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Alternative cover edition for this isbn here Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Alternative cover edition for this isbn here Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Meanwhile, his old schoolfriend Berry Conway, who is working for Frisby, himself falls for Ann - just as Biscuit falls for her friend Kitchie Valentine. In this typically hilarious novel by the master of light comedy, life can sometimes become a little complicated. Oh, and Berry has been left a lot of shares in the Dream Come True copper mine. Of course they're worthless... aren't they?


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Alternative cover edition for this isbn here Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Alternative cover edition for this isbn here Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Meanwhile, his old schoolfriend Berry Conway, who is working for Frisby, himself falls for Ann - just as Biscuit falls for her friend Kitchie Valentine. In this typically hilarious novel by the master of light comedy, life can sometimes become a little complicated. Oh, and Berry has been left a lot of shares in the Dream Come True copper mine. Of course they're worthless... aren't they?

30 review for Big Money

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Berry Conway falls in love at first sight with a girl named Ann Moon. Too bad she's already engaged to his best friend, "Biscuit" Biskerton. Fortunately, Biskerton is also engaged to a girl named Kitchie Valentine. Throw in a subplot about a penniless noble and a copper mine that may or may not be worthless and watch things come together... For me, a P.G. Wodehouse novel is like a drive down a familiar road to a well-loved destination. You already know the way but that doesn't make it any less en Berry Conway falls in love at first sight with a girl named Ann Moon. Too bad she's already engaged to his best friend, "Biscuit" Biskerton. Fortunately, Biskerton is also engaged to a girl named Kitchie Valentine. Throw in a subplot about a penniless noble and a copper mine that may or may not be worthless and watch things come together... For me, a P.G. Wodehouse novel is like a drive down a familiar road to a well-loved destination. You already know the way but that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. Big Money has all the usual Wodehouse plot elements, like broken engagements, misunderstandings, and mistaken identity, and still manages to craft a new and enjoyable tale. Even though I had a good ideal how things were going to go down, the plot twists kept me interested. I love good usage of a fake beard. Even though he breaks most of the supposed rules of good writing, Wodehouse clearly knows how to put pen to paper. There are so many subtly hilarious throwaway lines in his books. Like these: He looked at her like a cow examining a turnip. So next year you'll turn 27 and, if my figures are correct, 28 the following year. I haven't a bean. I only know what a pound is by here-say. As with most Wodehouse's, I can't help but think that the entire genre of romantic comedy owes old P.G. a huge debt. Wodehouse was perfecting the art before television was even around. While this isn't one of my favorite P.G. Wodehouse books by any means, it's still a good read for people who enjoy dry British humor and stories resembling musical comedies without the music.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Written after he had already begun his Jeeves & Wooster series, Big Money is pure Wodehouse! The circular, interconnected plot would do Ouroboros proud! The way characters fed into and inadvertently foiled a fellow's plans was delicious! I could have done without so much repeated exposition and perhaps a scene or two could have been tighter, or thrown out altogether, but these are minor quibbles. I also appreciate Big Money for giving me the opportunity to use the word quibble. Written after he had already begun his Jeeves & Wooster series, Big Money is pure Wodehouse! The circular, interconnected plot would do Ouroboros proud! The way characters fed into and inadvertently foiled a fellow's plans was delicious! I could have done without so much repeated exposition and perhaps a scene or two could have been tighter, or thrown out altogether, but these are minor quibbles. I also appreciate Big Money for giving me the opportunity to use the word quibble.

  3. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    I chanced upon a piece the other week which said, and I paraphrase here, that if you read one of Wodehouse’s major series – Jeeves or Blandings – then you’re pretty much guaranteed pleasure, but if you wander off the beaten track you’re taking your life into your own hands. I’m not sure I’d agree. My experience has been that, in the main, no matter which Wodehouse you pick up you are more than likely to have a pip and a dandy in your hands. This one has impoverished members of the aristocracy, un I chanced upon a piece the other week which said, and I paraphrase here, that if you read one of Wodehouse’s major series – Jeeves or Blandings – then you’re pretty much guaranteed pleasure, but if you wander off the beaten track you’re taking your life into your own hands. I’m not sure I’d agree. My experience has been that, in the main, no matter which Wodehouse you pick up you are more than likely to have a pip and a dandy in your hands. This one has impoverished members of the aristocracy, unscrupulous businessman, star crossed lovers, a copper mine which is valueless (or is it?) and some of the finest one-liners you will ever find in any book written in English.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chas Bayfield

