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The acclaimed #1 "New York Times" bestselling author presents a spellbinding tale of a mother's tragic loss and one man's last chance at gaining salvation.Can we save ourselves, or do we rely on others to do it? Is what we believe always the truth? One moment June Nealon was happily looking forward to years full of laughter and adventure with her family, and the next, she w The acclaimed #1 "New York Times" bestselling author presents a spellbinding tale of a mother's tragic loss and one man's last chance at gaining salvation.Can we save ourselves, or do we rely on others to do it? Is what we believe always the truth? One moment June Nealon was happily looking forward to years full of laughter and adventure with her family, and the next, she was staring into a future that was as empty as her heart. Now her life is a waiting game. Waiting for time to heal her wounds, waiting for justice. In short, waiting for a miracle to happen. For Shay Bourne, life holds no more surprises. The world has given him nothing, and he has nothing to offer the world. In a heartbeat, though, something happens that changes everything for him. Now, he has one last chance for salvation, and it lies with June's eleven-year-old daughter, Claire. But between Shay and Claire stretches an ocean of bitter regrets, past crimes, and the rage of a mother who has lost her child. Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? Would you want your dreams to come true if it meant granting your enemy's dying wish? Once again, Jodi Picoult mesmerizes and enthralls readers with this story of redemption, justice, and love.


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The acclaimed #1 "New York Times" bestselling author presents a spellbinding tale of a mother's tragic loss and one man's last chance at gaining salvation.Can we save ourselves, or do we rely on others to do it? Is what we believe always the truth? One moment June Nealon was happily looking forward to years full of laughter and adventure with her family, and the next, she w The acclaimed #1 "New York Times" bestselling author presents a spellbinding tale of a mother's tragic loss and one man's last chance at gaining salvation.Can we save ourselves, or do we rely on others to do it? Is what we believe always the truth? One moment June Nealon was happily looking forward to years full of laughter and adventure with her family, and the next, she was staring into a future that was as empty as her heart. Now her life is a waiting game. Waiting for time to heal her wounds, waiting for justice. In short, waiting for a miracle to happen. For Shay Bourne, life holds no more surprises. The world has given him nothing, and he has nothing to offer the world. In a heartbeat, though, something happens that changes everything for him. Now, he has one last chance for salvation, and it lies with June's eleven-year-old daughter, Claire. But between Shay and Claire stretches an ocean of bitter regrets, past crimes, and the rage of a mother who has lost her child. Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? Would you want your dreams to come true if it meant granting your enemy's dying wish? Once again, Jodi Picoult mesmerizes and enthralls readers with this story of redemption, justice, and love.

30 review for Change of Heart

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    OK, I generally like Jodi Picoult. I think she's usually a thinking person's beach read. But this was CRAP. First, she owes Stephen King part of her royalties from this book, because the first quarter or so is a shameless ripoff of THE GREEN MILE (what, she couldn't have picked a more obscure text? Because, I mean, hardly ANYONE has read THE GREEN MILE, right?). Second, she also owes at least a small debt to John Grisham's THE CHAMBER, in that they are both incredibly heavy-handed indictments of OK, I generally like Jodi Picoult. I think she's usually a thinking person's beach read. But this was CRAP. First, she owes Stephen King part of her royalties from this book, because the first quarter or so is a shameless ripoff of THE GREEN MILE (what, she couldn't have picked a more obscure text? Because, I mean, hardly ANYONE has read THE GREEN MILE, right?). Second, she also owes at least a small debt to John Grisham's THE CHAMBER, in that they are both incredibly heavy-handed indictments of the death penalty. But even separate from her blatant theft, the story line was just....perhaps cumbersome is the best word. The dialogue was stilted, the actions of all the characters were unbelievable (c'mon, folks, EVERYONE would JUMP at the chance for a new heart for his/her child if the alternative was death, I don't care if it was Adolf Hitler's), the romance was forced and irrelevant. UGH. I just really hated the whole thing, with one small redeeming factor - the character of Maggie (clearly modeled on Picoult herself) was well-drawn, and presented as someone the reader would like to have as a friend, but even she collapsed when, naturally, her miserable life was saved by the love of a good man. Why couldn't she just have achieved happiness on her own terms? Edited to add: HOW could I have forgotten to mention the patented Picoult 11th hour "twist", only in this case you'll see it coming a hundred pages in advance, and only made me hate June even more than I already did. I just can't recommend this one for anybody.....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Crumb

    Although this wasn't my favorite book by Jodi Picoult, I still thought it was very good. In this novel, Picoult utilizes a familiar technique; you can expect moral quandaries abound served up on a silver platter. The characterization was excellent and the characters relatable. I wasn't really a fan, however, of the over-arching themes of this particular book. This book capitalized on the controversial subject of capital punishment (see what I did there ?) and religion (two pretty heavy subjects, Although this wasn't my favorite book by Jodi Picoult, I still thought it was very good. In this novel, Picoult utilizes a familiar technique; you can expect moral quandaries abound served up on a silver platter. The characterization was excellent and the characters relatable. I wasn't really a fan, however, of the over-arching themes of this particular book. This book capitalized on the controversial subject of capital punishment (see what I did there ?) and religion (two pretty heavy subjects, if you ask me). I found the capital punishment theme interesting.. but I felt Picoult was a little too overzealous about the religious aspect, which could very well turn off a lot of readers, myself included. Picoult always handles controversial and hot-button topics with grace and a deft hand. However, this book hit below the mark, in my opinion. Bottom Line Would I recommend this? Yes, if you are a Picoult fan. Was it my favorite book by Picoult? No.. Not by a long shot, but I still enjoyed different aspects of the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin McAllister

