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Emotional First Aid: Practical Strategies for Treating Failure, Rejection, Guilt, and Other Everyday Psychological Injuries

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First aid for failure Although we have bandages for cuts, chicken soup for colds, and ice packs for bruises, most of us have no idea how to treat day-to-day emotional injuries such as failure, rejection, and loss. But, as Guy Winch, Ph.D., points out, these kinds of emotional injuries often get worse when left untreated and can significantly impact our quality of life. In First aid for failure Although we have bandages for cuts, chicken soup for colds, and ice packs for bruises, most of us have no idea how to treat day-to-day emotional injuries such as failure, rejection, and loss. But, as Guy Winch, Ph.D., points out, these kinds of emotional injuries often get worse when left untreated and can significantly impact our quality of life. In this fascinating and highly practical book he provides the emotional first aid treatments we have been lacking. Explaining the long-term fallout that can result from seemingly minor emotional and psychological injuries, Dr. Winch offers concrete, easy-to-use exercises backed up by hard cutting-edge science to aid in recovery. He uses relatable anecdotes about real patients he has treated over the years and often gives us a much needed dose of humor as well. Prescriptive, programmatic, and unique, this first-aid kit for battered emotions will appeal to readers of Unstuck by James S. Gordon and Self-Compassion by Kristin Neff.


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First aid for failure Although we have bandages for cuts, chicken soup for colds, and ice packs for bruises, most of us have no idea how to treat day-to-day emotional injuries such as failure, rejection, and loss. But, as Guy Winch, Ph.D., points out, these kinds of emotional injuries often get worse when left untreated and can significantly impact our quality of life. In First aid for failure Although we have bandages for cuts, chicken soup for colds, and ice packs for bruises, most of us have no idea how to treat day-to-day emotional injuries such as failure, rejection, and loss. But, as Guy Winch, Ph.D., points out, these kinds of emotional injuries often get worse when left untreated and can significantly impact our quality of life. In this fascinating and highly practical book he provides the emotional first aid treatments we have been lacking. Explaining the long-term fallout that can result from seemingly minor emotional and psychological injuries, Dr. Winch offers concrete, easy-to-use exercises backed up by hard cutting-edge science to aid in recovery. He uses relatable anecdotes about real patients he has treated over the years and often gives us a much needed dose of humor as well. Prescriptive, programmatic, and unique, this first-aid kit for battered emotions will appeal to readers of Unstuck by James S. Gordon and Self-Compassion by Kristin Neff.

30 review for Emotional First Aid: Practical Strategies for Treating Failure, Rejection, Guilt, and Other Everyday Psychological Injuries

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    **First aid for the psyche** As a therapist, I’m constantly looking out for helpful resources for clients. This book has quickly been added to my list. It so clearly explores the seven most common—and inevitable, if you’re human!—psychological injuries and then provides specific “first aid” treatments for each: 1. Rejection—The emotional cuts and scrapes of daily life Description: Rejections can inflict four distinct emotional wounds, each of which might require some from of emotional first aid: l **First aid for the psyche** As a therapist, I’m constantly looking out for helpful resources for clients. This book has quickly been added to my list. It so clearly explores the seven most common—and inevitable, if you’re human!—psychological injuries and then provides specific “first aid” treatments for each: 1. Rejection—The emotional cuts and scrapes of daily life Description: Rejections can inflict four distinct emotional wounds, each of which might require some from of emotional first aid: lingering visceral pain, anger and aggressive urges, harm to self-esteem, and damage to feeling that we belong. (p. 17) Treatments: • Argue with self-criticism • Revive your self-worth • Replenish feelings of social connection • Desensitize yourself 2. Loneliness—Relationship muscle weakens Description: Loneliness makes us constantly on guard, prepared for the disappointment and rejection we are sure will come. As a result, we miss opportunities to make social connections and behave in ways that push others away. (p. 53) Treatments: • Remove your negatively tinted glasses • Identify your self-defeating behaviors • Take on the other person’s perspective • Deepen your emotional bonds • Create opportunities for social connection • Adopt a best friend 3. Loss and Trauma—Walking on broken bones Description: Loss and trauma create four psychological wounds. They cause overwhelming emotional pain, they undermine our basic sense of identity and the roles we play in life, they destabilize our belief systems and our understanding of the world, and they challenge our ability to remain present and engaged in our most important relationships. (p. 85) Treatments: • Soothe your emotional pain your way • Recover lost aspects of your self • Find meaning in tragedy 4. Guilt—The poison in our system Description: Guilt usually serves an important function by alerting us to when we might have harmed another person or when any actions we’re considering might do so. However, if our offense is serious or if we’ve already made significant efforts to apologize to a person we harmed or atone for our actions in other ways and our guilt remains excessive, or if we suffer from substantial survivor guilt, or separation and disloyalty guilt, emotional first aid is indeed necessary. (p. 119) Treatments: • Learn the recipe for an effective apology • Forgive yourself • Reengage in life 5. Rumination—Picking at emotional scabs Description: In order to break the self-reinforcing nature of ruminative thoughts and allow our wounds to heal, we must interrupt the cycle of rumination once it gets triggered, and we should weaken the urge to ruminate at the source by diminishing the intensity of the feelings that fuel it. We must also make efforts to monitor our relationships and to ease the emotional burden we might be placing on loved ones. (p. 154) Treatments: • Change your perspective • Reframe the anger • Go easy on your friends 6. Failure—Emotional chest colds become psychological pneumonias Description: When we fail repeatedly or when we respond to failures in ways that set back our confidence, our self-esteem, and our chances of future success, we run the risk of allowing our emotional chest cold to turn into psychological pneumonia. Because much of the anxiety associated with failures can build upon itself, it is best to be prudent and apply psychological first aid treatment as soon as possible after meaningful or bothersome failures occur. (p. 189) Treatments: • Get support and get real • Focus on factors in your control • Take responsibility and own the fear • Distract yourself from performance pressure distractions 7. Low Self-Esteem—Weak emotional immune systems Description: Having low self-esteem weakens our emotional immune systems and inflicts three kinds of psychological wounds: it makes us more vulnerable to psychological injuries, it makes us dismissive of positive feedback and resistant to emotional nutrients, and it makes us feel unassertive and disempowered. (p. 232) Treatments: • Adopt self-compassion and silence the critical voices in your head • Identify your strengths and affirm them • Increase your tolerance for compliments • Increase your personal empowerment • Improve your self-control Think of this book as first aid for the psyche. And, use as needed until symptoms subside.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    My true rating is 2.5 stars. Overall the book is great guide for how to address the minor emotional scrapes and bruises in life. Most of the techniques describes are science based and I have heard about from other sources. I really enjoyed his presentation, he offers treatment plans for each malady. I liked that he cited research for each of the treatment. The reason for a grading it down is that a few examples that the author puts into the book are far more complex and he uses them in attempt t My true rating is 2.5 stars. Overall the book is great guide for how to address the minor emotional scrapes and bruises in life. Most of the techniques describes are science based and I have heard about from other sources. I really enjoyed his presentation, he offers treatment plans for each malady. I liked that he cited research for each of the treatment. The reason for a grading it down is that a few examples that the author puts into the book are far more complex and he uses them in attempt to illustrate a much simpler concept. He does stay on point with those examples, just focusing on issue at hand. But I feel like him ignoring the other much bigger and complex issues at hand. Case in point is his patient who accidentally runs over mother's foot. In the situation the woman's argument with her mother escalates to the boiling point, so she tries to leave the house to disengage. Her mother follows her & insists on carrying on an argument in public. In the heat of the argument the woman forgets to straighten the steering wheel before starting to drive & runs over her mother's foot. The author focuses only on guilt part of the situation and even draws a conclusion that the woman's mother will not be able to forgive her daughter until she offers her mother a recompense - a promise never to leave in a middle of an argument. I feel that in this specific case the guilt ties into much deeper feelings shame, blame in a relationship, history of emotional abuse, inability to set boundaries and deal with conflict in a healthy way. The author doesn't mention any of these factors, although I feel they apply in much greater degree in this case than simple guilt. The author also makes a statement, which sounds like he endorses the idea that the woman to offer mother her desired recompense just to alleviate her guilt. I strongly disagree with that statement and wished he used a much less complex case to illuminate his point.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I first heard Guy on several episodes of The Mental Illness Happy Hour and his humor, easy approach, and intelligence struck a chord with me. Much of this carries over to his book, although I’d definitely recommend looking up the podcasts. Emotional First Aid is divided into different chapters according to emotional “ailments.” Each then has a set of “prescriptions” (i.e. when battling low self esteem and the vicious cycle of negative thoughts such as “I’m a failure. I’m stupid. I’ll never be ab I first heard Guy on several episodes of The Mental Illness Happy Hour and his humor, easy approach, and intelligence struck a chord with me. Much of this carries over to his book, although I’d definitely recommend looking up the podcasts. Emotional First Aid is divided into different chapters according to emotional “ailments.” Each then has a set of “prescriptions” (i.e. when battling low self esteem and the vicious cycle of negative thoughts such as “I’m a failure. I’m stupid. I’ll never be able to write a Goodreads review that will win the hearts and minds of mankind” think of what you would say to a child or a friend in a similar circumstance and try to steer your thoughts to be more kind than cruel). Although Guy recommends reading the book in its entirety (rather than focusing on any chapter that pertains to you specifically at the time), I’m not sure if that was the best approach or not. I also can’t speak to the efficacy of the “prescriptions” but they seem to be of sound reasoning, and were often things I had heard before (not to say that it isn’t valuable to read this, because I do think it could be quite useful). But ultimately, reading/hearing advice only gets you so far, it’s ultimately up to you to put some of that wisdom into action.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alice Bendor

