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In a remote house in the middle of Dartmoor, six shadowy figures huddle around a table for a seance. Tension rises as the spirits spell out a chilling message: "Captain Trevelyan . . . dead . . . murder." Is this black magic or simply a macabre joke? The only way to be certain is to locate Captain Trevelyan. Unfortunately, his home is six miles away and, with snowdrifts blo In a remote house in the middle of Dartmoor, six shadowy figures huddle around a table for a seance. Tension rises as the spirits spell out a chilling message: "Captain Trevelyan . . . dead . . . murder." Is this black magic or simply a macabre joke? The only way to be certain is to locate Captain Trevelyan. Unfortunately, his home is six miles away and, with snowdrifts blocking the roads, someone will have to make the journey on foot...


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In a remote house in the middle of Dartmoor, six shadowy figures huddle around a table for a seance. Tension rises as the spirits spell out a chilling message: "Captain Trevelyan . . . dead . . . murder." Is this black magic or simply a macabre joke? The only way to be certain is to locate Captain Trevelyan. Unfortunately, his home is six miles away and, with snowdrifts blo In a remote house in the middle of Dartmoor, six shadowy figures huddle around a table for a seance. Tension rises as the spirits spell out a chilling message: "Captain Trevelyan . . . dead . . . murder." Is this black magic or simply a macabre joke? The only way to be certain is to locate Captain Trevelyan. Unfortunately, his home is six miles away and, with snowdrifts blocking the roads, someone will have to make the journey on foot...

30 review for The Sittaford Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    A pretty entertaining mystery, although a little excessive as to coincidences and red herrings. The human element would have been stronger if we had ever met Jim -- or would it? Maybe he would have proven to be just as wimpy and dull as he sounded second-hand.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Laurel Young

    Just for maximum confusion, many of Agatha Christie's novels have different titles in the British vs. American editions. What I actually read was entitled Murder at Hazelmoor, but it is aka The Sittaford Mystery. Whatever one calls it, this novel typifies why Dame Agatha is the Queen of Mystery to me. I love many of her contemporaries--Dorothy L. Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Josephine Tey, Patricia Wentworth, and (especially) Mary Roberts Rinehart--but it is rare for them to stump me with the solution I Just for maximum confusion, many of Agatha Christie's novels have different titles in the British vs. American editions. What I actually read was entitled Murder at Hazelmoor, but it is aka The Sittaford Mystery. Whatever one calls it, this novel typifies why Dame Agatha is the Queen of Mystery to me. I love many of her contemporaries--Dorothy L. Sayers, Ngaio Marsh, Josephine Tey, Patricia Wentworth, and (especially) Mary Roberts Rinehart--but it is rare for them to stump me with the solution IF the author plays fair. Dame Agatha, however, puts me firmly in my place, and I revere her for it. She often provides hints to anything up to half a dozen solutions of fiendish ingenuity, and we alert readers may figure them out...only to have her hit us upside the head with the ONE solution that somehow we didn't see coming! Such is Murder at Hazelmoor. I really thought I had it, and I was really wrong. However, I don't feel at all cheated; I bow to the superior detective, in this case one of Dame Agatha's charming "flapper"-type young women amateurs. Emily could be the sister of Tuppence (as in Tommy & Tuppence, Dame Agatha's "Partners in Crime"), and she's delightful. Unless of course she's the murderer, which I won't say! ;) This isn't one of Dame Agatha's best-known novels, but I highly recommend it. Classic Christie, with the clues there but somehow so hard to spot, and an above-average number of red herrings to throw you off! I also love it when she does the trick of having an apparently supernatural occurrence--in this case a seance that appears to predict a murder--and then provides a solidly real explanation. So, so clever. Finally, this is a great "Christie for Christmas" if you've already read "Hercule Poirot's Christmas" and "4:50 from Paddington". The setting is a snowy English village described on the very first page as looking like the pictures "on Xmas cards"!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julian Worker