    This is the fourth Jodi Picoult novel I've read and they all follow pretty much the same formula : A vunerable child/teenager. Loving parents/parent. Concerned professionals i.e. cops, doctors, lawyer,and or teachers. And a kind stranger. And while Jodi uses a basic formula, her novels are anything but simple or predictable. The other novels I've read have covered stem cell research, teenage date rape, and school shootings. What makes me such a fan of Jodi's novels is that rather than use an om This is the fourth Jodi Picoult novel I've read and they all follow pretty much the same formula : A vunerable child/teenager. Loving parents/parent. Concerned professionals i.e. cops, doctors, lawyer,and or teachers. And a kind stranger. And while Jodi uses a basic formula, her novels are anything but simple or predictable. The other novels I've read have covered stem cell research, teenage date rape, and school shootings. What makes me such a fan of Jodi's novels is that rather than use an omnipotent narrator, her stories are told from the point of view of the various characters. There's always two sides to any given story, and by using this method of story telling, the reader receives compelling and personal arguments from both sides of an issue. Most people would never think of taking the side of an accused rapist, a school shooter, or a cop killer, but Jodi's characters are so fairly drawn, that's exactly what happens. Change of Heart involves many current and important issues. It's core issue is the validity of religion in modern day society. Another theme is the use of capital punishment. And in that vein, the rights of prison inmates are also thoroughly discussed. Some of the main characters includes Maggie an atheist lawyer who begins to find God. Mike a priest who begins to question his faith. And June who goes through quite a number of Changes of Heart. Because Shay, a man on trial for his life, is a keeper of many secrets, and as these secrets are slowly revealed, June and the other characters, are taken on many emmmotional roller coaster rides. As a consequence, we the reader get taken along on that same ride. What more could a reader ask for ? Oh yeah, we can ask a novelist to make as laugh. And boy did I laugh, while reading the passage where a prison inmate named his pet robin, get this, Batman the Robin ! Funny, informative, and emmotional. Just a few of the reason why I love Jodi Piccoult.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Silva

    “After all, how many of us had tried to forget something traumatic...only to find it printed on the back of our eyelids, tattooed on our tongues?” The book is narrated from the perspective of four characters: June, Michael, Lucius and Maggie. For each character, the chapter is written with a different font. The ending was not satisfying, I still have questions. However, was more interesting than I thought.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This book was incredible. I knew before reading it that it dealt with religion (one of the many subject matters that Picoult handles with grace) but I had no idea how and to what surprising extent. It amazes me (as always) that Picoult can handle a myriad of topics and characters, that require such care and research, so deftly. You read it and believe it without it ever seeming forced. It made me question my beliefs about life itself. This book encompasses the following topics- the death penalty This book was incredible. I knew before reading it that it dealt with religion (one of the many subject matters that Picoult handles with grace) but I had no idea how and to what surprising extent. It amazes me (as always) that Picoult can handle a myriad of topics and characters, that require such care and research, so deftly. You read it and believe it without it ever seeming forced. It made me question my beliefs about life itself. This book encompasses the following topics- the death penalty, guilt, forgiveness, religion, right and wrong, parent/child relationships, the legal world, the medical world and life in prison. I can't even explain how I feel about it all after just breathlessly speed reading the final 100 pages of the novel. A quote "...there are all sorts of experiences that we can't really put a name to. The birth of a child, for one. Or the death of a parent. Falling in love. Words are like nets- we hope they'll cover what we mean, but we know they can't possibly hold that much joy, or grief, or wonder. Finding God is like that, too. If it's happened to you, you know what it feels like. But try to describe it to someone else- and language only takes you so far." Picoult presents such a wide range of takes on religion, from Catholicism to Judaism to Christianity to Gnosticism. The characters range from the spiritual to the devout, the questioners to the flat-out atheists. Always, always we are never told as the reader what to believe and she keeps you guessing and second-guessing until the last moment. Then, if you are like me, you are still left thinking and thinking and feeling amazed by the whole experience. This just might be my favorite of hers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    You know how when you start a book the evening before and then go to bed later thinking, "I cannot wait to wake up tomorrow and finish this book!" That is how I felt about this book last night. I was so happy to get right back to it today. These characters! This story! Incredibly entertaining! There is the theme of the issues around capital punishment, along with themes of religion and spirituality, and overall the biggest in my opinion: redemption and acceptance. Just when you believe you can p You know how when you start a book the evening before and then go to bed later thinking, "I cannot wait to wake up tomorrow and finish this book!" That is how I felt about this book last night. I was so happy to get right back to it today. These characters! This story! Incredibly entertaining! There is the theme of the issues around capital punishment, along with themes of religion and spirituality, and overall the biggest in my opinion: redemption and acceptance. Just when you believe you can predict the story, Shay drops one heck of a bomb about what happened during shooting. My short and simple overall: incredible and thought provoking!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Britta