    I was lucky enouth to put my hands on an advance copy of this important book. Dr. Winch gives us a tool box for life to deal with psychological everyday but distressing problems as well as how we can indeed benefit from them. Parents shold make a point to get the book for their kids as this is an amazing guide for adulthood, college years and throughout life. The outstanding book specifies very clearly when we can practice "self help" and when we should seek professional advice. My advice is to I was lucky enouth to put my hands on an advance copy of this important book. Dr. Winch gives us a tool box for life to deal with psychological everyday but distressing problems as well as how we can indeed benefit from them. Parents shold make a point to get the book for their kids as this is an amazing guide for adulthood, college years and throughout life. The outstanding book specifies very clearly when we can practice "self help" and when we should seek professional advice. My advice is to keep this book very handy, right next to the band aid, as am sure it will and should be referred to as an important manual to accompany us in various points in our life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Afreen

    Written by psychologist Guy Winch, this book should probably be in your medicine cabinet, not your book shelf. This book focuses on how ignoring emotional wounds makes them worse and how your emotional outlook on life is infected by that initial trauma. It also sections out each emotional "infection" like guilt, anger, low self-esteem, failure, etc. and teaches you how to treat the wounds before they turn into full-fledged diseases. Here's the TED talk by the author which is pretty useful in itse Written by psychologist Guy Winch, this book should probably be in your medicine cabinet, not your book shelf. This book focuses on how ignoring emotional wounds makes them worse and how your emotional outlook on life is infected by that initial trauma. It also sections out each emotional "infection" like guilt, anger, low self-esteem, failure, etc. and teaches you how to treat the wounds before they turn into full-fledged diseases. Here's the TED talk by the author which is pretty useful in itself. https://www.ted.com/talks/guy_winch_t... This book is one of those that I'll keep in my book shelf to go to for first aid tips when I feel sad, angry or probably low on self-esteem.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cathryn