    I saw two guys on a tube and one was reading an extract of this to the other and they were both howling with laughter. I bought it and became the bloke howling with laughter on a train. Want to laugh out loud in public? Read this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Typical shenanigans in this stand-alone, but oh! the wordplay and the absurdities.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    4.5* One of Wodehouse's best stand-alone books, or so I think so far (I haven't read them all yet). Jonathan Cecil is in top form narrating this audiobook edition. 4.5* One of Wodehouse's best stand-alone books, or so I think so far (I haven't read them all yet). Jonathan Cecil is in top form narrating this audiobook edition.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dawn C.

    This book began with an expectation of a great story, and the story while reading promised a good outcome. Unfortunately, the ending was disappointing.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Frankham

    A wonderfully humorous Wodehouse, from 1931. Don't stick just to Wooster and Blandings, Wodehouse stand-alone novels are just as funny. I was laughing out loud many many times at this. Thee GR blurb: 'Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields A wonderfully humorous Wodehouse, from 1931. Don't stick just to Wooster and Blandings, Wodehouse stand-alone novels are just as funny. I was laughing out loud many many times at this. Thee GR blurb: 'Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Meanwhile, his old schoolfriend Berry Conway, who is working for Frisby, himself falls for Ann - just as Biscuit falls for her friend Kitchie Valentine. In this typically hilarious novel by the master of light comedy, life can sometimes become a little complicated. Oh, and Berry has been left a lot of shares in the Dream Come True copper mine. Of course they're worthless... aren't they?'

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Crompton

    My wife practically insisted that I read something light after my last couple of reads, so I pulled this off the shelf. I've read it before, as I have almost all Wodehouse, but not for a long time, and I didn't remember many details. Well, it's prime Wodehouse. There's lots of silliness and plenty of misunderstandings, but the right young women end up with the right young men, the hero ends up with a windfall of cash, and the bad guys get what's coming to them - in a mild, Wodehousian way. My wife practically insisted that I read something light after my last couple of reads, so I pulled this off the shelf. I've read it before, as I have almost all Wodehouse, but not for a long time, and I didn't remember many details. Well, it's prime Wodehouse. There's lots of silliness and plenty of misunderstandings, but the right young women end up with the right young men, the hero ends up with a windfall of cash, and the bad guys get what's coming to them - in a mild, Wodehousian way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sawan

    Haven't laughed out loud while reading a book in a while. Absolutely amazing read! Haven't laughed out loud while reading a book in a while. Absolutely amazing read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Illiterate

    I’m a bit foggy on the facts but I fancy the critic S. T. Coleridge, or some equally brainy cove, said: “Plum’s spiffing book delivers the jollies.”

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vivek

    A classic Wodehouse comedy of errors with Berry Conway and Lord Biskerton or Biscuit as the main protagonists. No Jeeves or Wooster here but full of classic Wodehouse lines. "She gazed at Berry with stolid affection, like a cow inspecting a turnip." Overall a great light read. A classic Wodehouse comedy of errors with Berry Conway and Lord Biskerton or Biscuit as the main protagonists. No Jeeves or Wooster here but full of classic Wodehouse lines. "She gazed at Berry with stolid affection, like a cow inspecting a turnip." Overall a great light read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beau Stucki

    A jaunty Wodehouse affair at the four-star level till a single conversation about romantic engagements near the end tacks on that fifth and final star

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    There's nothing to criticize here. Solid, funny Wodehouse with several perfectly constructed sentences There's nothing to criticize here. Solid, funny Wodehouse with several perfectly constructed sentences

  15. 4 out of 5

    Addy

    Well, I have to say, it was one of the lesser novels that the master has written as it lacked a certain punch, strong characters and was a tad too long. But that is because I've already read his best of the best works. Well, I have to say, it was one of the lesser novels that the master has written as it lacked a certain punch, strong characters and was a tad too long. But that is because I've already read his best of the best works.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raj