    "...I knew what it was like to lose someone you loved. You didn't get past something like that, you got through it..." "In the space between yes and no, there's a lifetime. It's the difference between the path you walk and one you leave behind; it's the gap between who you thought you could be and who you really are;" "When you're different, sometimes you don't see the millions of people who accept you for what you are. All you notice is the one person who doesn't." "I imagine the touch of someone "...I knew what it was like to lose someone you loved. You didn't get past something like that, you got through it..." "In the space between yes and no, there's a lifetime. It's the difference between the path you walk and one you leave behind; it's the gap between who you thought you could be and who you really are;" "When you're different, sometimes you don't see the millions of people who accept you for what you are. All you notice is the one person who doesn't." "I imagine the touch of someone who loves you so much, he cannot bear to watch you sleep; and so you wake up with his hand on your heart." "...the sum of a man's life was not where he wound up but in the details that brought him there." "...faith, the only weapon in our arsenal to battle doubt." "They say you get over your grief, but you don't really, not ever. It's been eleven years, and it hurts just as much as it did that first day." "...How many of us tried to forget something traumatic... only to find it printed on the back of our eyelids, tattooed on our tongues?" "When a child is killed, two people die, I think. The only difference is that his mother still had to suffer a heartbeat." "I didn't know what it felt like to carry a child underneath my heart for nine months, to feel my body give way to make room for hers. I didn't know what it felt like to hold an infant and rock her to sleep, to find a lullaby in her breathing. But I knew what it was like to be the daughter." "Someone once told me that when you give birth to a daughter, you've just met the person whose hand you'll be holding the day you die." "Family's not a thing, it's a place... It's where all the memories get kept."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    A total disappointment considering Picoult is a great writer and does not need to borrow ideas from other writers. This was too much like "The Green Mile". A total disappointment considering Picoult is a great writer and does not need to borrow ideas from other writers. This was too much like "The Green Mile".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Malissa

    Thought provoking to say the least. What if God is incarnate in each of us? What if there is no God? What if there is only a hope that there is a God? What if there is no heaven or hell? What if this life on Earth is both heaven and hell? Why does religion serve to divide us rather than unite us? Why does life have to be such a conundrum? Or is it really simple? Do we make it more difficult than it is because we are blessed with freedom of choice? Is it a blessing or a curse? After I finished re Thought provoking to say the least. What if God is incarnate in each of us? What if there is no God? What if there is only a hope that there is a God? What if there is no heaven or hell? What if this life on Earth is both heaven and hell? Why does religion serve to divide us rather than unite us? Why does life have to be such a conundrum? Or is it really simple? Do we make it more difficult than it is because we are blessed with freedom of choice? Is it a blessing or a curse? After I finished reading the book, I went for a walk to try to think these things through. I have to come realize that it is a lifelong journey not one that can be solved in an afternoon. I also think that I may be agnostic. I will also make time to research and study the fifth gospel, the gospel of Thomas. Reading this book provided me with my first encounter of this writing. It intrigues me. I do believe that there is a Higher Power that is incarnate in each of us. Share the kindness that is within each of us. The characters of this book will stay with me for a while for they have truly touched me ... Isaiah "Shay" Thomas Bourne who said, "Everyone's got a little God in them and a little murder in them,too. It's how your life turns out that makes you lean to one side or the other." Lucius who thought "Why would God choose to inhabit any of us? What if it was the other way around ... if we were the ones who inhabited God?" Maggie who said "You know why I think we still execute people? Because, even if we don't want to say it out loud for the really heinous crimes, we want to know that there's a really heinous punishment." June who thought "It's a strange thing, putting justice in the hands of twelve strangers". Claire who thought "I have been someone different now for three weeks." Michael who thought "Sometimes we see what we want to, instead of what's in front of us. And sometimes we don't see clearly at all".

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If you have read or watched The Green Mile you’re going to see some similarities here however I would argue that this is equally as good. Heavy religious theme throughout so beware of that if that’s an issue for you. I was gripped at the first chapter.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Doralyn

