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'When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - 'When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; a creeping man and the three-gabled house - all test the bravery of Dr Watson and the brilliant mind of Mr Sherlock Homes, the greatest detective we have ever known.


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'When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - 'When you have eliminated all which is impossible, then whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.' In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; a creeping man and the three-gabled house - all test the bravery of Dr Watson and the brilliant mind of Mr Sherlock Homes, the greatest detective we have ever known.

30 review for The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 76% | Good Notes: A volume divided into two tiers of quality. Heavily reliant on gimmickry and clear retreads of earlier Holmes stories.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #9), Arthur Conan Doyle In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; a creeping man and the three-gabled house - all test the The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (Sherlock Holmes, #9), Arthur Conan Doyle In this, the final collection of Sherlock Holmes adventures, the intrepid detective and his faithful companion Dr Watson examine and solve twelve cases that puzzle clients, baffle the police and provide readers with the thrill of the chase. These mysteries - involving an illustrious client and a Sussex vampire; the problems of Thor Bridge and of the Lions Mane; a creeping man and the three-gabled house - all test the bravery of Dr Watson and the brilliant mind of Mr Sherlock Homes, the greatest detective we have ever known. ‏‫‭The Case-book of Sherlock Holmes, by A. Conan Doyle. ‏‫‭Harmondsworth, Middlesex‏‫‭: Penguin Books‏‫‭, 1955 ‏‫‭= 1334. 254p The Adventure of the Illustrious Client The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone The Adventure of the Three Gables The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire The Adventure of the Three Garridebs The Problem of Thor Bridge The Adventure of the Creeping Man The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place The Adventure of the Retired Colourman تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و پنجم ماه می سال 2011 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای شرلوک هولمز؛ نویسنده: آرتور کانن دوبل؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This is the final Sherlock Holmes book, and while it is enjoyable, I think "Casebook" is the weakest collection of Sherlock stories. Having gone through all nine books this summer, it really seems like Doyle was so tired of the character that he was phoning it in by the 1920s. But I did have some favorites in the bunch: "The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone," in which Holmes uses that wacky new gizmo called a phonograph to fool some criminals; "The Problem of Thor Bridge" has an ingenious method This is the final Sherlock Holmes book, and while it is enjoyable, I think "Casebook" is the weakest collection of Sherlock stories. Having gone through all nine books this summer, it really seems like Doyle was so tired of the character that he was phoning it in by the 1920s. But I did have some favorites in the bunch: "The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone," in which Holmes uses that wacky new gizmo called a phonograph to fool some criminals; "The Problem of Thor Bridge" has an ingenious method of framing someone for murder using a rock, a handgun and some string; and "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs," because Sherlock shows genuine feeling for Dr. Watson when he gets shot in the leg while on a case. "It was worth a wound, it was worth many wounds, to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask." Despite the unevenness of this story collection, it was bittersweet for me. I'm sad that my summer of Sherlock is now over. I've spent the past two and a half months listening to the marvelous actor Derek Jacobi narrate all nine books of Holmes, and he really made the great detective come alive. If any of you Goodreaders want to delve into the Sherlock canon, I recommend letting Jacobi be your guide.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a writer I count among my favorites, and I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan since my boyhood. However, although I've read all four of Doyle's Holmes novels, there are still a number of the short stories in the canon that I haven't read; and except for The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, this is the only one of the author's own collections I've read. This volume collects the last dozen stories Doyle wrote about Holmes (his preface states his intention not to write any more Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is a writer I count among my favorites, and I've been a Sherlock Holmes fan since my boyhood. However, although I've read all four of Doyle's Holmes novels, there are still a number of the short stories in the canon that I haven't read; and except for The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, this is the only one of the author's own collections I've read. This volume collects the last dozen stories Doyle wrote about Holmes (his preface states his intention not to write any more of them), all set before "His Last Bow," which takes place at the outset of World War I, though they were written after it. (Some of the story settings are given exact chronological dates, and some aren't.) Stylistically, they're very much of a piece with any of the earlier ones that I've read. Holmes solves cases by the rigorous observation of details and the application of deductive logic, in a coldly intellectual fashion that the Neoclassical writers would have approved; but Doyle's essentially Romantic approach shows in the appeal of the tales to the emotions, and the frequent use of outre and exotic motifs and sometimes Gothic atmosphere. Most of the stories here, unlike the majority of modern mysteries, don't involve murder (and some don't actually involve criminal behavior at all). Usually Holmes' faithful sidekick Dr. Watson narrates the tales, but one story here is told in third person, and the great detective himself narrates two of them. Most of the stories were new to me in written form, though I'd previously read "The Adventure of the Creeping Man," which appears in the excellent Southern Illinois Univ. Press collection The Best Science Fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle; the Holmes stories avoid use of actual supernatural elements (though Doyle wrote supernatural fiction with other characters), but this is a good example of the few that use science fictional elements. (I also realized, while reading the book, that I'd previously read "The Adventure of the Illustrious Client" and "The Problem of Thor Bridge," because I recognized remembered passages of dialogue in both of them; but those reads were long ago and I'd forgotten almost all of the plots.) In a few cases, I'd also seen an adaptation of a story years ago on the outstanding PBS series Mystery!, whose wonderful Holmes episodes feature Jeremy Brett, whom I consider THE definitive cinematic Holmes. But the adaptations were different enough from the written stories (and I'd forgotten enough of most of them!) to not be spoilerish. One of these adaptations was the main source of my interest in this particular collection. The two-part episode The Last Vampire (which is actually feature-film length, and which I taped on VHS and re-watch occasionally) was based on one of the stories here, "The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire," and I've wanted to read the latter ever since seeing the TV version. The two, however, are actually significantly