    This is a classic Agatha Christie where she makes you suspect most of the characters during the book and then it turns out to be the one person you least suspected - and then it seems so obvious they did it. How does she do this and how come I didn't spot the clues? The writing is so effortless and simple to read. There's a little love mystery in the book too. I find myself reading her books from beginning to end in perhaps four installments - what a pity I have to sleep, eat, and go to work! This is a classic Agatha Christie where she makes you suspect most of the characters during the book and then it turns out to be the one person you least suspected - and then it seems so obvious they did it. How does she do this and how come I didn't spot the clues? The writing is so effortless and simple to read. There's a little love mystery in the book too. I find myself reading her books from beginning to end in perhaps four installments - what a pity I have to sleep, eat, and go to work!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I am really enjoying Agatha Christie novels! I like the way she has a sly laugh at crime detection. I like the way she includes red herrings. I like the way I can’t work out the culprit, dammit! I even like the 1920s language, and laughing at the cultural norms of the time and wondering what on earth Christie would make of life in 2017.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Agatha Christie does it again. No Marple or Poirot in this one. Instead, Emily Trefusis is our plucky heroine. Christie adores creating a smart, attractive, sharp female character. Emily is determined to get her fiancée, James Pearson, out of jail. He's accused of murder - but Emily knows there's no way he could have done it. "Jim is a frightful idiot. But he doesn't murder people.” Once again, Christie's wit and humor blow me away. She is such a funny writer! I would almost classify her books as Agatha Christie does it again. No Marple or Poirot in this one. Instead, Emily Trefusis is our plucky heroine. Christie adores creating a smart, attractive, sharp female character. Emily is determined to get her fiancée, James Pearson, out of jail. He's accused of murder - but Emily knows there's no way he could have done it. "Jim is a frightful idiot. But he doesn't murder people.” Once again, Christie's wit and humor blow me away. She is such a funny writer! I would almost classify her books as comedies. Of course, Sittaford is populated with a number of colorful characters. A curmudgeon of an old military man who is perpetually grumpy. Another military man who's an invalid. He's always complaining about 'civilized people' and their tendency to hurry. He's got the hots for young Emily and claims she needs a “real man”, meaning himself – even though he's thirty years her senior. There's the old woman invalid, a sharp-witted nosy busybody in the vein of Miss Marple who knows all the goings-on. There's the young man, Charles Enderby, a journalist who is helping Emily to solve the case – while falling hard for her. Inspector Narracott, the clever and resourceful policeman assigned to the case. Mrs. Willett and her daughter Violet – who very suspiciously moved to Sittaford's cold winter climate from sunny South Africa – if what they say is true. Etc. etc. Another gem in this novel is Christie's choice to start out the mystery with a 'table turning'. This 'old-style' form of playing Ouija board involves six or so people sitting at a table and asking spirits to 'knock' on the table to indicate 'yes', 'no', and letters of the alphabet. The ghost tells the players of the murder. Of course, there's no real supernatural element and everything is explained to satisfaction by the end. The vocabulary was wonderful. Also worth noting was the mountain of 1931 slang that was colorful and highly amusing. Emily Trefusis is a gem – plucky, smart, funny – and able to get any man, woman or child to do what she wants through subtle manipulation, praise and occasional tears. Her tactics work wonders on all – especially the hapless males who cross her path. She has no less than 4 men chasing after her in this novel. Actually, Christie creates a brilliant and gradual love triangle with Emily, the jailed Pearson, and the intrepid reporter Enderby. Who will Emily choose? I was on tenterhooks wondering how this triangle was going to resolve itself. Last but not least, Christie fooled me again. I never suspected the true murderer in the least. I was shocked. My two or three running theories and suspicions were all for naught. It's very rare that I'm able to solve a Christie novel correctly and this one is no exception. YA novels with Mary Sues and love triangles have NOTHING on Christie's Mary Sue of Emily and her intense yet chaste love triangle in this novel. These Agatha Christie novels were probably the very thing teenagers were consuming by the dozen in 1931. Pretending to be Emily Trefusis instead of Katniss Everdeen. Published as Murder at Hazelmoor OR The Sittaford Mystery.

  6. 4 out of 5

    AnnaLuce

    ★★★✰✰ 3.25 stars “What an awful place to live in England is,” thought Emily. “If it isn't snowing or raining or blowing it's misty. And if the sun does shine it's so cold that you can't feel your fingers or toes.” The Sittaford Mystery is one of Agathat Christie’s ‘cosier’ mysteries. We have a picturesque location, a wintry atmosphere, a seance or two, and liberal doses of Christie’s signature wit. While I was certainly entertained by the cast of characters part of me would have enjoyed this more ★★★✰✰ 3.25 stars “What an awful place to live in England is,” thought Emily. “If it isn't snowing or raining or blowing it's misty. And if the sun does shine it's so cold that you can't feel your fingers or toes.” The Sittaford Mystery is one of Agathat Christie’s ‘cosier’ mysteries. We have a picturesque location, a wintry atmosphere, a seance or two, and liberal doses of Christie’s signature wit. While I was certainly entertained by the cast of characters part of me would have enjoyed this more if the whodunnit had been a tad more complex. Here the focus seems to be Emily Trefussis, someone who is definitely unlike most of Christie’s female characters as she is very proactive and demonstrates a rather cunning awareness of her own charms. In order to clear her ‘sweetheart’s’ name she forms a partnership of sorts with a young journalist and they embark on their own investigation. Witty dialogues aside, the mystery seemed secondary to Emily’s character. Not Christie’s best, nor her worst. Read more reviews on my blog / / / View all my reviews on Goodreads