    It's sad for me to have to give a Picoult book 1 star, but I was heartily disappointed with this read. The plot was so thin to accommodate the anti-Christian and anti-religion propaganda. Picoult has definitely shot arrows at religion in the past, but this book went beyond that. In the past, I was always able to say that it was fiction, not necessarily the author's viewpoint or something she was trying to make us believe in, but I don't know how you couldn't believe some of the notions in this b It's sad for me to have to give a Picoult book 1 star, but I was heartily disappointed with this read. The plot was so thin to accommodate the anti-Christian and anti-religion propaganda. Picoult has definitely shot arrows at religion in the past, but this book went beyond that. In the past, I was always able to say that it was fiction, not necessarily the author's viewpoint or something she was trying to make us believe in, but I don't know how you couldn't believe some of the notions in this book and spout off about it for such a lengthy tome. I have read 13 of Picoult's 15 books, but I'm sincerely questioning whether I will read another.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A convicted Death Row murderer who is believed by his lawyer and priest to be the Messiah due to his uncanny ability to manifest daily miracles in front of his dumbfounded cell block mates fights for the right of death by hanging so he can donate his heart to the ailing daughter of one of his victims. C'mon, SERIOUSLY?? I just didn't believe a single manipulative word of this soapy, soft-focus combination of The Green Mile and The DaVinci Code (both of which were immensely better.) Chapters tend A convicted Death Row murderer who is believed by his lawyer and priest to be the Messiah due to his uncanny ability to manifest daily miracles in front of his dumbfounded cell block mates fights for the right of death by hanging so he can donate his heart to the ailing daughter of one of his victims. C'mon, SERIOUSLY?? I just didn't believe a single manipulative word of this soapy, soft-focus combination of The Green Mile and The DaVinci Code (both of which were immensely better.) Chapters tended to end with "deep" pronouncements designed to make the reader "think." For me, a completely ridiculous and utterly unbelievable read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    I couldn't even finish this book! I gave it 150 pages to get me hooked, and it just didn't... It had way too much political crap in it - one of the main characters is a lawyer who works for the ACLU and is against the death penalty, so the author goes on about that... In addition, there was a lot of religion that I didn't necessarily agree with. All in all, I really just didn't like the book. I wanted to finish it because I feel like once I start something I should finish it. But I just couldn't I couldn't even finish this book! I gave it 150 pages to get me hooked, and it just didn't... It had way too much political crap in it - one of the main characters is a lawyer who works for the ACLU and is against the death penalty, so the author goes on about that... In addition, there was a lot of religion that I didn't necessarily agree with. All in all, I really just didn't like the book. I wanted to finish it because I feel like once I start something I should finish it. But I just couldn't. 150 pages later, I didn't mind sending this one back to the library. I don't even care to know how it ended. I've heard Jodi Piccoult is like that though - totally hit or miss... This ones a "miss"!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Jodi Picoult is an interesting author. For some reason she writes books where I struggle with the characters, don't really like the book yet read the whole thing and then pick up another one of hers, hoping it will be better. Right away I had problems with Change of Heart. Can a person who is currently serving time in prison even be an organ donor? Somehow, the environment they live in makes me think that they cannot due to being exposed to so many blood-borne diseases and questionable behaviors Jodi Picoult is an interesting author. For some reason she writes books where I struggle with the characters, don't really like the book yet read the whole thing and then pick up another one of hers, hoping it will be better. Right away I had problems with Change of Heart. Can a person who is currently serving time in prison even be an organ donor? Somehow, the environment they live in makes me think that they cannot due to being exposed to so many blood-borne diseases and questionable behaviors that would seem to defer you from being of good enough health. In the book Shay even talks about how they are exposed to hepatitis C during haircuts--that doesn't seem compatible with organ donation. The priest was a very weak character, able to be talked into sentencing a man to death, dropping his beloved religious beliefs, lying when convenient, and manipulating others for Shay's gain. But, perhaps he was meant to be like that, and there is a lesson in there that just because someone appears to be an authority figure, they may not know more than anyone else. The gnostic gospels seem to be showing up a lot in novels--very trendy. Picoult likes to be controversial but I think she was all over the place in this book and tried to address too many issues at once--death penalty, child abuse, foster care system, many, many religious issues, the terrible choice June had to make, the ACLU, on and on. Then she turns the story on it's ear the last 20 pages, and it was too late to have sympathy for the real victim. And then she adds another nugget of surprise and you wonder who is the victim? I wish the author would stop cranking out so many books, so fast, and take some time to do the necessary research so her books can have some semblance of being reality-based. I know it is fiction, but I believe she is not going for the "fantasy" genre. Just my opinion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I read this book in less than 48 hours. It was so good I could only put it down when it was time to go to bed. It is told from the viewpoints of 4 people: A Catholic priest, a mother who has lost her daughter and husband, a convicted murderer, and an ACLU lawyer. I usually don't like that style but it was really nice and this story kind of needed it. A mother's 7 year old daughter and husband are killed and the man who was convicted of their murders is now on death row. He wants to donate his he I read this book in less than 48 hours. It was so good I could only put it down when it was time to go to bed. It is told from the viewpoints of 4 people: A Catholic priest, a mother who has lost her daughter and husband, a convicted murderer, and an ACLU lawyer. I usually don't like that style but it was really nice and this story kind of needed it. A mother's 7 year old daughter and husband are killed and the man who was convicted of their murders is now on death row. He wants to donate his heart to the mother's only living child who needs a transplant to save her life. The novel follows what happens when the man who took away almost everything you have wants to help you keep the only thing you have left. There is a lot of religious elements in this book that kind of rubbed me the wrong way but it is just a fictional story and it was fun to read. Lots of twists and turns that will definitely keep you wanting to finish in one sitting.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Debby

