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Uncover the ancient history of the Jedi, the Sith, and even hyperspace, in these earliest known stories of the Star Wars galaxy, taking place five thousand years before Luke Skywalker's successful assault on the Death Star. In a galaxy linked together by a newly formed Republic and protected by the Jedi Knights, two fortune-seeking hyperspace explorers unwittingly ignite a Uncover the ancient history of the Jedi, the Sith, and even hyperspace, in these earliest known stories of the Star Wars galaxy, taking place five thousand years before Luke Skywalker's successful assault on the Death Star. In a galaxy linked together by a newly formed Republic and protected by the Jedi Knights, two fortune-seeking hyperspace explorers unwittingly ignite a war between the preciously uncharted Sith Empire and the Republic, the repercussions of which will echo for a thousand years afterward, and change the lives of young Jedi Ulic Qel-Droma and Nomi Sunrider forever!


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Uncover the ancient history of the Jedi, the Sith, and even hyperspace, in these earliest known stories of the Star Wars galaxy, taking place five thousand years before Luke Skywalker's successful assault on the Death Star. In a galaxy linked together by a newly formed Republic and protected by the Jedi Knights, two fortune-seeking hyperspace explorers unwittingly ignite a Uncover the ancient history of the Jedi, the Sith, and even hyperspace, in these earliest known stories of the Star Wars galaxy, taking place five thousand years before Luke Skywalker's successful assault on the Death Star. In a galaxy linked together by a newly formed Republic and protected by the Jedi Knights, two fortune-seeking hyperspace explorers unwittingly ignite a war between the preciously uncharted Sith Empire and the Republic, the repercussions of which will echo for a thousand years afterward, and change the lives of young Jedi Ulic Qel-Droma and Nomi Sunrider forever!

30 review for Star Wars Omnibus: Tales of the Jedi, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    2 1/2 stars. what you get: "The Golden Age of the Sith": Naga Sadow and the Sith are pretty fun but Gav and Jori are very annoying and their comedy relief constantly falls flat. It's funny to me that almost the entirety of Star Wars history as we know it started because of these two morons getting lost. They also act more like lovers than brother/sister, which seems to happen a lot in the galaxy far, far away... We also learn about the Great Hyperspace War, which is kind of misnamed because it on 2 1/2 stars. what you get: "The Golden Age of the Sith": Naga Sadow and the Sith are pretty fun but Gav and Jori are very annoying and their comedy relief constantly falls flat. It's funny to me that almost the entirety of Star Wars history as we know it started because of these two morons getting lost. They also act more like lovers than brother/sister, which seems to happen a lot in the galaxy far, far away... We also learn about the Great Hyperspace War, which is kind of misnamed because it only lasts for a few hours. Maybe they should have called it the Little Hyperspace Tiff. Next is "The Beast Wars of Onderon", which feels like someone's D&D campaign. It's just one fight or plot point rushed into another. Finally, we have "The Saga of Nomi Sunrider". I wasn't holding out much more hope for this volume by the time I reached this story, but it is probably the best of the bunch. We get an extremely interesting and unique Jedi master named Thon, and we also get some girl power with Nomi without making her a Mary Sue. Overall, this volume had a lot of neat ideas that were marred by clunky dialog, so-so art, sloppy lettering, and nonsensical plot points. As an example of some of the ridiculousness that hurts this omnibus: there is a scene that closed out one issue that involves one person mistakenly thinking that another person has killed someone. They call this person a murderer and go on about how they must be stopped, all the while chopping at them with a lightsaber and ignoring their pleas for a moment to explain. Cut to the beginning of the next issue, and there is no fight at all, the person that was attacking is now begging for an explanation, and the person wanting so badly to explain is now running away and refusing to talk... did the writer paint himself into a corner and have to do an instant retcon or something? Also, I would be remiss if I didn't mention the part where a city is being attacked and a person (a non Jedi) is like "I need a weapon" and a Jedi master that barely knows her is like "here, take my lightsaber". Wait, What? Doesn't a lightsaber take lots of training to use? Also, I don't think a Jedi would just give one away to a random passerby, especially at a time when he really needs it. It would have been hilarious if she turned it on and immediately cut herself in half with it. So, anyway, if you like Star Wars then you will likely find something here to enjoy. Just keep in mind that there are better Star Wars comics out there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Iset