    Buzzfeed likes to rec this book a lot and I get it because it's nicely written and easy to digest, but I felt it was repetitive and probably better to look at when you have a particular problem in mind than to just generally read. Buzzfeed likes to rec this book a lot and I get it because it's nicely written and easy to digest, but I felt it was repetitive and probably better to look at when you have a particular problem in mind than to just generally read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    Dr. Winch says that we should treat emotional pain like we do physical pain- with a good wash and a bandaid. The problem is that very few of us have had the training to know what to do when various emotional hurts occur. This book gives practical suggestions and exercises to help reduce and eliminate the lingering psychological pain and dysfunction from every day hurts and disappointments. It's an amazing little book and, potentially, life changing if the reader takes Dr. Winch's suggestions and Dr. Winch says that we should treat emotional pain like we do physical pain- with a good wash and a bandaid. The problem is that very few of us have had the training to know what to do when various emotional hurts occur. This book gives practical suggestions and exercises to help reduce and eliminate the lingering psychological pain and dysfunction from every day hurts and disappointments. It's an amazing little book and, potentially, life changing if the reader takes Dr. Winch's suggestions and runs with them.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    I wanted to hide my self-help books for fear of showing to public every inch of a wimp that I am. This one I can hide because I read its Kindle edition on my phone. I know you think the cover screams "FOR WIMPS". I thought so too, but the fact that Guy Winch has the authority to speak on this matter, being a clinical psychologist with decades of practice, triggered me to start reading. It only takes a few minutes of reading the Introduction before I bought Winch's idea that it's curious how well w I wanted to hide my self-help books for fear of showing to public every inch of a wimp that I am. This one I can hide because I read its Kindle edition on my phone. I know you think the cover screams "FOR WIMPS". I thought so too, but the fact that Guy Winch has the authority to speak on this matter, being a clinical psychologist with decades of practice, triggered me to start reading. It only takes a few minutes of reading the Introduction before I bought Winch's idea that it's curious how well we're trained to take care of our bodies since childhood, yet we know practically nothing on how to treat "common psychological injuries." Children know what we should do when we catch a cold or get a scratch on our knee, he wrote, yet as adults we know little on how to recover from low self-esteem or loss and trauma. The book is divided into 8 chapters, one chapter each to discuss rejection, loneliness, loss and trauma, guilt, rumination, failure, and low self-esteem. The last chapter is Conclusion, where Winch urges his readers to "create your personal psychological medicine cabinet." In each chapter Winch discusses examples he encountered from his practice, and provides techniques to administer a "psychological aspirin" for our psychological injuries. He is cautious though to describe symptoms which signal the need to consult a mental health specialist. I like how Winch seems to find a perfect physical ailment analogy for each of the 7 psychological ones he writes about. Loss and trauma is likened to walking on broken bones (the mental imagery alone gave me insight on why loss is something difficult to recover from), while the analogy of picking at emotional scabs is used for rumination. Through his description, I can appreciate how important it is not to dismiss the everyday hardship we have to endure - the way we won't dismiss a broken leg saying "Oh well, the pain will go away on itself." I read the real-life examples he writes intently, marvelled at how we humans are capable to treat ourselves so badly when it comes to psychological well-being. At the end of each chapter he lists down the "aspirins", coded as Treatment A, Treatment B, etc followed by Exercises on how to apply the treatments. I find this arrangement disrupts my reading, but I can understand its reason: after all, the book bears the words “practical strategies” in its title. I didn't read this book linearly from Chapter 1 to 8, but picked a random chapter each time instead. The one that intrigued me the most was the chapter about Rumination, because I was feeling that I tended to ruminate too much for my own good. He is so spot on - describing in detail how his clients fell into the deep well of rumination, and its horrifying effects on their lives. I liked the "treatments" he prescribed at the end of the chapter, and could see how they'd help. All in all, it's an enjoyable book and a good one to study about man's psychological ailments. If anything, I am now constantly reminded that much as leaving my scraped knee untreated is not a brave act, taking care of a psychological cuts and wounds is not a sissy one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally Boyer

    Straightforward, delivering what the title promises. Some of my favorite tips include: 1. Our need to belong has some substitutability, meaning that new relationships and memberships can psychologically replace those that have ended, especially if they provide a better fit for our personality and interests. (P29) I did this over the past few months by joining a few meetup groups that align with my interest and it has truly made me happier. 2. Social snacking is good for you and can include things Straightforward, delivering what the title promises. Some of my favorite tips include: 1. Our need to belong has some substitutability, meaning that new relationships and memberships can psychologically replace those that have ended, especially if they provide a better fit for our personality and interests. (P29) I did this over the past few months by joining a few meetup groups that align with my interest and it has truly made me happier. 2. Social snacking is good for you and can include things like keeping photographs of loved ones near, maybe on your desk. When you look at the photos, you are reminding yourself that you belong and are loved. (P. 31) 3. Loneliness begets loneliness and can actually be contagious. Furthermore it causes us to evaluate others more harshly and to perceive our interactions with friends and loved ones more negatively than we would if we were not lonely. (P 44) So, try to not get lonely because it’s hard to reverse. 4. “Improving our empathy skills will do wonders for our most important relationships. The caring and consideration that empathy conveys can spark a cycle of goodwill, affection, and generosity of spirit that radically deepens bonds of marriage, family, or friendship.” (P 69) the best way to become more empathetic is to visualize yourself in the other person’s situation in as much detail as possible. It might help to journal it out as well. Also remember that contradictory feelings and experiences can happen simultaneously. Humans are complicated and so is our world! 5. Post-traumatic growth is a real potential for survivors of a traumatic event. This is often done when the survivor reframes the experience and finds meaning in the trauma or becomes grateful for the fact that it wasn’t worse. Also, talking about the trauma event too much and too soon after might actually make PTSD more likely and severe, so be careful and don’t force someone who’s been through a hard time to talk about it if he or she isn’t ready. Unlike what we’ve often been told, talking it out isn’t always the right thing to do. It’s more personal than that. (P. 87) 6. Similar to over-talking or forced talking about a traumatic event, rumination can cause more damage than the thing you’re ruminating about. Positive destructions might actually prove more effective in dealing with something that’s bothering you that you just can’t stop thinking about. 7. Finally, another “common sense” notion is once again incorrect. “The effectiveness of venting anger by letting off steam has been studied extensively and the verdict of all such studies has been virtually unanimous—the catharsis model is not only wrong, it is actually harmful!” (P 161) So punching a pillow will probably mar you feel even more angry, not less. So don’t let your anger get the best of you because it’s a downward spiral from there.