    Well, I gave it a valiant try, but...no go. If you like to follow stories about things like images of Jesus Christ showing up on grilled cheese sandwiches or someone claiming to have seen a statue of Mary cry real tears, or those healer/dealer people that desperate suffering people flock to with their hearts full of hope and anticipation, then you'll probably like Change of Heart. I'll just say I couldn't take the idea of the protagonist in this book for one more page. I'm a Christian and I beli Well, I gave it a valiant try, but...no go. If you like to follow stories about things like images of Jesus Christ showing up on grilled cheese sandwiches or someone claiming to have seen a statue of Mary cry real tears, or those healer/dealer people that desperate suffering people flock to with their hearts full of hope and anticipation, then you'll probably like Change of Heart. I'll just say I couldn't take the idea of the protagonist in this book for one more page. I'm a Christian and I believe in the supernatural; however, I do not believe in the kind of stuff that Picoult wrote about in Keeping Faith and in Change of Heart as well. I've hit the point of no return with reading Picoult's books. DONE!! I refuse to torment myself one more time!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Love Fool

    Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? Would you want your dreams to come true if it meant granting your enemy's dying wish? This book got me wanting to read the whole thing in a day. I didn't want to put it down. Plus, it had some twists that I didn't expect. I also had my heart strings pulled for the "bad guy". However, the ending was not satisfying and I still have questions regarding characters and events. It just needed one more chapter Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? Would you want your dreams to come true if it meant granting your enemy's dying wish? This book got me wanting to read the whole thing in a day. I didn't want to put it down. Plus, it had some twists that I didn't expect. I also had my heart strings pulled for the "bad guy". However, the ending was not satisfying and I still have questions regarding characters and events. It just needed one more chapter to give me those answers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sezín Koehler

    This was, quite simply, one of the best books I have ever read and the first time I have seen someone take a Stephen King idea and make it so much better than the original. I honestly haven't cried so much over a book since reading Alice Hoffman's "Blue Diary" years and years ago. I was completely overcome. The story is beautifully crafted, and Jodi Picault has an amazing way of weaving different lives together to describe the moments in which they intersect. It also got me thinking about forgive This was, quite simply, one of the best books I have ever read and the first time I have seen someone take a Stephen King idea and make it so much better than the original. I honestly haven't cried so much over a book since reading Alice Hoffman's "Blue Diary" years and years ago. I was completely overcome. The story is beautifully crafted, and Jodi Picault has an amazing way of weaving different lives together to describe the moments in which they intersect. It also got me thinking about forgiveness and justice, and what these two acts really mean. One of the main characters is on death row about to be executed and not only is he not at all who he seems to be or who people think he is, he embodied what it means to sacrifice oneself wholly and completely for a greater good. The novel also reminded me of what is holy in all of us and how important it is to always remember that fact in our interactions with others. I feel like I knew and lived with that kind of conciousness years ago, but I've slipped back into the complacency of hatred that is so much easier than finding the good and God in fellow human beings. You just never know who someone really is and that's why it's so important to treat everyone with love and respect, even our so-called enemies. It's just so much harder to find that love in our hearts for people who have wronged us, but it is vital that we do. This novel is a powerful testament against the death penalty as well as being a gospel to the wonder of God's and the human spirit. Each of her novels should be required reading for high schoolers, especially in the USA, because they find a way to get right to the heart of the matter of American issues in order to expose all of the love and darkness you find there. Absolutely magnificent and groundbreaking.