different. A literal adaptation of the story wouldn't have run for more than an hour (half an hour might have done it). Both story and film are set mostly in rural Sussex, though the latter develops the setting more; the dynamics of the Ferguson household in the film are (mostly) also in the story, and a couple of plot elements are the same, but used differently. But two of the best-drawn characters in the film, Stockton and the vicar, as well as the villagers, are absent from the story, as is the background about the St. Clair family and their ruined mansion, and the whole theme of psychic vampirism is lacking as well. Also, the film version is darker, more suspenseful, and more emotionally impactful. I won't say the story was a disappointment; it's a good yarn for what it is. (But it's nowhere near as ripping good as the TV "adaptation!" Viewed strictly as a adaptation, I'd have to give the latter a D-; but taking it on its own terms just as a piece of cinema in its own right, I'd give it an A+, five stars, and two thumbs up.) In some cases here, Holmes doesn't have to do much deduction; and in other stories, I was able to figure out the basic nature of the solution to the mystery pretty quickly. (That didn't preclude enjoying the stories, however.) Doyle's leading female characters are often morally courageous, emotionally strong women of admirable character, although we also have one nasty villainess here (and it isn't Kitty Winter, despite her "fallen" status!). "The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger" is perhaps the most emotionally evocative of the twelve stories here, and "the Adventure of the Lion's Mane" perhaps the most imaginative. A couple of caveats are in order about ethnic stereotyping. One of the minor villains in "The Adventure of the Three Gables" is black (and a police inspector refers to him by the infamous "n-word," though Holmes and Watson don't), and in "The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place" it's mentioned more than once that a number of Sir Robert's creditors are Jews, though the principal one is a Gentile. But Doyles's criminals are generally white; there's no suggestion here that blacks are commonly criminals, or that Steve is a criminal because he's black. (Blacks have the same range of moral possibilities as any other ethnic group; for writers to always feel self-consciously obliged to portray them as saintly doesn't really represent an embrace of the idea of racial equality, in the actual meaning of the term.) And although the legal and ecclesiastical rules against Christians charging interest on loans (which had meant that in the medieval and early modern eras, only Jews engaged in commercial money-lending) had been done away with by Holmes' time, the traditional pattern in the financial industry still persisted to a degree --most Jews weren't money-lenders, and a number of money-lenders were Gentiles, but a disproportionate number of them were still Jewish. (Doyle doesn't suggest that the trade is in any way dishonorable, or that those who follow it, Jewish or Gentile, are at all out of line in expecting to be repaid money that they loaned in good faith!) All in all, I think this collection would appeal to any Holmes fan. Mystery fans in general, provided they don't avoid short stories as such, should also enjoy these; the diction isn't particularly challenging, nor archaic. IMO, though, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes or one of the first two novels, A Study in Scarlet or The Sign of Four, might be a better first introduction to the character of Holmes, if you've never actually read any of the canon. But that may be just me, and reflecting the fact that those were the first Holmes books that I read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    My edition of this book has a nice Preface by the author himself, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He explained that he had written enough about Holmes and Watson so he said goodbye to them. However, he hoped that his readers will remember those characters for a long time. There were some readers who advised him not to end the series as it had formed part of their boyhood. Well, I was already in my middle age when I finally read this but still I appreciated it and for 10 months became part of my daily My edition of this book has a nice Preface by the author himself, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He explained that he had written enough about Holmes and Watson so he said goodbye to them. However, he hoped that his readers will remember those characters for a long time. There were some readers who advised him not to end the series as it had formed part of their boyhood. Well, I was already in my middle age when I finally read this but still I appreciated it and for 10 months became part of my daily reading routine. I normally read this as a back up (if the first book proved to be boring) book in the morning early morning, during weekends and especially while resting at the gym lounge. You see, there are some books that I would not dare bring at the gym because some of the members are snoopy and form some kind of expression on their faces if they see me reading books that they think make my sexual preference the same as theirs. Yes, when I closed this book after my workout today, I also said goodbye to Sherlock Holmes as but I definitely enjoyed reading the whole canon. This book, his last collection of 12 (out of 56) short stories has works that deviated from the usual Watson as the narrator. Rather there is one “Mazarin Stone” narrated by an unnamed third person then there are two, “Blanched Soldier” and “Lion’s Mane” with Holmes as narrator himself. Also, that “Lion’s Mane” is already set after Holmes’ retirement. This gave me the inkling that Sir Doyle also thought twice before deciding to end this canon. The Adventure of the Illustrious Client. Violet is the daughter of General De Merville and she is in love with a murderer, Austian Baron Adelbert Gruner. The murderer’s last victim is his wife but he does not get punished because the witness gets sick and dies during the trial. Holmes first sees the baron himself but the meeting does not help Holmes in anyway. It takes the other past mistress for him to get clues on what really happened to the victims. Quite interesting. I thought that the baron was some kind of a vampire killer and then it turned out that he was just ugly and turned uglier at the end of the story. The story is entertaining but when the real baron is revealed towards the end, I said: “huh? okay” and proceeded right away to the next story. This is the reason why it took me a while to finish this collection. - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier. Godfrey Emsworth is missing and his friend James Dodd is looking for him. They both served as armies during the Second Boer War in South Africa. It has been six months since the war ended and since they were friends during the war, Dodd tries to contact him and since Emsworth has not responded, Dodd writes to his father. The father says that his son is on travel around the world but Dodd does not believe him. He thinks that Emsworth is missing so he consults Holmes for help. This is one of the two short stories that are narrated by Sherlock Holmes instead of his partner, Dr. Watson. The reason is that “Watson deserted me for a wife.” The wife being referred here is Watson’s second wife since this was published after Watson and his first wife have separated. The story ends happily and hopeful as regards to the real condition (why is he called “blanched”) of Emsworth. Quite different from the other stories. I also liked the friendship between the two men. - 4 STARS The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone. Count Negretto Sylvius still an important jewel called the Mazarin Stone. Together with his henchman, Sam Merton, Count