    To try and explain the plot of this book would make it sound complicated and unfunny, neither of which is really true, but I couldn't do it justice. Let's just say that it has one or more of the following elements: the peerage, the suburbs, fiancés, love at first sight, formidable aunts, an old copper mine and a dyspeptic millionaire. I really enjoyed this book. It's got a different tone to the Jeeves books, but it really came together for me. The protagonists, Lord "Biscuit" Biskerton and John B To try and explain the plot of this book would make it sound complicated and unfunny, neither of which is really true, but I couldn't do it justice. Let's just say that it has one or more of the following elements: the peerage, the suburbs, fiancés, love at first sight, formidable aunts, an old copper mine and a dyspeptic millionaire. I really enjoyed this book. It's got a different tone to the Jeeves books, but it really came together for me. The protagonists, Lord "Biscuit" Biskerton and John Beresford "Berry" Conway are very likeable and even (gasp) competent, if in that slightly potty upper-class way that Wodehouse could capture so well. There are fiancés by the handful (and Wodehouse's fiancés usually are a handful), misunderstandings, plots, crosses, double crosses, and much fun to be had by all. Wodehouse's batting average is still incredibly high with me and whilst I may just be easily pleased, it's funny, light of touch and marvellously easy to read. Both a great entry point to the world of Wodehouse and a fine addition to the collection of an existing fan.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ian Wood

    In Adjacent houses in Wodehouse’s suburban ideal Valley Field, Berry Conway and Lord Biskerton are residing. Berry is in love with Ann Moon whom is engaged to Lord Biskerton who in turn is in love with Ann’s friend whom also lives in Valley Field. Berry is currently employed by Lord Biskerton’s uncle T. Patterson Frisby whom is keen for the Biscuit to marry the very wealthy Miss Moon but equally keen to prize Berry’s shares in the Dream Come True cooper mine away from him before he realises thei In Adjacent houses in Wodehouse’s suburban ideal Valley Field, Berry Conway and Lord Biskerton are residing. Berry is in love with Ann Moon whom is engaged to Lord Biskerton who in turn is in love with Ann’s friend whom also lives in Valley Field. Berry is currently employed by Lord Biskerton’s uncle T. Patterson Frisby whom is keen for the Biscuit to marry the very wealthy Miss Moon but equally keen to prize Berry’s shares in the Dream Come True cooper mine away from him before he realises their incredible value. Mr Hoke and his college Captain Kelley are equally keen to financially gain from the cooper mine and are willing to hold up the majority of Valley Fields up at gun point to make dreams come true. Only Wodehouse will be able to ensure the couples are righted and that the shares ensure they will never have to do anything as squalid as work to ensure there place in this, the best of all possible worlds. A Wodehouse comedy that stand alone and doesn’t rely on his more famous characters to bring home the bacon. Another Wodehouse triumph.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Individualfrog

    I was bummin' pretty hard until last week I got this book at a second-hand bookshop near my house. I'm pretty sure PG Wodehouse is feeling the keen pleasure of a job well done up in heaven, because I imagine that cheering up the bummin' on their daily commuter train is exactly what he hoped his books to accomplish. Of course his style gets under your skin, but it brings with it the whole musical comedy vision of the world, where everyone is always falling in love, having no money is no bar to en I was bummin' pretty hard until last week I got this book at a second-hand bookshop near my house. I'm pretty sure PG Wodehouse is feeling the keen pleasure of a job well done up in heaven, because I imagine that cheering up the bummin' on their daily commuter train is exactly what he hoped his books to accomplish. Of course his style gets under your skin, but it brings with it the whole musical comedy vision of the world, where everyone is always falling in love, having no money is no bar to enjoying the good life, even the villains get happy endings of a sort, and especially all obstacles can be overcome. I feel better about myself, about my life, about the people around me, cheered up by the silliest of goings-on in this novel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    A delight always, to re-read PG Wodehouse - literary balm in the depths of winter. Stepping away from Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, here The Master gives us a fairy tale of American beauties, penniless peers and dyspeptic tycoons bent on gaining Scrooge McDuck-level wealth. False whiskers, stolen hats and Wodehouse's unmatched command of the appropriate classical quote make this a total winner. A delight always, to re-read PG Wodehouse - literary balm in the depths of winter. Stepping away from Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, here The Master gives us a fairy tale of American beauties, penniless peers and dyspeptic tycoons bent on gaining Scrooge McDuck-level wealth. False whiskers, stolen hats and Wodehouse's unmatched command of the appropriate classical quote make this a total winner.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Barakiel

