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District 14 Season 1

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Follow Michael the elephant as he arrives to the city known as District 14, a labyrinthine metropolis where humans, animals and aliens all co-exist.


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Follow Michael the elephant as he arrives to the city known as District 14, a labyrinthine metropolis where humans, animals and aliens all co-exist.

30 review for District 14 Season 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιnΕ

    You know what I'm sick of? People. They suck. I'm sure I don't have to tell you. Fortunately, cartooning is the artistic perversion of choice for The Anti-Society of Misanthropes, most of whom suffer each other’s presence just long enough to set policy. Then they get all shifty-eyed and cranky, taking mad flight for the safety and solitude of a troglodytic abode. Robert Crumb is their patron saint and/or mascot, and the stuffed corpse of Fritz the Cat has his own shrine in Curmudgeon's Hall. The You know what I'm sick of? People. They suck. I'm sure I don't have to tell you. Fortunately, cartooning is the artistic perversion of choice for The Anti-Society of Misanthropes, most of whom suffer each other’s presence just long enough to set policy. Then they get all shifty-eyed and cranky, taking mad flight for the safety and solitude of a troglodytic abode. Robert Crumb is their patron saint and/or mascot, and the stuffed corpse of Fritz the Cat has his own shrine in Curmudgeon's Hall. The whispered word went out decades ago, announcing when the medium was still in it's infancy that Sequential Art Inc. had some crusty new owners... and the human face slowly began disappearing from strips and comic-books around the globe. Superheroes wear masks, robots run amok, and for no reason the masses could guess at, your favorite genres are being tastefully played out on paper and pixel by animals. People-loving perverts still do their best to keep flesh-tone colors in the medium, however, so the work is far from done. Thank you, Art Spiegelman, for a fun romp through the concentration camps with mice and cats and pigs (No, not a romp. Spiegelman used animals as racial avatars to make the horrific subject matter more accessible and less intimidating, without diminishing the impact of the terrible truths at the core). Thank you, Trondheim and Sfar, for an epic fantasy ripe with comedy and wonder and horror, and not a homo sapien in sight. Thank you, Jim Woodring, for the adorable and sociopathic half-chipmunk, half-river otter named Frank; his vaguely anthropomorphic quirks never taint the candy-colored LSD fables. Art Spiegelman, Maus: Stephane Blanquet, Donjon - Monsters: Jim Woodring, The Frank Book: But crime is well-covered indeed -- Grandville by Bryan Talbot; Blacksad by Guarnido and Canales; and District 14, by Reutimann and Gabus. All are wonderful testaments to the essential shittiness of the human race, but are very tactful about never offending misanthropic tastes with a higher primate visage, instead featuring tenacious badgers, fluffy-ass cats, and stealthy elephant reporters in their place. Bryan Talbot, Grandville: Juanjo Gurnido, Blacksad: Comparisons to Blacksad are common when discussing District 14, but beyond the 'Comics Noir', totem animals, and solid bande dessinee pedigree, they're very different beasts... so to speak. Juanjo Guarnido is one of the greatest artists to ever work in comics, so when I say that Romuald Reutimann's black-and-white, mechanically-toned style belongs to another species entirely, but is rendered with a skill nearly commensurate to Guarnido's fully-painted art on Blacksad, I don't say so flippantly. Reutimann's elegant linework evokes the best of the French and Belgian BD tradition, without specifically referencing Herge or Swarte or Chaland. Yves Chaland, Freddy Lombard: Romuald Reutimann, District 14: Even though I came to comics as a fan of great literature, and still value great story-telling above all else, I'm an unapologetic art lover, and my ratings tend to reflect that. That said, I'm not in love with the unfortunate habit some mainstream Euro-comics have for being hollow, superficial exercises in the 'draw first, plot never' method, an unfortunate side-effect of the 'Metal Hurlant' treatment. That's not a problem with District 14. The story is densely plotted and meticulously structured, and the apparently odd and arbitrary narrative details aren't the random splashes of color they seem to be. The story begins with an Elephant on the run. Fleeing Europe and a history of radical politics and violence, he becomes a fugitive in America hours after stepping ashore. An unlikely encounter with a brazen beaver reporter leads to an even more unlikely career as an assistant and unofficial bodyguard to his new rodent friend. Crime bosses, a murderous stag looking for vengeance one body part at a time, a mysterious brute of a superhero, and an alien race living in District 14 as refugees: all add to the chaotic choreography of Pierre Gabus' narrative. It didn't pull me in right away, but gathered speed and mass consistently as I read. Ironically... or coincidentally... or neither... District 14 is published by Humanoids. I've had mixed opinions about the production values of their deluxe hardcovers, especially when compared to similar releases from American publishers like Dark Horse and Image. 'Seasons' 1 and 2, however -- the hardcover omnibus volumes collecting the first 650-page cycle -- are exquisitely designed and manufactured. Using thick, glossy, acid-free paper, as they usually do, the newest printings have slightly upgraded binding and fancy fucking bookmarks. Isn't that exciting? Yes. Yes it is. Beautiful stuff... with nary a primate in sight. ;-)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bogdan

