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Republic of Wrath

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A prize-winning political scientist untangles the deep roots of tribalism in America. American politics seems to be in an unprecedented uproar. But in this revelatory work of political history, James A. Morone shows that today’s rancor isn’t what’s new — the clarity of the battle lines is. Past eras were full of discord, but the most contentious question in American society A prize-winning political scientist untangles the deep roots of tribalism in America. American politics seems to be in an unprecedented uproar. But in this revelatory work of political history, James A. Morone shows that today’s rancor isn’t what’s new — the clarity of the battle lines is. Past eras were full of discord, but the most contentious question in American society — Who are we? — never split along party lines. Instead, each party reached out to different groups on the margins of power: immigrants, African Americans, and women. But, as the United States underwent profound societal transformations from the Civil War to the populist explosion to the Great Migration to civil rights to the latest era of immigration, the party alignment shifted. African Americans conquered the old segregationist party and Democrats slowly evolved into the party of civil rights, immigration, and gender rights. Republicans turned whiter and more nativist. The unprecedented party lineup now injects tribal intensity into every policy difference. Republic of Wrath tells the story of America as we’ve never heard it before, explaining the origins of our fractious times and suggesting how we might build a more robust republic.


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A prize-winning political scientist untangles the deep roots of tribalism in America. American politics seems to be in an unprecedented uproar. But in this revelatory work of political history, James A. Morone shows that today’s rancor isn’t what’s new — the clarity of the battle lines is. Past eras were full of discord, but the most contentious question in American society A prize-winning political scientist untangles the deep roots of tribalism in America. American politics seems to be in an unprecedented uproar. But in this revelatory work of political history, James A. Morone shows that today’s rancor isn’t what’s new — the clarity of the battle lines is. Past eras were full of discord, but the most contentious question in American society — Who are we? — never split along party lines. Instead, each party reached out to different groups on the margins of power: immigrants, African Americans, and women. But, as the United States underwent profound societal transformations from the Civil War to the populist explosion to the Great Migration to civil rights to the latest era of immigration, the party alignment shifted. African Americans conquered the old segregationist party and Democrats slowly evolved into the party of civil rights, immigration, and gender rights. Republicans turned whiter and more nativist. The unprecedented party lineup now injects tribal intensity into every policy difference. Republic of Wrath tells the story of America as we’ve never heard it before, explaining the origins of our fractious times and suggesting how we might build a more robust republic.

36 review for Republic of Wrath

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Excellent History Lesson. I'm a guy that prides myself in knowing more about American history than most. (Well, let's be honest, my normal line is that I know more about most than most, and that generally holds true - even when people know far more than I do about a given topic.) Anyways... :D This book did a phenomenal job of bringing forth quite a bit of American history that even I wasn't aware of, particularly in my acknowledged weak area between the War of 1812 and the Civil War. For exampl Excellent History Lesson. I'm a guy that prides myself in knowing more about American history than most. (Well, let's be honest, my normal line is that I know more about most than most, and that generally holds true - even when people know far more than I do about a given topic.) Anyways... :D This book did a phenomenal job of bringing forth quite a bit of American history that even I wasn't aware of, particularly in my acknowledged weak area between the War of 1812 and the Civil War. For example, despite how heated American political discourse feels at times over the last couple of years in particular, apparently there was a point in the lead-up to the Civil War where *Congressmen* routinely brought knives and guns *onto Capitol Hill*. Indeed, one line Morone quotes from a Congressman of the time is that those that didn't bring a knife and a gun brought two guns! While the ending of the narrative, with Morone's recommendations of how to fix where we find ourselves, is more "your mileage may vary" level, the lead up to that point is a solid look at American history, if hyper focused on the general premise that all conflict came from either race or immigration - which is a bit disingenuous at times, but the analysis here isn't so flawed as to claim absolute exclusivity to the premise. Absolutely a must-read for Americans and really anyone wishing to understand how America has arrived at its current place in time. Very much recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    A Morone has discovered the concept of Tribalism. And because he wasn't aware of this, obviously the entire World known by A Morone was invaded by Tribalism that very moment. And, what else would one expect from A Morone?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Barsanti

    Mostly satisfying history of tribalism in American politics may cover a lot of familiar territory for some. But Morone's take on a subject that has become journalistic cliché ("We are a divided nation," etc.) stands out for its refusal to romanticize the past as a halcyon paradise of aisle-crossing political partnering. That realism extends to a refreshingly clear-eyed assessment of failed bipartisan efforts like 1860's Constitutional Party, which reached for "an old illusion-they would leap rig Mostly satisfying history of tribalism in American politics may cover a lot of familiar territory for some. But Morone's take on a subject that has become journalistic cliché ("We are a divided nation," etc.) stands out for its refusal to romanticize the past as a halcyon paradise of aisle-crossing political partnering. That realism extends to a refreshingly clear-eyed assessment of failed bipartisan efforts like 1860's Constitutional Party, which reached for "an old illusion-they would leap right past the national divisions and land on some hazy, ill-defined consensus." The lesson, Morone argues convincingly, "is that there is no politics outside of, well, politics. The idylls of nonpartisan unity may stretch back to the founding, but they are no use in the messy, real world of passion and politics."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thomas West III

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Autiello

  7. 4 out of 5

    Don Doebler

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Book

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  12. 5 out of 5

    megan ♡

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  15. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alec

  18. 4 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

  19. 5 out of 5

    John Baxter

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cora Jane

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thefirebottle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christos

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zaid

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Rader

  27. 4 out of 5

    Simona

  28. 4 out of 5

    M.A.S.K.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Guera25

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Elise

  32. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  33. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  35. 5 out of 5

    Aly

  36. 4 out of 5

    Alex

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