression to just stop. I grew up in Milwaukee about the same time period that they were living in Chicago, so I really expected to feel some connection to his story. If this is the attitude that it takes to be at the peak of success in our society, then it is not the direction I hope for my children.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James

    Very revealing insight into the background of these three brothers and their family history and dynamics. Certainly many will read it because of the middle Emanuel brother and they will be rewarded with an understanding that few have. I recommend this as a necessary read for anyone with an opinion or interest in the current mayor of Chicago - whether you hate him, love him, or cover him. (For instance, I recently saw a critique of Rahm that called him "a child of privilege." Sure he was - if liv Very revealing insight into the background of these three brothers and their family history and dynamics. Certainly many will read it because of the middle Emanuel brother and they will be rewarded with an understanding that few have. I recommend this as a necessary read for anyone with an opinion or interest in the current mayor of Chicago - whether you hate him, love him, or cover him. (For instance, I recently saw a critique of Rahm that called him "a child of privilege." Sure he was - if living in an Uptown apartment where he shared a bedroom rats sometimes ran through - with two brothers is living in "privilege.") If you're going to have an opinion of someone, you should learn something about them first. Perhaps the only thing I didn't like about Ezekiel Emanuel's writing was the psychological analysis he offers of his family members - especially his mother and father. In the end though, it's a really good picture of three highly driven, energetic, passionate, foul-mouthed, loud, relentless, sharp-elbowed men with different talents and challenges, who each found great success in their respective fields.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Les

    This book tells the story of a great Jewish family which stared in the 1950's in Chicago. We read about the three boys growing up amid the antisemitism of a suburbs of Chicago. The Father Benjamin was a a pediatrician. Marsha, his mother was a house wife. She was also a social activist. She was involved in Core and other social issues and seeing people elected in public office. This book brings to life all the problems families had in the fifty's in raising three sons. We witness the workings of This book tells the story of a great Jewish family which stared in the 1950's in Chicago. We read about the three boys growing up amid the antisemitism of a suburbs of Chicago. The Father Benjamin was a a pediatrician. Marsha, his mother was a house wife. She was also a social activist. She was involved in Core and other social issues and seeing people elected in public office. This book brings to life all the problems families had in the fifty's in raising three sons. We witness the workings of a great family. We also see that Ari, the youngest son struggle with dyslexia. At that time no one new about this and ADHD which he also had. He became a great talent agent. Rahm became the mayor of Chicago and the author became a bioethics doctor and a teacher at Harvard and also worked in hospitals. You don't need to be a Republican or Democrat or NRP to enjoy this book. It is about a family living in the fifty's. The only thing that was left out of the book was about their young sister, Shoshana that was bore in 1973.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did. If it wasn't for living near Chicago, I most likely would never have read this book. Middle brother, Rahm is mayor of Chicago and like most politicians, he is not the most upstanding guy: I think that is inherent to almost anyone who is in politics and otherwise, I like him. I found the story of the three brothers: Zeke, Rahm, and Avi very interesting and in some aspects surprising. All 3 brothers grew up in a middle-class Jew I was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did. If it wasn't for living near Chicago, I most likely would never have read this book. Middle brother, Rahm is mayor of Chicago and like most politicians, he is not the most upstanding guy: I think that is inherent to almost anyone who is in politics and otherwise, I like him. I found the story of the three brothers: Zeke, Rahm, and Avi very interesting and in some aspects surprising. All 3 brothers grew up in a middle-class Jewish family and became successful, each in very different fields: Zeke in medicine, Rahm in politics and Avi as a talent agent in Hollywood. I enjoyed this and am glad I chose to listen to this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    A fascinating story that I could not put down. I felt like I was a fly on the wall. What a way to grow up!

  12. 5 out of 5

    catherine

    meh. competent memoir, familiar sibling dynamic, but i don't really care. most interesting parts were about the family history and visits to israel as a burgeoning state. meh. competent memoir, familiar sibling dynamic, but i don't really care. most interesting parts were about the family history and visits to israel as a burgeoning state.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Caldwell

    I so enjoyed this 1960's Jewish American family true story. Mom was a civil rights activist/father a pediatric doctor- fun tales of their 3 boys growing up. Ea son successful a Hollywood Gru, a Chicago Mayor and one an oncologist/health/policy advisor. I so enjoyed this 1960's Jewish American family true story. Mom was a civil rights activist/father a pediatric doctor- fun tales of their 3 boys growing up. Ea son successful a Hollywood Gru, a Chicago Mayor and one an oncologist/health/policy advisor.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I think what put me off the most was the seemingly prideful way Emmanuel wrote about how all the brothers not only were verbally aggressive but physically, as well. He was open about their flaws, however, but it still left a bad taste in my mouth.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mairead Rochford