    Now this is a blast from the past. A re-read of a series I’ve read many times before. I have to say right at the outset that I’ve never really liked Kevin J. Anderson’s additions to the Star Wars novel series, whereas I’ve much more enjoyed Tom Veitch’s work in the graphic novels over the years. Anderson is responsible for the Golden Age of the Sith story here, also known as the Great Hyperspace War, whilst Veitch wrote Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider. Now this is a blast from the past. A re-read of a series I’ve read many times before. I have to say right at the outset that I’ve never really liked Kevin J. Anderson’s additions to the Star Wars novel series, whereas I’ve much more enjoyed Tom Veitch’s work in the graphic novels over the years. Anderson is responsible for the Golden Age of the Sith story here, also known as the Great Hyperspace War, whilst Veitch wrote Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider. And one thing I definitely can’t complain about is the length of the story. This collated volume is lengthy enough to satisfy even the hungriest of comic book readers, and in actual fact was so weighty that I had to read it in short bursts at a time. The Golden Age of the Sith is set 5000 years before the Battle of Yavin (BBY), and sees Force sensitive explorers Gav and Jori Daragon accidentally stumble across the Sith Empire as the descendants of exiled Dark Jedi fight to claim the title of new Dark Lord of the Sith. This has never been one of my favourite stories from the pre-movie era, but I wish it were. The first great conflict between the Republic and the Sith Empire in millennia, the power struggle between Ludo Kressh and Naga Sadow, the luckless explorer siblings Gav and Jori… this should be a good story. And yet I’ve always felt somewhat detached from it. The main problem is that the characters needed to be fleshed out more. Ludo Kressh and Naga Sadow, and their rivalry, always felt like it could be an intriguing story, a struggle also bound up in their respective backgrounds – Sadow has a more direct bloodline from the original Dark Jedi, whilst Kressh’s ancestors interbred more with the native Sith population. Sadow in particular, as the eventual victor, seems to have the potential to be a really gripping character – sharply intelligent, treacherous, cruel. At least, that’s the Sadow I’ve always imagined. But in this story he comes off as not particularly clever and not particularly interesting. Yes, he does execute a few double-dealings, but they’re not especially ingenious, and they’re usually revealed without fanfare as they unfold, with all the characters somehow surprised that a Sith Lord tricked them. I’ve always wanted more from the character of Naga Sadow than this. He needs to be more intelligent for me to take him seriously as a threat, and he needs to have more personality in order to get me invested as a reader in rooting for him to win the Sith power struggle. Another problem is that the rest of the Sith are virtually indistinguishable – none of the other Sith Lords seem to have anything that make them stand out at all, and the Sith warriors just throw themselves in waves upon the pikes of the Republic without question. I would really like to see a little more background for the Sith people to explain their fierce devotion to the Dark Lords – in my head I’m imagining a Spartan style upbringing in which children are taken out into the wild from a young age and relentlessly trained into elite warriors – but this needs to be shown or at least referenced in order for us to buy into it, because in most cases an antagonist comes up against resistance from an underling or two who questions their decisions, showing us as the audience that their followers aren’t completely evil or stupid and often giving a chance to show the antagonist’s ruthlessness by disposing of the dissenters. When we don’t see any questioning going on we have a harder time buying into the plausibility of these antagonists’ leadership – unless it can be established that there is a reason why they aren’t questioned, e.g. society of fear, society of martial training, or other. Gav and Jori Daragon were reasonably well done, but I felt they needed a couple more quiet human moments to make them more sympathetic – I couldn’t care as much as I sensed Anderson wanted me to when Gav sacrificed himself, but maybe I could have if a little more time had been spent on showing the Daragons doing and feeling ordinary human things. I’ve never been able to decide if the art style is something I dislike, or if I actually want to applaud the artistic genius of. It hearkens back to early-20th century with harsh, garish colours and little subtlety that I admit are not aesthetically pleasing to me. But this old style is also quite effective in evoking that sense of the past. By using a retro art style, the artists highlight the fact that the story itself is set 5000 years BBY, and it does actually succeed rather well in making me feel like this is a completely different time in the Star Wars universe, way in its past. Gav and Jori Daragon, despite being penniless, are garbed in these garish yellow-gold shoulder pads, bracers, and headdresses that are just so reminiscent of 1930s sci-fi Flash Gordon. Of course, this genius falls apart under logic – the Republic was founded in 25,053 BBY, so I would actually expect this kind of style and the job that the Daragons do, mapping out new hyperspace routes on the fringe of known space, circa 20,000 BBY, not c. 5000 BBY – in the following stories in the volume, set c. 4000 BBY, the atmosphere already feels a lot more modern and up to date with the film era. Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon is a story I’ve always enjoyed far more. It’s considerably shorter than the Golden Age of the Sith, which takes up about three quarters of this volume’s page count, but far more compelling. The cast is kept small, but they feel far more fleshed out, despite the shorter story. A certain degree of stock characters is resorted to – Ulic is brave but rash, Cay is tech-obsessed, Tott is quiet and slightly bookish – but they felt like they had more personality than the like of Naga Sadow, and it was easy to get a handle on their attitudes and motivations. Arca Jeth’s backstory set up was done well, I felt, delivered with suitable character and keeping the interest where often an information dump can be too dry and clumsily dropped into a story. The art style was more up to date than the previous story, but the colours are still somewhat restricted, emphasising that this story is closer in time than the previous one, but still maintaining a certain level of distance. I would have liked just a little more page space devoted to the unfolding Beast War, and Tott’s mastery of beast empathy was a little too convenient, but all in all given its compact nature the story was told well, the characters kept my interest, and it was a tale I enjoyed. The Saga of Nomi Sunrider by far captured my attention and interest over the other stories – or, I should say, it still does, since this is a much re-read book in my collection. The first story tried to tell a tale of epic and historic proportions, but despite commanding a full 75% of the book simply didn’t have enough room to work with to develop a really thick plot or do more than roughly sketch out its characters. The Beast Wars of Onderon was more interesting, but at only 10% it felt too short; events seemed to happen around the three Jedi without their input, and they too did not have enough time to establish their characters. This story, however, at 15% of the book’s total length, did it best. It doesn’t try to tell a whole self-contained story in limited space. Rather it only attempts to tell an intriguing beginning to a much bigger story, and this is something at which it succeeds marvellously. It sets one character’s personal life struggles onto a background where there are a lot of other self-interested factions directing the action. This makes it feel like the main character is existing in a realistic universe of agency and consequence. And the real heart of the story is Nomi Sunrider’s struggles. In the two previous stories the Jedi characters were just kind of there. They waited for the Sith to come and then fought back, or, in the case of The Beast Wars of Onderon, they tried to unravel a mystery but were largely duped by others who truly controlled the action; but they didn’t grow in and of themselves. Nomi’s struggle feels more gritty and real. The story hits us early with a devastating consequence, which Nomi then has to deal with whilst continuing to be a parent to her child and deciding what path she now wants to take in her life. This is an internal life struggle that we can all empathise with, and what makes this particular story the most gripping and engaging. All the while, it builds up a subtle level of background tension as events far away in the galaxy begin to have a ripple effect and reach the remote planet where Nomi now lives. All praise to the writer and artists on this one – I have to say I liked the art styles best in this story also. There’s nice attention to detail and the environment really looks lived in. I would give the Saga of Nomi Sunrider 8 out of 10, the Beast Wars of Onderon 7 out of 10, and the Golden Age of the Sith probably 5 out of 10, giving this omnibus as a whole an average combined score of 6.6 recurring out of 10.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Damon