  10. 5 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    We sustain frequent psychological wounds as we go through life. Unfortunately, until now, few of us have had the awareness and the know-how to treat them effectively. Instead we tend either to ignore them entirely or to unwittingly react in ways that deepen them and allow them to cause damage to our mental health over time. … this is the whole premise of Guy Winch's Emotional First Aid. More and more people are become aware of mental health and the importance of taking the time to see about the We sustain frequent psychological wounds as we go through life. Unfortunately, until now, few of us have had the awareness and the know-how to treat them effectively. Instead we tend either to ignore them entirely or to unwittingly react in ways that deepen them and allow them to cause damage to our mental health over time. … this is the whole premise of Guy Winch's Emotional First Aid. More and more people are become aware of mental health and the importance of taking the time to see about their emotional health. I think this book is timely and offers solid, practical advice for some common emotional wounds. In Emotional First Aid Guy Winch offers treatment for the following areas of life: 1. Rejection- The emotional cuts and scrapes of daily life 2. Loneliness- Relationship muscle weakens 3. Loss and Trauma- Walking on broken bones 4. Guilt- The poison in our system 5. Rumination- Picking at emotional scabs 6. Failure-Emotional chest colds become psychological pneumonias 7. Low Self-Esteem -Weak emotional immune systems A well put together emotional medical cabinet if you are looking to tackle one of the following areas above. Winch did warn that this is just a "first aid kit" so if you need to go deeper please seek the relevant help. A good read for your emotional health.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jyoti

    As we grow up, we sometimes forget to learn how to rightfully deal with our emotions. Some of these emotions are so common that we face them almost daily and yet, we never learn how to handle them. We push them down, lock them in and smile for people. This results in self destructive behaviour/decisions. Some of us end up sharing things with wrong people and some of us push away the only people who care about us. Emotional First Aid is what it tells us it is: a first aid kit. Something to help y As we grow up, we sometimes forget to learn how to rightfully deal with our emotions. Some of these emotions are so common that we face them almost daily and yet, we never learn how to handle them. We push them down, lock them in and smile for people. This results in self destructive behaviour/decisions. Some of us end up sharing things with wrong people and some of us push away the only people who care about us. Emotional First Aid is what it tells us it is: a first aid kit. Something to help you when the wound is fresh (emotional wound). What to do right after you are rejected? What to do when your only loved one doesn't call you on your birthday? What to do when you realise you have lost contact with other fellow humans and are in dire need to talk? What to do right away when you feel guilty? And more questions like that. The book is divided in some parts, each part dealing with a different emotion. It helped me a bit (yes, only a bit), but it is a nice kit to have in my collection. Because I read this book, I became more aware of instances when I was pushing down my emotions. It's a good book to have and definitely worth reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Stern

    As a therapist, I'm constantly looking out for helpful resources for clients. This book has quickly been added to my list. It so clearly explores the seven most common--and inevitable, if you're human!--psychological injuries and then provides specific "first aid" treatments for each: 1. Rejection--The emotional cuts and scrapes of daily life Description: Rejections can inflict four distinct emotional wounds, each of which might require some from of emotional first aid: lingering visceral pain, ang As a therapist, I'm constantly looking out for helpful resources for clients. This book has quickly been added to my list. It so clearly explores the seven most common--and inevitable, if you're human!--psychological injuries and then provides specific "first aid" treatments for each: 1. Rejection--The emotional cuts and scrapes of daily life Description: Rejections can inflict four distinct emotional wounds, each of which might require some from of emotional first aid: lingering visceral pain, anger and aggressive urges, harm to self-esteem, and damage to feeling that we belong. (p. 17) Treatments: * Argue with self-criticism * Revive your self-worth * Replenish feelings of social connection * Desensitize yourself 2. Loneliness--Relationship muscle weakens Description: Loneliness makes us constantly on guard, prepared for the disappointment and rejection we are sure will come. As a result, we miss opportunities to make social connections and behave in ways that push others away. (p. 53) Treatments: * Remove your negatively tinted glasses * Identify your self-defeating behaviors * Take on the other person's perspective * Deepen your emotional bonds * Create opportunities for social connection * Adopt a best friend 3. Loss and Trauma--Walking on broken bones Description: Loss and trauma create four psychological wounds. They cause overwhelming emotional pain, they undermine our basic sense of identity and the roles we play in life, they destabilize our belief systems and our understanding of the world, and they challenge our ability to remain present and engaged in our most important relationships. (p. 85) Treatments: * Soothe your emotional pain your way * Recover lost aspects of your self * Find meaning in tragedy 4. Guilt--The poison in our system Description: Guilt usually serves an important function by alerting us to when we might have harmed another person or when any actions we're considering might do so. However, if our offense is serious or if we've already made significant efforts to apologize to a person we harmed or atone for our actions in other ways and our guilt remains excessive, or if we suffer from substantial survivor guilt, or separation and disloyalty guilt, emotional first aid is indeed necessary. (p. 119) Treatments: * Learn the recipe for an effective apology * Forgive yourself * Reengage in life 5. Rumination--Picking at emotional scabs Description: In order to break the self-reinforcing nature of ruminative thoughts and allow our wounds to heal, we must interrupt the cycle of rumination once it gets triggered, and we should weaken the urge to ruminate at the source by diminishing the intensity of the feelings that fuel it. We must also make efforts to monitor our relationships and to ease the emotional burden we might be placing on loved ones. (p. 154) Treatments: * Change your perspective * Reframe the anger * Go easy on your friends 6. Failure--Emotional chest colds become psychological pneumonias Description: When we fail repeatedly or when we respond to failures in ways that set back our confidence, our self-esteem, and our chances of future success, we run the risk of allowing our emotional chest cold to turn into psychological pneumonia. Because much of the anxiety associated with failures can build upon itself, it is best to be prudent and apply psychological first aid treatment as soon as possible after meaningful or bothersome failures occur. (p. 189) Treatments: * Get support and get real * Focus on factors in your control * Take responsibility and own the fear * Distract yourself from performance pressure distractions 7. Low Self-Esteem--Weak emotional immune systems Description: Having low self-esteem weakens our emotional immune systems and inflicts three kinds of psychological wounds: it makes us more vulnerable to psychological injuries, it makes us dismissive of positive feedback and resistant to emotional nutrients, and it makes us feel unassertive and disempowered. (p. 232) Treatments: * Adopt self-compassion and silence the critical voices in your head * Identify your strengths and affirm them * Increase your tolerance for compliments * Increase your personal empowerment * Improve your self-control