    The anthropomorphic inspirations are one of my favourites subjects in graphic novel, so I was very eager to read this one asap as I heard about it. And, until the end, I wasn`t disappointed at all. You`ll need to wait a little that the story to really get going, but I was surprise by the multiple threads used here and how diverse there were. The characters are very well defined, the drawings are really good and let`s not forget about the aliens!!! Yeah, there are some here, too! Very, very good vol The anthropomorphic inspirations are one of my favourites subjects in graphic novel, so I was very eager to read this one asap as I heard about it. And, until the end, I wasn`t disappointed at all. You`ll need to wait a little that the story to really get going, but I was surprise by the multiple threads used here and how diverse there were. The characters are very well defined, the drawings are really good and let`s not forget about the aliens!!! Yeah, there are some here, too! Very, very good volume, and I highly, highly recommend it to you all!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pturingan

    My goodness, this was far better than I expected. I was disappointed at first when I opened it and saw that it was in black and white but I soon forgot about that as I read the story. My only other problem was with how fast events started to move in the last chapter after all the suspense building up in the previous 11 chapters but it's a minor concern at most. Great value for a thick hardcover and I look forward to reading Season 2 My goodness, this was far better than I expected. I was disappointed at first when I opened it and saw that it was in black and white but I soon forgot about that as I read the story. My only other problem was with how fast events started to move in the last chapter after all the suspense building up in the previous 11 chapters but it's a minor concern at most. Great value for a thick hardcover and I look forward to reading Season 2

  4. 5 out of 5

    The Bibliopossum

    I'm gonna need to give this another read after I finish the whole story, but I'm cautiously optimistic of how this is unfolding. I'm gonna need to give this another read after I finish the whole story, but I'm cautiously optimistic of how this is unfolding.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arsnoctis

    Mentre lo leggevo... https://www.instagram.com/p/B332RtgIz-a/ Mentre lo leggevo... https://www.instagram.com/p/B332RtgIz-a/

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simon Chadwick

    There are a few books available at the moment using anthropomorphic animals in a crime noir setting, most notably Bryan Talbot’s excellent Grandville and the utterly glorious Blacksad. So, considering Pixar are also developing a movie on a similar footing you’d be forgiven for thinking this was becoming a crowded sub-genre with possibly little else for other creators to offer and explore. And then along comes District 14. District 14 is a monochromatic story of a bustling city with a 1940s vibe. There are a few books available at the moment using anthropomorphic animals in a crime noir setting, most notably Bryan Talbot’s excellent Grandville and the utterly glorious Blacksad. So, considering Pixar are also developing a movie on a similar footing you’d be forgiven for thinking this was becoming a crowded sub-genre with possibly little else for other creators to offer and explore. And then along comes District 14. District 14 is a monochromatic story of a bustling city with a 1940s vibe. It’s a busy and chaotic place largely due to an enormous influx of human-like animals and aliens living alongside the people. By and large it’s as harmonious an existence as any other city, but generally the diverse inhabitants are accepted and are thriving in all walks of life. The story itself follows the arrival of Michael, an anthropomorphic immigrant elephant, escaping a past to begin a new life in the city. Almost immediately he finds himself at odds with the law and rushes headlong into a criminal exchange being staked out by a hidden reporter. In Michael’s attempt to shake off the immigration guards he manages to disrupt the criminals’ meeting, assist in blowing the reporter’s cover, and subsequently save him by tipping a car onto the villains so he and the reporter can make their escape. Grateful, the reporter, a beaver called McKeagh, ends up taking Michael under his wing and helps him settle in the city, but Michael’s actions, and his involvement with the relentless McKeagh, mean things are going to get increasingly complicated. There’s just so much going on here, and full credit must be given to Gabus’s writing that he allows us the time to explore the city and its characters and fully immerse ourselves in this utterly bizarre but strangely familiar metropolis. Because of how it’s paced Reutimann gets an amazing opportunity to bring the city to life in a unique fashion, blending wonderfully depicted architecture, a strange array of vehicles, and the vast mix of different inhabitants. Against this richly realised background the characters thrive upon the page, and even the supporting characters are given the opportunity to show their fragility and strengths as darker and darker secrets are revealed. As you’d expect from Humanoids, the book is beautifully presented, with 300 pages of fantastic art and story to enjoy. There’s also a warm and affectionate foreword by Jeff Smith, perhaps the perfect choice given the subject matter – if you’re a fan of Bone then you won’t be disappointed here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex Scales