    I think these stories are based on some mythology mentioned in the non-canon sequel novels. I liked seeing these olden day characters and I especially liked the sith amulets that were used instead of lightsabers until they were introduced to lightsabers when they clashed again with the jedi.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 stars Very good comic book/graphic novel. Nice to learn more about the history of the Jedi and the Sith. Would recommend to fans of Star Wars. Can't wait to read more Star Wars books!!!! 5 stars Very good comic book/graphic novel. Nice to learn more about the history of the Jedi and the Sith. Would recommend to fans of Star Wars. Can't wait to read more Star Wars books!!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This is odd because the collection includes not just work by Anderson on the prequel stuff to the originally published Tales of the Jedi, but the work by Tom Veitch as well. Anderson's pieces about Naga Sadow and the background of the Sith people was meant to flesh out Veitch's original work in which the characters are only referenced. The Veitch stuff is much better than Anderson's work, both in imagination and in quality of writing. Four thousand years before the birth of Luke Skywalker, the ga This is odd because the collection includes not just work by Anderson on the prequel stuff to the originally published Tales of the Jedi, but the work by Tom Veitch as well. Anderson's pieces about Naga Sadow and the background of the Sith people was meant to flesh out Veitch's original work in which the characters are only referenced. The Veitch stuff is much better than Anderson's work, both in imagination and in quality of writing. Four thousand years before the birth of Luke Skywalker, the galaxy was a different place. There were thousands of Jedi spread across a fledgling Republic and planets of Sith organized in an expansionist Empire that frequently brushed against each other. The philosophies of both sides are not as well fleshed out as what we're used to and a lot of this world reads like a sword and sorcery type of epic where Sith lords wield Dark Side magic and lightsabers had ornate bone-like hilts hooked up to battery packs. What Veitch and company do successfully is re-imagine a more primitive galaxy. Hyperspace lanes have yet to be tamed, worlds are still unknown and it feels like species are just getting to know one another and work out how they're going to live together. Hidden on new worlds are unique cultures with their own traditions of Force use, good and bad, that have yet to be incorporated into a coherent and dogmatic doctrine. The writing isn't horrific, but is filled with usual comic-ese. Lots of explanation points for sentences that seem more like statements! and the obligatory "Let me explain what I'm doing in my dialogue because the panel isn't exactly clear." This is less a story about empire and epic space opera conquest than it is an adventure story, and enjoyable one at that. It also fills in gaping holes in the EU mythology explaining the back story of famous historical names dropped in other stories and brings them to life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    Volume #1 consists of three stories: The Golden Age of the Sith, Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon, and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider set 3000-4000 years before the Battle of Yavin. The "Golden Age" is an overwrought story that tells of the invasion of the republic by the Sith empire; the dialogue is stiff, the story jumps unevenly from scene to scene, and the plot twists feel too contrived. Ultimately, they're trying to tell too big of a story in too few pages (even though the war itself Volume #1 consists of three stories: The Golden Age of the Sith, Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon, and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider set 3000-4000 years before the Battle of Yavin. The "Golden Age" is an overwrought story that tells of the invasion of the republic by the Sith empire; the dialogue is stiff, the story jumps unevenly from scene to scene, and the plot twists feel too contrived. Ultimately, they're trying to tell too big of a story in too few pages (even though the war itself consumes 2/3rd of the book). The best parts detail the scheming of the Sith Lords, but unfortunately these conflicts are kludged onto the larger Sith invasion storyline. The whole thing fails as a cohesive story, even though it has entertaining elements. The Beast Wars of Onderon is a far stronger story, following three Jedi apprentices as they are sent to the world of Onderon to attempt to negotiate an end to its centuries-old conflict between its dominant city state, and the beast lords living outside its walls. I think it works better because it's painting on a smaller canvas, and focusing on the trials of the three apprentices. Good stuff. The Saga of Nomi Sunrider is an even more intimate story, showing the training of its namesake character at the feet of Jedi Master Thon. Sunrider sees her husband, a Jedi Knight, cut down by thugs, but is urged to take up his mantle by his Force ghost by training with Thon. Over the course of the story she's forced to confront her own fears to save herself, her master and the life of her child. All in all, the book's worth picking up, particularly for those (like me) who are running Knights of the Old Republic RPG campaigns. "The Golden Age" may be weak, but the other two stories make up for it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tyson Adams

    Meh. Not as good as I remembered this to be, from when I read this as a teenager.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Aaaaand here we go: the beginning of my attempt to read through all the Legends Star Wars comics. I'm using Wookieepedia's timeline to read stuff in order, except... of course... that I started with Dark Empire.... and Knights of the Old Republic.... and Crimson Empire.... so I was definitely jumping around. ANYWAY... now I'm starting at the "beginning" (still minus the Dawn of the Jedi stuff, but there's not very much of that) with the Sith Empire. First of all, the artwork is putting me off som Aaaaand here we go: the beginning of my attempt to read through all the Legends Star Wars comics. I'm using Wookieepedia's timeline to read stuff in order, except... of course... that I started with Dark Empire.... and Knights of the Old Republic.... and Crimson Empire.... so I was definitely jumping around. ANYWAY... now I'm starting at the "beginning" (still minus the Dawn of the Jedi stuff, but there's not very much of that) with the Sith Empire. First of all, the artwork is putting me off something fierce. It's just a product of when it was written and what the trends were at the time, I think. It has that really weird color palette - full of pastels and magenta - pretty much like Dark Empire had. The two main characters made a lot of obnoxious and/or idiotic choices too, so it was hard to feel particularly bad about what was happening to them. I guess it was interesting seeing how the Sith and the dark side got so intertwined and how Sith culture evolved. The Ulic Qel-Droma storyline was ok. One star on this rating is purely for the Nomi Sunrider story, which was my favorite out of this bunch. On to volume 2...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Juliette Barasch

    3.5 stars! Definitely going to continue reading in the Legends chronological order.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dubzor

    I like this more than anything the franchise has done in the past 20 or so years...first season of Mando excluded.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ithlilian

