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Heart of Darkness; Almayer's Folly; The Lagoon

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Three stories of the tropics... Heart of Darkness The haunting story of a journey into the heart of the Congo ivory country, where a remarkable man named Kurtz degenerates while wielding the power of a native deity. Almayer's Folly A European deteriorates on his jungle estate in the Borneo back country, his dreams of wealth and escape frustrated by native intrigue and the loss Three stories of the tropics... Heart of Darkness The haunting story of a journey into the heart of the Congo ivory country, where a remarkable man named Kurtz degenerates while wielding the power of a native deity. Almayer's Folly A European deteriorates on his jungle estate in the Borneo back country, his dreams of wealth and escape frustrated by native intrigue and the loss of his half-caste daughter. The Lagoon A pictorially lush landscape provides the setting for this disillusioned tale of a Malayan who unintentionally betrays his brother while securing the woman he loves.


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Three stories of the tropics... Heart of Darkness The haunting story of a journey into the heart of the Congo ivory country, where a remarkable man named Kurtz degenerates while wielding the power of a native deity. Almayer's Folly A European deteriorates on his jungle estate in the Borneo back country, his dreams of wealth and escape frustrated by native intrigue and the loss Three stories of the tropics... Heart of Darkness The haunting story of a journey into the heart of the Congo ivory country, where a remarkable man named Kurtz degenerates while wielding the power of a native deity. Almayer's Folly A European deteriorates on his jungle estate in the Borneo back country, his dreams of wealth and escape frustrated by native intrigue and the loss of his half-caste daughter. The Lagoon A pictorially lush landscape provides the setting for this disillusioned tale of a Malayan who unintentionally betrays his brother while securing the woman he loves.

40 review for Heart of Darkness; Almayer's Folly; The Lagoon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    An excellent three story collection based around the Tropics, no doubt representative of Conrad's experiences in modern day Malaysia/Indonesia. The first of course is Heart of Darkness, and there's not much more that I could probably add that someone hasn't already. This is certainly Conrad at full command of his prose and psychological insight. The slow creep of impending doom and the claustrophobia brought on by the description of the jungle reminded me of Lovecraft in some ways. Almayer's Foll An excellent three story collection based around the Tropics, no doubt representative of Conrad's experiences in modern day Malaysia/Indonesia. The first of course is Heart of Darkness, and there's not much more that I could probably add that someone hasn't already. This is certainly Conrad at full command of his prose and psychological insight. The slow creep of impending doom and the claustrophobia brought on by the description of the jungle reminded me of Lovecraft in some ways. Almayer's Folly is next and one can tell it is the first novel he wrote. Still a great story and is at the very least a look into the colonial politics of the day from someone who was involved in trading in that region. The constant intrigue between the English, Dutch, Arabs, and native Malay people was no doubt a complicated matter. The theme of regret, misery, deterioration, and fleeting moments of hope are all touched upon in the story. As it was a first novel there was too much exposition and description of the surroundings and it is evident that Conrad packed a lot more into Heart of Darkness's 120 pages versus the 170 or so of this story. The Lagoon is the last and short at 17 pages. What immediately stands out about the story is that the main character is one of the "savage" Malay people, who like Almayer in the previous story must deal with intense regret in regards to a member of his family. Once again Conrad writes with keen insight into the heart of man and gives maybe a small glimpse into the Malay culture at the time. Overall a great collection from a great English language author who I feel is sometimes overlooked due to the subject matter of his well known novels. No doubt he shared the mainstream British opinion about the colonized and "savage" peoples, but in these stories I saw more of a cautionary tale of the consequences of two cultures colliding that do not understand each other. Heart of Darkness in particular I felt showed how easy it was for the supposed civilized man to quickly fall into the savagery he sees in other peoples.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Such story telling such character development. Such a grasp of heart and soul. So progressive and compassionate are Conrad's insights that the reader encounters outrageously retrograde comments on Malay and Arab character and assumes Conrad wrote with irony, satire, or disdain for the prejudices endemic to nineteenth century Europe. In truth, the text doesn't make a strong enough case to support Conrad's mind being more progressive than those of his characters. One knows he traveled around the w Such story telling such character development. Such a grasp of heart and soul. So progressive and compassionate are Conrad's insights that the reader encounters outrageously retrograde comments on Malay and Arab character and assumes Conrad wrote with irony, satire, or disdain for the prejudices endemic to nineteenth century Europe. In truth, the text doesn't make a strong enough case to support Conrad's mind being more progressive than those of his characters. One knows he traveled around the world severally; observed; and started writing relatively late in life. His command of of structure, exposition, and psychological in depth analysis would induce the reader to assume him open-minded, but I don't know. I just don't know. What I know beyond a shadow of a doubt is the value of the three novellas herein. The heart of darkness, an old warhorse I had to read many times in school, exposes in excoriating detail the twin perils of absolute power and hubristic certainty of one's immortality. Almayer's Folly, a morality okay about myopic dreams, cultural imperialism, and unchecked avarice, rebids the heart with cascading treachery and woe. In Lagoon, the final tale, also features treachery and woe, but finds no redemption in the Self-awareness attained by Arsat, a Malay who has stolen his rajah's prized woman (Concubine? Conrad leaves her role a bit vague) and let his brother sacrifice his life that Arsat and Daimilen, his conquest, might escape scot free. How much this costs Arsat emerges as he relates the take to a white mercenary who comes to visit. Together with an introduction by Albert j guerard, these three stories reveal more of Conrad's brilliance than I had ever credited him with possessing, and the discovery has proven a treat. I strongly recommend this volume.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Oman

    One of the most atmospheric novels ever written. Every sentence is a treasure.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yves

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ross

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Hancock

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dionisia

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nita

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Evan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Damon Wasem

  15. 5 out of 5

    DaniSays

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shane

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  18. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Sigal

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tom Baker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aaaron

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bea

  25. 4 out of 5

    Simplesoul

  26. 5 out of 5

    LDB

  27. 4 out of 5

    Art Brandecker

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tomás Paradise

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elijah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jarrod

  31. 5 out of 5

    Robin

  32. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  33. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sreevidhya

  35. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  36. 5 out of 5

    Man Solo

  37. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

  38. 4 out of 5

    Scott Silverman

  39. 5 out of 5

    Charles Thomas

  40. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

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