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jess d'Artagnan

    I seem to be one of the few people who didn't love this book. I whole heartedly support the underlying concept of "emotional hygiene" and "emotional first aid" but found that some of the "first aid" suggestions were not any different than other ideas offered in a plethora of other self help books. I was hoping for more of a research-based (rather than anecdotal) read, but I'm not necessarily the audience he was targeting. He's clearly targeting the general public and not those of us who have bee I seem to be one of the few people who didn't love this book. I whole heartedly support the underlying concept of "emotional hygiene" and "emotional first aid" but found that some of the "first aid" suggestions were not any different than other ideas offered in a plethora of other self help books. I was hoping for more of a research-based (rather than anecdotal) read, but I'm not necessarily the audience he was targeting. He's clearly targeting the general public and not those of us who have been steeped in psychological research. In that regard, he does a good job of simplifying concepts for readers (if this is what readers want--I didn't necessarily enjoy this part of the writing). I appreciate the effort, but for me, this didn't have the impact I'd hoped. The TED talk the author gives is just as good and takes less time. :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    James

    Good reference book, but didn't learn anything particularly interesting, but fairly applicable for most emotional "injuries". I was hoping for a chapter on jealousy and envy, but there was none. Also found Winch seems to shoehorn the book a bit too much into the "First Aid" analogy without giving too much information. Didn't like the bits of humor he included in his book either. Good reference book, but didn't learn anything particularly interesting, but fairly applicable for most emotional "injuries". I was hoping for a chapter on jealousy and envy, but there was none. Also found Winch seems to shoehorn the book a bit too much into the "First Aid" analogy without giving too much information. Didn't like the bits of humor he included in his book either.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    I especially loved the chapter on ruminating. In addition to making it clear why we tend to think the way we do, Winch offers concrete ways to deal with those emotional "injuries" the instant they happen. I especially loved the chapter on ruminating. In addition to making it clear why we tend to think the way we do, Winch offers concrete ways to deal with those emotional "injuries" the instant they happen.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Par-

    3 1/2 Stars. “There is something wrong about the fact that we know so much about brushing and flossing but so little about how to take care of our emotions and our psychological well-being.” We all have experiences that damage our emotional dimension and there are things that we could do, but we barely are conscious of them. We care about our body, society forces us for a sexy and unreal physical shape, we try to choose what we eat carefully, but nobody simply gives a fuck about his or her mind(ma 3 1/2 Stars. “There is something wrong about the fact that we know so much about brushing and flossing but so little about how to take care of our emotions and our psychological well-being.” We all have experiences that damage our emotional dimension and there are things that we could do, but we barely are conscious of them. We care about our body, society forces us for a sexy and unreal physical shape, we try to choose what we eat carefully, but nobody simply gives a fuck about his or her mind(maybe because we can’t see it like our belly). Describing emotional hygiene is the simple goal behind this book. It contains of seven chapter, each describes a psychological medicine cabinet about Rejection, Loneliness, Loss and Trauma, Guilt, Rumination, Failure and Low self-esteem. I found chapters classification very well and helped me not to get confused. Each one contains 1. The psychological wounds that inflict our body, 2. General treatment guidelines (with a summary after it), 3. Some exercises (sometimes) to help you stick to that guideline and at last 4. A brief part, when to consult a mental health professional. Also, finding sources of what Guy Winch was saying all through book, enabled me to check it for further information when I needed. I didn’t check all of solutions that were in the book practically, but I did use some of them before even starting this book and they were helpful in some ways. So, I know some of them (not most or all of them) works well (at least in my case) and it’s not just some crap thing to sell and deplete your pockets out of money. I first saw this book when I was watching one of Guy Winch’s videos about “Emotional First Aids” and why we all need it. I found it amusing, you can watch here: https://www.ted.com/talks/guy_winch_the_case_for_emotional_hygiene?language=en

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aziza Aouhassi

    A reference book and psychological medicine cabinet to have at hand for daily aches. I read it as an ebook. I'll definitely have the paper version to keep and review as much as necessary. As a review of the content, I found it highly efficient, based on scientific researches and extremely simple (not effortlessly though) to implement. I hope this will help more people to spend more time on making their psychological well being a priority. A reference book and psychological medicine cabinet to have at hand for daily aches. I read it as an ebook. I'll definitely have the paper version to keep and review as much as necessary. As a review of the content, I found it highly efficient, based on scientific researches and extremely simple (not effortlessly though) to implement. I hope this will help more people to spend more time on making their psychological well being a priority.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aryeh

    I think this book is best read on an as-needed basis. Required reading, IMO. Always good to get a refresher on how to apologize, how to manage rumination, how to heal from grief, etc. Insane that this stuff is not taught in schools. Not the most in-depth, insightful, paradigm-shifting book you read on the topic, but that's not what it is supposed to be. I think this book is best read on an as-needed basis. Required reading, IMO. Always good to get a refresher on how to apologize, how to manage rumination, how to heal from grief, etc. Insane that this stuff is not taught in schools. Not the most in-depth, insightful, paradigm-shifting book you read on the topic, but that's not what it is supposed to be.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Kappes

    Sometime in the last year, I realized that someday, my beloved therapist of 10+ years is PROBABLY going to want to retire SOMEDAY, and in the time I have now, I should probably start working on self-care. So I did what any smart and self-sufficient millennial would do. I turned to BuzzFeed! And voila, there it was-- "Just 15 Great Books That'll Genuinely Change Your Life For The Better". Out of everything on there, this book stood out- it reminded me of all of my weird long-winded titled Psychol Sometime in the last year, I realized that someday, my beloved therapist of 10+ years is PROBABLY going to want to retire SOMEDAY, and in the time I have now, I should probably start working on self-care. So I did what any smart and self-sufficient millennial would do. I turned to BuzzFeed! And voila, there it was-- "Just 15 Great Books That'll Genuinely Change Your Life For The Better". Out of everything on there, this book stood out- it reminded me of all of my weird long-winded titled Psychology textbooks from college. And I'm glad I did-onto the actual book review. Emotional First Aid is a book that explains seven different, very common feelings: rejection, loneliness, loss & trauma, guilt, rumination, failure, and low self-esteem. Dr. Winch takes the careful time to understandably explain what these feelings are, potential causes of each feeling, offers multiple coping mechanisms that can be repeated at home as solutions to these problems, and my favorite-- tells us when these problems may be serious enough to seek professional help. What I love this book is that Dr. Winch is a real-life experienced psychologist, and as a result, he doesn't make the mistakes many self help books do. He's no Dr. Phil, offering potential damaging criticism. He doesn't waste time telling us so many stories about his life that it's basically an autobiography. He doesn't try and get me to go to church or change my diet or encourage me to just believe in myself. Instead, he offers examples of real-life patients who have had common and relatable problems and shares how they found solutions to these problems. At the beginning of the book, he talks of looking for psychological asprin. Things that could be applied in everyday situations, that do not require immediate professional administration. His peers and teachers laughed at him, saying there was no such thing. But I believe he's really succeeded in finding it on his own. His suggestions for treatment are all the kind of thing I'd imagine my therapist would offer to me- but they're things I can do at home, on my own, in my own time. Sometimes, like most therapeutic remedies, they make me roll my eyes. Why so much self-talk and visualization and writing things down? Ugh! But in the end, they work. In the end, Dr. Winch offers hope for people looking to treat themselves for minor, everyday emotional hurts. Or, like me, people looking for additional mental health homework to do on their own outside of therapy. It could even serve as a useful guide for parents, teachers, or anyone else who frequently encounters people who may need emotional assistance and advice. It's no substitute for a real therapist if you need one, and Dr. Winch acknowledges that. But it's definitely a wonderful supplement.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Meranda