Sylvius comes to 221B Baker St. to confront Holmes and ask why the latter’s henchmen are following him. After explaining that the henchmen are all him in disguise, Holmes pulls a series of tricks to make the count admit that he is indeed the thief. This is one of the two Sherlock Holmes stories (the other is His Last Bow that are written in third person. Also, what is noteworthy here is the fact that there is only one setting: Holmes’ room in 221B Baker St. Based on Wiki, the reason is that that this short story is originally written for a theatre play. – 3 STARS The Adventure of the Three Gables. Steve Dixie, a black dimwitted man, tells Holmes to stay away from Harrow (a area in London). To know the reason for the threat, Holmes floated that he knows Dixie’s participation on the Perkin’s case (death). Dixie’s boss is Barney Stockdale and Holmes suspects that he is connected with Harrow Weald case as is tipped off by Mary Maberley, the lady who lives at Three Gables.This is the best story in this collection. It reminded me of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The House of the Seven Gables especially because of the characters. Was it possible that this story was inspired by that classic novel by Hawthorne? - 4 STARS The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire. Mr. Ferguson suspects that his wife is a vampire because their son’s nurse has caught her sucking the blood of their son. Mr. Ferguson tells the nurse to keep quiet by bribing her. The baby is the 2nd son of Mr. Ferguson. The first one is the 15-y/o Jack whose mother is not Mrs. Ferguson. The family lives at their Essex Estate. The starting scene is very engaging. I thought that this was comparable to the gothic ingredient of The Hound of the Baskervilles. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Three Garridebs. Nathan and John Garridebs are looking man whose surname is unusual: Garrideb. Holmes finds out that there is an American Garrideb who asks John Garrideb to look for another man who has the same surname and he will give John $15 million dollars. So far, John has found only Nathan who consults Holmes and so the American Garrideb is not pleased. I liked how the deductions were done by Holmes in the story. The basic premise is not very interesting because the Garrideb does not longer look like an out of this world surname. However, it might be the case when Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote this in June 1902. - 3 STARS The Problem of Thor Bridge. Maria Gibson is killed near Thor Bridge apparently by her children’s governess, Grace Dunbar. Maria’s husband goes to Sherlock Holmes to clear Dunbar. Despite the obvious evidences, Holmes proceeds to the investigation and by the power of deduction, finds out what are really happened. Simple yet elegantly told. At first, it seems like a simple straightforward story yet when Holmes’ deductive skills come into play, the unearthing of the real story is just impressive. – 3 STARS The Adventure of the Creeping Man. Professor Presbury is acting strange and his personal secretary, Mr. Bennett seeks the help of Holmes and Watson. Mr. Bennett informs the duo that the professor has just come from Prague and that he does not want a box to be opened and the letters with cross beneath the stamps to go straight to his master. Prague should be an exotic place around that time that this was written. Maybe like Transylvannia where Dracula used to reside. No extraordinary flavor in this story except that Sir Doyle seemed to be thinking of going sci-fi. Do old man who are about to re-marry, this time with a much younger woman, have to resort to those things? - 2 STARS The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane. Harold Stackhurst is a headmaster of The Gables, a preparatory school. Holmes is enjoying a weekend with him because they are friends when another teacher in the same school, Fitzroy McPherson arrives with blood and says something about “lion’s mane” before collapsing then dies. The third teacher, Ian Murdoch, comes after but says that he has no knowledge about the murder. Holmes thinks that Murdoch is the killer because he used to court Maud Bellamy, McPherson’s fiancée until the lion’s mare comes out. Very educational at least for me. I grew up in an island but I never knew about this lion’s mane could be deadly. Maybe this is found only in that part of the world and not in the Pacific? I like it when I learned something from Holmes. - 4 STARS The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger. Mrs. Merrilow has a lodger who is mysterious because she has not shown her face. Once, Mrs. Merrilow sees it by accident and it was disfigured. Another lodger complains and so Holmes and Watson do their investigation and find the history of the disfigurement. It is that time when the lodger is working on a carnival and gets herself a boyfriend. This one is quite different. It is more dramatic than the usual illustration of Holmes’ power of deduction. This one has heart and Holmes is more of like a shrink rather than a detective. But I enjoyed it nonetheless. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Shoscombe Old Place. John Mason is a trainer at a racing stable called Shoscombe Old Place. He consults Holmes because he thinks that his master, Sir Robert Norberton is going mad. The owner of the racing stable is the sister of Sir Robert but Sir Robert is betting on the horse called Shoscombe Prince because if the horse wins, he will be out of debt. When the sister-owner dies, Sir Robert has to hide the body while waiting for the derby where Shoscombe Price competes. This was the last work included in this Sherlock Holmes canon. Yey! It’s a nice story and ends happily. There is nothing remarkable but it felt nice to finally read all the works. So, maybe that’s the reason why I liked this. I said “finally! At last!” and closed the book. - 3 STARS The Adventure of the Retired Colourman. A wife of a man leaves with her lover. The man is Josiah Amberley and the lover is Dr. Ray Ernest. The husband is the one who comes to Holmes to help track down the lovers. It turns out that the lovers have not eloped as the husband is telling Holmes. Very nice story and I thought that the reason why the British edition put this as the last story is that this is better than the real last which was the Shosombe. This has all the usual elements of a Sherlock Holmes story: deduction, Watson being part of the plot, Baker has an appearance here, the drama of mature adult relationship, etc. - 5 STARS Thank you, gentlemen (Doyle, Holmes and Watson). I really had a nice time knowing you. We were together for 10 months and I will surely miss all of you. *salutes* Now, my problem is what book to bring to the gym.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, like all the other collections, is a must read for every mystery fan. As always, some stories are better than others, but all are pure Sherlock at his best. While not the most famous of Sherlocks cases, Shoscombe Old Place and The Illustrious Client are excellent examples of the Sherlock canon, while The Blanched Soldier and The Lions Mane, both narrated by Holmes, are unique variations on a tried and true format. Yet, perhaps the best story in the entire canon, ‘The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes’, like all the other collections, is a must read for every mystery fan. As always, some stories are better than others, but all are pure Sherlock at his best. While not the most famous of Sherlock’s cases, Shoscombe Old Place and The Illustrious Client are excellent examples of the Sherlock canon, while The Blanched Soldier and The Lion’s Mane, both narrated by Holmes, are unique variations on a tried and true format. Yet, perhaps the best story in the entire canon, is The Problem of Thor Bridge, a classic locked room tale!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lumsden