    This book includes a forward from Jeff Smith of Bone fame, and I can't think of a more apt person to introduce American comics fans to District 14. That said, while Jeff Smith compares District 14 to Little Orphan Annie and Dick Tracy, I'd say a more apt comparison would be Dragon Ball. This is a world full of average humans, anthropomorphic gangsters, aliens, and the unidentifiable somethings in between. It's just great cartooning helped a lot by the inky visuals-- lots of velvety blacks and sc This book includes a forward from Jeff Smith of Bone fame, and I can't think of a more apt person to introduce American comics fans to District 14. That said, while Jeff Smith compares District 14 to Little Orphan Annie and Dick Tracy, I'd say a more apt comparison would be Dragon Ball. This is a world full of average humans, anthropomorphic gangsters, aliens, and the unidentifiable somethings in between. It's just great cartooning helped a lot by the inky visuals-- lots of velvety blacks and screen tones to make this feel like a cross between film noir and shonen manga. The plot concerns an elephant guy relocating from his home country to the city (think early 1930's new york), where he runs into a hot shot reporter quickly lands a gig as a photojournalist. the two begin investigating affairs across the city and they become involved with gangsters, a superhero, assassins, corrupt police, psychics, and even finds a few mysteries to solve. Fun adventure story, probably well suited for teen readers. Little bit of sex, and it's a bit violent-- severed hands, some blood, dead bodies, but nothing graphic. Oh, and my favorite character is the cat that pilots everything from submarines to zeppelins.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schlatter

    Gonzo. If you don't know about this series, it's set in a vaguely early twentieth century French city where we have human and "furry" characters. (For example, our protagonist is an elephant resembling Barbar). We have blimps, aeroplanes, suspended shuttles between skyscrapers, and submarines. We have muckraking journalists, angry mobsters, and frightening psychics. We have super-heroes and extraterrestrials. We have anarchists and hanging judges. And throughout the entire work are more plots an Gonzo. If you don't know about this series, it's set in a vaguely early twentieth century French city where we have human and "furry" characters. (For example, our protagonist is an elephant resembling Barbar). We have blimps, aeroplanes, suspended shuttles between skyscrapers, and submarines. We have muckraking journalists, angry mobsters, and frightening psychics. We have super-heroes and extraterrestrials. We have anarchists and hanging judges. And throughout the entire work are more plots and stories and mysteries than you expect. It should be a mess, but it's not. It actually feels fairly seamless, especially because the creators are taking time to ground everything emotionally. Two meta notes: First, this is "Season 1" of the series. Don't get the book expecting resolution to everything (or anything). Second, this is an expensive book (40 bucks for about 300 pages). The paper is luxurious, the hardcover binding looks good, but my copy had a few very annoying ink splotches right over dialogue balloons. If you are concerned about the price, try your library first.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Absolutely fantastic first volume of the ongoing adventures of two tough reporters--one an angry beaver, the other a phlegmatic elephant with a mysterious past--covering a broken, corrupt metropolis of talking animals, extraterrestrial immigrants, superpowered cats, a violent superhero, and much, much more. It's a tough book to high-concept--"what if Jay Stephens had created Sin City," maybe?--but easy to fall in love with, as writer Pierre Gabus and artist Romauld Reutimann create a briskly pac Absolutely fantastic first volume of the ongoing adventures of two tough reporters--one an angry beaver, the other a phlegmatic elephant with a mysterious past--covering a broken, corrupt metropolis of talking animals, extraterrestrial immigrants, superpowered cats, a violent superhero, and much, much more. It's a tough book to high-concept--"what if Jay Stephens had created Sin City," maybe?--but easy to fall in love with, as writer Pierre Gabus and artist Romauld Reutimann create a briskly paced story that feels neither ponderously overplotted or frustratingly slapdash. The Europeans have always delighted in this sort of thing--talking animals in tough urban milieus, the doodling of a happy face on the skipped check of western democracy, and District 14 finally lets the rest of us in on the joke. One of the best "light" graphic novels I've read in sometime. I can't wait to read "Season 2."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary Stapleton

  11. 4 out of 5

    ali yunus gencer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Ruminski

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zappster

  14. 5 out of 5

    Casey

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave Corun

  16. 5 out of 5

    King

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christoffer

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andromeda Tait

  19. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Dreiss

  20. 5 out of 5

    Door Williams

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pw

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  23. 5 out of 5

    Manatees

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gautham Selvamohan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Damian Murphy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thaddeus602

  28. 5 out of 5

    Smckillo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christine Mogan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eli

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