    I really enjoyed this collection of stories and this glimpse into the Star Wars universe. I couldn't put it down initially, and loved that the Sith were made to be interesting and exciting, while the good guys were portrayed as whiny and irritating. Well, they came off as whiny to me, so needless to say, the stories that included the Sith were my favorite. The last story in the collection was my least favorite as I couldn't really connect with the characters. All in all I am glad I read this, an I really enjoyed this collection of stories and this glimpse into the Star Wars universe. I couldn't put it down initially, and loved that the Sith were made to be interesting and exciting, while the good guys were portrayed as whiny and irritating. Well, they came off as whiny to me, so needless to say, the stories that included the Sith were my favorite. The last story in the collection was my least favorite as I couldn't really connect with the characters. All in all I am glad I read this, and appreciate the extra information I've gained about the wonderful world of Star Wars. I will read as many more of these as I can get my hands on, and I hope that the writing and illustrations stay on this level. Very good.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this while listening to the "Luke and Leia" theme on repeat. Superb artwork. Lots of magic. Very cool epic battle scenes with alien Triceratops/Elephants and Sith armies vs Jedi. The Knights of the Old Republic arc from 1993 is the real highlight. It has the best artwork of the three arcs. Very imaginative and bizarre designs. Great backstory for Onderon. I love the drawings of Iziz, the Nebulon Ranger, and the scene in which Ulic, Cay and Tott come charging into the wedding down the temp I read this while listening to the "Luke and Leia" theme on repeat. Superb artwork. Lots of magic. Very cool epic battle scenes with alien Triceratops/Elephants and Sith armies vs Jedi. The Knights of the Old Republic arc from 1993 is the real highlight. It has the best artwork of the three arcs. Very imaginative and bizarre designs. Great backstory for Onderon. I love the drawings of Iziz, the Nebulon Ranger, and the scene in which Ulic, Cay and Tott come charging into the wedding down the temple stairs riding Bomas with their lightsabers drawn. Amanoa was a cool spooky villain, I also loved the scene when the flying beast riders came bursting through the throne room window to rescue Galia. It's very dark and violent at times. Especially during the Saga of Nomi Sunrider. She has a somewhat sad story. Nomi Sunrider is a great character. I loved the parts with the pirates and Bogga the Hutt's gang. The Colossus Wasp was an awesome work of imagination and beautifully drawn. The vision of Ood Bnar's holocron which Thon showed to Nomi was another great highlight. Tales of the Jedi perfectly captures the epic feeling you want from the ancient history of the Jedi and the Sith.

  13. 5 out of 5

    MC

    When Dark Horse Comics began releasing Omnibus editions of various Star Wars comics, they didn't stop at reissuing collections of the old '70's and '80's Marvel stories. Instead, they also began releasing their own previously published SW stories in these combined editions. The book I am reviewing here is one of these. In Star Wars Omnibus: Tales of the Jedi, Volume 1, the ancient history of the "galaxy far, far away" is explored. This Omnibus edition is comprised of three individual, but interco When Dark Horse Comics began releasing Omnibus editions of various Star Wars comics, they didn't stop at reissuing collections of the old '70's and '80's Marvel stories. Instead, they also began releasing their own previously published SW stories in these combined editions. The book I am reviewing here is one of these. In Star Wars Omnibus: Tales of the Jedi, Volume 1, the ancient history of the "galaxy far, far away" is explored. This Omnibus edition is comprised of three individual, but interconnected, stories. Each graphic novel will briefly be reviewed and rated, and then a few closing remarks and rating for the whole work will be given. ----- Star Wars: The Golden Age of the Sith Approximately 5,000 years before the events of the original trilogy, two "hyperspace explorers" (think those who sought water-lanes to deliver goods in real-life for a somewhat analogous parallel) accidentally stumble upon the fabled Sith Empire. In the back-story of the Star Wars Anyways, two young explorers who stole back their impounded ship to make one last run for glory, wind up in the clutches of a Sith Lord named Naga Sadow. Sadow, while pretending to be a friend, sends Jori Daragon to the Republic with a tracer on her ship, while also corrupting her brother, Gav, to gain his help in conquering the Republic. He does this by playing on the hardship and oppression that the siblings felt after their parents' deaths. Once in Republic space, a brief, but devastating war occurs, one in which Sadow almost conquers the Republic. Of course, the Republic and Jedi win, largely through the assistance of Jori and a repentant Gav. The story was actually pretty good, if a bit brief and predictable. I would give this comic four stars for a rating. ----- Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon This story is straightforward and simple. A group of young Jedi Apprentices nearing Knighthood are sent on a diplomatic mission to the planet Onderon. In charge is Jedi Ulic, who leads an expedition team to attempt to make peace between the powerful city state there and the "uncivilized" beast-riders of the wilds that constantly attack the city. Ulic is perfectly willing to believe the queen's family is good, until he discovers that she is a Sith acolyte, and that she is repressing the people. A battle ensues, in which the more powerful, but woefully inexperienced at command, Ulic and his team almost get themselves slaughtered. Ulic's master comes to turn the tide of battle, and Ulic and the Beast-Riders win. Not the most impressive tale, and the action just seems way, way too quick. Nonetheless, it was a fun read. I give this graphic novel 3 1/2 stars for a rating. ----- The Saga of Nomi Sunrider In this third and final tale in the Omnibus, a young Jedi takes his wife and daughter with him to train under a legendary Jedi Master on a far-off planet. He is also carrying valuable gems that are useful in many applications, including use as focusing crystals for lightsabers. During the trip, a Huttese gangster murders the Jedi for his crystals. The only reason he doesn't get them, and also enslave the Jedi's wife and infant daughter, is because Nomi Sunrider (the wife) is also Force sensitive. In fact, she probably has greater raw talent in the Force than her husband did. She simply never wanted to learn, but preferred a quiet life. Nomi fights off the gangsters, and successfully delivers the crystals to Jedi Master Thonn, who agrees to train Nomi as a Jedi. Nomi has some real issues with this, though. She is disgusted at how she killed the gangsters, because she hates killing, even though it was in self-defense. So she wants to never touch a lightsaber, or harm a person again. Unfortunately for Nomi, she is a woman of prophecy. She is destined to help the Jedi win a terrible war against the Sith. This prediction makes Nomi even more determined to escape her fate, and never touch a lightsaber again. This won't last, however, as in the SW universe, prophecies come true whether we like it or not. She does eventually accept her destiny and take up her lightsaber. Overall, a good story that is more of a personal tale of rising from adversity. The only part that troubles me is that Master Thonn seems to be manipulative and ruthless in forcing Nomi towards beginning proper training to the point that all of Obi-Wan's and Yoda's antics in the original movie trilogy seem quaint and straight-forward by comparison. Definitely a troubling character, and more of an anti-hero, really. My rating for this final graphic novel is 5 stars. ----- Conclusion In general, I quite enjoyed this read. Where the storyline faltered, the art more than made up for it. The stories in this Omnibus also benefited from being so far before the movies that there was more freedom to explore galactic history, and it really showed in the imaginative scope of the plots. This would be an excellent place for someone to begin at if they wished to start reading the non-Marvel Star Wars comics.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Grace Poolman