    My final Sherlock Holmes! A joy to read, like the rest of the short stories - I can't believe I've actually finally read all of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    RJ from the LBC

    The final installment in the original Sherlock Holmes series includes the following short stories: The Adventure of the Illustrious Client - 4/5 - Holmes tries to get a woman away from the clutches of a bad dude. The Adventure of the Blanched Solider - 4/5 - Holmes narrates as Watson takes some time off. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone - 4/5 - The story of a missing gem is told in the third person and not narrated by Watson The Adventure of the Three Gables - 3/5 - similar to a couple other The final installment in the original Sherlock Holmes series includes the following short stories: The Adventure of the Illustrious Client - 4/5 - Holmes tries to get a woman away from the clutches of a bad dude. The Adventure of the Blanched Solider - 4/5 - Holmes narrates as Watson takes some time off. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone - 4/5 - The story of a missing gem is told in the third person and not narrated by Watson The Adventure of the Three Gables - 3/5 - similar to a couple other Holmes stories The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire - 3/5 - stretched credibility but not in the way one might think The Adventure of the Three Garridebs - 4/5 - similar to The Red Headed League but still quite fun The Problem with Thor Bridge - 3/5 - not bad but the ending stretched the bounds of believability somewhat Sherlock Holmes: Adventure of the Creeping Man - 3/5 - the science is far-fetched but the story is unique The Adventure of the Lion's Mane - 3/5 - Holmes again narrates, story is unique but again far-fetched The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger - 3/5 - a woman explains away an incident that happened several years ago The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place - 3/5 - Holmes investigates some strange happenings The Adventure of the Retired Colourman - 3/5 - a little different from the usual Holmes story

  9. 4 out of 5

    Exina

    The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone 4 stars My review. The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire - 5 stars My review. The Three Garridebs - 3 stars My review. The Problem of Thor Bridge - 5 stars My review. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone – 4 stars My review. The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire - 5 stars My review. The Three Garridebs - 3 stars My review. The Problem of Thor Bridge - 5 stars My review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pallavi Sareen

    It is Sir Doyle. Can you expect anything less than completely entertaining and genius stories? Life, it turns out, is infinitely more clever and adaptable than anyone had ever supposed. I can't even say much about this book except that I stayed up till 4 am reading because I love Sherlock Holmes. My Favourite story has to be The Problem of Thor Bridge and The Adventure of Sussex Vampire. It is Sir Doyle. Can you expect anything less than completely entertaining and genius stories? “Life, it turns out, is infinitely more clever and adaptable than anyone had ever supposed.” I can't even say much about this book except that I stayed up till 4 am reading because I love Sherlock Holmes. My Favourite story has to be The Problem of Thor Bridge and The Adventure of Sussex Vampire.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Olivia-Savannah Roach

    I wasnt feeling hopeful when going into this final read of Holmes. But it was more of the same really. Its another short story collection but after reading the first one this felt a bit dry and repetitive. It was a struggle to read through, so I ended up audiobooking it. (I dont know who but a man was reading it in a deep gravelly voice. He sounded elderly and like he wouldve been telling this story with a pipe, which was so scenic.) The mysteries were clever, but I was sort of over them because I wasn’t feeling hopeful when going into this final read of Holmes. But it was… more of the same really. It’s another short story collection but after reading the first one this felt a bit dry and repetitive. It was a struggle to read through, so I ended up audiobooking it. (I don’t know who but a man was reading it in a deep gravelly voice. He sounded elderly and like he would’ve been telling this story with a pipe, which was so scenic.) The mysteries were clever, but I was sort of over them because the formula as to how they are written is so repetitive. Also, there’s some more racism for you. I just don’t think I like the way Conan Doyle describes anyone who isn’t white, male, and fit. Otherwise, they get some pretty grotesque or unpleasant descriptions. This review and others can originally be found on Olivia's Catastrophe: https://oliviascatastrophe.com/2020/0...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    This last collection is an odd mixture: a few stories that are very good and a couple not at all (one was originally a play that itself seems to have been based on an earlier tale); a story in which Sherlock does nothing much but listen; two narrated by Sherlock himself (as one might imagine, he is not the storyteller Watson is, though his second tale is much better than his first, perhaps owing to relaxation in his retirement). As to Watson, age and experience become him; and his warning to one This last collection is an odd mixture: a few stories that are very good and a couple not at all (one was originally a play that itself seems to have been based on an earlier tale); a story in which Sherlock does nothing much but listen; two narrated by Sherlock himself (as one might imagine, he is not the storyteller Watson is, though his second tale is much better than his first, perhaps owing to relaxation in his retirement). As to Watson, age and experience become him; and his warning to one who has tried to steal his notes is priceless. Marring my enjoyment of a few of these stories were some racist elements, though it’s true those may be considered thoughts belonging to the characters and not to Doyle himself, who seems to have been a fairly progressive thinker for his time. It was also odd to have two stories in which Englishmen have married Latin American women said to have “tropical” natures, due to their country of origin. One of them is described that way several times and by more than one character. I was born, raised and live in a subtropical climate: I guess I have a subtropical (whatever that might be) nature. For the first time (that I am aware of), Doyle includes a short author’s preface, which was delightful. So I end my Sherlockian journey with a phrase from the preface which perhaps explains why I undertook the journey in the first place (um, that, and the Cumberbatch TV series, that is): And so, reader, farewell to Sherlock Holmes! I thank you for your past constancy, and can but hope that some return has been made in the shape of that distraction from the worries of life and stimulating change of thought which can only be found in the fairy kingdom of romance.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    A Rather Clever Collection 7 July 2017 (Great Australian Bight) Well, that was annoying. I had finished writing my review of the Case-book last night while I was sitting on the plane, saved it to my external harddrive, packed up my bag and then headed off to my parent's house. When I got there I suddenly discovered that my external harddrive was missing. Fortunately I had backed the harddrive up on my desktop at home, however I hope that the harddrive basically disappears as opposed to ending up A Rather Clever Collection 7 July 2017 (Great Australian Bight) Well, that was annoying. I had finished writing my review of the Case-book last night while I was sitting on the plane, saved it to my external harddrive, packed up my bag and then headed off to my parent's house. When I got there I suddenly discovered that my external harddrive was missing. Fortunately I had backed the harddrive up on my desktop at home, however I hope that the harddrive basically disappears as opposed to ending up in the hands of some Nigerian Prince. What it also means is that I pretty much have to write this review again from scratch, and attempt to remember what it was that I said in the previous review. Oh well, that probably isn't as much of a problem as it could have been, though I do hope that the hard drive vanishes for good (that would be the better outcome). So, here I am, sitting once again on a plane flying at 30,000 feet over the Great Australian Bight heading to what is probably one of the, if not the, most remote cities in the entire world – Perth – namely because I've never actually been to Perth, and also because I watch to go and watch my football team lose (which is most likely what is going to happen because the away teams do tend to lose in Perth). Anyway, enough of that because you probably want to know more about this book as opposed to my current location and my immediate plans, so I guess on with the review. Personally, I found this book somewhat more enjoyable than some of the other Holmsian collections, in particular the previous two. It felt as if Doyle had gone back to his original style as opposed to just a collection of murder mysteries – these stories seem to be more like puzzles than anything else. Sure, there were a couple of murders, but just because somebody died doesn't necessarily mean that they were killed by another human being. The collection itself was interesting, and did seem to work more like a guessing game, though of course, as with Doyle's other works, it generally turns out that there is something that Holmes knows that he isn't letting on so it isn't necessarily possible to actually work out the solution to the puzzle. However, we do have some quite interesting stories, such as the one where an American with a rather odd name appears and claims that if he can find two other people with the same last name that he has then they would all inherit a rather expensive piece of property. This story actually reminded me a lot of the Redheaded League, which I also found to be quite clever. This is the thing that I enjoy about some of Doyle's stories – they don't necessarily involve solving a murder. With some of the other stories, you have this puzzle regarding a professor, wearing a trench coat and covered in some nasty bruises, dying all of the sudden. You also have an adventure where Holmes is asked to basically stop this woman from marrying what appears to be a rather suspicious character, though this particular character is actually quite well connected. The problem is that she is only one of a long list of partners who all end up in a rather sticky position. Also, conving somebody not to marry somebody with whom they are smitten with is a challenge in and of itself. Once again, we don't have a murder, and we even have poor Holmes being arrested, though the charges basically don't end up sticking. Like the previous collection, these stories aren't in chronological order, and one of them isn't even written by Watson (it is narrated by Holmes). As we remember from Volume 3, Holmes retired to tend bees, so what we are seeing now are casefiles that were closed, but for some reason or another kept hidden (or simply may not have been interesting enough to publish with the previous collections). Some of the stories occur after Holmes retires, some of them before. In fact it is even suggested that a couple are set after World War I (remember that Holmes' last case involved busting open a German spy ring). So, I can now add the entire Sherlock Holmes stories to my have-read list, though a part of me is a bit sad that it has now come to an end and the books returned to my father. However, maybe, someday in the future, I'll crack open the case books again simply to revisit the stories, particularly stories that I quite enjoyed. Oh, and before I forget, I should mention that in one of the stories we even meet Holmes' rival – not nemesis as in the case of Doctor Moriatry, but rather another consulting detective who proves to be just as capable as Sherlock Holmes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Firmage