  7. 4 out of 5

    W

    Captain Trevelyan,who is very well off,owns an isolated house in the country.In the middle of winter,the mysterious Mrs.Willett and her daughter,from South Africa,rent the house from him. He moves into a smaller place.His tenants host a seance.The table starts rocking and the word MURDER is spelled out. Sure enough,the captain has been murdered at his new place.Stingy with his money,he never helped his poor relations during his lifetime.But in his will,he leaves them with substantial amounts. Why h Captain Trevelyan,who is very well off,owns an isolated house in the country.In the middle of winter,the mysterious Mrs.Willett and her daughter,from South Africa,rent the house from him. He moves into a smaller place.His tenants host a seance.The table starts rocking and the word MURDER is spelled out. Sure enough,the captain has been murdered at his new place.Stingy with his money,he never helped his poor relations during his lifetime.But in his will,he leaves them with substantial amounts. Why have his mysterious tenants rented the house from him ? Are his relatives to blame ? Does he have other enemies ? An exciting,fast paced mystery which kept me engrossed.Doesn't feature Christie's regular sleuths,but the star performer is a girl who outshines the police.

  8. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    The perfect winter read! I rarely read mysteries, but this was delightful. The Sittaford Mystery is set in a remote village in England, which gets completely cut off from civilization when it's snowing. And it was snowing, you get what I'm saying? *eyebrows wagging* I liked the village busy-body characters and the multitude of suspicious types. I was also glad to see so many strong women in the book. A number of female characters significantly further the plot, and even save the day. It's the sec The perfect winter read! I rarely read mysteries, but this was delightful. The Sittaford Mystery is set in a remote village in England, which gets completely cut off from civilization when it's snowing. And it was snowing, you get what I'm saying? *eyebrows wagging* I liked the village busy-body characters and the multitude of suspicious types. I was also glad to see so many strong women in the book. A number of female characters significantly further the plot, and even save the day. It's the second time I read a book by Agatha Christie. And here again, she did a great job creating a distinct atmosphere. I enjoyed her writing. I didn't guess who committed the murder, and the book flew by in no time. This is a perfect book for some cozy reading under a blanket. Nothing too nerve-wracking, scary, or gruesome. I feel like Agatha Christie books are in their own category altogether. Recommend!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 3* of five A classic-era mystery by one of the world’s most praised and revered mystery writers. First published in 1931, it was a stand-alone tale (no Poirot and his little grey cells! No Marple and her knitting!) of crimes thought buried rising up from their unmarked graves to feed, zombie-like, on the perpetrators in the present day. Sadly, the whole world they inhabit gets to suffer along with the perpetrators; after all, crime doesn’t pay so much as it pays back. The setting of a sno Rating: 3* of five A classic-era mystery by one of the world’s most praised and revered mystery writers. First published in 1931, it was a stand-alone tale (no Poirot and his little grey cells! No Marple and her knitting!) of crimes thought buried rising up from their unmarked graves to feed, zombie-like, on the perpetrators in the present day. Sadly, the whole world they inhabit gets to suffer along with the perpetrators; after all, crime doesn’t pay so much as it pays back. The setting of a snowbound country house with bored wealthy guests is chilly enough. When the pieces of the criminal puzzle start coming apart (or together, depending on your perspective), the emotional chills go from the fridge to the freezer. What an awful place to live in England is...If it isn't snowing or raining or blowing it's misty. And if the sun does shine it's so cold that you can't feel your fingers or toes. By the time you’ve finished this modest-in-scope (288 pages) novel, you’re unlikely to feel your fingers for a few hours. Though in this case it will be from gripping the darn thing so tight in sheer desperation to see why anyone would kill the victim, shifting to a desperate need to know what took someone so long to kill the bastard. $9.99 for the Kindle edition, or free from your OverDrive-participating library. Agatha Christie's Marple: The Sittaford Mystery Rating: 3* of five How in the goddesses' names do they get this story of the Wages of Sin Punished out of a pretty straightforward criminally greedy plot to snag money not one's own, and send its roots back to the Empire's hotter corners (an archaeological dig in Egypt), I do not know. This novel never featured Marple at all. They bookhorned her in to make weight, since the old girl appeared in only twelve books. (And twenty or so stories, but apparently those were largely deemed inadequate for adaptation.) Since old Marple has to be given a reason to be there, her nephew Raymond West was blown through the keyhole as a resident neighbor of Capt. Trevelyan's. (He's