    This book was a tough selection for me to read, that being I typically don't jump for science fiction comic books. However, I would recommend this for my students who would find this engaging. This story features a collection of the three subdivisions. It is slightly different than the original series. There are details that change throughout the book that is different than the original. There were no diverse characters beyond the fictional characters. This book was a tough selection for me to read, that being I typically don't jump for science fiction comic books. However, I would recommend this for my students who would find this engaging. This story features a collection of the three subdivisions. It is slightly different than the original series. There are details that change throughout the book that is different than the original. There were no diverse characters beyond the fictional characters.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Compared to the TotJ stories set later, it's kind of jarring that these prequel volumes take such a dramatically archaic style. What's really confusing is that it doesn't seem to be deployed in a logical or consistent way. Okay, some of the characters dress like ancient Egyptian queens because it's old-timey. But why do the poor debtors dress just as elaborately as the literal Empress? The Sith have Egyptian tomb architecture because this is ye olde times but what does it tell us about their soc Compared to the TotJ stories set later, it's kind of jarring that these prequel volumes take such a dramatically archaic style. What's really confusing is that it doesn't seem to be deployed in a logical or consistent way. Okay, some of the characters dress like ancient Egyptian queens because it's old-timey. But why do the poor debtors dress just as elaborately as the literal Empress? The Sith have Egyptian tomb architecture because this is ye olde times but what does it tell us about their society? It's frustratingly arbitrary and blunt, where good Star Wars designs take from place and history through a lens that renders them both ancient and timeless. Narratively, it's quite as rushed and awkwardly squashed as the later volumes. The story of the Sith War on the Republic is over in the blink of an eye. And yet somehow they sew the events up so neatly that there's not really much room for later stories to fill in the cracks. Very uncomfortable plotting IMO. The minor improvement here is that Gav and Jori are semi-relatable protagonists with human emotions and comprehensible motivations. Their situation has tangible stakes and peril and perspectve in a way that nothing else in TotJ bothers to attempt. I felt this most when Jori's warning about the Sith was falling on deaf ears, since apparently I'm hypersensitive to that sort of injustice in fiction, but the whole works more or less the way fiction is supposed to work. It's not good fiction per se, especially when they get smashed into over-the-top arcs in the second volume that could have been good if they had ten volumes to develop, but it's recognizable as fiction. July 17-21 2011 4 stars [This review will represent, as one book, all of the Tales of the Jedi miniseries.] Kevin Anderson has the honor, dubious earned, of having written the chronologically earliest tales in the Star Wars Universe: The Golden Age of the Sith and the Fall of the Sith Empire. I'd known the plot and characters and even the ship designs I'd see in these stories for years, since reading the Essential Chronology. It was interesting to see them actually pulled off. The first problem was that reading the comics was little different from reading a summary of them. The characters aren't fleshed out much (for the Daragons) or at all (anyone else), and the plot moves along much more quickly and choppily than in ought to. To be fair, this is probably one of the better products of KJA's hand I've come across. But that is an insult in most contexts. I was surprised to find the art as unenjoyable as the writing - theoretically KJA couldn't bring down the quality of art drawn by whoever he's working with. The aesthetic is strange, un-Star Wars-like (a combination of cyber-Egypt/Rome and some kind of fishy/insectoid ship designs). The Sith look insipid and unappealing. Everything is cluttered and busy. Odan-Urr just looks ugly - and I'm sure that's not his fault! Tom Veitch's next two entries in the TotJ series benefit significantly from their lack of KJA. However, they still ultimately fail to please, to be what they ought to be. They attempt to tell the story of great, epic wars between the Jedi and the Sith, in the span of a few comics. The really good stories know that characters have to come first, and that you can't cram too much history into your medium. Great wars are best used as a setting for individual tales - like ANH, like the Clone Wars, like KOTOR (the game and the comics), and like Legacy all do. The media around the Galactic Civil War exemplify it best. By attempting to fit stories the size of the GCW into 5 issues of a comic, the creators end up unable to explore the character of the GFFA at the time, unable to provide some meaningful, interesting context for the conflict and the characters (this background is what makes Star Wars). By making their characters avatars of much larger forces, they trivialize the conflicts and hinder the characters' own development. Dark Lords of the Sith, while it took on KJA as an author, was an improvement over all its predecessors. Getting to see some actual Sith Alchemy at work is pretty sweet. Satal and Aleema's gruesome, depraved personalities are pretty fascinating. It's also interesting to get some sense of what the Jedi Order was like in those days: the Masters sort of sit around and train and the young kids (sometimes) seek permission to go out and do stuff. It doesn't seem so hierarchical. Seeing how powerful Sith spirits are meant to be is interesting, as well. It makes the plot of Jedi Academy seem a bit less stupid, and same for the rumor that the Sith ghosts might be actively opposing the Sith Empire in the time of TOR for some reason. Exar Kun's character is a joke - he was clearly written to fall to the dark side, and he is a terrible person from the very first time we see him, making racist slurs against his fellow padawans. The first thing he does after leaving Master Baas is to seek the Sith teachings. Predictably, he falls to the dark side immediately, with little hesitation. Ulic's fall to the dark side is more interesting. He is clearly starting for a position of genuine goodwill, but, like Anakin Skywalker, he is arrogant, and believes himself capable of walking the dark side path without embracing it in his heart.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    Three stories in this omnibus, and only the first one, which took up over half the book, was worthwhile. The second story was meh and the third story was only interesting at the end. But they were fun stories and really add to the Star Wars mythos... Y'know, back when it was good. Three stories in this omnibus, and only the first one, which took up over half the book, was worthwhile. The second story was meh and the third story was only interesting at the end. But they were fun stories and really add to the Star Wars mythos... Y'know, back when it was good.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rizzie

    For someone very interested in the ancient lore of the Star Wars universe, these volumes are fairly interesting, but for anyone else, I can't imagine you'd enjoy them. They're very dry and slow, your mileage may vary. For someone very interested in the ancient lore of the Star Wars universe, these volumes are fairly interesting, but for anyone else, I can't imagine you'd enjoy them. They're very dry and slow, your mileage may vary.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ritwick

