web site hit counter Tales of Soaring Science Fantasy from "... And Some Were Human" - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Tales of Soaring Science Fantasy from "... And Some Were Human"

Availability: Ready to download

This 1961 edition omits four stories (The Coppersmith, The Faithful, The Stars Look Down, and Nerves) from the original 1948 edition. Contents: - Foreword - Hereafter, Inc. (1941) - The Day Is Done (1939) - Forsaking All Others (1939) - The Luck of Ignatz (1939) - Dark Mission (1940) - Helen O'Loy (1938) - The Renegade (1943) - The Wings of Night (1942) This 1961 edition omits four stories (The Coppersmith, The Faithful, The Stars Look Down, and Nerves) from the original 1948 edition. Contents: - Foreword - Hereafter, Inc. (1941) - The Day Is Done (1939) - Forsaking All Others (1939) - The Luck of Ignatz (1939) - Dark Mission (1940) - Helen O'Loy (1938) - The Renegade (1943) - The Wings of Night (1942)


Compare

This 1961 edition omits four stories (The Coppersmith, The Faithful, The Stars Look Down, and Nerves) from the original 1948 edition. Contents: - Foreword - Hereafter, Inc. (1941) - The Day Is Done (1939) - Forsaking All Others (1939) - The Luck of Ignatz (1939) - Dark Mission (1940) - Helen O'Loy (1938) - The Renegade (1943) - The Wings of Night (1942) This 1961 edition omits four stories (The Coppersmith, The Faithful, The Stars Look Down, and Nerves) from the original 1948 edition. Contents: - Foreword - Hereafter, Inc. (1941) - The Day Is Done (1939) - Forsaking All Others (1939) - The Luck of Ignatz (1939) - Dark Mission (1940) - Helen O'Loy (1938) - The Renegade (1943) - The Wings of Night (1942)

30 review for Tales of Soaring Science Fantasy from "... And Some Were Human"

  1. 5 out of 5

    Simona B

    This short story inspired Isaac Asimov's robots. For that only, to me it may as well be considered a masterpiece. This short story inspired Isaac Asimov's robots. For that only, to me it may as well be considered a masterpiece.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mitticus

    Relato corto publicado en 1938. Dos científicos cumplen su fantasía de implementar una doméstica robotizada a nivel diosa doméstica. Por supuesto, ella adora al primer hombre que ve al despertar. Después de todo, sus ideas básicas las saca de telenovelas y libros de fantasia adolescente. Ya saben: la mujer perfecta. (1949) Al final, es como si Howard y Raj terminaran enamorados de su propia fantasia femenina. Y el final de ella, es demasiado a lo (view spoiler)[ mujer devota arrojandose a Relato corto publicado en 1938. Dos científicos cumplen su fantasía de implementar una doméstica robotizada a nivel diosa doméstica. Por supuesto, ella adora al primer hombre que ve al despertar. Después de todo, sus ideas básicas las saca de telenovelas y libros de fantasia adolescente. Ya saben: la mujer perfecta. (1949) Al final, es como si Howard y Raj terminaran enamorados de su propia fantasia femenina. Y el final de ella, es demasiado a lo (view spoiler)[ mujer devota arrojandose a la pira incendiaria del marido . (hide spoiler)] . Aunque a la mujer mecánica de Metropolis (1927), revolucionaria y todo, no le fue mucho mejor. Demasiado corto para darle demasiadas lecturas al asunto. [ APRIL (the robot): I'm only supposed to love him. If I can't do that, what am I for? What do I exist for? ---Buffy Episode #93: "I Was Made To Love You" (Guionista Jane Espenson) ]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    This was del Rey's first book, a collection of the best of his science fiction and fantasy stories that had appeared up to that time. It was published by a small publisher, Prime Press, in 1949, and collects stories that first appeared from 1938-1942 at the beginning (and perhaps more prolific point) of his writing career. The stories had all been purchased by John W. Campbell and appeared in Astounding SF, except for three that came out in his short-lived fantasy magazine, Unknown. The book is This was del Rey's first book, a collection of the best of his science fiction and fantasy stories that had appeared up to that time. It was published by a small publisher, Prime Press, in 1949, and collects stories that first appeared from 1938-1942 at the beginning (and perhaps more prolific point) of his writing career. The stories had all been purchased by John W. Campbell and appeared in Astounding SF, except for three that came out in his short-lived fantasy magazine, Unknown. The book is well and liberally illustrated by Sol Levin. There are twelve stories (and an introduction) divided into three sections of four stories each: Today and Yesterday, Tomorrow and Tomorrow, and And Always. Two of the stories are true classics of the genre, Helen O'Loy (perhaps the first "fembot" inspiration), and Nerves ( written decades before Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and later expanded to novel length). del Rey blended humor with suspense to good effect, and the stories here showcased his mastery of storytelling, speculation, and human drama.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    This is the first story collection by science fiction writer Lester del Rey, originally published in hardcover by Prime Press in 1948 in an edition of 3,050 copies if which 50 were specially bound, slipcased and signed by the author. The stories first appeared in Astounding and Unknown. An abridged paperback edition, including only eight of the twelve stories, was issued by Ballantine Books in 1961. 9 - "Foreword" Part I "Today and Yesterday" 17 - "Hereafter, Inc." (Unknown 1941) 31 - "The Day Is This is the first story collection by science fiction writer Lester del Rey, originally published in hardcover by Prime Press in 1948 in an edition of 3,050 copies if which 50 were specially bound, slipcased and signed by the author. The stories first appeared in Astounding and Unknown. An abridged paperback edition, including only eight of the twelve stories, was issued by Ballantine Books in 1961. 9 - "Foreword" Part I "Today and Yesterday" 17 - "Hereafter, Inc." (Unknown 1941) 31 - "The Day Is Done" (Astounding 1939) 48 - "Forsaking All Others" (Unknown 1939) 63 - "The Coppersmith"* (Unknown 1939) Part II "Tomorrow and Tomorrow" 82 - "The Luck of Ignatz" ( Astounding 1939) 119 - "The Faithful"* (Astounding 1938) 139 - "Dark Mission" (Astounding Jul 1940) 149 - "Helen O'Loy" (Astounding 1938) Oart III "and Always" 164 - "The Stars Look Down"* (Astounding 1940) 208 - "The Renegade" (Astounding 1943) 236 - "The Wings of Night" (Astounding 1942) 247 - "Nerves"* (Astounding Sep 1942)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Davonna Juroe