the dead guy.) In the blizzard that occurs as the starting gun (!) for the plot, it's really incumbent upon Trevelyan to do the decent thing and invite Marple to shelter with him while the storm rages. An amusing aside: Inspector Narracott, the policeman in charge of the investigation, has morphed into "Constable Narracott"! But the horror of Marpling a pretty average Christie novel isn't the worst sin the producers committed. It was the idiotic way a lesbian subplot gets plopped onto the proceedings from out of nowhere and to no good purpose. It feels like they were so bored, or became so befuddled, while Frankensteining the murder back together that they added this to make things more fun for themselves. Timothy Dalton plays Captain Trevelyan, so it's worth watching for that alone. But really, in the cosmic scheme of things, is it necessary to search out so meager a pleasure when there are so many much more satisfying stories being told?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    Major Burnaby who has gone to visit with his neighbours the Willets finds himself participating in “tableturning” but after a harmless bit of fun, the “spirits” inform them that Captain Tevelyan has been murdered. Navy Captain Joe Trevelyan had retired to the small village of Sittaford in Dartmoor where he built six houses, one of which he occupied himself, and the rest sold to others, among them Major Burnaby his closest friend. The Captain’s only flaws seem reclusiveness and a fondness for mon Major Burnaby who has gone to visit with his neighbours the Willets finds himself participating in “tableturning” but after a harmless bit of fun, the “spirits” inform them that Captain Tevelyan has been murdered. Navy Captain Joe Trevelyan had retired to the small village of Sittaford in Dartmoor where he built six houses, one of which he occupied himself, and the rest sold to others, among them Major Burnaby his closest friend. The Captain’s only flaws seem reclusiveness and a fondness for money, the latter having led him to let his own house to the Willets for the winter and take up residence elsewhere. When Major Burnaby trudges through the thick snow to put himself at ease and ensure Trevelyan is safe, he finds that the séance was in fact right, and the Captain has been murdered. Captain Trevelyan had no enemies but was a very rich man, so of course those who stand to inherit are in the net of suspicion. When the police find his nephew James Pearson visited him just around the time the incident happened and was desperate for money, they are not long in arresting him. But Jim’s fiancé, Emily Trefusis knows even if he isn’t straightforward in all his dealings, he is not capable of murder and sets out to clear his name, along the way enlisting the help of journalist Charles Enderby who was in Sittaford for another purpose but jumps at the chance of the scoop of a lifetime. Emily is a very likeable heroine full of spunk and gumption, she knows what she needs to do and gets it done, not being above a bit of manipulation. Charles Enderby is eager to be of assistance (even when it means being outdoors in the middle of the night in frozen weather) and even the Inspector is happy to oblige with information which he wouldn’t probably reveal to any other. It was great fun “watching” Emily as she approaches the Captain’s relations and Sittaford residents finding out all she needs to know, and some that she probably doesn’t. Miss Percehouse was another character I thought good fun, shrewd and also in some ways like Emily, despite being an invalid. As is usual with Christie, there are various plotlines side by side. Everyone has something to hide but which of these has something to do with Captain Trevelyan’s murder? One pretty much needs to read to the end to find out. This was another one where I didn’t guess the murderer or the motive, for that matter. (I tried thinking up the most fantastic solution I could come up with, but it turned out to be just that, and completely wrong, though there was a “secret” in that quarter as well). The atmosphere is icy, there are secrets galore, even an escaped convict loose on the moors, all together making for very entertaining reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    “People don't do things without a reason.” Another entertaining read. No Poirot or Marple in sight, which always means that you have no idea where the narration is going to go. I rather enjoyed following smart and manipulative Miss Emily, sleuthing to prove the innocence of her Fiancé, who yes, looked rather insipid. One ‘thing’ at the beginning gave me a clue that reduced the pool of suspects. Still, it is always fascinating to see what all that colourful cast had to say and more importantly, t “People don't do things without a reason.” Another entertaining read. No Poirot or Marple in sight, which always means that you have no idea where the narration is going to go. I rather enjoyed following smart and manipulative Miss Emily, sleuthing to prove the innocence of her Fiancé, who yes, looked rather insipid. One ‘thing’ at the beginning gave me a clue that reduced the pool of suspects. Still, it is always fascinating to see what all that colourful cast had to say and more importantly, to hide ;0)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara K

