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Moving Innovation: A History of Computer Animation

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Computer graphics (or CG) has changed the way we experience the art of moving images. Computer graphics is the difference between Steamboat Willie and Buzz Lightyear, between ping pong and PONG. It began in 1963 when an MIT graduate student named Ivan Sutherland created Sketchpad, the first true computer animation program. Sutherland noted: "Since motion can be put into Sk Computer graphics (or CG) has changed the way we experience the art of moving images. Computer graphics is the difference between Steamboat Willie and Buzz Lightyear, between ping pong and PONG. It began in 1963 when an MIT graduate student named Ivan Sutherland created Sketchpad, the first true computer animation program. Sutherland noted: "Since motion can be put into Sketchpad drawings, it might be exciting to try making cartoons." This book, the first full-length history of CG, shows us how Sutherland's seemingly offhand idea grew into a multibillion dollar industry. In Moving Innovation, Tom Sito -- himself an animator and industry insider for more than thirty years -- describes the evolution of CG. His story features a memorable cast of characters -- math nerds, avant-garde artists, cold warriors, hippies, video game enthusiasts, and studio executives: disparate types united by a common vision. Sito shows us how fifty years of work by this motley crew made movies like Toy Story and Avatar possible.


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Computer graphics (or CG) has changed the way we experience the art of moving images. Computer graphics is the difference between Steamboat Willie and Buzz Lightyear, between ping pong and PONG. It began in 1963 when an MIT graduate student named Ivan Sutherland created Sketchpad, the first true computer animation program. Sutherland noted: "Since motion can be put into Sk Computer graphics (or CG) has changed the way we experience the art of moving images. Computer graphics is the difference between Steamboat Willie and Buzz Lightyear, between ping pong and PONG. It began in 1963 when an MIT graduate student named Ivan Sutherland created Sketchpad, the first true computer animation program. Sutherland noted: "Since motion can be put into Sketchpad drawings, it might be exciting to try making cartoons." This book, the first full-length history of CG, shows us how Sutherland's seemingly offhand idea grew into a multibillion dollar industry. In Moving Innovation, Tom Sito -- himself an animator and industry insider for more than thirty years -- describes the evolution of CG. His story features a memorable cast of characters -- math nerds, avant-garde artists, cold warriors, hippies, video game enthusiasts, and studio executives: disparate types united by a common vision. Sito shows us how fifty years of work by this motley crew made movies like Toy Story and Avatar possible.

37 review for Moving Innovation: A History of Computer Animation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Al Eden

    This was bit drier than I had hoped it would be. It is very much a list of names and dates. Good history perhaps, but like any history textbook not terribly entertaining. Then again I suspect entertainment was not Tom's objective.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    777.709 S6236 2013

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

  4. 4 out of 5

    Parshav Chauhan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Richard Wright

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evan Tedlock

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    Steve Diggins

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cogspa

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Hunting

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  11. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  12. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  13. 5 out of 5

    Renee Zipp

  14. 4 out of 5

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  15. 4 out of 5

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  16. 4 out of 5

    Piotr

  17. 5 out of 5

    alison szabo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  19. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

    Will Bryan

  21. 5 out of 5

    David McGowan

  22. 4 out of 5

    M

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Cockerill

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hutton

  25. 4 out of 5

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  26. 4 out of 5

    Jorge

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    Corey

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marc

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yang Zhang

  30. 5 out of 5

    Micha

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  32. 5 out of 5

    COM Library Rarian

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jon Guah

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lin Ding

  35. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  36. 5 out of 5

    Mariam

  37. 5 out of 5

    Anna Glassman

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