  19. 5 out of 5

    kwesi 章英狮

    Every Sunday we went to the church to attend a mass or sometimes we do contemplate ourselves to communicate with God through prayers. Even you are hiding in the dark or in deep spiritual unconsciousness; God will show you the way and give you strength to overcome darkness by his pure light. Nobody knows when or where we will be disappear in this world or how far can our faith help us to conquer evil, it is ourselves who can choose what path we will take it's either the path of evil or the goodne Every Sunday we went to the church to attend a mass or sometimes we do contemplate ourselves to communicate with God through prayers. Even you are hiding in the dark or in deep spiritual unconsciousness; God will show you the way and give you strength to overcome darkness by his pure light. Nobody knows when or where we will be disappear in this world or how far can our faith help us to conquer evil, it is ourselves who can choose what path we will take it's either the path of evil or the goodness that God gave us in the first place. Currently, how many religions do we have in the 21st century? Ten, Twenty or maybe more than one hundred. Nobody knows exactly the number of religion that took place in the Earth. Many chose Christianity, maybe some chose Jewish or you wanted to be alone as a spiritual man or someone who don't believe in the existence of God, an aethiest. How can we even manage when religion and thoughts of every individual got conflict in such way to achieve salvation? In Change of Heart, Picoult enthralls everyonewith her captivating story of redemption, justice and love. Shay Bourne, convicted a very murderous crime that punished him of death. It was one of the worst case scenarios that happened in Hampshire. Some said he was innocent of his crime and some give him no justice to speak of the truth. He killed a man who serviced his life to the people and a daughter that gives hope to the family, or did he really killed them? A fact that he kept everything in secret for the people he loves so much that he wanted to push his limits to salvage himself by offering himself especially his heart to the girl that justice had been victimize. Michael, a catholic priest and a lawyer in his early years that signed as one of the convector of Shay to sentence him to death and accusing him of 3 major crimes. But his faith to God and his vocation never let him down under the spell of injustice cowardy. But after meeting Shay he was forced to ask himself questions that cannot be answer but only his faith that can help him conquer. Questions about good and evil; himself and above all God. Maggie, a smart lawyer who have parents who devoted their lives to God and they are Jewish. But besides all those experiences with her parents she admit herself as an atheist who believe only for herself and no other than her philosophies in life. And Lucius, a homosexual who suffered for the death of his boyfriend because of jealousy. He admitted himself that he sees Shay as the new Messiah, he do miracles far from what a normal people can. Multiplying gums, transforming liquid to wine and preaching the word of God. June, a mother who seek for her happiness and once again losing her daughter Claire. How can she forgive the person who killed her husband and daughter and the only donor to help Claire to survive. A book with five voices that seeks spiritual guidance and justice. Picoult once again give miraculous applause for her literary and commercial type of novel. A powerful and extraordinary book for us to be strengthens. Miracles are inside us; if we believe in them all our wishes will be granted. There are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle. - Albert Einstein [image error] In the end of the world the new Messiah will come and show himself in the public to give the message of God. Do you think the message in the last book of the Bible talks about the destruction of the Earth or just simply the new beginning for everyone to change? Rating - Change of Heart by Jodi Picoult, 5 Sweets and the end of the new century's Messiah! (This is a good book if you want to know more about death penalty in America and to consider the fact the reason why it is being humane and destructive to mankind at the same time Picoult also discussed topics like religion between characters and how they manage to obtain salvation in the end. Not recommended for those people who have soft spot with religion or not open minded, this is not a good start for newbie Picoult readers.) Challenges: Book #66 for 2011 Book #40 for Off the Shelf! Book #8 for Jodi Picoult Reading Challenge 2011