    Not bad, but far from my favorite Christie. The premise was tempting but although there was nothing terribly wrong with the follow through, it rested so much on the surface that I never felt connected. I'm typically an enthusiast of well placed red herrings, but there were so many in this book that their effect was to dissipate tension rather than build it. And I will admit to being a bit put off by Emily, the spunky girl ("woman" is not the appropriate noun in this context) who manipulates all Not bad, but far from my favorite Christie. The premise was tempting but although there was nothing terribly wrong with the follow through, it rested so much on the surface that I never felt connected. I'm typically an enthusiast of well placed red herrings, but there were so many in this book that their effect was to dissipate tension rather than build it. And I will admit to being a bit put off by Emily, the spunky girl ("woman" is not the appropriate noun in this context) who manipulates all the men she encounters in her attempts to prove that her not-very-bright boyfriend did not commit a murder. The rationale provided for her commitment to this guy who seemed incapable of navigating life on his own was that she was a strong woman and needed a weak man to manage. Ick. All in all, a disappointment, but still written with Christie's wit and style.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lotte

    A pretty standard Agatha Christie mystery. I liked the snowy winter atmosphere and the mystery was intriguing throughout. Emily, the amateur detective, felt pretty much interchangeable with any other young female detective in any other Agatha Christie novel though and I wasn't a fan of that. A pretty standard Agatha Christie mystery. I liked the snowy winter atmosphere and the mystery was intriguing throughout. Emily, the amateur detective, felt pretty much interchangeable with any other young female detective in any other Agatha Christie novel though and I wasn't a fan of that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    People don't generally move from somewhere warm in winter to somewhere wintry. But two of the characters in this story do, to everyone's puzzlement. But they're not even the most interesting characters in this mystery. That honour goes to Emily Trefusis who, after Captain Trevelyan is murdered and her fiancé is charged, embarks on her own investigation of all the potential suspects, roping in a reporter and using her wits, intelligence and lots of logic. This isn't a Marple or Poirot story, and People don't generally move from somewhere warm in winter to somewhere wintry. But two of the characters in this story do, to everyone's puzzlement. But they're not even the most interesting characters in this mystery. That honour goes to Emily Trefusis who, after Captain Trevelyan is murdered and her fiancé is charged, embarks on her own investigation of all the potential suspects, roping in a reporter and using her wits, intelligence and lots of logic. This isn't a Marple or Poirot story, and this time the Police Inspector is a pretty smart guy. Emily and Inspector Naracott conduct their respective investigations, eventually pooling their knowledge together, and I was surprised by who the murderer was.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    Another blockbuster from the pen of Agatha Christie. This novel has the most eerie beginning amongst all her novels. The development of the plot is slow in the beginning but it soon picks up pace and you just cannot out it down in last hundred pages. And in the end when the murderer is revealed you are left wondering as to why you did not think of that before.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    A very enjoyable read, like all Agatha Christie, and with some wonderful characters, although I think my reading was slightly marred by having seen a (very different) television adaptation of the story first.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    It's weird for me to dislike Christie books, but this one did nothing for me. It was a struggle to finish. I think the main issue was that I just found the why behind who murdered an eccentric and misogynistic man (Captain Trevelyan) to be boring due to one of the main character we follow through most of the book. Captain Trevelyan is found murdered after a weird seance tells the group who is holding it that he is dead. Trevelyan's long time friend and neighbor Major Burnaby goes to his home duri It's weird for me to dislike Christie books, but this one did nothing for me. It was a struggle to finish. I think the main issue was that I just found the why behind who murdered an eccentric and misogynistic man (Captain Trevelyan) to be boring due to one of the main character we follow through most of the book. Captain Trevelyan is found murdered after a weird seance tells the group who is holding it that he is dead. Trevelyan's long time friend and neighbor Major Burnaby goes to his home during a heavy snow and finds Trevelyan dead. Trevelyan's will leaves things to his sister and to his niece and two nephews. Questions quickly emerge about was it one of Trevelyan's family members that finally did him in for their inheritance. I was more interested when we had Inspector Narricot investigating things. He reminded me a lot of Poirot in his thinking, but the way he acted with