    Fascinating men and a beautiful story of family, values and education.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Beal

    This was such an interesting peek into the lives of this family living in Chicago in the 60-70s.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lenny

    A lot of very entertaining and emotionally moving memories by one of the Emanuel brothers. Very well written!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alyson

    I received this as a promotional copy through the Good Reads First Reads program. This is a fascinating look inside a middle class family in the 2nd half of the 20th century, that just happened to produce 3 driven and ultimately powerful sons. Zeke Emanuel successfully depicts his early life positively, while still being honest about the family's flaws. For myself, I would have appreciated a little more of a linear structure. The book, roughly, takes you from Rahm's birth through to present day, I received this as a promotional copy through the Good Reads First Reads program. This is a fascinating look inside a middle class family in the 2nd half of the 20th century, that just happened to produce 3 driven and ultimately powerful sons. Zeke Emanuel successfully depicts his early life positively, while still being honest about the family's flaws. For myself, I would have appreciated a little more of a linear structure. The book, roughly, takes you from Rahm's birth through to present day, however it jumps back and forward enough that I at times it got a little confusing. It would have been a smoother ride if Zeke had chosen one structure (linear, thematic, character) for the memoir and stuck with it. As it is it seems to be trying to do all three simultaneously and at times is a bit disjointed. Zeke was the least sympathetic of the three brothers, in my opinion. It is hard to draw your own character, flaws and accomplishments, without sounding either self-deprecating or boastful. Zeke never came across as self-deprecating. To the contrary, he recounted stories that should have been embarrassing or (at times) shameful in a way that suggested he learned nothing from the experience. Instead he at one point said that while he recognized his behavior was bad, he would not change it or learn from it. It was hard to sympathize with a character (especially a real-life character) that refused to try and improve his shortcomings. I do, though, give him major props for being so honest about his lack-of desire to change. Overall the book was enlightening, and was a peek inside a new and interesting world that I have little experience in/knowledge of. Was it biased? Of course, it's a memoir. Could it have used some extra editing to make it flow better? Yes. Was it an enjoyable and captivating read? Absolutely.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    As a Chicagoan, of course I mostly wanted to hear about Rahm. Zeke does a great job of pacing the important contextual elements that make the focuses on him when they do arrive, more meaningful than if he had just satisfied my impulses. Along the way, honestly- the drive and passion for justice in this family is pretty amazing. I appreciated that they were honest about how their commitment to justice was sometimes overblown due to hereditary stubbornness bordering on entitlement. (Can justice be As a Chicagoan, of course I mostly wanted to hear about Rahm. Zeke does a great job of pacing the important contextual elements that make the focuses on him when they do arrive, more meaningful than if he had just satisfied my impulses. Along the way, honestly- the drive and passion for justice in this family is pretty amazing. I appreciated that they were honest about how their commitment to justice was sometimes overblown due to hereditary stubbornness bordering on entitlement. (Can justice be entitled? Hmmm....) I think it would have been tempting to have crafted 300-pages of "O'Doyle Rules!" which mercifully, Zeke does not, in favor of a more challenging yet more authentic and enjoyable path. My favorite part of the book was reading about Dr. King's visit to Chicago and the family's participation in it. Pretty mind-blowing. I picked up this read under the guise of being a loyal Chicagoan, but really it made me prouder to be an American- this is a great genre/ethnic/neighborhood/racial/time transcending doc that is representative of those only possible in this country.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    a really fascinating read about the childhood of three very successful brothers: a doctor, current mayor of chicago and famous hollywood agent (entourage's ari gold). they were really lucky to have such a close and supportive family. i loved how his mother took them to civil rights protests. their mom really sacrificed a lot to raise them. she got passed over to go to college because they could only afford to send one child, her brother, and then she spent the rest of her life raising them. zeke a really fascinating read about the childhood of three very successful brothers: a doctor, current mayor of chicago and famous hollywood agent (entourage's ari gold). they were really lucky to have such a close and supportive family. i loved how his mother took them to civil rights protests. their mom really sacrificed a lot to raise them. she got passed over to go to college because they could only afford to send one child, her brother, and then she spent the rest of her life raising them. zeke alludes a bit to the resentment she felt and it would really be interesting to hear everything from her point of view. zeke says something about how the hallmark of a good parent is when your kids dont need you anymore, that they grow up to be successful and independent people. it sounds like his mom struggled with this a bit. she devoted so much to them and was shocked when they pulled away from her. the stories are sometimes a bit disjointed but still very interesting. i also enjoyed learning about the zionist movement and the history of israel.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