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Molencamp

    This book was a little on the disappointing side for me. I eagerly awaited it's released but I was very let down. I had a really hard time getting into this book which is very unusual for me when I read any book written by Jodi Picoult. I had a hard time connecting with it because I thought that it was just a little too far fethced. There was a lot of talk of Shane Bourne being the messiah and all sorts of stuff and I thouhgt it was a little too closely related to Keeping Faith (which she did ha This book was a little on the disappointing side for me. I eagerly awaited it's released but I was very let down. I had a really hard time getting into this book which is very unusual for me when I read any book written by Jodi Picoult. I had a hard time connecting with it because I thought that it was just a little too far fethced. There was a lot of talk of Shane Bourne being the messiah and all sorts of stuff and I thouhgt it was a little too closely related to Keeping Faith (which she did have charchters from in this book!). Keeping Faith was much easier for me to believe than this was as far as the biblical aspect of the book goes. I got very, very bored when there were several pages that talked about the Old Testiment and was tempted to skip ahead in hopes that it got better. I was also a little disappointed with the fact that there was very little court case in this book because there is usually a suffecient trial in every other book, which I look forward too. Any of the chapters that were Father Michael talking I found to be too biblical and usually pretty dull. This book is not at the top of my list and I would not reccomend it over some of her other books. I really hope this one doesn't foreshadow what's to come in her future writtings!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Boy, did this turn out to be a thought provoking page turner of a read! A medical dilemma/legal drama exploring the world of organ donation and capital punishment which really drew me in. It is told from multiple viewpoints, most notably those of the people around Shay Bourne, a prisoner on death row. We hear from Lucius his neighbour on the cell block, his Lawyer Maggie and his spiritual advisor Father Michael as a story of crime, faith and miracles unfolds. I have to say that it was not really Boy, did this turn out to be a thought provoking page turner of a read! A medical dilemma/legal drama exploring the world of organ donation and capital punishment which really drew me in. It is told from multiple viewpoints, most notably those of the people around Shay Bourne, a prisoner on death row. We hear from Lucius his neighbour on the cell block, his Lawyer Maggie and his spiritual advisor Father Michael as a story of crime, faith and miracles unfolds. I have to say that it was not really the read I was expecting as I thought I would hear far more from June – Claire’s mother who is at the heart (no pun intended) of the story. Should she accept a heart for Claire that has come from the person on death row for the murder of her father and sister? I thought it would be more of a “womans” read, with lots of emotional to-ing and fro-ing and not the prison/legal/faith drama that it did tend to veer towards. Having said all that, I did thoroughly enjoy it. It did challenge the way I thought about things in a story that does have its twists although I have to say that these were quite well signposted at times. All in all though, it was a thoroughly good read and I particularly enjoyed the allegorical aspect of it, the little part of me that loves to believe in miracles really warming to the story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I actually *read* this book, despite the fact that for some reason the above title is listed as an MP3 type thing. I'm up and down with Jodi Picoult and this latest novel certainly reminded me why I sometimes can't stand her writing. It's very stereotypical (almost offensively so). Let's be serious Jodi, you are just not meant to write about life on 'death row' in prison in a serious manner. The characters were very one sided and if she was trying to make a point about religion, the death penalty I actually *read* this book, despite the fact that for some reason the above title is listed as an MP3 type thing. I'm up and down with Jodi Picoult and this latest novel certainly reminded me why I sometimes can't stand her writing. It's very stereotypical (almost offensively so). Let's be serious Jodi, you are just not meant to write about life on 'death row' in prison in a serious manner. The characters were very one sided and if she was trying to make a point about religion, the death penalty, organ donation, the messiah, murder, (anything really), it fell very flat. I thought this book was very disappointing. Picoult is best when she takes on adolescent issues. She'sgood at writing from the point of view of a 16 year old.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Oh how I love this author. But not this book! It seems that Jodi is getting a little too political in recent novels and spending too much time focusing on her own religious and political questions instead of an actual story. Don't get me wrong... a little of that stuff is essential to make a book smart and worth reading but I found myself wishing to be to the end of a chapter and hoping for a better one in this book. The idea was great, but I could see where it was headed from the start and it s Oh how I love this author. But not this book! It seems that Jodi is getting a little too political in recent novels and spending too much time focusing on her own religious and political questions instead of an actual story. Don't get me wrong... a little of that stuff is essential to make a book smart and worth reading but I found myself wishing to be to the end of a chapter and hoping for a better one in this book. The idea was great, but I could see where it was headed from the start and it seemed like she was copying from one of her previous books and "Green Mile." Worth reading but if you want something REALLY great from Jodi Picoult check out "My Sisters Keeper." And really any of her books are worth reading. She writes beautifully!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Change of Heart is about Shay Bourne, a man who is on death row for murdering a young girl named Elizabeth Nealon and her stepfather Kurt Nealon. Kurt's husband and Elizabeth's mom June, has been left behind with eleven year old Claire now, who is in desperate need of a heart. Other characters in this novel are Michael, a priest who is becoming confused and questioning his own faith, and Maggie, a somewhat big-boned ACLU lawyer who is determined to take on her case, and her own family person lif Change of Heart is about Shay Bourne, a man who is on death row for murdering a young girl named Elizabeth Nealon and her stepfather Kurt Nealon. Kurt's husband and Elizabeth's mom June, has been left behind with eleven year old Claire now, who is in desperate need of a heart. Other characters in this novel are Michael, a priest who is becoming confused and questioning his own faith, and Maggie, a somewhat big-boned ACLU lawyer who is determined to take on her case, and her own family person life. I loved this book, I'm so glad I read it despite the feminine cover. I enjoyed all of the characters' voices, with Lucius and Maggie's being my favorites. Jodi Picoult did a nice job of using the religion aspect in a way that wasn't tiresome and easy to understand. The twists and turns in the plot line were surprising and well-done. Picoult also has a nice way of forming a solid story with believable characters and keeping the whole novel flowing smoothly for the reader. Definitely recommend it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Welp,let me start by saying that I'm a huge Jodi Piccoult fan. She's an excellent writer and has captures the voice of her characters beautifully. Her device is to stir the pot, make you think, and examine difficult situations where you find yourself sympathizing with people you'd never believe was possible. But it appears that Piccoult has gone the way of mega popular writers that bang out books once a year for the sake of, well, banging out books once a year. The formula she always uses (and t Welp,let me start by saying that I'm a huge Jodi Piccoult fan. She's an excellent writer and has captures the voice of her characters beautifully. Her device is to stir the pot, make you think, and examine difficult situations where you find yourself sympathizing with people you'd never believe was possible. But it appears that Piccoult has gone the way of mega popular writers that bang out books once a year for the sake of, well, banging out books once a year. The formula she always uses (and that I've liked very much in her other novels) is still here, with a moral dilemma and child at the story's center. But the Green Mile rip-off and contrived subplots aren't convincing, and the whole time I found myself saying "Hey, that's a story that's already been written". Still better than most books out there, but disappointing for sure.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Per usual with Picoult, there is no shortage of hot-button social issues in this book. This time, she covers capital punishment, organ donation and the validity of organized religion through a cast of diverse characters with wildly different points of view. The characters are well-defined and distinct. I never did develop a real strong affinity for any one character, and for that I give this one 3.5 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josie

    THAT'S IT. No more Picoult for me ever again. I don't know why I tortured myself by reading so many of her books when I didn't even like the first one I tried. She may be raved about, but I honestly can't see why. I'm not going to write a full review on how awful this book was because so many other people have already done so. Suffice it to say I couldn't even finish this one, and had to skim-read to the end just to see if I'd predicted the ending and all the plot twists correctly. (I had.) I will THAT'S IT. No more Picoult for me ever again. I don't know why I tortured myself by reading so many of her books when I didn't even like the first one I tried. She may be raved about, but I honestly can't see why. I'm not going to write a full review on how awful this book was because so many other people have already done so. Suffice it to say I couldn't even finish this one, and had to skim-read to the end just to see if I'd predicted the ending and all the plot twists correctly. (I had.) I will, however, rant about how sickly Picoult is when it comes to motherhood. Maybe it's because I'm not a mother, but even if I were I doubt I'd be moved by all this sentimental sap about "carrying a child underneath your heart for nine months". I've also noticed that Picoult mentions "a unique skill that mothers possess" in nearly all of her novels. This skill? To be able to tell if a child has a fever by kissing their forehead. Seriously. I've never seen or heard of this before, but she goes on and on about it. Newsflash: anyone can lay their hand on a child's forehead and feel if they're over-hot or not.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Darlene Stericker

    This book creeped me out. I am not sure what Picoult was thinking. She would lay out evidence and then later give contrary evidence. Then she would contradict herself once again. The twist was evident very early in the book. I feel very unsettled and not in a good way.