people reminded me of Superintendent Battle. When Christie switched over to the fiancee of a man suspected of the murder (Emily) I just didn't care anymore. Christie tried to throw some romance via Emily and two men during the course of the book, but in the end Emily chooses the one who I considered to be a waste. This is a common theme in Christie books though. She always has the bright young thing seemingly throwing her life away on some man that is not perfect since she will bring him up to scratch. I also didn't like how we get the perspective of the person who murdered Trevelyan but with a cheat (you don't know that you are not getting the full picture until the end). Usually it seems so obvious when Christie reveals the who and the why since she props up clues along the way. This book felt very muddled to me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    "Major Burnaby drew on his gum boots, buttoned his overcoat collar round his neck, took from a shelf near the door a hurricane lantern, and cautiously opened the front door of his little bungalow and peered out." I love this opening paragraph. It sets the scene for one of my favourite cozy mysteries: A small village near Dartmoor - you know, the misty remote parts of Baskerville fame. Some of the villagers have are gathering for tea and enjoy a game of table-turning, adding a supernatural edge to "Major Burnaby drew on his gum boots, buttoned his overcoat collar round his neck, took from a shelf near the door a hurricane lantern, and cautiously opened the front door of his little bungalow and peered out." I love this opening paragraph. It sets the scene for one of my favourite cozy mysteries: A small village near Dartmoor - you know, the misty remote parts of Baskerville fame. Some of the villagers have are gathering for tea and enjoy a game of table-turning, adding a supernatural edge to the already eerie setting. As the party enjoys the movements of the ouija board, it spells out a name and the party is stunned: "Supposing something had happened to Captain Trevelyan… Supposing…" Anyway, not to take too much away from the ensuing story, there is a murder and a subsequent investigation, and a number of potential culprits. After all, this is Christie mystery. What makes The Sittaford Mystery stand out for me is that there is lightheartedness and humor in this story which is lacking in some of her other books, and there is a female lead who cracks the confines of her role: So, one hand she proclaims that: "One can’t do anything without a man. Men know so much, and are able to get information in so many ways that are simply impossible to women." And on the other, only a few pages later she takes charge of the investigation: "‘Well,’ said Emily rising to her feet. ‘It’s about time we went back to the Three Crowns, and I will pack my suitcase and do a short weeping act on Mrs Belling’s shoulder.’ ‘Don’t you worry,’ said Mr Enderby rather fatuously. ‘You leave everything to me.’ ‘That’s just what I mean to do,’ said Emily with a complete lack of truth. ‘It’s so wonderful to have someone you can really rely on.’ Emily Trefusis was really a very accomplished young woman." A brilliant read for admirers of the cozy mystery and the classic Christie who-dunnit. I still have to re-read some of the stories that pre-date The Sittaford Mystery (1931) but at the time of writing this one, Christie had already found her forte of setting the story in a confined space and letting psychology drive the story. Review first posted on BookLikes: http://brokentune.booklikes.com/post/...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    I actually guessed the killer right! Ah, how wonderful it is to follow your gut right from the start and not let go even as she started throwing in little hints to who else it could be. Overall, this wasn't too thrilling of a mystery since I followed my gut the whole time and didn't sway with it. Usually, I just go along with mysteries and don't bother trying to formulate too many ideas. Most of my ideas are flexible in mysteries. This is one of the few I've actually gotten right, another notabl I actually guessed the killer right! Ah, how wonderful it is to follow your gut right from the start and not let go even as she started throwing in little hints to who else it could be. Overall, this wasn't too thrilling of a mystery since I followed my gut the whole time and didn't sway with it. Usually, I just go along with mysteries and don't bother trying to formulate too many ideas. Most of my ideas are flexible in mysteries. This is one of the few I've actually gotten right, another notable one being The Cuckoo's Calling. Classic Christie through and through is all I can say on this one. The only complaint I really have is that I wish Christie would stop with the romance. I'm here to read a mystery, not listen to some girl choose between two men.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    THE SITTAFORD MYSTERY made it onto my list, 5 Snowy Literary Escapes from this Summer of Climate Change Horror http://tinyurl.com/h6ca8ca You'll get mental frostbite reading this one, but it's better than the heat! #BeachReads THE SITTAFORD MYSTERY made it onto my list, 5 Snowy Literary Escapes from this Summer of Climate Change Horror http://tinyurl.com/h6ca8ca You'll get mental frostbite reading this one, but it's better than the heat! #BeachReads