    I enjoyed this collection more than those in His Last Bow. My favourite being The Adventure of the Lion's Mane.

  15. 5 out of 5

    russell barnes

    Despite the title previous Holmes compendium being called His Last Bow and the fact his brother Mycroft killed him before that, this is the last last Holmes novel by arthur conan doyle. Anyway, in keeping with my last Holmes and Watson review I offer the following: "Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson went on a camping trip. After sharing a good meal and a bottle of Petrie wine, they retire to their tent for the night. At about 3 AM, Holmes nudges Watson and asks, "Watson, look up into the sky Despite the title previous Holmes compendium being called His Last Bow and the fact his brother Mycroft killed him before that, this is the last last Holmes novel by arthur conan doyle. Anyway, in keeping with my last Holmes and Watson review I offer the following: "Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson went on a camping trip. After sharing a good meal and a bottle of Petrie wine, they retire to their tent for the night. At about 3 AM, Holmes nudges Watson and asks, "Watson, look up into the sky and tell me what you see?" Watson said, "I see millions of stars." Holmes asks, "And, what does that tell you?" Watson replies, "Astronomically, it tells me there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, it tells me that Saturn is in Leo. Theologically, it tells me that God is great and we are small and insignificant. Horologically, it tells me that it's about 3 AM. Meteorologically, it tells me that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. What does it tell you, Holmes?" Holmes retorts, "Someone stole our tent." Indeed

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    By the time Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the dozen stories that make up "The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes," from 1921 to 1927, he had clearly tired of the character. He had already tried to kill off the sleuth once, after all, and was forced by fans to bring him back. By the '20s, he obviously wasn't putting the same effort into the tales he once had, and turned to entertaining himself, seemingly, by experimenting with the Sherlock Holmes format. While the bulk of the Holmes canon is told from By the time Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the dozen stories that make up "The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes," from 1921 to 1927, he had clearly tired of the character. He had already tried to kill off the sleuth once, after all, and was forced by fans to bring him back. By the '20s, he obviously wasn't putting the same effort into the tales he once had, and turned to entertaining himself, seemingly, by experimenting with the Sherlock Holmes format. While the bulk of the Holmes canon is told from Watson's point of view, one in "Case-Book" is told in third person, and two others are narrated by Holmes himself. The former, "The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone," is jarring to read, particularly when Watson leaves the scene for the first time. The latter two, "The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier" and "The Adventure of the Lion's Mane," are not quite as disorienting, with Holmes speaking directly to us, the readers, in much the same way he usually addresses Watson. "Case-Book" also contains one truly bad story, "The Adventure of the Creeping Man," and one that's almost a rewrite of an earlier, far superior Holmes story: the plot of "The Adventure of the Three Garridebs" is almost identical to that of "The Red-Headed League," from 1891. Most of the book's other stories, though, are more enjoyable, while still paling in comparison to Doyle's earlier work. Even with a couple elements unpleasant to modern readers -- Holmes' condescending treatment of a black man, and a debt-ridden baronet said to be "in the hands of the Jews" -- it's hard to completely dislike even the least of the Sherlock Holmes books.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This collection of short stories is not the strongest in the series, but it certainly has its moments. Doyle knew this would be the end, and he took a few risks with the storytelling, getting away, in places, from his standard approach. This is the book, more than any of the others, where he really seemed to relax and get creative with the style. Some parts are better than others, but all of them are interesting. This book features some stories narrated from Sherlocks point of view, and one of This collection of short stories is not the strongest in the series, but it certainly has its moments. Doyle knew this would be the end, and he took a few risks with the storytelling, getting away, in places, from his standard approach. This is the book, more than any of the others, where he really seemed to relax and get creative with the style. Some parts are better than others, but all of them are interesting. This book features some stories narrated from Sherlock’s point of view, and one of those, set during Holmes’ retirement, takes place mostly on the beach. That’s a fun deviation from Sherlock’s usual milieu. Doyle also allowed himself to get a little sentimental here, especially in the story “The Three Garridebs.” I would give the collection 5 stars for this story alone. (view spoiler)[In this story, Holmes and Watson go off on an adventure, and Watson gets shot. Watson is also narrating the story, and his account of Sherlock’s reaction is golden: “‘You're not hurt, Watson? For God's sake, say that you are not hurt!’ It was worth a wound—it was worth many wounds—to know the depth of loyalty and love which lay behind that cold mask. The clear, hard eyes were dimmed for a moment, and the firm lips were shaking. For the one and only time I caught a glimpse of a great heart as well as of a great brain. All my years of humble but single-minded service culminated in that moment of revelation.” I can’t imagine that. Sherlock losing control, his lip trembling? And all because he cares for Watson! (hide spoiler)] This is the moment I’d been waiting to see since book one. Absolutely lovely.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bibliovoracious

