web site hit counter 'Nature and the Greeks' and 'Science and Humanism' - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

'Nature and the Greeks' and 'Science and Humanism'

Availability: Ready to download

The texts of two of Schrodinger's most famous lecture series are made available again. In Nature and the Greeks, he offers an historical account of the scientific world picture. In Science and Humanism, he addresses fundamental questions about the link between scientific and spiritual matters. The texts of two of Schrodinger's most famous lecture series are made available again. In Nature and the Greeks, he offers an historical account of the scientific world picture. In Science and Humanism, he addresses fundamental questions about the link between scientific and spiritual matters.


Compare

The texts of two of Schrodinger's most famous lecture series are made available again. In Nature and the Greeks, he offers an historical account of the scientific world picture. In Science and Humanism, he addresses fundamental questions about the link between scientific and spiritual matters. The texts of two of Schrodinger's most famous lecture series are made available again. In Nature and the Greeks, he offers an historical account of the scientific world picture. In Science and Humanism, he addresses fundamental questions about the link between scientific and spiritual matters.

30 review for 'Nature and the Greeks' and 'Science and Humanism'

  1. 4 out of 5

    E. G.

    Foreword, by Roger Penrose --Nature and the Greeks Bibliography --Science and Humanism Literature

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Taylor

    Erwin Schrödinger was one of the finest physicists of the last century and he is best known for his ambivalence toward cats. This book includes two lectures series given by Schrödinger in 1948 and 1950, respectively. “Nature and the Greeks” looks at the origins of science in ancient Greek philosophy. Schrödinger argues that two aspects of Greek thought are fundamental to Western science: 1) the belief that nature can be understood; and, 2) the technical approach of excluding the person making th Erwin Schrödinger was one of the finest physicists of the last century and he is best known for his ambivalence toward cats. This book includes two lectures series given by Schrödinger in 1948 and 1950, respectively. “Nature and the Greeks” looks at the origins of science in ancient Greek philosophy. Schrödinger argues that two aspects of Greek thought are fundamental to Western science: 1) the belief that nature can be understood; and, 2) the technical approach of excluding the person making the enquiry into nature from the subject matter of the enquiry. These two points guide Schrödinger's overview of Greek thought and lead him to make several important arguments about the epistemological insights of Democritus, Heraclitus and others. The presentation is clear and compelling. Schrödinger's key point is that we must fully recognize both the strengths and the limits of science. In particular, a materialist approach inherently excludes the subject/mind from its “objective” investigations. That fact has consequences which should neither surprise nor be forgotten. “Science and Humanism” is a less focused work than “Nature and the Greeks”. Schrödinger discusses things such as the value of science (one element in the human journey to “know thyself”), the nature of specialization (a necessary evil), the implications of quantum physics for free will (there are none) and the conundrum posed by the continuum. It is this last problem which ties in best with “Nature and the Greeks” and it is perhaps the most profound in its implications. Schrödinger examines the tension between the mathematics of a continuum and the reality of the physical world. Atomism is a natural conceptual framework given the evidence the world presents us. But it involves gaps. And gaps don't work when you assume a continuum as the basis for your mathematical models. And that represents a singularly difficult problem. These works were written more than sixty-five years ago. A lot of ground has been covered in both physics and philosophy since then. Nonetheless, Schrödinger's ideas remain important. He writes clearly and honestly. He attempts to provide a balanced view. And his primary goal is to highlight the importance of a balanced view: a view of science and humanity that recognizes the strengths and the limits of human thought. It is a book well worth reading.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Foster

    Schroedinger’s thought went much deeper than confused cats. He published three thoughtful little books, packed with insights only available to a genius polymath willing to delve intensely into fundamental, universal, and therefore timeless and essential, questions. We remember him today for the brilliant thought experiments, showing how genuinely strange a world composed of elements at the quantum level, our world, really is. But we forget that he did the same for biology (in "What is Life?”) an Schroedinger’s thought went much deeper than confused cats. He published three thoughtful little books, packed with insights only available to a genius polymath willing to delve intensely into fundamental, universal, and therefore timeless and essential, questions. We remember him today for the brilliant thought experiments, showing how genuinely strange a world composed of elements at the quantum level, our world, really is. But we forget that he did the same for biology (in "What is Life?”) and for humanity (in “Science and Humanism”). In this book, "Nature and the Greeks", he reminds us that the foundations of modern science are less solid than we usually think, as one can discover by taking seriously the insights of pre-Socratic Greek philosophers. The main contribution of the Greeks, according to Schroedinger, was the assumption that the universe could in fact be understood through human investigation. Note that this is far from given, even today. It remains possible that our current scientific understanding is actually our human minds misleading us about the nature of the world. For example, modern cognitive science has thrown doubt on (or even disproved) the existence of "free will". And our "understanding" of quantum phenomena is at least strange. The pre-scientific outlook was that the universe was mysterious, perhaps even capricious; that one must rely on revelation. The change has a dramatic effect on how humans live their lives. In the pre-scientific view, the incentive is for the priestly caste to hide knowledge (as, for example, Pythagorus did). But the scientific view leads one to share understanding, in order to benefit from the exchange. The first tends to sustain the status quo, restraining advancement; the second increases understanding at an increasing rate, due to the feedback from others. This is a difference worth remembering today, since these two views are both still strong and extent.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sanjarbek