    I am obsessed with this book. It’s connected so many dots in my head to help me be happier and healthier mentally. Also, a lot of the stuff that the author talks about are things that I’ve worked on in therapy, so the advice is very legit imho. If you’ve got some free time, I highly recommend putting this on your reading list.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alaa

    it was good, simplified and practical, aimed at the general readers and not for scientific researchers. I'm not sure if it's the first of its kind or not, but I think it's a good and important topic to be discussed. the book is divided by the emotional symptom and then at the end of each chapter he gives the prescription. Although giving anecdotes supposed to bring the meaning closer to you and to your understanding, the stories of the people -for me- was annoying. and I couldn't tell if they wer it was good, simplified and practical, aimed at the general readers and not for scientific researchers. I'm not sure if it's the first of its kind or not, but I think it's a good and important topic to be discussed. the book is divided by the emotional symptom and then at the end of each chapter he gives the prescription. Although giving anecdotes supposed to bring the meaning closer to you and to your understanding, the stories of the people -for me- was annoying. and I couldn't tell if they were true or made up to present as an example. I think it will be better if you go through the chapters you need at the moment rather than reading the whole book all at once. because at some points it is repetitive and somehow 'too obvious' . in the end, there's no magical pills or methods that could bring you any salvation. it's the process, and will power. oh yes, and check out the Author talk at Google talks.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    I really, really liked this. It's given me a lot to think about and makes me feel better equipped to deal with my problems in the future. The way Dr. Winch writes is clear and straight to the point. His examples are great and very illustrative. This book really does apply to everyone and the patients he uses for his examples are in situations that anyone can relate to. I appreciated the empathy and sensitivity he took to the variety of things that can cause failure, low self-esteem, etc. I liked I really, really liked this. It's given me a lot to think about and makes me feel better equipped to deal with my problems in the future. The way Dr. Winch writes is clear and straight to the point. His examples are great and very illustrative. This book really does apply to everyone and the patients he uses for his examples are in situations that anyone can relate to. I appreciated the empathy and sensitivity he took to the variety of things that can cause failure, low self-esteem, etc. I liked his treatments too. All things you can do on your own, in your own time. Boosted my self-esteem a bit just reading it and seeing how I'm not as messed up or beyond repair as I may have previously thought.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I came across this book after watching Guy Winch's TED talk about emotional first aid. This book expands on the information the author presents in his TED talk. While the book is based on psychological research, Winch writes for a general audience using anecdotal stories from his counseling practice. Each chapter also ends with suggestions and strategies of how to handle common emotional challenges. Besides the advice being practical and research-based, what I liked about this book is that the a I came across this book after watching Guy Winch's TED talk about emotional first aid. This book expands on the information the author presents in his TED talk. While the book is based on psychological research, Winch writes for a general audience using anecdotal stories from his counseling practice. Each chapter also ends with suggestions and strategies of how to handle common emotional challenges. Besides the advice being practical and research-based, what I liked about this book is that the author genuinely believes that by taking care of our emotional selves we can live better lives for ourselves and the people around us.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    An amazing book and tool to psychologists!! I definitely recommend this book not only to people with work with mental health but to everyone!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Lowton

    I'm a huge fan of Guy Winch's TED Talk on Emotional First Aid, and so it was a no-brainer that I would eventually read this book. Emotional First Aid offers many interesting case studies, research, and interventions related to loneliness, rejection, low self-esteem, guilt, failure, etc. However, I couldn't help but wonder who Dr. Winch's intended audience was. He wasn't writing for mental health practitioners, because he ended each chapter with "if you are experiencing ______, see a mental healt I'm a huge fan of Guy Winch's TED Talk on Emotional First Aid, and so it was a no-brainer that I would eventually read this book. Emotional First Aid offers many interesting case studies, research, and interventions related to loneliness, rejection, low self-esteem, guilt, failure, etc. However, I couldn't help but wonder who Dr. Winch's intended audience was. He wasn't writing for mental health practitioners, because he ended each chapter with "if you are experiencing ______, see a mental health practitioner." He wasn't writing for teachers or parents, because many of the interventions required extensive writing assignments that would alienate a child. I hope he wasn't writing for people experiencing failure, rejection, guilt, and low self-esteem because...well, let's face it, if you are experiencing ALL of those things, you probably need more than a self-help book. So while I thought Dr. Winch offered many useful vignettes and interventions, I wasn't sure to whom he was writing (or, which of my roles should be engaged in the reading). I may lend the book to a client and recommend they read a specific chapter as an early introduction into therapy, but I don't know to whom I would recommend the book in its entirety. Maybe (I hope?) Dr. Winch will collaborate with an early childhood educator or child psychologist to revamp these techniques to teach young children emotional first aid strategies.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melody Schwarting