    This is the last collection of Holmes stories before Sir Arthur's death, when he was churning them out for money. Try as he might to kill him off, Holmes dogged him to the last. I found this interesting to read knowing that Sir Arthur absolutely despised Holmes by this time in his career, and also, somehow I missed this collection! So it was a delight to read new-to-me Holmes tales... and yet... These stories are short and snappy. Also, Doyle experiments with tales told by Sherlock himself, and This is the last collection of Holmes stories before Sir Arthur's death, when he was churning them out for money. Try as he might to kill him off, Holmes dogged him to the last. I found this interesting to read knowing that Sir Arthur absolutely despised Holmes by this time in his career, and also, somehow I missed this collection! So it was a delight to read new-to-me Holmes tales... and yet... These stories are short and snappy. Also, Doyle experiments with tales told by Sherlock himself, and the third person, which is an interesting departure! On the down side, this collection is, well, weak. Dated. A couple "solutions" are transparent from the beginning. The racism is shocking. The cloak of anachronism is slipping off of the misogyny. Doyle's frustration seems to be finding vent in some very dark and vengeful stories and resolutions. Therefore, not a completely enjoyable escape. I found I couldn't avoid being aware of all the problems, despite the well-oiled story-telling format and form; all the characters reappearing like familiar old friends.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ferdy