    Rarely do I agree with the blurbs on the cover of books, but in this case I agree 100%: "Light as a feather, but fabulous." Wodehouse is at the top of his form here, with his usual methods of comparing blue bloods with barnyard animals. The way he structures his sentences is incomparable. My favourite comedy writer, by far. Rarely do I agree with the blurbs on the cover of books, but in this case I agree 100%: "Light as a feather, but fabulous." Wodehouse is at the top of his form here, with his usual methods of comparing blue bloods with barnyard animals. The way he structures his sentences is incomparable. My favourite comedy writer, by far.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Esteban

    Classic Wodehouse. The story is simple, as are the characters, always count on Plum for a good laugh!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luke Poff

    There's nothing quite like Wodehouse. There's nothing quite like Wodehouse.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Satterfield

    BIG MONEY is not one of Wodehouse's sunnier books. Of course, Wodehouse wound all his plots tight as watch springs, and BIG MONEY is no exception. Berry Conway is in love with visiting American Ann Moon. Complication 1: Ann is engaged to Berry's schoolboy friend Lord Biskerton (the Biscuit). Complication 2: due to reduced circumstances not of his doing, Berry is working as the secretary for Ann's uncle, T. Paterson Frisby, a wealthy tycoon better at turning money than dispensing with it; and Ann BIG MONEY is not one of Wodehouse's sunnier books. Of course, Wodehouse wound all his plots tight as watch springs, and BIG MONEY is no exception. Berry Conway is in love with visiting American Ann Moon. Complication 1: Ann is engaged to Berry's schoolboy friend Lord Biskerton (the Biscuit). Complication 2: due to reduced circumstances not of his doing, Berry is working as the secretary for Ann's uncle, T. Paterson Frisby, a wealthy tycoon better at turning money than dispensing with it; and Ann expresses a contempt for mere office workers. She wants a man of adventure who is neither the rich chinless wonders in her set nor a wage slave employed by relatives. BIG MONEY, like a few assorted other Wodehouses (SUMMER MOONSHINE springs to mind) introduces villainous characters more unpleasant than his usual assortment of blowhards, fumbling petty crooks and aunts who wear barbed wire next to their skin. Many of his characters, like Ukridge, are consistently hard-up and trying to earn money by devious means but who remain philosophical or at least calmish when their plans go phut in their face. Not here. The Biscuit is firmly in the Ukridge class, but his relatives the hard-up peers are greedy, interfering busybodies with bad attitudes and desperate for loot. One of them, Lord Hoddesdon, is a victim, in of all places that haven of rest Valley Fields, of one of the most unpleasant assaults committed in Wodehouse's pages--at least, during the Master's Golden Years (and this book dates from 1931, giving it firm G.Y. status, coming after MONEY FOR NOTHING and SUMMER LIGHTNING and just before the very weak IF I WERE YOU but very strong HOT WATER and HEAVY WEATHER). Ranking in unpleasantness with the impecunious, money-grubbing peers, T. Paterson Frisby is no tycoon in the class of Lord Tilbury, who can be hilarious and who, at least, loves pigs. Frisby is sarcastic and underhanded, and the fact that he suffers from chronic stomach disorders is not a sufficient palliative for the unpleasantness he causes. Ann herself comes across as . . . well, odd. She's nice enough, but she does have her prejudice against office-workers (she comes from a wealthy background and doesn't seem to understand some people need to work in offices to support habits like eating, wearing clothing and sleeping indoors). Berry wrongs her from the beginning by telling wild yarns about himself (he leads her to believe he's a Secret Service agent) so her eventual disenchantment with him is understandable; but her own attitude needs adjustment. Then there are the crooks. And they aren't crooks like those in HOT WATER, or the recurring characters Chimp Twist or Dolly Molloy. These crooks mean business (they're from Chicago--and remember, the book is from 1931 and Al Capone went to prison in Oct. of that year). Too, there's some nasty business toward the end involving firearms that may put some readers off. Don't look for recurring characters, even minor ones like Percy Pilbeam, though the Biscuit is a Drones member (however, the major moneybags of that Club is here listed as Oofy Simpson). Berry is like other one-off Wodehouse heroes, say Bill of BILL THE CONQUEROR or Sam of SAM THE SUDDEN. Husky, stalwart and fairly dull. Only the Biscuit really shines throughout the book, especially in a delightful, perfectly Wodehousean incident at a wayside pub. Had the story remained on that level BIG MONEY might have been a stand-alone classic. BIG MONEY is cleverly plotted, of course, with quite enough suspense as we see Berry sinking deeper in the soup in his relations with Ann, and as the Biscuit becomes engaged to a multiplicity of women. Well-written, if lacking in those wacky little narrative phrases that make the better Wodehouses a joy. This is definitely a minor Wodehouse. But minor Wodehouse is better than most other writers in a major key. If you love your Wodehouse, give it a try.