    Guy Winch sets some clear categories, responses, and guidelines for handling the emotional stresses of human life. He helpfully explains psychological studies and data, while making his advice concrete through stories. Emotional First Aid is really helpful for those of us who are not going through major psychological issues (he recommends professional help for that!) but would like to be more resilient and emotionally developed. The emotional first aid kit I now have will help me, but it'll also Guy Winch sets some clear categories, responses, and guidelines for handling the emotional stresses of human life. He helpfully explains psychological studies and data, while making his advice concrete through stories. Emotional First Aid is really helpful for those of us who are not going through major psychological issues (he recommends professional help for that!) but would like to be more resilient and emotionally developed. The emotional first aid kit I now have will help me, but it'll also help me be a more supportive wife, constructive friend, and empathetic person. I'd highly recommend this book to parents who hope to set good patterns for familial emotional health (who knew guilt tripping breeds resentment? Every kid ever and exactly 2% of guilt trippers, according to Winch). Like a first aid kit, this book is helpful to keep on hand for self-counseling after minor issues. I found the chapter on rumination to be particularly helpful; I skipped over part of the chapter on self-esteem because I've benefited from very effective cognitive therapy for that, and my therapist's techniques matched Winch's. This isn't the most well-written book ever, but it's easy to read and enjoy. The chapter structure is repetitive, so it's easy to reference the therapeutic techniques after reading the chapter. Overall, I really enjoyed it and will keep coming back to it for future psychological injuries.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amandanoel

    Some things felt a little obvious, but this is a GREAT reference for general mental health with a lot of dry humor thrown in. Will be trying extra hard to practice some mental care around the subject of ruminating. Might end up buying this one as a reference.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kholoud Fathi