    As usual some of the short stories were a tad predictable but overall they were all quite entertaining. I liked the more modern setting of the early 1900s compared to the late 1800s of earlier stories, it made things seem a bit more refreshing. One thing that I really disliked about the series was Sherlock's claim that more or less every case was the most complex or most interesting he'd ever come across, it just made me roll my eyes. Also, the repetition of words throughout was irritating to As usual some of the short stories were a tad predictable but overall they were all quite entertaining. I liked the more modern setting of the early 1900s compared to the late 1800s of earlier stories, it made things seem a bit more refreshing. One thing that I really disliked about the series was Sherlock's claim that more or less every case was the most complex or most interesting he'd ever come across, it just made me roll my eyes. Also, the repetition of words throughout was irritating to read, the word 'singular' was used way too much. All in all, I'm glad I've finally finished with the Sherlock series, I was getting rather tired of the formulaic way Sherlock/Watson investigated their cases.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    With this book I have re-read the entire Sherlock Holmes canon. I loved every minute and will probably do it again several times with whatever amount of time I have left to me. The complete canon would be a great desert island suggestion. A tip--get these books with the original illustrations. Makes them even more fun.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm glad he went for one more round. I liked all of these better than the ones in His Last Bow. Because Im lazy, Im copying and pasting all my mini-reviews for this book instead of writing a comprehensive review. I will hopefully put up a review of The Complete Sherlock Holmes HERE sometime soon. December 18, 2018 88.0% The Adventure of the Illustrious Client Holmes is hired by an anonymous client (who is probably the King) to prevent the marriage of a dear friends daughter to a notorious man I'm glad he went for one more round. I liked all of these better than the ones in His Last Bow. Because I’m lazy, I’m copying and pasting all my mini-reviews for this book instead of writing a comprehensive review. I will hopefully put up a review of The Complete Sherlock Holmes HERE sometime soon. – – – December 18, 2018 – 88.0% ““The Adventure of the Illustrious Client” — Holmes is hired by an anonymous client (who is probably the King) to prevent the marriage of a dear friend’s daughter to a notorious man who is widely believed to have murdered his last wife, among many other transgressions. I liked this one quite a lot, great mystery, Watson has a lot to do, great villain. — 4.5/5 stars” December 19, 2018 – 89.0% ““The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier” — Another one of the few narrated by Holmes himself, and this one was written because Watson goaded Holmes to “Try it yourself!” because of excessive criticism of Watson’s methods. Holmes doesn’t do much, but it has a happy ending, and is suitably creepy in places. — 4/5 stars” December 20, 2018 – 90.0% ““The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone” — One of only two Holmes stories told in the third person, to hide a trick. It was okay, but I missed Watson’s voice. Holmes does get extra tricksy here, though, so that’s fun. — 3.5/5 stars” December 20, 2018 – 91.0% ““The Adventure of the Three Gables” — The mystery here was okay, although I think Holmes was too easy on the perpetrator there at the end. But this one really has not aged well. It’s pretty racist. — 3/5 stars” December 20, 2018 – 92.0% ““The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire” — This one was wacky and I was thoroughly enjoying it, until I figured out what was going on, that is. I’m so used to not being able to do that, it was a little disappointing when I did. But seriously: wacky. — 4/5 stars” December 23, 2018 – 93.0% ““The Adventure of the Three Garridebs” — I was really digging this until I realized that Conan Doyle had already used this same plot structure in two other stories (he used it in “The Red-Headed League” and “The Stockbroker’s Clerk”). Still, this was my favorite of those three. Holmes and Watson have a sweet moment at the end. Friendship <3 — 4/5 stars” December 25, 2018 – 95.0% ““The Problem of Thor Bridge” — Pretty good one. The Victorian conception of foreign women is messed up, though. Especially where Central and South America were concerned. This isn’t really new information though, and it’s the third or fourth of these stories to feature a woman of “foreign temperament”. — 3.5/5 stars” December 26, 2018 – 96.0% ““The Adventure of the Creeping Man” — This was fun to read but it was ultimately ridiculous, the ending unsatisfying. It’s basically sci-fi, and not the realism we normally associate with Holmes stories. It was probably written about the time ACD started believing in fairies. Still, it’s got some great lines (“Come at once if convenient — if inconvenient come all the same. S. H.”) — 3/5 stars” December 26, 2018 – 97.0% ““The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane” — The final of three stories narrated by Holmes instead of Watson, and this one post-retirement! A man drops dead right in front of Holmes, so of course he has to investigate. The beginning and end were good, but the middle lacked the magic. — 3.5/5 stars” December 27, 2018 – 98.0% ““The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger” — Holmes and Watson don’t really do anything but listen to a story, but it’s an interesting one at least. — 3.5/5 stars" December 27, 2018 – 99.0% ““The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place” — Holmes and Watson investigate a man who has been doing very odd and out of character things. Good, but not great. — 3.5/5 stars” December 27, 2018 – 100.0% ““The Adventure of the Retired Colourman” — A nice one to end on. Holmes doing actual detection, getting Watson mixed up in it unbeknownst to him. Trickery. — 4/5 stars – – – And with that, I’m officially done with The Complete Sherlock Holmes. I feel accomplished.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    I am done with all the Sherlock Holmes canon!! Almost cant believe it! Im so glad that I finally went on this journey and got to experience this character that Ive been fascinated with since before I can really remember. Well worth the journey. And I really liked this collection, it was probably the most varied of the collections, and we actually got to see Sherlock narrate a couple of the stories, which I was hoping would happen eventually! I am done with all the Sherlock Holmes canon!! Almost can’t believe it! I’m so glad that I finally went on this journey and got to experience this character that I’ve been fascinated with since before I can really remember. Well worth the journey. And I really liked this collection, it was probably the most varied of the collections, and we actually got to see Sherlock narrate a couple of the stories, which I was hoping would happen eventually!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    ***The Summer of Sherlock 2019*** The last collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyles stories about the great detective. Theyre not bad, but they certainly are not his best efforts either. By this time, he had already tried to kill Mr. Holmes and had to revive him. These last few stories, it seems, were written as money making ventures. Not that theres anything wrong with that, authors should make money from their creations. I guess what Im saying is that Doyles heart really didnt seem to be in ***The Summer of Sherlock 2019*** The last collection of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories about the great detective. They’re not bad, but they certainly are not his best efforts either. By this time, he had already tried to kill Mr. Holmes and had to revive him. These last few stories, it seems, were written as money making ventures. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, authors should make money from their creations. I guess what I’m saying is that Doyle’s heart really didn’t seem to be in these stories. There also seems to be an awful lot of violence and unhappiness. In The Adventure of the Illustrious Client there is an evil criminal who is “ruining” women just for the pure misogynistic joy of it. Plus, there is vitriol throwing, disfiguring those that it doesn’t kill. The Adventure of the Three Gables has racism on display in an ugly fashion. Two of the stories feature dysfunctional families and marriages that are obviously in trouble (The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire and The Problem of Thor Bridge). In the first, there is potential for the spouses to reconcile, but in the second, the unfaithful husband seems to be almost rewarded and definitely goes unpunished. There is also disfigurement in The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger.” Two of the stories have medical solutions: The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier, which at least ends semi-happily and The Adventure of the Creeping Man, a tale of medical quackery. Disappointing or not, they are part of the Holmes canon and I am glad to have read them.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    Conan Doyle at his most offensive. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone ⭐⭐⭐ The Problem of Thor Bridge ⭐⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Creeping Man⭐⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire⭐⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Three Garridebs ⭐⭐⭐ The Adventire of the Illustrious Client⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Three Gables⭐⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Lions Mane⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Retired Colourman⭐ The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger⭐⭐⭐ The Adventure of the Shoscombe Old Place ⭐⭐ Conan Doyle at his most offensive. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Problem of Thor Bridge ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Creeping Man⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Three Garridebs ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventire of the Illustrious Client⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Three Gables⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Retired Colourman⭐️ The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Adventure of the Shoscombe Old Place ⭐️⭐️

  25. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Done with all of em

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    After a year, I've read all Sherlock Holmes books, at last. I loved each one of them and this whole world created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle changed my life. I thought to pay my final homage to this series by listing each book of it by my personal liking. Can't say why I love one more than another: I've always, completely, followed my instincts. And here it is: 1. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★★) 2. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★★) 3. The Hound of the Baskervilles (★★★★★) 4. The Valley After a year, I've read all Sherlock Holmes books, at last. I loved each one of them and this whole world created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle changed my life. I thought to pay my final homage to this series by listing each book of it by my personal liking. Can't say why I love one more than another: I've always, completely, followed my instincts. And here it is: 1. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★★) 2. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★★) 3. The Hound of the Baskervilles (★★★★★) 4. The Valley of Fear (★★★★★) 5. The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★★) 6. A Study in Scarlet (★★★★☆) 7. The Return of Sherlock Holmes (★★★★☆) 8. The Sign of Four (★★★★☆) 9. His Last Bow and Other Stories (★★★★☆)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sammy