  24. 5 out of 5

    William Leight

    [3.5 stars really] This is from the beginning of Wodehouse's most fertile period, which makes it a bit of a disappointment. There is really only one memorable character, the hero's comedic sidekick Lord Biskerton (known to all as Biscuit): forced by his inability to pay various debts to flee London high society, Biscuit ends up falling in love with the idyllic middle-class lifestyle he finds in the (imaginary) London suburb of Valley Fields. The remaining characters mostly come from Wodehouse's s [3.5 stars really] This is from the beginning of Wodehouse's most fertile period, which makes it a bit of a disappointment. There is really only one memorable character, the hero's comedic sidekick Lord Biskerton (known to all as Biscuit): forced by his inability to pay various debts to flee London high society, Biscuit ends up falling in love with the idyllic middle-class lifestyle he finds in the (imaginary) London suburb of Valley Fields. The remaining characters mostly come from Wodehouse's stock company: Frisby the dyspeptic millionaire, Lady Vera the knockoff Lady Constance, etc. And the romantic leads are throwbacks to an earlier Wodehouse era, when the main characters weren't expected to take up too much of the burden of keeping things funny. However, Wodehouse fans won't be too disappointed: the language still sparkles, the jokes are funny, the plot machinations run like clockwork, and there are a handful of hilarious scenes sprinkled throughout. It's hardly "The Code of the Woosters", but it's still enjoyable.

  25. 4 out of 5

    S Prakash

    Wanted to enter 2020 laughing all the way. What better can there be than flipping through a laughter riot, splashed on each page of a book. Wodehouse never disappoints. Even when his regular stars like Bertie Wooster, Jeeves, Psmith and the others are on a holiday. Coming to the story, its about Biscuit and Conway -two blossom friends, who have lot of love in their hearts but not a penny in their pockets. They fall in love with Ann, a rich damsel in turns, unaware that they are involved with the Wanted to enter 2020 laughing all the way. What better can there be than flipping through a laughter riot, splashed on each page of a book. Wodehouse never disappoints. Even when his regular stars like Bertie Wooster, Jeeves, Psmith and the others are on a holiday. Coming to the story, its about Biscuit and Conway -two blossom friends, who have lot of love in their hearts but not a penny in their pockets. They fall in love with Ann, a rich damsel in turns, unaware that they are involved with the same girl. Meanwhile the story cuts and jumps around a supposedly dud copper mine of Conway. A rich investor and Conway's boss- Paterson Frisby, schemes to takeover the mine, by just paying some nickels, as Conway isn't aware of its true worth. How the friends work through their own idiotic moments and the collective lunacy of their uncles/ bosses etc and at last win over their respective girls and make gains out of the dud mine, forms the rest of the story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    A large cast of characters in typical Wodehouse scenarios, starring two young men with the unlikely names Berry and Biscuit. The story involves high finance, integrity and broken engagements as well as double- and triple-crossing by dubious people from the dregs of society. The people are rather two-dimensional and unmemorable, but it doesn't spoil an enjoyable story that made me smile several times. Wodehouse's stories rather stretch one's credulity but it doesn't matter; plenty of ironical humo A large cast of characters in typical Wodehouse scenarios, starring two young men with the unlikely names Berry and Biscuit. The story involves high finance, integrity and broken engagements as well as double- and triple-crossing by dubious people from the dregs of society. The people are rather two-dimensional and unmemorable, but it doesn't spoil an enjoyable story that made me smile several times. Wodehouse's stories rather stretch one's credulity but it doesn't matter; plenty of ironical humour, and a dramatic - if slightly ridiculous - ending. Well worth the 50 cents I paid for this at a church bookstall. Longer review here: https://suesbookreviews.blogspot.com/...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe Stevens