    "... Nearly our entire intellectual education originates from the Greeks. A thorough knowledge of these origins is the indispensable prerequisite for freeing ourselves from their overwhelming influence. To ignore the past is here not merely undesirable, but simply impossible. You need not know of the doctrines and writings of the great masters of antiquity, of Plato and Aristotle, you need never have heard their names, none the less you are under the spell of their authority. Not only has their "... Nearly our entire intellectual education originates from the Greeks. A thorough knowledge of these origins is the indispensable prerequisite for freeing ourselves from their overwhelming influence. To ignore the past is here not merely undesirable, but simply impossible. You need not know of the doctrines and writings of the great masters of antiquity, of Plato and Aristotle, you need never have heard their names, none the less you are under the spell of their authority. Not only has their influence been passed on by those who took over from them in ancient and in modern times; our entire thinking, the logical categories in which it moves, the linguistic patterns it uses (being therefore dominated by them) – all this is in no small degree an artefact and is, in the main, the product of the great thinkers of antiquity. We must, indeed, investigate this process of becoming in all thoroughness, lest we mistake for primitive what is the result of growth and development, and for natural what is actually artificial..."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jacko Cabrera

    Nunca me gustaron las matemáticas cuando iba al colegio, pero con la edad encuentro algo mágico en ellas, supongo que hallarme en un entorno desconocido hace que deje que los números me sorprendan, así es la historia del ser humano, cuando no entiende algo busca respuestas en lo metafísico. Y llegaron los griegos y de eso va este libro. ¿Qué nos quedó como sociedad de aquello, qué había en la filosofía del mundo clásico que hizo que por primera vez quisieran ver el mundo con otros ojos, con ojos Nunca me gustaron las matemáticas cuando iba al colegio, pero con la edad encuentro algo mágico en ellas, supongo que hallarme en un entorno desconocido hace que deje que los números me sorprendan, así es la historia del ser humano, cuando no entiende algo busca respuestas en lo metafísico. Y llegaron los griegos y de eso va este libro. ¿Qué nos quedó como sociedad de aquello, qué había en la filosofía del mundo clásico que hizo que por primera vez quisieran ver el mundo con otros ojos, con ojos de científico? Voy subrayando el texto y a veces no sé exactamente porque he resaltado un párrafo del que apenas entiendo el vocabulario. La lectura nones fácil para los que no somos doctos en la materia pero te deja buen poso y se entiende el mensaje que el autor quiere hacer llegar. La ciencia no es infusa, o si, nada es definitivo, lo que si sabemos es que hubo personas, hoy considerados sabios y filósofos, que hace más de dos mil años pusieron los cimientos de la ciencia a base de preguntas simples que nadie antes había formulado.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Yasin Ramazan

    A classical statement of the modern scientific view as it looked in the mid-20th century. I particularly like the way he expresses his ideas quite clearly and pointedly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elia

    Compilation of two lectures. The first deals with the Greek way of thinking about the world, back when seeking knowledge through science and metaphysics were not independent. The second deals with the uselessness of scientific specialization while forgoing integration into the bigger picture. Both are more appealing to audiences with interest in Maths and physics as the author introduces examples from them to discuss forms and substances leading to the indeterminacy, continuum seeking and free w Compilation of two lectures. The first deals with the Greek way of thinking about the world, back when seeking knowledge through science and metaphysics were not independent. The second deals with the uselessness of scientific specialization while forgoing integration into the bigger picture. Both are more appealing to audiences with interest in Maths and physics as the author introduces examples from them to discuss forms and substances leading to the indeterminacy, continuum seeking and free will.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nick Black

    Amazon 2008-07-03. It's hard to go wrong with Canto editions, and Schrödinger's What is Life? is about the most perfect short scientific work ever (I had to switch from book: to author: there; search results for the former were ghoulishly unacceptable). Amazon 2008-07-03. It's hard to go wrong with Canto editions, and Schrödinger's What is Life? is about the most perfect short scientific work ever (I had to switch from book: to author: there; search results for the former were ghoulishly unacceptable).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Guilherme Ferrão

    A wonderful book by one of the greatest thinkers in the XX century, presenting a fascinating view on the Greek culture and the impacts of quantum mechanics on the debate of free-will and determinism, among other amazing subjects.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kris Demey

    Maybe it’s me, but this has been a pageturner. It was highly entertaining, readable and thought provoking. Schrödinger was much more than the feline thought experiment he is known for.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Duy Nguyen