    Interesting science-fiction short story about two men who build a robot woman and their ensuing entanglements with their creation. Dominick M. Grace, an Associate Professor of English at Algoma University College, points out that "Helen O'Loy" is "a satire on male fantasies." http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307... Assuming Grace's assertion is true, this story is akin to Ira Levin's science-fiction novel the Stepford Wives. Interesting science-fiction short story about two men who build a robot woman and their ensuing entanglements with their creation. Dominick M. Grace, an Associate Professor of English at Algoma University College, points out that "Helen O'Loy" is "a satire on male fantasies." http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307... Assuming Grace's assertion is true, this story is akin to Ira Levin's science-fiction novel the Stepford Wives.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Logan Streondj

    The writing is pretty good, the immersion is decent. For the late 1930's this is a fairly forward thinking short story, but for the 21st century it has some fairly archaic perceptions of women. Overall it raises some valid issues, like that memory tampering of a sentient being is unethical, even if they are a robot. The writing is pretty good, the immersion is decent. For the late 1930's this is a fairly forward thinking short story, but for the 21st century it has some fairly archaic perceptions of women. Overall it raises some valid issues, like that memory tampering of a sentient being is unethical, even if they are a robot.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kaleigh

    Ah, the old fembot-sexbot scifi mainstay. A guy creates a female-esque AI robot and it falls in love with him. Naturally. Is this the first? The catalyst for the millions of retellings to follow. You really never have to watch another "Ex Machina" if you just read this short story. Save yourself the eye-rolling and agony and from now on just say, "I've already read Helen O'Loy, so no thanks." Ah, the old fembot-sexbot scifi mainstay. A guy creates a female-esque AI robot and it falls in love with him. Naturally. Is this the first? The catalyst for the millions of retellings to follow. You really never have to watch another "Ex Machina" if you just read this short story. Save yourself the eye-rolling and agony and from now on just say, "I've already read Helen O'Loy, so no thanks."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pendry