    Well, I've now read the nine books in the Sherlock Holmes canon, and what a ride! After the initial two disappointing novels came three very good short story collections, a great novel, a better-than-average novel and a slightly-better-than-average short story collection. To finish off the series, "The Case-Book" is... well, not that great. On the one hand, Conan Doyle's prose skills have developed considerably from the early days of A Study in Scarlet and his handling of both atmosphere and the Well, I've now read the nine books in the Sherlock Holmes canon, and what a ride! After the initial two disappointing novels came three very good short story collections, a great novel, a better-than-average novel and a slightly-better-than-average short story collection. To finish off the series, "The Case-Book" is... well, not that great. On the one hand, Conan Doyle's prose skills have developed considerably from the early days of A Study in Scarlet and his handling of both atmosphere and the Holmes/Watson relationship is rivalled perhaps only by that series peak, The Hound of the Baskervilles. However, there's not really a lot to recommend here. In truth, it's 2 stars for a non-Holmes fan, and 2-and-a-half if you know and love the guy already. The bad: One of the most frustrating elements of this book (admittedly a collection of individually-published short stories) are how often similar character tropes pop up. There are three - maybe four - fiery foreign ladies whose ethnicity is a key part of the solution. The Adventure of the Creeping Man - the biggest letdown in the canon. This story features the single most arresting, chilling images that Holmes and Watson ever encounter, but is ruined by a gobsmackingly bad denouement. The Adventure of the Mazarin Stone - adapted from a play, this story not only relies on previously unheard-of architectural features at Baker Street, but fails to capture the reader's interest or render the characters particularly realistically. The Illustrious Client - can barely even remember it. Moving on. The thoroughly average Intriguingly, many of the stories herein are structured less as 'whodunnits' and more as 'howdunnits'. Very few of the stories (indeed, only really two) feature more than one suspect. Some stories never even attempt to hide the perpetrator, the question is instead "what is going on?". This is not unprecedented in the canon by any means, but is highly concentrated here. Thor Bridge - while it has a clever denouement and some good characterisation, it is another story that doesn't stick in the mind. The Three Gables - this story is noted most for the questionable racial stereotype character who opens the piece. Personally, I'd argue he has at least two dimensions, and he is a bad guy who happens to be black rather than any kind of argument being made, but it's still a bit edgy, I'll concede. The story itself is quite readable, but no great secret or particularly intriguing characters jump out at us. (Indeed, the story has mild echoes of other stories in the canon.) The unsatisfying The Lion's Mane - one of two stories in this volume to be narrated by Holmes (and not to feature Watson at all), the tone of voice is delightful, and the atmosphere electric. However - as with the much earlier story The Five Orange Pips - it is ultimately unsatisfying. This ISN'T Conan Doyle's fault for once; but as with that story, most modern readers will pick up the solution the minute the clues arrive, as it is no longer something mysterious... The odd Perhaps most interesting is to see how public sensibilities changed over the years. The early works could only hint at impropreity, while the crimes in this and the previous collection are far more wide-ranging. Bodies - when they appear, which is actually quite rare here - are often brutally destroyed; people having affairs are clearly now having sexual ones; alcohol is far more prevalent. A window into a world. The Veiled Lodger is a strange, haunting little piece. It is one of the better stories in the collection, although a bizarre addition. It isn't really a mystery at all, but a retelling of a "cold case", with a dark and brooding central figure who has spent years following Holmes' career. Unsettling, but also un-Holmesian. The Sussex Vampire - atmospheric and ripe for adaptation, yes. Silly? Even more so. Along with one of our many fiery Latin women, the solution hearkens back to the exotica and melodrama of the early Holmes novels. While the true villain of the piece is deftly handled, the vampirism is a tad overdone. The ... satisfactory? One shouldn't assume this book is a 'write-off', it's just that even the four most typical Holmes stories, as outlined below, are somewhat lacking. Shoscombe Old Place and The Blanched Soldier - have some intriguing set pieces, but aren't particularly memorable (aside from the latter being written by Mr. Sherlock Holmes himself). The Retired Colourman - the most Holmesian story in the collection, but - as mentioned before - lacks suspects. However, it is also possibly the best story in the collection as it features some lovely secondary characters. The Three Garridebs - well-plotted but, aside from lacking in suspects, is basically a shot-for-shot remake of an early (and very memorable) Holmes short story. I apologise for the length, but this sums up both the story and the collection: Conan Doyle had tired of Holmes to an extent, and what we get here are stories that focus on the complexity of how the crime was done, rather than making the surrounding elements - suspects, primarily - a mystery. As a result, we generally get a puzzle followed by a chase. Not always unsatisfying, but never as captivating as the earlier works. In closing, if you're new to the wonderful world of Holmes, there are many other better ideas. Read The Hound of the Baskervilles and any of the other, earlier short story collections - Adventures, Memoirs or The Return. If you like those, read The Valley of Fear, His Last Bow and (to know how it all began)A Study in Scarlet. If ALL of those suit you, then come crawling to this one. (Don't bother with The Sign of Four as no good can come from that.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lilli Reuss

    This was quite a pleasant surprise. I especially enjoyed the stories out of Sherlock's perspective. This series has definitely been a rollercoaster but I am happy to be done with it now. I will miss Sherlock and Watson.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Certainly the weakest set of the original canon, but still a few good pieces. The three garridebs and the retired colourman were particularly interesting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shayantani

    And with this I finish reading the Sherlock Canon. Although some of the stories in this collection have the classical characteristics Holmes being a prick and using his deductive and acting skills to solve mystery, Watson with his modesty and loyalty and a range of queer cases; yet mostly this novel is rather disappointing. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was rather tired of this character by the time he wrote this book. He had almost killed him off in some previous part and the lack of enthusiasm is And with this I finish reading the Sherlock Canon. Although some of the stories in this collection have the classical characteristics – Holmes being a prick and using his deductive and acting skills to solve mystery, Watson with his modesty and loyalty and a range of queer cases; yet mostly this novel is rather disappointing. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was rather tired of this character by the time he wrote this book. He had almost killed him off in some previous part and the lack of enthusiasm is reflected in some of the cases. This collection has two stories from Holmes’s P0V. Reading them made me realise how fond I am of Watson as a character. Thus for me, the best part of the book was when Watson gets shot and Holmes drops his impersonal facade and for the first time shows his love for his good old pal. Other than that, the climax of most of the cases will make you stare at the last line for a few seconds, then shake your head and move on to the next chapter. I sensed a bit of repetition in a few cases, and some like the Tiger’s Mane and Veiled Tenant lacked any notable elements. Reading the canon has been an immensely enjoyable experience. Study in Scarlett and Sign of Four were perhaps the most disappointing stories while Valley of Fear and The Hound of Baskervilles were my favourite. I liked Sherlock from the very beginning but it is only on finishing the last novel that I have realised how much I adore Watson too. Thank you Sir Doyle for these memorable characters and such amazing cases.

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