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    Agatha Christie has been my favorite author since I was 9 and read my first Hercule Poirot novel (It was The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in case anybody is curious). I bought a box set of Poirot paperbacks at a garage sale for the exorbitant price of $4 (and spent a lot of time mowing the lawn that summer to pay my mom back for giving me the cash to buy books!) and was whisked away into Christie's golden age mystery world of waxed moustaches, sinister plots and murders at country estates. :) Fl Agatha Christie has been my favorite author since I was 9 and read my first Hercule Poirot novel (It was The Mysterious Affair at Styles, in case anybody is curious). I bought a box set of Poirot paperbacks at a garage sale for the exorbitant price of $4 (and spent a lot of time mowing the lawn that summer to pay my mom back for giving me the cash to buy books!) and was whisked away into Christie's golden age mystery world of waxed moustaches, sinister plots and murders at country estates. :) Flash forward mumble-mumble-ahem years, and I still LOVE Christie's style and characters. I always wanted to read all of Christie's writing....but could never find a comprehensive list. Back in the pre-internet days, I lived in a small town in BFE Kansas that had no bookshop and a very small library. I made a list of her novels using book lists in paperbacks I bought...and found many of her books over the years. I have a shelf filled with old, disheveled but much loved, paperbacks. But I could never find them all. And some were published under multiple titles....making it really rough to tell what book was actually which. :) But.....the internet is a wonderful tool....and I've finally started on my quest to read my way through Christie. In publication order (as best I can, with some backtracking when I find I have gone off track) and much meandering down rabbit holes when necessary (references to historical events, places, or phrases/language that is dated by almost 100 years of time passing). I'm loving it! I had to smile when I reached The Sittaford Mystery in my travels through Christie. This is a Christie novel that I had never read before. And not only that, it was the first Christie novel to be published under one title in the US and another in the UK. In 1931, the book was published in the United States as The Murder at Hazelmoor. Later that year, the book was published in the UK as The Sittaford Mystery. This story doesn't feature one of Christie's well-known detectives, but instead focuses on a group of people in two English villages following a blizzard. Throw in a supernatural element -- a session of "Table-Turning'' that hints at a murder -- and Christie weaves an interesting tale of cold, winter murder! Very entertaining mystery! I liked the fact that the characters were just randoms thrown in together and not Poirot/Marple, etc. This particular plot worked better that way. I listened to the audio book version of this story. Narrated by Hugh Fraser (who played Hastings in the Poirot television series), the audio is about 6.5 hours long. Fraser does an excellent job of narrating! I went down a bit of a rabbit hole on this one.... Table Turning. Before oujia boards became all the rage, spiritualists, magicians and charletans used table turning to contact the spirit world. Participants would sit around the table and when there was a spirit with a message, they would speak the alphabet waiting for the table to dip or move at the correct letter. Movement of the table or even raps were used as signals. Definitely a fun and easily manipulated parlor trick for amusement. Christie, of course, turned it to sinister, murderous ends! The television series Agatha Christie's Marple adapted this story in Season 2, Episode 4. I had never watched the show before....so was very interested to check it out. Jane Marple is played by Geraldine McEwan. I liked her portrayal of the character, but was disappointed in the episode. Significant changes to the plot were made....so many in fact that it really is no longer the same story. Ick. The story is great the way Christie wrote it --- why mangle it just to add Miss Marple in the mix?? It could easily have been kept mostly intact and Marple still interjected into the investigation....but they made major plot changes. Boo! Moving on to the next book in my Christie adventure: Peril at End House! Hercule Poirot!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    A winter mystery is perfect for those wintery days where a solstice is around the corner, a new year is beginning, etc. When I first got into this book, I needed to prevent myself from calling it "The Sit-Upon Mystery." Sit-Upon is a Victorian-Era word for backside, isn't it? Could a woman complain, "That man had his eyes upon my sit-upon! Police! Arrest him!" Anyway, seems like our heroine in this book, a potential long-lost feisty niece of Miss Marple, Emily Trefusis is well-aware of the shapeli A winter mystery is perfect for those wintery days where a solstice is around the corner, a new year is beginning, etc. When I first got into this book, I needed to prevent myself from calling it "The Sit-Upon Mystery." Sit-Upon is a Victorian-Era word for backside, isn't it? Could a woman complain, "That man had his eyes upon my sit-upon! Police! Arrest him!" Anyway, seems like our heroine in this book, a potential long-lost feisty niece of Miss Marple, Emily Trefusis is well-aware of the shapeliness of her sit-upon, and she is aware that she looks fantastic. She's that fortunate sort of young lady who uses her wiles and wits regardless of the circumstances, and she uses all resources that come her way. And always, for people like Emily, her resources include gallant men of all ages who want to be impressive, and they want her to be with them, etc. Emily agrees that these men can, why not!, go ahead and put yourself through multiple inconveniences, how impressive! And the gullible menfolk help her solve the mystery. Was I surprised by the ending? Of course I was. Mystery stories make no sense to me. But Huzzah for Emily and her decision to marry an idiot, I guess.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    It was by chance that I picked this Christie mystery out of the pile to read next, the story is set in a snowy wintry Dartmouth and whilst reading this during the middle of December really added to my enjoyment of this story. I really liked the seance sequences, this is the main focus of the story as it appears that the spirits inform the group of the murder of Captain Trevelyan. When they discover that he has in fact been killed, surely it must be someone playing a practical joke on the rest of t It was by chance that I picked this Christie mystery out of the pile to read next, the story is set in a snowy wintry Dartmouth and whilst reading this during the middle of December really added to my enjoyment of this story. I really liked the seance sequences, this is the main focus of the story as it appears that the spirits inform the group of the murder of Captain Trevelyan. When they discover that he has in fact been killed, surely it must be someone playing a practical joke on the rest of the party? That idea instantly hooks you into the novel and makes for a great mystery.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I am a great admirer of Agatha Christie stand alone book's. I love her Poriot and Miss Marple but I think her stand alone book's should get more attention. This one is about a murder, and a seance reveals the murder. Who the murder is I won't tell, but I recommend you read this book, so you can find out for yourself. I am a great admirer of Agatha Christie stand alone book's. I love her Poriot and Miss Marple but I think her stand alone book's should get more attention. This one is about a murder, and a seance reveals the murder. Who the murder is I won't tell, but I recommend you read this book, so you can find out for yourself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    DJ