    A fledgling republic... A Jedi order still scattered because they were yet to gather- An era of hyperspace explorers and a time when the map of the known universe is still expanding. Gav & Jori Daragon, Nomi Sunrider... A time of greats, a time of legends.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Umur

    Kinda mediocre (Sorry Kevin J.). There are better SW comics if you want to start. I recommend Knights of the Old Republic or even Boba Fett after that.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    An interesting look into the origins of dark jedi, hyperspace travel, and how the jedi connected to the force in the old republic era.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Juffs

    For a comic, it kept me hooked!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Audiobook - Good story from early Jedi Tales

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This was a collection of the Tales of the Jedi comics The Golden Age of the Sith, The Fall of the Sith Empire, Knights of the Old Republic (which contained the stories Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider). For this review I just re-posted the reviews I made for all three of the stories. But overall I found that these stories were interesting and offered insight into ancient Star Wars times. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Golden Age of the Sith Kevin J. And This was a collection of the Tales of the Jedi comics The Golden Age of the Sith, The Fall of the Sith Empire, Knights of the Old Republic (which contained the stories Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider). For this review I just re-posted the reviews I made for all three of the stories. But overall I found that these stories were interesting and offered insight into ancient Star Wars times. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Golden Age of the Sith Kevin J. Anderson I have to say, I enjoyed this story more than I thought I would have. The story itself was on focused on a brother and sister named Gav and Jori Daragon who are hyperspace navigators. While getting exploring they stumble upon the planet Korriban and get captured by Sith Lords. It was really interesting to finally read the story on the infamous Naga Sadow that is so often referenced in stories as well as Ludo Kressh. Also, though he is dead in the story, Marka Ragnos is also heavily referred to. You really get a better understanding of the ancient Sith and the Sith in general. Also, you get to find out more about the mysterious Massassi that built the Temples on Yavin 4 in “A New Hope.” I also liked how we gain more insight to the Jedi as well during this time, such as the power packs that lightsabers have to be hooked up to. I would imagine fighting with those would be difficult. Also, it was cool to see that the symbol for the “Old Republic” era (sometimes referred to as the “Sith Era”) is from this story. It’s the symbol that is placed on Naga Sadow’s forehead as a sign of power. Very cool, and a very interesting story all together. I look forward to rereading this in the future. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Fall of the Sith Empire Kevin J. Anderson As its predecessor, The Golden Age of the Sith, this story was equally as interesting and engaging. The story continued where The Golden Age of the Sith left off. The story quickly unravels into a gruesome battle between the Republic and the Sith Empire over none other than Coruscant itself. Other than an interesting plot, there we other details that made the story fun to read. I like how further insight is gain into the Republic as well as the Jedi during this time period. Second, the level of action increased in this as well when the Sith Empire and the Republic finally face off against each other. I also liked how we gain knowledge of the mysterious structures that the Rebel Base is stationed in on Yavin Four. Overall a great read. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: Knights of the Old Republic Tom Veitch This had to stories in it: Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon and The Saga of Nomi Sunrider. As there were two stories, I broke this review down into the two stories. Ulic Qel Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon I ended up really liking this story. It had a slower start, but a powerful ending. Basically, Ulic Qel-Droma, Cey Qel-Droma, and Tott Deneeta are sent to the planet Onderon to end the centuries old war that has been held between the people of Onderon. But things don’t quite go as accord to plan when the Queen unleashes an evil power. Like I have said in past reviews for the Tales of the Jedi stories, I like the insight gained into the iconic ancient Sith Lords of Star Wars. In this story it was Freedon Nadd whose descendants rule over the planet Onderon. We also learn more about Ulic Qel-Droma who is mentioned quite often in the Knights of the Old Republic video games. Everything wasn’t explained by the end of the story and left you on a cliff hanger that could lead to a very interesting story later on. The Saga on Nomi Sunrider I was disappointed in this story. I found the whole story to rather boring. Nomi and her daughter Vima venture out to find the Jedi Master Thon and she begins to be trained in the ways of the Jedi. But after the death of her husband, Andur, she is hesitant and fearful of picking up a lightsaber. In the end, she has to summon up the courage to become the Jedi she is destined to be. I found that the story just wasn’t that interesting. There wasn’t much action and nothing very interesting other than this Jedi Master Thon who is more beast-like than most Jedi seen in Star Wars. Much mystery surrounds him. Also, the planet that Nomi goes to is Ambria which we later see in the Darth Bane Trilogy as a training grounds for Darth Zannah and the lake mentioned in this story. Overall, nothing to get super excited about. If this story stood alone I would have given it 3 stars possible 2 stars. I gave it 4 as it was in conjunction with the other story. Though this story wasn’t all I had hoped it to be, I still look forward to reading more of the series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Haile