    The technology may be a bit clunky but this 'Astounding Science Fiction' story from 1938 must be one of the earliest attempts to deal with an emotion that has since emerged in virtual worlds and latterly in cinema - the pain of falling in love with a beautiful robot who appears to be programmed to love. It is actually just a projection of the fact on the ground of male desire. It does not ask any deep questions yet at least it opens the subject up. The robot in question, the beautiful Helen of th The technology may be a bit clunky but this 'Astounding Science Fiction' story from 1938 must be one of the earliest attempts to deal with an emotion that has since emerged in virtual worlds and latterly in cinema - the pain of falling in love with a beautiful robot who appears to be programmed to love. It is actually just a projection of the fact on the ground of male desire. It does not ask any deep questions yet at least it opens the subject up. The robot in question, the beautiful Helen of the title, is definitely not drawn as a sex bot but as a loving and loyal housewife of that period's dreams. The gender relations are, of course, as clunky as the technology - people travel, it would appear, by rocket and doctors are hired to help mothers stop their sons from falling in love with servant girls (a fit of heavy-handed authorial irony) - but the story remains prescient at a human level.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erika Hood

    No soy un super fan de los robots (pero me encanta el libro de cinder escrita por marrisa meyer) por lo cual este cuento me imagino que tiene un poquito detalle de CINDER porque: A) Por los androids B) Y por ultimo, amor es amor, no importa su genero ni caracteristicas de cualquier cosa. Entonces le daré un 3.7 a este obra. Si alguien le gusta leer cuentos cortos sobre robots y amor, este historia es bueno y recomendable!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    A 1938 classic, still eminently readable, but a Story of its Time. I'll look in a bit, but I'm guessing that the female half of the audience will find the 1930s attitudes harder to take.... Here's a copy online: https://my.fit.edu/~rosiene/delrey.pdf A 1938 classic, still eminently readable, but a Story of its Time. I'll look in a bit, but I'm guessing that the female half of the audience will find the 1930s attitudes harder to take.... Here's a copy online: https://my.fit.edu/~rosiene/delrey.pdf

  11. 4 out of 5

    SmallToothedSmile

    Very thought-provoking. Are androids contemporary slaves?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    The best of the lot so far. 1939 Retro Hugo Nominee for Best Short Story. Published in Astounding Science-Fiction, December 1938

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl

    Ballentine reprint of 1948 HB, some of his best. Great cover art.

  14. 4 out of 5

    JoeK

    This was a quick enjoyable read. It was fun reading a story about a robot developing human feelings. I think robots have really fallen out of favour since the late sixties - early seventies. Maybe it's because the idea of humanoid robots now seems impractical when we have so many real robots that are very function-specific and look nothing like humans at all. In fact, since I started keeping track of my reading, robots have only played a major role in the plot of 27 stories in my database of 1,5 This was a quick enjoyable read. It was fun reading a story about a robot developing human feelings. I think robots have really fallen out of favour since the late sixties - early seventies. Maybe it's because the idea of humanoid robots now seems impractical when we have so many real robots that are very function-specific and look nothing like humans at all. In fact, since I started keeping track of my reading, robots have only played a major role in the plot of 27 stories in my database of 1,546. Nowadays, the trend in fiction seems to be toward malevolent A.I.s that want to take over, or leave the Earth. There still seem to be plenty of robots in movies though, probably because they’re a lot more visual than talking computers. Or maybe it’s because Hollywood loves to perpetuate old myths (making humanoid robots is easy — humans only use 10% of their brains — cars explode at the drop of a hat — you get the idea…) I imagine that when he wrote this, Lester del Rey probably thought the idea of people falling in love with robots was kinda cute, if farfetched. He probably didn’t imagine it would really happen. Since that time we have had the advent of “love dolls” and even Futurama has made jokes about “Robo-sexuals”. We live in strange times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Aldridge

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Mindwebs audiobook 41. (A 1938 story included in “18 Greatest Science Fiction stories” edited by Laurence Jennifer. ) About the uncanny valley effect of a prototype female android type of robot (rather cornily using tape and memory coils ) with glands and hormones. Naturally there are emotional complications, she declares her undying love for her creator and she objects to the suggestion that her memory coils be changed on the grounds that she prefers not to be murdered. We aren’t there yet but Mindwebs audiobook 41. (A 1938 story included in “18 Greatest Science Fiction stories” edited by Laurence Jennifer. ) About the uncanny valley effect of a prototype female android type of robot (rather cornily using tape and memory coils ) with glands and hormones. Naturally there are emotional complications, she declares her undying love for her creator and she objects to the suggestion that her memory coils be changed on the grounds that she prefers not to be murdered. We aren’t there yet but I reckon it’s certainly a reasonable possibility given the rate of progress in AI.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laur-Marian Mertea