    Two and a half stars really ... Interesting family. I picked this book up from a discount bin, when I found myself without a book at an airport. Definitely a Tiger Mom, with a strong political conscious ruled this unruly household. The youngest brother, Ari, states "I loved my Mother, but not sure I liked her." In this wildly competitive and verbally aggressive household, its not surprising that each brother chose a different profession - their own corner of the universe to excel in, and that it Two and a half stars really ... Interesting family. I picked this book up from a discount bin, when I found myself without a book at an airport. Definitely a Tiger Mom, with a strong political conscious ruled this unruly household. The youngest brother, Ari, states "I loved my Mother, but not sure I liked her." In this wildly competitive and verbally aggressive household, its not surprising that each brother chose a different profession - their own corner of the universe to excel in, and that it took some years after high school for them to come back together as adults. It was also interesting to me the role that Amherst (a toommate in particular) in Ezekial's case helped to socialize somewhat these boys. this book answered my question as to how Rahm started ballet, too! A fast read about an interesting family, but not sure I'd care to participate in their family dinners.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Harry Lane

    A well-written memoir by the eldest of three high-achieving brothers. The anecdotes and narrative of growing up Emanuel do explain the forces fueling their accomplishments. It is a mystery to me how any siblings could engage in the kind of raucous and adversarial exchanges the author describes, and still have the strong bonds that clearly exist among the three of them. This unusual dynamic is at the heart of the story, but the author simply puts it out there with no more than a superficial explo A well-written memoir by the eldest of three high-achieving brothers. The anecdotes and narrative of growing up Emanuel do explain the forces fueling their accomplishments. It is a mystery to me how any siblings could engage in the kind of raucous and adversarial exchanges the author describes, and still have the strong bonds that clearly exist among the three of them. This unusual dynamic is at the heart of the story, but the author simply puts it out there with no more than a superficial exploration of how it worked. Maybe its one of those happy combinations of nature and nurture that cannot be fully appreciated within the limits of our current state of knowledge. While it appears relatively unvarnished, do not expect any skeletons to emerge.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ede

    I bought the book after reading an excerpt of it in Vanity Fair which made it sound like an interesting account of a personal story as well as an overview of a certain decisive period in American history. There is no longer a question in my mind why it was published in this magazine as this book is mostly about pure vanity. The description of the Emanuel family life made me as a reader feel ill at ease, constant repetitions of the other brothers' dyslexia and unwillingness to be as good as the o I bought the book after reading an excerpt of it in Vanity Fair which made it sound like an interesting account of a personal story as well as an overview of a certain decisive period in American history. There is no longer a question in my mind why it was published in this magazine as this book is mostly about pure vanity. The description of the Emanuel family life made me as a reader feel ill at ease, constant repetitions of the other brothers' dyslexia and unwillingness to be as good as the older brother and the description of self-centric parents' supposedly creating an unusually supportive environment for raising extremely intelligent kids made me feel sorry not just for them but mostly for the author.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This is a great book that made me laugh over and over again. Zeke Emanuel narrates his own work and is perfect for the role as his voice and antics during the telling of family stories are hilarious. This book helped me better understand the history of Chicago and Israel from the 1940-1970's and the daily discrimination experienced by races of all kinds. Sparing neither his parents nor brothers, Zeke details the many personal and family experiences that created men who are driven, dedicated and This is a great book that made me laugh over and over again. Zeke Emanuel narrates his own work and is perfect for the role as his voice and antics during the telling of family stories are hilarious. This book helped me better understand the history of Chicago and Israel from the 1940-1970's and the daily discrimination experienced by races of all kinds. Sparing neither his parents nor brothers, Zeke details the many personal and family experiences that created men who are driven, dedicated and hard workers. The best part of the book for me was the telling of the history of their father, a jewish immigrant to US who worked hard to become a physician and live out the American dream, often at the expense of his wife's desires for her family.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jan Daker

    When parents raise 3 kids & each rise to the peak of their field, you want to understand how this is done. Zeke Emanuel unfolded the enlightening answers which is opposite of much of how children are raised today. Then the mind spins to wonder if onc can accomplish this & not be "so in your face" all of the time. Stillness apparently was not the norm. The U.S. has changed so much in my lifetime that I forget "No Jews Allowed" was not that long ago. Religion supposedly preaching love certainly has When parents raise 3 kids & each rise to the peak of their field, you want to understand how this is done. Zeke Emanuel unfolded the enlightening answers which is opposite of much of how children are raised today. Then the mind spins to wonder if onc can accomplish this & not be "so in your face" all of the time. Stillness apparently was not the norm. The U.S. has changed so much in my lifetime that I forget "No Jews Allowed" was not that long ago. Religion supposedly preaching love certainly has not fostered togetherness over the centuries. Still am curious why the adopted sister was not included at some point.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen Dee