    Most of it was great but some of it made me cringe! Like a giant space wasp converted into a spaceship?? WTF??? And I didnt really care for Naomi Sunriders master. He looked kinda like a beast rhino thing and didn't really make sense as a jedi. Almost as dumb of an idea as a Hutt Jedi..... but for the most part it was pretty good. Recommend, but they're are better Star Wars Omnibus out there. Most of it was great but some of it made me cringe! Like a giant space wasp converted into a spaceship?? WTF??? And I didnt really care for Naomi Sunriders master. He looked kinda like a beast rhino thing and didn't really make sense as a jedi. Almost as dumb of an idea as a Hutt Jedi..... but for the most part it was pretty good. Recommend, but they're are better Star Wars Omnibus out there.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Of the many Star Wars comics issued by Dark Horse, the Tales of the Jedi line was far and away my favorite. The series' setting (5000 years before A New Hope) let authors Kevin J. Anderson and Tom Veitch really go wild in creating the early tales of the Jedi Knights and their Sith adversaries, and resulted in the creation of some of the Star Wars Universe's most memorable characters. Since many of the original Tales of the Jedi trade paperbacks are out of print, Dark Horse has issued Omnibus coll Of the many Star Wars comics issued by Dark Horse, the Tales of the Jedi line was far and away my favorite. The series' setting (5000 years before A New Hope) let authors Kevin J. Anderson and Tom Veitch really go wild in creating the early tales of the Jedi Knights and their Sith adversaries, and resulted in the creation of some of the Star Wars Universe's most memorable characters. Since many of the original Tales of the Jedi trade paperbacks are out of print, Dark Horse has issued Omnibus collections of the Tales of the Jedi comics. This is the first volume, and it collects the following stories: Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Golden Age of the Sith This series was useful in recounting the original schism between the Jedi and the Sith as well as the Sith's defeat and exile across the galaxy. In this series a pair of Force-sensitive hyperspace explorers accidentally discovers the Sith homeworld. After a power struggle among the Sith Lords, the explorers are used to bring the evil of the Sith back to the Republic. As important as these events are to Star Wars continuity (never mind that the prequels would undo much of what Anderson had established regarding the Sith), the series just runs too long and has too many bland characters. The artwork is downright ugly too, which doesn't help. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Fall of the Sith Empire This series picks up where Golden Age left off, with Sith Lord Naga Sadow's invasion of the Republic. This series was plagued by uninteresting characters, ridiculous dialogue, and the same dreadful artwork as Golden Age. Honestly, they could have combined the two series and made the story far more effective. It also hurts that there really aren't any Jedi to speak of, which kind of defeats the purpose of the title. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Ulic Qel Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon/The Saga of Nomi Sunrider (previously collected in the original Tales of the Jedi tpb) Finally we get to the good stuff! These were originally the first TOJ stories, and they are the focus for all of the TOJ stories that follow. Set 4000 years before A New Hope, the series introduces an exciting group of young Jedi Knights whose adventures would change the galaxy. The epic battle between good and evil, Jedi and Sith begins here. Even though the first and second parts of the book aren't as connected as later TOJ series were, they are included in chronological order. If you can make it through the disappointing first part of the book, the second part will have you eagerly awaiting the second Tales of the Jedi Omnibus. I love the idea of these mid-priced Omnibus volumes, but am not crazy about their size. Compared to Marvel's larger Omnibus hardcovers, these smaller (they shaved roughly an inch from the height and width of the trade paperback size) paperback collections fall a bit short (no pun intended). Still, if you're new to the Tales of the Jedi series, or like me never got around to buying all of the trade paperbacks, they are an ideal way to get the most bang for your buck. PS - For what it's worth, my copy of this Omnibus has a different cover than what is pictured. I'll try and upload a scan to show the difference.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Killer of Dreams

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It’s an alright plotline in general. The Great Hyperspace War is overhyped and not as interesting as it seemed other than seeming to last no more than a day to which the Sith are immediately beat. Really average plot. The Beast War comics were not better though other than providing a little framework from what is to come in the future. The Nomi Sunrider part at least provided a bit of interest. Overall the omnibus gets a 3 stars out of 5. What kept me entranced a bit was the Sith lore and the ol It’s an alright plotline in general. The Great Hyperspace War is overhyped and not as interesting as it seemed other than seeming to last no more than a day to which the Sith are immediately beat. Really average plot. The Beast War comics were not better though other than providing a little framework from what is to come in the future. The Nomi Sunrider part at least provided a bit of interest. Overall the omnibus gets a 3 stars out of 5. What kept me entranced a bit was the Sith lore and the old retro style of the comic. Rating Update 3/14/2019 - 3 to 2 stars. Because I found it boring, it doesn't mean I liked it (3 stars). Update 4 June 2019 With the adoption of my new rating system, a two star rating is befitting. The original review explains how two of the arcs in the omnibus are average, which would be a two star rating. The only three star rated section, that being the Nomi Sunrider section, cannot raise the omnibus to three stars. September 5, 2019 Update It was not mentioned that the appearance of the comics help maintain the volume at a two star rating. The dull colors and the mechanized gladiator look of the Old Republic wars and its combatants is nice. Visually appealing at times. September 8, 2019 Update I have thought of lowering the rating to one star because the only section I enjoy now is on the Beast Rider War and Nomi Sunrider sections because they explain a later era in "Star Wars" that I am interested, and since now I am not as enthusiastic for "Star Wars" and reading into lore since my time is short. However, at the time I found it to be mediocre so the rating will stay at two stars. January 4, 2020 Update I have placed this book in the 2Q rating type, particularly because I cannot recall the contents of much of this book. Even a brief skim of the volume has left me ill at how little I can recall, and with the realization that a reread will fill in the scarcity of my notes on this volume. In skimming the volume, I was unable to conjure positive or negative feelings for the book apart from the art, which is a good thing since the original review seems to focus on the blandness of the volume. Though the two star-rating is a safe, good estimate, I cannot properly analyze my reaction to the plot apart from giving it a generalized, two star-rated mediocrity brand to it. The original review is lengthy enough to convince me that there are not areas that I would dislike that would bring the rating of the book to a one star-rating. Because of this, I have left the color of the rating at yellow instead of grey, but the yellow color is still not a one hundred percent guarantee, merely an educated guess.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kynan

    I recently rediscovered the Star Wars universe, courtesy of my son, and decided I wanted to know more about the story that came before A New Hope (not the new prequels). According to http://librarything.com/series/Star+Wars, Tales Of The Jedi was probably a good place to start. Its stories occur 5000ish years before the events depicted in Star Wars AND there was a copy available locally to me :) Unfortunately, I didn't find what I was looking for. I was going for more Jedi/Sith prehistory than is I recently rediscovered the Star Wars universe, courtesy of my son, and decided I wanted to know more about the story that came before A New Hope (not the new prequels). According to http://librarything.com/series/Star+Wars, Tales Of The Jedi was probably a good place to start. Its stories occur 5000ish years before the events depicted in Star Wars AND there was a copy available locally to me :) Unfortunately, I didn't find what I was looking for. I was going for more Jedi/Sith prehistory than is provided in this volume, which basically states in the first panels of the first story that the dark-side Jedi were banished from local space and, in their wanderings, ultimately discovered the Sith people, whom they promptly enslaved and took the name of. I wanted to know more about what happened before that banishment and the last story in the volume has a tangential reference to the fact that the hyperdrive had been around in the "current" universe for 20,000 years already. 20,000 years! Just for reference, at the time I'm writing this my ancestors of 20,000 years ago were working out that sharp rocks were useful and wondering if there might be something more to life than this whole hunt-and-gather thing. I didn't have a particular problem with the stories told in this volume, but they didn't grab me either. They were kind of interesting but there didn't appear to be any overarching storyline that we were following (after reading Volume II, turns out there was, but it's a long game we're playing here) and the technology portrayed in the stories, set five thousand years before Star Wars, seemed almost on par with what will come. I think that was the thing I found most annoying. I'm finding it difficult to believe that the universe that spawned the faster than light hyperdrive then proceeded to rest on its laurels for twenty thousand years...it just doesn't make sense. Anyway, it was OK, I think the final story in the book (3,999 years before Star Wars) was the best and I might try to dig up Dawn of the Jedi which will apparently enlighten me with regard to what harkened in that mysterious 20,000 year ago past.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cook