    3.5 A recommended book 😃

  29. 5 out of 5

    Areej

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A great book written by Guy Winch based on top - notch science studies that have been subjected to peer review procedure.The writer says: :We sustain frequent psychological wounds as we go through life .Unfortunately few of us have had the awareness and the know how to treat them effectively. We often neglect our psychological wounds until they become severe enough to impair our functioning.we would never leave a cut on our knee unattended until it compromised our ability to walk,but we leave ps A great book written by Guy Winch based on top - notch science studies that have been subjected to peer review procedure.The writer says: :We sustain frequent psychological wounds as we go through life .Unfortunately few of us have had the awareness and the know how to treat them effectively. We often neglect our psychological wounds until they become severe enough to impair our functioning.we would never leave a cut on our knee unattended until it compromised our ability to walk,but we leave psychological wounds unattended all the time ,often until they literally prevent us from moving forward in life. There are 7 common psychological injuries we sustain in daily life: rejection, loneliness,loss, guilt, rumination,failure,and low self esteem. (1)REJECTION: What separates rejection from almost every other negative emotion we encounter in life is the magnitude of the pain it elicits.its pain was rated as equal in severity to that associated with natural childbirth. Brain scans show that the very same brain regions get activated when we experience rejection as when we experience physical pain.when scientists gave people acetaminophen before putting them through a rejection experiment,they reported significantly less emotional pain. The link between rejection and aggression is strong . We all have a tendency to take rejections too personally and to draw conclusions about our shortcomings when there is little evidence that such assumptions are warranted.Rejections hurt enough we don’t need to add salt to our own wounds or kick ourselves once we are already down. Once we’ve suffered profound and repeated rejection over lifetimes,finding our place in the world and feeling as though we belong can be the hardest struggle. Treatment of rejection: a)argue with self criticism because needlessly finding all kinds of faults in our character will only deepen the pain.use counterarguments .perhaps the person prefers a specific type that you don’t fit.It is possible you are too good for the person in some way. When people give you the “it’s not you,it’s me”speech - believe them. b) Review your self worth : make a written list of5 characteristics,attributes,or traits you value highly that you possess within your self . Try to keep your list relevant to the domain in which the rejection occurred.chose 2 and write an essay about each . C)replenish feelings of social connection:subjects with pictures of celebrities on their desks suffered a large drop in mood as a result of recalling the rejection while those with pictures of loved ones registered almost no change in mood at all. D) desensitize yourself: the more we are exposed to situations we find uncomfortable or unpleasant,the more used to them we become and the less they disturb us. (2)LONELINESS: Not everyone who lives alone is lonely and not everyone who is lonely lives alone. What determines our loneliness is not the quantity of our relationship but rather their subjective quality. One of the things people rarely have the courage to admit is how lonely they feel. While we often feel invisible to others,our loneliness is usually very visible to them indeed. Many journeys into loneliness begin during periods of transition and change. It is hard to connect when you are angry all the time. Our relationship muscles function in much the same way regular muscles do.we use them or we lose them. TREATMENT Of Loneliness: If we try to rush our recovery we are likely to reinjure ourselves. (A) fight pessimism: Loneliness makes our minds generate instant negative thoughts (B)give the benefit of doubt: loneliness might make us question how our friends feel about us, but we should always balance our doubts with reminders of our mutual history and the shared experiences that created and sustained the friendship overtime. (C)Take action: chronic loneliness causes us to perceive ourselves as passive victims of our harsh circumstances. There are always steps we can take to improve our situation. Go through your phone numbers and make a list of people you consider friends or good acquaintances .Note when you last communicated with him. Make a list of people you have not been in touch with for a while . Prioritize your list based on who in the past made you feel best about being you.initiate plans to meet. (D) identify your self defeating behaviors (E) take the other person’s perspective .The following 3errors are the most important to keep in mind as they represent our most frequent oversights: 1-Failing to engage our perspective taking muscles when we should 2- we favor our own point of view(our own perspective is so apparent to us that we fail to give the other person’s point of view sufficient weight).3- we consider the wrong information. Women should give men the space and leeway to express their thoughts and even to restate them (without incurring a penalty if their words do not reflect their true intent. Do not get discharged by initial failures . (F) deepen your emotional bonds. It takes more than a single empathy workout to build up relationship muscles to their full strength. Convey your insight thoughtfully.Be as descriptive as possible. (G)create opportunities for social connection. Approach situations with a larger goal in mind. (H) volunteer to help others . (3) LOSS and Trauma : We struggle to make sense of the events or to integrate them into the larger framework of our belief systems. We risk allowing ourselves to become defined by our experiences. The challenge of redefining ourselves and our identities accompanies many experiences of trauma and loss. We might have defined ourselves by our careers and lost our jobs, we might have defined ourselves by our couplehood and lost our partner. We need to take time to rediscover who we are ,to search within for things we find meaningful , and to find new ways of express aspects of ourselves that lay dormant, buried under an avalanche of sorrow. The intense need to make sense of things can leave us ruminating incessantly about how the events occurred. TREATMENT of Loss and Trauma: (a)sooth your emotional pain your way. there is evidence to suggest that those who find it less pressing to discuss traumatic experiences might benefit from the natural tendency to avoid talking about their thoughts and feelings . Those who feel the need to share their thoughts and feelings with others should do so ,and those who feel the need to remove themselves from such discussions should avoid them as best they can. It us always best to let those around us know we wish to discuss tragic events or avoid such conversations so they know how best to conduct themselves around us. (B) recover lost aspects of your self . Avoidance of extended periods of time is problematic. List your qualities ,characteristics,and abilities that you valued in yourself or that others values about you before the event occurs.Which items feel most disconnected from you ? Why do you feel disconnected? Describe possible people and activities you could pursue that would allow you to express the quality more than you are able to do currently. (C) find meaning in tragedy. Occurs in later stages of our recovery. Make sense of tragic events by asking why not how . Make sense of tragic events by asking what might have been . Our natural tendency is to employ counterfactual thoughts to explore how we might have avoided the loss or trauma,but we can also direct our thoughts to how things could have been worse. Help others who have had similar experiences. Imagine yourself years in the future . (4) GUILT Studies estimate that people experience 2 hours a day of mild guilt,5 hours a week of moderate guilt,and 3 and a half hours a month of severe guilt. Guilt does so much to protect our relationships but not everything guilt does is psychologically beneficial. Extracting the venom is no easy task. Many of those with severe survivor guilt also suffer from PTSD. We might find it difficult to enjoy a promotion because our friend had competed for the same position. Separation guilt involves feeling guilty about moving forward and pursuing our own life when doing so involves leaving others behind. Guilt can consume us and paralyze us. A toxic effect of excessive guilt is punishing ourselves. Guilty feelings were snowballing . TREATMENT of GUILT: (A) learn the recipe for an effective apology. Although we are taught when to say “I’m sorry” , we’re never taught how to say it . The recipe for communicating effective apologies: a statement of regret for what happened, a clear I’m sorry statement, a request for forgiveness. Scientists have discovered 3 additional components; validating the other person’s feelings,offering atonement,and acknowledging we violated expectations. Emotional validation is a powerful tool when used correctly and a great toxin remover when used in apologies. (B) forgive yourself. (C) reengage in life (5)RUMINATION: What makes rumination a form of psychological injury is that it provides no new understanding that could heal our wounds.The danger of it is not only that it deepens whatever emotional distress we already feel about the events, but it is linked to a wide range of threats to our psychological and physical health (it prolongs depressive episodes) Rumination and sadness are best friends. One of the reasons rumination is so difficult to treat is its self- reinforcing nature. Our loved ones pay a price for our rumination. Intense rumination can often make us so focused on our emotional needs that we become blind to those of the people around us and our relationships often suffer as a result. TREATMENT of Rumination: we must interrupt the cycle of rumination once it gets triggered. (A) change your perspective.(a 3rd person perspective) subjects who were asked to analyze painful experiences this way experienced less emotional pain and less frequently than those using self immersive perspectives. (B) Look at the bride (Distract yourself from emotional pain). Nothing compels us to think of something more than trying desperately not to think of it . (Not thinking of a White bear experiment - less than few seconds passed till the average number of subjects rang the bell) Spending few minutes engaging in a brief mental exercise like completing a quick sudoku puzzle was found not only to interrupt rumination but to improve their mood as well. Identify which distractions work best. List places and situations in which you tend to ruminate most often.for each place and situation list as many distractions as possible. (C) Reframe the anger. Embrace the learning moments. (d) go easy on your friends. It takes one to two months for every year of a relationship to recover. We all have our go to people when it comes getting social support. It might be wise to spread things around and utilize other sources of social support as well so as to avoid overburdening the people we go to most. Make sure you keep a balance of light conversation, enjoyable moments and fun whenever possible. (6)FAILURE: Failure can make us perceive our goals as being out of reach.It damages our self esteem by inducing us to draw conclusions about our skills,abilities and capacities that are highly inaccurate and distorted. Our goals seem bigger when we fall smaller. Every new year we list our resolutions with hops of improving our lives and feeling better about ourselves,only to abandon our efforts entirely by February. When we set too many goals for ourselves we are unlikely to complete any of them. Failure convinces us that we have no chances of getting what we want and so we stop trying. Failure can be very persuasive.(we might have been second in line for a promotion). Anxiety can cause us to score 15 points lower than we would otherwise. Stereotype threat : when we are reminded of negative stereotypes about our gender ,race ..etc. For some of us failure is associated with embarrassment and shame. Fear of failure makes many of us engage in all manner of self handicapping behavior. We are extremely creative in the self handicapping device we construct in order to have something to blame for our failure. TREATMENT of FAILURE: (a)get support and get real . Express emotional support and Point out some of the lessons . (B) focus on factors you can control. When defining our subgoals focus on variables within your control (our performance) rather than those outside our control (specific outcomes) . E.g. #of hours writing not number of pages , how many hours to exercise not how many KGs to lose. Identify factors that contribute to failure. (C) take responsibility and own the fear. (D) distract yourself from performance pressure distractions. (7) LOW SELF-ESTEEM: Everyone desires high self esteem. People with low self esteem experience rejection as more painful than people with higher self esteem. We are likely to be less persistent after failing. We respond to stress much less effectively when our self esteem is low. When our self esteem is chronically low feeling unworthy becomes part of our identity. People with low self esteem often feel more comfortable with negative feedback. Low self esteem limits our ability to benefit from positive feedback. Low self esteem makes us feel fundamentally insecure. TREATMENT of low self esteem: (A) Adopting self compassion.imagine that the event happened to a dear friend or close family member. (B) identify your strengths and affirm them. (C)increase your tolerance for compliments. (D)increase your personal empowerment. Gain a grasp of the priorities. Practice ,patience and persistence are key ingredients in developing personal empowerment. (E) Improve your self control. Use your non dominant hand for as many tasks as possible. The best way to manage temptation is not to overestimate our ability to manage them but to avoid them when possible. If we wish to change the habits, we have to avoid the triggers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elin

    Love everything about it. It's interesting not just from a personal perspective but in the way it reveals something about the behaviour of other people, and by inference the best way to support others at such times. Love everything about it. It's interesting not just from a personal perspective but in the way it reveals something about the behaviour of other people, and by inference the best way to support others at such times.

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