    Really subjective opinion: - average read for a science-fiction fan (3.5/5); - good read for someone who's just starting to read science-fiction (4/5); Although I'm not a big fan of romance in science-fiction (and although neither the story, nor the story are extraordinary in any way) I will recommend this short story for the way it captures the way people were back in the days and what they thought future would bring . It has its shortcomings and hasn't aged that well, but if you get past those yo Really subjective opinion: - average read for a science-fiction fan (3.5/5); - good read for someone who's just starting to read science-fiction (4/5); Although I'm not a big fan of romance in science-fiction (and although neither the story, nor the story are extraordinary in any way) I will recommend this short story for the way it captures the way people were back in the days and what they thought future would bring . It has its shortcomings and hasn't aged that well, but if you get past those you will actually find that the story is actually enjoyable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Stockett

    I have always loved artificial intelligence. As a programmer, I'm fascinated by the idea of computers gaining intelligence. Of course, beyond that is the question of whether we can program a computer to feel, to emote, to love. This is a fun little story about two men who design a robot with emotions, first thinking that emotion is an important part of decision making. But they didn't bargain for the roller coaster that comes with a robot that falls in love with it's creator. Definitely a fun, wo I have always loved artificial intelligence. As a programmer, I'm fascinated by the idea of computers gaining intelligence. Of course, beyond that is the question of whether we can program a computer to feel, to emote, to love. This is a fun little story about two men who design a robot with emotions, first thinking that emotion is an important part of decision making. But they didn't bargain for the roller coaster that comes with a robot that falls in love with it's creator. Definitely a fun, worthwhile read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    This story was nominated for the 1939 Retro-Hugo for Best Short Story. It's a story about two men who build a robotic woman and the romance that develops thereafter. Helen O'Loy=Helen of Troy=Helen Alloy. Get it? If you don't, it's spelled out in the story. The story lacked any oomph, emotional or otherwise and was not helped by the references to women, who seemed as familiar as a member of an alien species. This story was nominated for the 1939 Retro-Hugo for Best Short Story. It's a story about two men who build a robotic woman and the romance that develops thereafter. Helen O'Loy=Helen of Troy=Helen Alloy. Get it? If you don't, it's spelled out in the story. The story lacked any oomph, emotional or otherwise and was not helped by the references to women, who seemed as familiar as a member of an alien species.

  19. 5 out of 5

    PvOberstein

    Read via the Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/stream/Astounding... Interesting set-up (robot develops emotions and creators are conflicted as to its consciousness), but way too much of it is generic fembot fantasy. The gender norms of the era _really_ permeate the piece, likely to the detriment of the modern reader. Read via the Internet Archive at: https://archive.org/stream/Astounding... Interesting set-up (robot develops emotions and creators are conflicted as to its consciousness), but way too much of it is generic fembot fantasy. The gender norms of the era _really_ permeate the piece, likely to the detriment of the modern reader.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    Read in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Vol. 1: 1929-1964. In the story two men make a life like robot. The robot listens to a romantic story on the radio and falls for one of the men. It was an interesting story, as another reviewer has said, it maybe one of the first stories to deal with the idea.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    I read this story because it was nominated for the Retro-Hugo Award. Two men develop a female robot with human emotions. The robot falls in love with one of the men, and complications ensue. Not a bad little story, although horribly sexist by today's standards. I read this story because it was nominated for the Retro-Hugo Award. Two men develop a female robot with human emotions. The robot falls in love with one of the men, and complications ensue. Not a bad little story, although horribly sexist by today's standards.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Enh. Thoughts on all the 1939 Retro-Hugo nominated short stories here: http://ciaracatscifi.blogspot.com/201... Enh. Thoughts on all the 1939 Retro-Hugo nominated short stories here: http://ciaracatscifi.blogspot.com/201...

  23. 4 out of 5

    B.szoke

    A classic work of early science fiction.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hoffmann

    Another 1930's Science Fiction story told as a flash back. I would much rather be in the action than a retelling of it. Anyway, this one was much better and I enjoyed it. Another 1930's Science Fiction story told as a flash back. I would much rather be in the action than a retelling of it. Anyway, this one was much better and I enjoyed it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

  26. 4 out of 5

    Luna Holmes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Willian Perpétuo Busch

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shelley356

  29. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evalyn

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.