    Comprised of four big stories. The first two are more related to each other than the last two; and the last two are more related to each other and the entire second volume than they are to the first two stories. This is a quick read, probably two to three hours total. A fast read as well because it is difficult to put down. This is the first graphic novel I have ever read and I am amazed how drawn in I was to the stories just like with a good novel or movie. As far as the individual stories go: Gol Comprised of four big stories. The first two are more related to each other than the last two; and the last two are more related to each other and the entire second volume than they are to the first two stories. This is a quick read, probably two to three hours total. A fast read as well because it is difficult to put down. This is the first graphic novel I have ever read and I am amazed how drawn in I was to the stories just like with a good novel or movie. As far as the individual stories go: Golden Age of the Sith - whilst reading this story, I found myself somewhat disappointed. I read the entire story in two sittings, it was entertaining, but not exciting or great. I may have put the book down and not continued, but I had nothing better to do at the time, so I continued reading. 2 Star. Fall of the Sith Empire - this story was a bit better than the last. Maybe at this point I was used to the comic book format, so the flow was easier. The art didn't seem much better and the dialogue and plot were no more revealing, but I enjoyed this story a little bit more, and enough to continue reading. 3 Star Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon - This story was yet another incremental improvement to the first two. At this point, I feel at home in the Star Wars universe of this time-frame. The protagonist was not so likable, but his master was and the morality tale is actually pretty good. I like this story enough to want to finish the whole book. 3 Star The Saga of Nomi Sunrider - After being somewhat disappointed with the first three stories, my guard is down and expectations are low. Then I read this story. What a wonderful story. It feels like it is just setting us up for something more, but I really fell in love with this story. 5 Star I immediately ordered volume 2 after finishing the last story. The Saga of Nomi Sunrider was amazing and makes me want more and more.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    This was the first Star Wars and Dark Horse comic I have ever read. I really enjoyed the long format that this omnibus allowed, enabling the story to have a complex and very interesting plot. The art style wasn't my favorite, the combat visuals particularly were kind of strange to me. This omnibus has three stories, the first is the longest and it is set about 5,000 years before the Battle of Yavin. It chronicles the rediscovery of and subsequent war with Naga Sadow and the Sith Empire after two This was the first Star Wars and Dark Horse comic I have ever read. I really enjoyed the long format that this omnibus allowed, enabling the story to have a complex and very interesting plot. The art style wasn't my favorite, the combat visuals particularly were kind of strange to me. This omnibus has three stories, the first is the longest and it is set about 5,000 years before the Battle of Yavin. It chronicles the rediscovery of and subsequent war with Naga Sadow and the Sith Empire after two Republic Hyperspace Explorers stumble across the imperial controlled planet of Korriban. In some places I felt like the story sort of jumped ahead, skipping weeks or months into the future without any clear indication of it taking place. Once I got used to that I found the story otherwise flowed fairly consistently and I enjoyed it. The second story tells of Ulic Qel Droma and the Battle of Onderon as it is considering joining the Republic. I really liked this story even though it was pretty clearly a set up for later stories with Ulic. In this whole Omnibus Ulic was the character I felt I understood the best, and I'm sure this first encounter with the influence of the dark side will not be the last. The third story was that of Nomi Sunrider, a force sensitive woman who's Jedi husband is murdered in front of her eyes. She takes up his lightsaber to defend her daughter and later decides to follow the path of the Jedi. She struggles with her past decisions, refusing to take up a lightsaber again after what she considers murder. I enjoyed this story as well though it clearly felt like a pretty big set up for further stories in volume 2. I look forward to reading them. I wish there had been more lightsabers and force use. The Sith in the main story line weren't equipped with lightsabers and the force was only sparsely used in combat. As a Star Wars nerd, I would have liked some more of that. 6/10

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    The foundation for a lot of the early '90s novels, particularly those by Kevin J. Anderson (no surprise there), is evident here. He put in a lot of work to link the different media at that time. The Golden Age of the Sith The story and the art are spectacular, for the most part. It is a bit distracting though that different artists and colorists were used for the three subsections. Still, in all, there is a lot of detail in each image, allowing the story to be more vivid, more real. The color from The foundation for a lot of the early '90s novels, particularly those by Kevin J. Anderson (no surprise there), is evident here. He put in a lot of work to link the different media at that time. The Golden Age of the Sith The story and the art are spectacular, for the most part. It is a bit distracting though that different artists and colorists were used for the three subsections. Still, in all, there is a lot of detail in each image, allowing the story to be more vivid, more real. The color from Murtagh (the third subsection) is truly vibrant and fantastic. The only thing that really bothered me is that some of the panels stretched two pages (and I don't mean a spread, but uneven paneling that doesn't add to the story), which made me lose track of where the story continued. The space scenes though were spectacular, and absolutely stunning. One thing I really like is that Coruscant is being built up here. It's pretty neat. Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon I don't know much about Ulic Qel-Droma since he's not in the novels, so this was a great addition to the history. While the art wasn't as good as Golden Age, the story was fleshed out well. I really enjoyed learning more about Onderon since I've played KOTOR I & II. The Saga of Nomi Sunrider Nomi is another character I don't know much about beyond what Tionne sings of in the novels. Her story is very sad, but for some reason the comics didn't draw me in as much. I also had major issues with Master Thon forcing Nomi to use a lightsaber even though she didn't want to. That wasn't very Jedi-like of him. In fact, I don't like his character at all.

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