  29. 5 out of 5

    lacy white

    tw: racism, fat shaming, sexual assault Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? One of the best things about Jodi Picoult and why I fell in love with her books is because of her ability to write about topics that are morally grey. I live for the books that people shy away from. When The Da Vinci Code was released and it caused issues, I hopped aboard that hype train and haven't looked back. Jodi Picoult makes you think about your feeli tw: racism, fat shaming, sexual assault Would you give up your vengeance against someone you hate if it meant saving someone you love? One of the best things about Jodi Picoult and why I fell in love with her books is because of her ability to write about topics that are morally grey. I live for the books that people shy away from. When The Da Vinci Code was released and it caused issues, I hopped aboard that hype train and haven't looked back. Jodi Picoult makes you think about your feelings on topics that you normally wouldn't think about. One of her books is about an Amish woman that is going to be convicted of murder. I mean, when was the last time you read a book about something like that? This particular book is about the death penalty. For the record: I am neither for nor against the death penalty. I have not researched enough about it to form an educated opinion. This may come off as ignorant but I don't ever make judgements on things I don't know enough about. The quote about encompasses what the entire book is about and it leaves you thinking. Shay is convicted of killing June's husband and daughter and is set to die. With his death, June's other daughter, Claire, gets another shot at life. But it is so much more complex than what I am making it to be. Of course, I don't know of a book about the death penalty that isn't complex. One of the strongest things about this book and about Jodi Picoult's writing is the multiple POVs that come together to tell the story of Shay. The four POVs are in no way overwhelming and offer multiple insights to the story. Many authors struggle with two POVs but Picoult can balance upwards of six with ease. One of the things she does that I think all authors should do if they have different POVs, is change the font type. That helps loads and gives the characters a more personal feel. For me anyway. This book also talks a lot about religion, as one of the POVs is a Catholic priest and the lawyer is Jewish but not practicing. I am not religious, not in the "normal" sense anway. Because of that, I tend to judge books with religion more than if they didn't have that element with the exception of historical fiction. It's a personal flaw that I am working on overcoming. For those that aren't religious like me, this book might come off as preachy at times, especially with Michael's POV (the Catholic priest). But it also gives insight to how some religious officials feel about the death penalty. Overall, this book is amazing. It's an excellent reason why Jodi Picoult is so good at what she does. Her topics, often controversial and morally grey, make you think about things in an entirely different light. I am seriously tempted to go and do research on the death penalty and how it came to be. I highly suggest this to anyone looking into a read that isn't your typical book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This reminded me a lot of another Picoult book, "Keeping Faith," the ending of which disappointed me. So I was wary as I listened, wondering where the author would take this. I saw the plot twist coming long before it happened. Although the USA Today reviewer called it contrived, the twist did not bother me, probably because of the way it was handled. (It's hard to write about this without spoilers!) Meaning that I thought this end was more as it should have been than "Keeping Faith"'s ending ha This reminded me a lot of another Picoult book, "Keeping Faith," the ending of which disappointed me. So I was wary as I listened, wondering where the author would take this. I saw the plot twist coming long before it happened. Although the USA Today reviewer called it contrived, the twist did not bother me, probably because of the way it was handled. (It's hard to write about this without spoilers!) Meaning that I thought this end was more as it should have been than "Keeping Faith"'s ending had been, and I even smiled at the end of the epilogue. (I appreciated the narrator switch there.) As usual, Picoult raises lots of socially charged issues, including questions about the death penalty, organ donation, and religion. The parts about the gnostic gospels felt a little bandwagonish, following a couple years after the hype over The Da Vinci Code and then last year's books about the Gospel of Judas, but she does tend to write about what's in the public eye. And it was interesting that she brought back Ian Fletcher (and, for a few minutes, Mariah and Faith) from "Keeping Faith"--almost like she knew those characters weren't finished in the previous book. Maggie annoyed me at the beginning, with her self-deprecation and obsession over her weight (size 14 is not that big and is very common for American women). As she became more involved with the trial, she annoyed me less because she seemed to find herself despite herself. I almost liked her by the end. I kept picturing Hugh Grant as Dr. Gallagher, and I think he was good for Maggie as well. Michael's choice of profession after the trial surprised me and never quite convinced me. That seemed a little too convenient. So he came off as wishy-washy. Lucius was probably my favorite character throughout the story. He was the most honest of the narrators, I thought-- Which was interesting since he was the convicted murderer. Like Maggie, June grew as a character through the story as well. Her righteous anger was almost stifling in the beginning, but by the time she declares herself the mother and starts acting decisively, I liked her. So, I would say this is my second favorite Picoult book, after "My Sister's Keeper."

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