    This is the perfect book for a cosy night at home, wrapped in a blanket, eating chocolate and drinking tea (or wine 🤷🏻‍♀️).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tras

    Really enjoyed this one even though I didn't come anywhere near to guessing the murderer. Emily Trefusis is a wonderful character (one of the "plucky" heroines that Christie does so well) and she immediately became a favourite - on a par with the equally awesome Lucy Eyelesbarrow (from '4:50 to Paddington'). Really enjoyed this one even though I didn't come anywhere near to guessing the murderer. Emily Trefusis is a wonderful character (one of the "plucky" heroines that Christie does so well) and she immediately became a favourite - on a par with the equally awesome Lucy Eyelesbarrow (from '4:50 to Paddington').

  27. 5 out of 5

    John

    A solid 3.5. The book is much better than the movie where Miss Marple is added and Treveylan’s backstory is silly. Of course the ending is the much better in the book and makes more sense. Given that the murderer in the movie is different! So if you have seen the movie and not read the book you have a treat in store. I did like Emily and her intrepid sleuthing with Charles Enderby but her decision on who she would love is baffling. How can an intelligent woman make the decision she made. Some gr A solid 3.5. The book is much better than the movie where Miss Marple is added and Treveylan’s backstory is silly. Of course the ending is the much better in the book and makes more sense. Given that the murderer in the movie is different! So if you have seen the movie and not read the book you have a treat in store. I did like Emily and her intrepid sleuthing with Charles Enderby but her decision on who she would love is baffling. How can an intelligent woman make the decision she made. Some great characters the crossword playing Major Burnaby, the Willets and their bizarre decision to spend a winter in Devon in an isolated spot. Captain Trevelyan’s extremely unlikeable heirs. A niece married to a nasty piece of work, the sister besotted with her invalid husband and throw in some supernatural aspects makes a nice mix. The table turning at the start announcing he murder of Captain Trevelyan reminds me of A Murder is Announced. Overall a good read and not so disjointed as the movie with Mss Marple.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    As a huge Christie fan, I was alittle thrown off with the “twist” at the end. I feel like it wasn’t practical or fully developed, however, this book provides a TON of red herrings that kept me guessing at the murderer until the end. I also liked the use of snow as almost an ominous and claustrophobic entity in the book that felt perfect to read with there bringing about 3 feet of it outside my house. While I don’t think it is her best, it was definitely still a great mystery.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Vintage Christie. However, I found it hard to keep all the characters straight in my head and I'm not sure I completely understood who a few of them were, and next I found the reason for the murder pretty lame. Also, the whole murder episode had a pretty unbelievable element in there, too. This novel didn't not have Miss Marple or Poirot but a different, and never again used, Inspector. While he was present in the story, he seemed to do very little in solving the case. On an aside note, I read thi Vintage Christie. However, I found it hard to keep all the characters straight in my head and I'm not sure I completely understood who a few of them were, and next I found the reason for the murder pretty lame. Also, the whole murder episode had a pretty unbelievable element in there, too. This novel didn't not have Miss Marple or Poirot but a different, and never again used, Inspector. While he was present in the story, he seemed to do very little in solving the case. On an aside note, I read this one years ago - the title 'Murder at Hazelmoor' - from the Agatha Christie book club, which still sits on my shelf. These were the black 'faux' leather books with gold lettering. Well, in the first paragraph this version omitted a sentence describing the moors as a Xmas card snow covered setting. The paperback I read had it. Two thoughts - just how much other stuff did those book club editions leave out of their stories, and next, why didn't the paperback version say 'Christmas' instead of 'Xmas'? Weird.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Janete

    I already knew who the killer was, since I had watched a Brazilian booktuber's review with spoilers on youtube, but I didn't remember how it was possible the murder was committed, since there wasn't enough time for the killer to arrive at the murdered's house. I liked the book a lot because in it there is a woman with a very strong personality and she's also very intelligent. This woman decided to investigate the murder together with a reporter and they did very well in this task. I already knew who the killer was, since I had watched a Brazilian booktuber's review with spoilers on youtube, but I didn't remember how it was possible the murder was committed, since there wasn't enough time for the killer to arrive at the murdered's house. I liked the book a lot because in it there is a woman with a very strong personality and she's also very intelligent. This woman decided to investigate the murder together with a reporter and they did very well in this task.

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