    His arguments on free will and separation between object and subject depend somewhat on the nature of mind, which is still a topic of debate (Schrodinger seems to be a dualist)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mangoo

    It was through a lecture of Mermin on quantum bayesianism that I got drawn to this double offering from Schrödinger, as Mermin was remarking on the role of the observer in the description of reality, in particular given by science. Indeed, in both lectures collected in the short book, Schrödinger ends up exposing his concern on the disappearance of the observer in the scientific framing of reality. In the first series of lecture, he looks at the root of science in Greece to see where and how thi It was through a lecture of Mermin on quantum bayesianism that I got drawn to this double offering from Schrödinger, as Mermin was remarking on the role of the observer in the description of reality, in particular given by science. Indeed, in both lectures collected in the short book, Schrödinger ends up exposing his concern on the disappearance of the observer in the scientific framing of reality. In the first series of lecture, he looks at the root of science in Greece to see where and how this disappearance came to happen. In the second, he comments on it in the view of quantum mechanics. The lectures share also other topics, including eminently the conundrum of the continuum as opposed to quantum discreteness, the thought of ancient Milesian philosophers and of Democritus, who according to the author reached the conclusion of a reality formed by atoms and voids by the hint of Anaximenes that the fundamental process of reality if contraction and expansion (how can that be possible, if matter is a continuum?). In the first part, Schrödinger acknowledges that the Greeks posed that reality can be understood (in contrast to religious attitudes) and that the observed was excluded from the description of reality, although Democritus had thoughts prescient of Kant regarding the role of space and time and of the role of senses in limiting and guiding knowledge. In the second, the author highlights the real role of science, that is, to help man understand who he is, just like all other forms of knowledge. He observes that present science connects to the Greek one and is presented with very similar issues particularly with the advent of quantum mechanics. There is a final discussion, incepted by the change in interpretation of causality, on free will, and his take against Jordan and Bohr, also criticised by Cassirer, is fashinating (free will may be the actual mental correlate of physical determinism). The reader cannot but admire once again the clear and gentle style of the author, who shows to be learned well outside of physics and to be able to simply the exposition of matter to highlight crucial points (for instance, why according to Bohr the ultimate knowledge/existance of reality cannot even be conceived, that is because of the effect of the subject on the object in addition to object on the subject). And to explain the dual phenomena of light, Schrödinger already proposed the double slit experiment, that will be a staple in Feynman's and many others' exemplifications. A delightful, entertaining and thoughtful read, once more from this probably underestimated thinker beside physical genius.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bipul Roy

    Erwin Schrodinger, One of the founder of quantum physics has tried to present his vies on ancient Greek Natural philosophy, Greek Innovation. Surely one of the best book to learn about various greek philosophy and science. I Think through this book,he tried to pay back for the intellectual debt that the modern science drive from ancient greek philosophy. Absolutely worth readin. I personally add one more star 6 out of 5. .

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Interesting Even though this is an older book, there were many interesting and still valid points made. The hardest part for me was the writing style. Many sentences were quite long and run on. This did cause me to get “bogged down” in a number of areas. The math and physics touched in the book were not beyond most novice science reader's grasp. Interesting Even though this is an older book, there were many interesting and still valid points made. The hardest part for me was the writing style. Many sentences were quite long and run on. This did cause me to get “bogged down” in a number of areas. The math and physics touched in the book were not beyond most novice science reader's grasp.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Cabrera

    Salvo el capítulo final no ofrece mucho. Este último capítulo avanza un poco sobre el problema del sujeto del conocimiento y la imposibilidad de la ciencia de dotar de sentido a la vida humana dejando el autor apuntadas las grandes preguntas existenciales.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jei Moreno

    Muy buen libro, disfrute mucho leyéndolo.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    I've been reading a lot of discussion on Mind and Cosmos by Thomas Nagel. This book seems like in interesting companion. I've been reading a lot of discussion on Mind and Cosmos by Thomas Nagel. This book seems like in interesting companion.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rafelmenmell

    un científico como Dios manda, con su cultura humanista.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tika Sukarna

    My life's book of reference :) My life's book of reference :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carolina Álvarez Valencia

    Breve texto que recoge interesantes interpretaciones y explicaciones sobre la ciencia (o su primera concepción) de los antiguos griegos.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vance J.

    Clear and concise. It would be great if "modern" writers could be as succinct and clear when making their point. Clear and concise. It would be great if "modern" writers could be as succinct and clear when making their point.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Manuel

    Una especulación interesante acerca de las posibles intuiciones de los primeros atomistas sobre la realidad del universo. Schrödinger era un maldito genio.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Aguilar

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas STEINHUBER

  25. 4 out of 5

    Juancho Vizcaino

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Felix

  27. 5 out of 5

    Γεώργιος

  28. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Corvin Ninua

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steven

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.