    Does an extraordinary childhood create extraordinary adults? Zeke Emanuel certainly tries to make this case with his book chronicling his and his brothers' upbringing by Jewis parents in '60s and '70s Chicago. The story is interesting, if more than a bit self-congratulatory, but the exclusion of their adopted, handicapped sister from the book really bothered me. It's as if, because she didn't fit the mold he was putting forth, Zeke just excised her from the family. He also does not mention his o Does an extraordinary childhood create extraordinary adults? Zeke Emanuel certainly tries to make this case with his book chronicling his and his brothers' upbringing by Jewis parents in '60s and '70s Chicago. The story is interesting, if more than a bit self-congratulatory, but the exclusion of their adopted, handicapped sister from the book really bothered me. It's as if, because she didn't fit the mold he was putting forth, Zeke just excised her from the family. He also does not mention his own divorce even though it happened well before the book came out. Ah well. Probably would have given this 3.5 stars if that were possible on this site.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura Siegel

    Rom Emanuel, mayor of Chicago, is the most famous Emanual brother. Ari EmanueI is a Hollywood agent. This memoir is written by Ezekiel Emanuel, a physician and medical ethicist, and documents the lives of the three brothers growing up. The most striking feature of this memoir is the incredible closeness of the three brothers and the amazing parents who raised them to think for themselves, be politically active, and stand up for what they believe. An inspiring read. Ezekiel is an excellent reader Rom Emanuel, mayor of Chicago, is the most famous Emanual brother. Ari EmanueI is a Hollywood agent. This memoir is written by Ezekiel Emanuel, a physician and medical ethicist, and documents the lives of the three brothers growing up. The most striking feature of this memoir is the incredible closeness of the three brothers and the amazing parents who raised them to think for themselves, be politically active, and stand up for what they believe. An inspiring read. Ezekiel is an excellent reader of this audiobook.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This book was great. It was a good mix of Emanuel life, their parents, their culture and life in Chicago. Zeke talks alot about his 2 brothers and the dynamics involved. This book in no way focuses on Rahm, but does discuss each brother equally. It's a great read if you want to know more about the Emanuel's as a whole, how they found their path in life and what they are all like. There were some points in the book where I laughed out loud due to some of the child hood antics of Rahm, Ari and Zek This book was great. It was a good mix of Emanuel life, their parents, their culture and life in Chicago. Zeke talks alot about his 2 brothers and the dynamics involved. This book in no way focuses on Rahm, but does discuss each brother equally. It's a great read if you want to know more about the Emanuel's as a whole, how they found their path in life and what they are all like. There were some points in the book where I laughed out loud due to some of the child hood antics of Rahm, Ari and Zeke. Raising 3 sons as wild and smart at these 3 proved trying for their mother at times!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie|thebookishinsomniac

    Interesting look at an interesting family from its eldest son. I was expecting more on them as adults, but maybe there will be a sequel. Maybe in that one someone (like an editor?) will curb his long-winded tangents. Really enjoyed all of his history of Judaism as it pertained to his family and the importance of it to his family -- even though no one in it actually believes in God. (Also maybe like a book or 10 on that.) HUGE issue: Still no mention of the elusive, adopted Emanuel sister. She's i Interesting look at an interesting family from its eldest son. I was expecting more on them as adults, but maybe there will be a sequel. Maybe in that one someone (like an editor?) will curb his long-winded tangents. Really enjoyed all of his history of Judaism as it pertained to his family and the importance of it to his family -- even though no one in it actually believes in God. (Also maybe like a book or 10 on that.) HUGE issue: Still no mention of the elusive, adopted Emanuel sister. She's in one photo and in the family tree on last page, but that's it. Why are you hiding her!?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Magnus

    NOt a traditional political memoir mostly because the author isn't a politician in the strict sense of the word although Ezekiel Emmanuel worked on the affordable care act and in government. Some points are kind of boring. Prior to reading I was kinda hoping for some overarching parenting style or system that the parent's went through. You didn't really find that. The book focuses heavily on their lives growing up. I wish more time had been spent on steps Ari and Rahm took that them where they a NOt a traditional political memoir mostly because the author isn't a politician in the strict sense of the word although Ezekiel Emmanuel worked on the affordable care act and in government. Some points are kind of boring. Prior to reading I was kinda hoping for some overarching parenting style or system that the parent's went through. You didn't really find that. The book focuses heavily on their lives growing up. I wish more time had been spent on steps Ari and Rahm took that them where they are today.

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