    As I continue to wander chronologically though the works of The Great Wodehouse, I discover that I'm slowing down to savor more. The early works were interesting in a scholarly way to see the style of the writer develop and slowly round into form. Now that Wodehouse has reached the 1930s and very much come into his own, there are wonderful lines, descriptions and general silliness that make the reader pause and reread a passage just to see if that was what it really said or to enjoy again some b As I continue to wander chronologically though the works of The Great Wodehouse, I discover that I'm slowing down to savor more. The early works were interesting in a scholarly way to see the style of the writer develop and slowly round into form. Now that Wodehouse has reached the 1930s and very much come into his own, there are wonderful lines, descriptions and general silliness that make the reader pause and reread a passage just to see if that was what it really said or to enjoy again some bit of comedic work. While the plot is decent and the characters passable, it is this Wodehousian sparkle that makes this book worth reading. A good solid one-off Wodehouse.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    A stand alone Wodehouse novel first published in 1931, so dating from what could fairly be described as his pre-war golden period. It's classic Wodehouse in its tight plotting, breezy characterisation and its scattering of quotable one liners and finely wrought sentences, but it belongs in a lower division than the peerless series books featuring Jeeves and Wooster, Mr Mulliner, Uncle Fred, the Oldest Member, Ukridge or the Blandings novels and stories. Still, there's plenty to enjoy in this sto A stand alone Wodehouse novel first published in 1931, so dating from what could fairly be described as his pre-war golden period. It's classic Wodehouse in its tight plotting, breezy characterisation and its scattering of quotable one liners and finely wrought sentences, but it belongs in a lower division than the peerless series books featuring Jeeves and Wooster, Mr Mulliner, Uncle Fred, the Oldest Member, Ukridge or the Blandings novels and stories. Still, there's plenty to enjoy in this story of an American plutocrat, his niece Ann and the impecunious Lord 'Biscuit' Biskerton and his equally poverty-stricken old school friend Berry Conway.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ranjit Kulkarni

    A classic Wodehouse romantic comedy of errors but a standalone novel without the usual suspects one finds in a Wooster or Blandings story. The plot and writing tends to get convoluted at times. For some reason one doesn't expect the same silliness from other standalone characters that one laughs at wholeheartedly when a Bertie or Emsworth does the same. Not one of his best books by any means, it still has all the ingredients of a typical Wodehouse love story of mix-ups and broken engagements but A classic Wodehouse romantic comedy of errors but a standalone novel without the usual suspects one finds in a Wooster or Blandings story. The plot and writing tends to get convoluted at times. For some reason one doesn't expect the same silliness from other standalone characters that one laughs at wholeheartedly when a Bertie or Emsworth does the same. Not one of his best books by any means, it still has all the ingredients of a typical Wodehouse love story of mix-ups and broken engagements but revolving around more real world elements like stock market, money, deceit and greed. All in all a good read, if you don't compare it to the Jeeves or Blandings classics.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    Another fun and interesting book by Wodehouse. This story revolves around two school friends Biscuit, a Lord and Berry, both hard up, both trying to make there way in life. Add an American woman and her mother looking for love, some worthless deeds and a seemingly worthless Copper Mine and, here you have the trappings of a great novel. We have engagements on and off, swindling money, hiding from relatives and love tryst’s. In parts the story dragged, it did end way too quickly for my liking. The Another fun and interesting book by Wodehouse. This story revolves around two school friends Biscuit, a Lord and Berry, both hard up, both trying to make there way in life. Add an American woman and her mother looking for love, some worthless deeds and a seemingly worthless Copper Mine and, here you have the trappings of a great novel. We have engagements on and off, swindling money, hiding from relatives and love tryst’s. In parts the story dragged, it did end way too quickly for my liking. The ending in part a let down, felt it didn’t sum/ round up the story sufficiently.

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